Courses

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  • AFRO-A 169 Introduction to African American Literature (3 cr.) Introduction to the African American literary tradition from the 1600s to the present.
  • AFRO-A 249 African American Autobiography (3 cr.) A survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in the last two centuries.
  • AFRO-A 379 Early Black American Writing (3 cr.) An exploration of African American literature from its beginnings until the mid-to-late 1800's.
  • AFRO-A 380 Contemporary Black American Writing (3 cr.) Study of texts (autobiography, memoir, fiction, poetry, drama, essay) written/published by contemporary African American authors.
  • AFRO-A 480 The Black Novel (3 cr.) Study of the development of the African American novel from the Harlem Renaissance to the present.
  • AHLT-B 320 Global Health Delivery (3 cr.) This course is intended to give students an overview of the history, structure, and financing of systems of health care delivery of developed and emerging nations in comparison and contrast to that of the United States.  Students will understand the goals and challenges in achieving optimum health in these countries.
  • AHLT-B 371 Human Resources Management in Health Care (3 cr.) Management of human resources in the health care system including human resource planning and staffing, training and development, performance appraisal, job design and analysis, and compensation.
  • AHLT-C 150 Body Structure and Function (3 cr.) Introduction to the basic structures and functions of the human body; fundamental anatomic terminology; relationships of clinical laboratory to diagnosis.
  • AHLT-M 102 Clinical Experience I (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 109 with C or better. Lab fee required. This is an advanced healthcare documentation course that focuses on improving keyboarding and proofreading skills in the health care field with emphasis on production, speed, and accuracy. Course includes formatting, transcription of case studies, medical procedures in various specialties, operative reports and discharge summaries. This course is in the process of being changed to AHLT-M 394 (Healthcare Documentation Practicum).
  • AHLT-M 109 Medical Transcription Technology (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 195 and ENG-W 131 with C or better. Lab fee required. This is a beginning medical word processing and healthcare documentation course that includes both lecture and laboratory components. Lecture will cover the career and certification of a medical documentation specialist, punctuation, grammar, proofreading skills, and the content and format of various medical reports. The laboratory portion will focus on transcribing medical reports and correspondence of different specialties, proofreading the work, and making necessary corrections to produce a legible document. This course is in the process of being changed to AHLT-M 393 (Healthcare Documentation).
  • AHLT-M 195 Medical Terminology (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to further develop a student's understanding of the study of the language of medicine, including word construction, definitions, spelling, and abbreviations with application to other healthcare courses. Emphasis on abbreviations, analyzing, words based on their root, prefeix or suffix, as well as identifying common mistakes within medical terminology. This course is in the process of changing to AHLT-M 330 (Medical Terminology).
  • AHLT-M 330 Medical Terminology (3 cr.) This course is the study of the language of medicine, including word construction, definitions, spelling, and abbreviations. It provides a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology, pathology, surgical procedures, laboratory and radiology procedures, and pharmacology. Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, word roots, and combining forms are presented. Emphasis is forming a foundation for a medical vocabulary including definition, spelling, and pronunciation. Medical abbreviations, signs, and symbols are included.
  • AHLT-M 350 Med Science for Health Info I (3 cr.) P: One science course for majors (AHLT, ANAT, CHEM, BIOL, MATH, or PHYS). This course will provide an introduction to pharmacology, the study of drugs. This course will introduce students to the most common drug classes and how these drugs are used in the treatment of disease. In particular, this course will focus on the mechanism of action of many drug classes, and aid students in the understanding of both the intended effects and the side effects of these drug classes.
  • AHLT-M 390 Coding I (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 330 with a grade of C or better. Provides instruction in coding of diagnoses, diseases, signs, and symptoms, procedures and services provided in office, inpatient hospital, outpatient hospital, nursing facilities, laboratories, radiology/diagnostic imaging. Provides an overview of medical insurance programs and the skills needed to assign and link ICD-9-CM/ICD-10-CM, CPT, and HCPCS codes in correct format to submit to an insurance carrier for reimbursement for medical necessity.
  • AHLT-M 391 Coding II (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 390 with grade of C or better. This is advanced instruction to include lecture and practice application in the assignment of CPT, ICD-9-CM/ICD-10-CM, and HCPCS codes as introduced in basic medical coding. Emphasis on correct code assignment and sequencing of codes to provide medical necessity for reimbursement by third party payers for services and procedures provided in a physician office, hospital, nursing facilities, laboratories, and radiology/diagnostic imaging. This course will include additional instruction in the coding of anesthesia services, extensive modifier placement, and the ability to abstract information from the medical record to select accurate codes for submission to a third party payer.
  • AHLT-M 392 Intro to HIM & Reimbursement (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 330 and AHLT-M 390 with a C or better. Introduction of Health Information Management principles and policies, medical records, standards, regulations, licensure, and content. Overview of medical insurance programs, including Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare, group health plans, and Workers Compensation reimbursement methodologies related to third party payers. Overview of release of information principles, privacy, and security standards as outlined by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).
  • AHLT-M 393 Healthcare Documentatioon (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 393 with a grade of a C or better. This is a beginning medical word processing and transcription course that includes both lecture and laboratory components.  Lecture covers the career and certification of a medical transcriptionist; punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure.   Introduction to the content and format of various medical reports transcribed in any health care facility, including all medical specialties.  Practice will include proofreading skills and making necessary corrections to produce a legible and legal medical document.  Introduction to the electronic medical record, HIPAA, and the confidentiality and security of the patient information. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • AHLT-M 394 Healthcare Documentation Practicum (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M393 with a grade of a C or better. Advanced medical transcription focusing on improving beginning skills to meet the demands of the workplace with emphasis on production, speed, and accuracy to produce a legal medical document. Skiills include legalities of the medical record, documentation requirements defined by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) as related to security, privacy, and confidentiality. Students will experience the diversity of the Health Information Management department of any healthcare facility to recognize the various functions within that department and how they relate to each other.
  • AHLT-M 395 Introduction to ICD-10-CM Diagnostic Coding (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 391 or equivalent with a grade of C or better, or instructor approval. This course focuses on the revised structure and format in the transition from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM. Review of guidelines and coding concepts with emphasis on correct code assignment and sequencing of codes to provide medical necessity for reimbursement for services and procedures in all healthcare facilities.
  • AHLT-R 200 Pathology (3 cr.) P: AHLT-C 150 or ANAT-A 215, or instructor approval. A survey of the changes that occur in the human body to include general concepts of disease, cause of diseases, clinical symptoms and treatment, and diseases that affect specific body systems.
  • AHSC-C 415 Health Assessment, Education and Promotion (6 cr.)

    This is an introductory course with a focus on the discipline and profession of health education. Major concepts to be explored include health and wellness, determinants of health behavior, the nation's health status and health promotion. Preparing an assessment and plan for health promotion for the student's own community will be the culminating teaching-learning activity.

  • AHSC-H 301 Healthcare Delivery and Leadership (6 cr.) This is an introduction course for all Applied Health Science students. It contains concepts and basics for other Applied Health Science program courses.  Focus is on the components, their interaction and internal / external controls. As a person in leadership roles of organizations you will also discover how to effectively deliver health care services in hospitals, nursing homes, multi-specialty clinics, and home health care agencies. Students will examine how principles of effective leadership skills including organizational design, motivation, conflict management, teamwork, and strategic alliances are utilized in the ever changing healthcare environment.
  • AHSC-H 310 Health Policy, Ethics, and Legal Issues (6 cr.) In this course, students are introduced to the concepts of health policy and policy analysis, health care ethics and contemporary ethical dilemmas, and legal issues related to health care and health care outcomes.  Students will be exposed to leadership strategies for effecting changes in policy, and in resolving legal and ethical dilemmas that arise in health care. Emphasis is placed on application of knowledge to real and simulated case problems.
  • AHSC-H 320 Consumer Health (3 cr.) Students are introduced to the ways consumers receive and use information to inform health practices and influence choices of health products, services, and providers.  Concepts include health literacy and decision-making, internal and external influences on health care decisions and health outcomes, and effective health education.  Exemplar health issues are discussed.
  • AHSC-H 330 Intercultural Health Communication (6 cr.) This course explores issues related to intercultural communication practices. It examines the important role of social, cultural, and historical context in human interactions related to health disparities.  This course is designed to increase students understanding of the growing interdependence of nations and peoples and to develop students' ability to apply a comparative perspective to cross-cultural social, economic, and political experiences.
  • AHSC-H 340 Research in the Health Sciences (3 cr.) This course is designed as an introduction to using the research process to address health science problems and the use of evidence as a foundation for practice. Critical analysis of research studies will be emphasized.
  • ANAT-A 215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.) Lab fee required. Structure of cells, tissues, organs, and systems and their relationship to function. The course will cover each of the organ systems at both the gross and histological levels.
  • ANAT-A 464 Human Tissue Biology (5 cr.) P: BIOL-L 317 with grade of C or better. Microscopic structure of mammalian (with emphasis on human) tissues and organs.
  • ANAT-A 465 Advanced Regional Anatomy (6-12 cr.) A 6 credit hour course structured in the same format as a graduate or medical school anatomy course, and directed to upper level majors.  Specifically, undergraduate anatomy is typically taught in a systems format; whereas, graduate and medical school anatomy curriculum is structured by regions; i.e. head and neck, thoracic, limb, etc.  The curriculum will be designed by body regions and clinical information will be introduced throughout the course.  The upper level anatomy course will provide new program development in support of the Bachelor of Science in HIA and HIM, in addition to supporting new curriculum reform by offering an upper level online course for allied health, biology and chemistry pre-professional majors. Repeatable up to 12 credits.
  • ANAT-M 100 Improving Learning Skills in Anatomy (1-3 cr.) C: ANAT-A 215. This course examines the skills that can improve student learning in ANAT-A 215 (Basic Human Anatomy). A variety of study methods and skills will be explored and utilized to increase the understanding of topics in human anatomy. Coverage of course topics will occur concurrently in M100 and A215. Readings and lectures will be supplemented by whole-class and small-group discussions and by written assignments.
  • ANTH-A 103 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.) Man, his biological evolution, and his archaeological history through Stone and Metal Ages.
  • ANTH-A 105 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.) Human biological evolution and prehistory from the earliest archaeological record through the rise of civilization. Credit given for only one of the following: ANTH-A 102, ANTH-A 105, or ANTH-A 303.
  • ANTH-A 303 Evolution and Prehistory (3 cr.) Introductory course for more advanced students.  Man's place in nature, emergence of man and contemporary races, development of culture from Paleolithic onward, problems arising from interaction of biological and cultural phenomena.
  • ANTH-E 105 Culture and Society (3 cr.) Introduction to the comparative study of contemporary human cultures and social processes that influence behavior. Not sequential with ANTH-A 105. Credit given for only one of the following: ANTH-A 104, ANTH-A 304, ANTH-E 105, or ANTH-E 303.
  • ANTH-E 320 Indians of North America (3 cr.) P: ANTH-A 104. Ethnographic survey of cultural areas from the Artic to Panama, plus cross-cultural analysis of interrelations of culture, geographical environment, and language families.
  • ANTH-P 200 Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology (3 cr.) Introduction to archaeology and world prehistory. Concentrates on the history, methods, and theory of American anthropoloigical archaeology and is designed to answer some of the basic questions that many people have about world prehistory.
  • ANTH-P 361 Prehistory of the Midwestern U.S. (3 cr.) Survey of the prehistory of midcontinental North America, beginning with humans' entry into the New World and concluding with the European invasion. Covering the major cultural periods defined for Eastern Woodlands prehistory--Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississipian--as well as the sociocultural attributes by which each is defined.
  • AST-A 100 The Solar System (3 cr.) Celestial sphere and constellations, measurement of time, astronomical instruments, Earth as a planet, moons, eclipses, planets and their satellites, comets, meteors, theories of origin of solar system.
  • AST-A 105 Stars and Galaxies (3 cr.) The sun as a star, physical properties of stars, principles of spectroscopy as applied to astronomy, double stars, variable stars, star clusters, gaseous nebulae, stellar motions and distribution, Milky Way system, expanding universe, cosmic time scale.
  • AST-A 130 Short Courses in Astronomy (1 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Short courses on a variety of topics in astronomy.
  • AST-A 150 Introductory Astronomy Lab (1 cr.) C: AST-A 100 or AST-A 105 or instructor permission. The observation of selected celestial objects using astronomical binoculars and telescopes. Astronomical data will be gathered and plotted by the student using auxiliary equipment installed on the telescopes. May be repeated (not to exceed 3 credit hours) with consent of instructor.
  • AST-A 151 Introductory Astronomy Research Lab (2 cr.) C: AST-A 100 or AST-A 105 and instructor permission. Research projects include gathering and measuring data obtained from planets, variable stars, and deep-sky objects. Measurements made using optical telescopes, cameras, photoelectric photometer, charge-coupled device, and radio telescope. Also, simple problem-solving exercises in stellar and planetary astronomy.
  • AST-A 200 Introduction to Cosmology (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 100 or consent of instructor; AST-A 100 or AST-A 105 and MATH-M 102 are recommended. Historical and philosophical development of our physical picture of the Universe, evolution of galaxies, origin on the elements, cosmic distance scale, development of large scale structure, and the earliest stages of the Big Bang.
  • BIOL-E 111 Basic Biology by Examination I (3 cr.) Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content of BIOL-L 101. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-E 111.
  • BIOL-E 112 Basic Biology by Examination II (3 cr.) Credit by examination for demonstrating an understanding of basic facts and concepts of the lecture content in BIOL-L 102. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 102 and BIOL-E 112.
  • BIOL-K 312 Immunology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101, BIOL-L 102, & CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 102, CHEM-C 105, or CHEM-C 106, all with grades of C or better. An examination of molecular and cellular immunology, abnormal immune responses, and immunology reactions used in diagnosis.
  • BIOL-K 313 Immunology Laboratory (2 cr.) C: BIOL-K 312. Experimental examination of the immune response. Use of the antigen-antibody reaction for diagnostic purposes.
  • BIOL-L 100 Humans and the Biological World (3 or 5 cr.) Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organisms to populations. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms, with special reference to human beings. Lecture or lecture and laboratory. Will not count toward a biology degree. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 100 and BIOL-L 101.
  • BIOL-L 101 Introduction to Biological Sciences I (5 cr.) One year of high school chemistry or one semester of college chemistry is recommended. Fundamental principles of biology for students considering a biology major or students with high school science background. Principles of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, developmental biology, animal morphology, and physiology. Lecture and laboratory. Credit not given for both BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 100.
  • BIOL-L 102 Introduction to Biological Sciences II (5 cr.) One year of high school chemistry or one semester of college chemistry is recommended. Fundamental principles of biology for students considering a biology major or students with high school science background. Principles of evolution, systematics, diversity and ecology, and plant biology. Lecture and laboratory.
  • BIOL-L 110 Insects: The Alien Empire (3 cr.) The course examines relationships between humans and the most successful multi-celled organisms on earth - the insects. Understanding the philosophy of science and biological concepts using insects as model organisms is emphasized. The negative and positive impact of insects on the human condition is explored in an historical and contemporary context. The course examines how insect transmitted pathogens have influenced human history and how changes in technology have affected our food supply and the direction of research aimed at developing alternative control measures, including genetically modified crops. Other topics include the past and potential use of insects as weapons of war and how insects have influenced human art, religion, and entertainment. Will not count toward a biology degree.
  • BIOL-L 111 Foundations of Biology: Diversity, Evolution, and Ecology (3 cr.) For biology and other science majors. Preference will be given to freshmen and sophomores. Focus is on the processes of evolution leading to organismal diversity and adaptation, as well as basic ecological concepts.
  • BIOL-L 112 Foundations of Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3-4 cr.) Integrated picture of manner in which organisms at diverse levels of organization meet problems in maintaining and propagating life.
  • BIOL-L 113 Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: Introductory Biology course and permission. Laboratory experiments in various aspects of biology with focus on investigation logic and methods. Introduces aspects of cell-biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology.
  • BIOL-L 200 Environmental Biology and Conservation (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. Study of flora and fauna of Indiana through laboratory and fieldwork. Emphasis on identification, classification, life histories, and habitats of organisms and their conservation as renewable resources.
  • BIOL-L 211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101, BIOL-L102, and CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 102, CHEM-C 105, or CHEM-C 106, all with grades of C or better. Structure and function of DNA and RNA. DNA replication, mechanisms of mutation, repair, recombination, and transposition. Mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The genetic code, transcription, and translation. Introduces bacteriophages, plasamids, and the technology of recombinant DNA.
  • BIOL-L 303 Field Biology (3 cr.) P: One semester of biology and department consent. A summer or intensive course designed to acquaint the student with natural biological interactions in the environment. The course consists of a period of field study in an area remote from the local campus. Orientation before and following course. May be repeated once for credit.
  • BIOL-L 304 Marine Biology (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. An introductory course for majors and nonmajors involving the study of principles, concepts, and techniques of marine and estuarine biology.
  • BIOL-L 311 Genetics (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with C or better. C: BIOL-L 319. Lecture course on the principles of heredity at the molecular, cellular, individual, and population levels. Credit given for only one: BIOL-L 311 or BIOL-K 322.
  • BIOL-L 312 Cell Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with C or better. Current views of the structure and function of cellular organelles and components, with emphasis on the flow of information through the cell, the metabolism that supports cellular functions, and differences among different specialized cells.
  • BIOL-L 313 Cell Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 312 with C or better. C: BIOL-L 312. Theory and techniques of experimental cell physiology. Current techniques will be stressed.
  • BIOL-L 317 Developmental Biology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101, BIOL-L 102 with C or better. C: BIOL-Z 318. Analysis of developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single cells. Includes the principles of embryology and analysis of mutations affecting development. Credit given for only one: BIOL-L 317 or BIOL-Z 317.
  • BIOL-L 318 Evolution (5 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211, BIOL-L 311 with grade of C or better. Provides an explanation of the theory of evolution--the conceptual core of biology. Topics include origins and history of life; the interplay of heredity and environment in shaping adaptations; molecular, behavioral, and social evolution; patterns of speciation, extinction, and their consequences; methods for inferring evolutionary relationships among organisms.
  • BIOL-L 319 Genetics Laboratory (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with C or better. C: BIOL-L 311. Experimentation demonstrating fundamental genetics mechanisms.
  • BIOL-L 323 Molecular Biology Laboratory (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211. Manipulation and analysis of genes and genomes. Gene cloning and library screening. Gene amplification and disease diagnosis. Gene mapping and southern blot analysis of complex genome structure.
  • BIOL-L 341 Natural History of Coral Reefs (3 cr.) P: 100-level biology course. Introduction to principles of biology, ecology, and geology as applied to coral reef ecosystems.
  • BIOL-L 343 Applied Conservation Biology (5 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with C or better. A course focusing on biodiversity loss and recovery. Lectures introduce concepts such as extinction, climate change, population declines, landscape changes, invasive species, management, and socio-politics of conservation. The applied component is demonstrated by seminars and research experiments that explore current conservation concepts.
  • BIOL-L 346 Survey of Molecular Developmental Biology (5-6 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101, BIOL-L 102 with a C or better. Throughout this course, the emphasis returns again and again to the modern molecular understanding of development and how this underlies development in all groups of living organisms. While classical aspects of development which can be observed with the naked eye and the dissecting microscope will, of course, be covered, providing students with a clear molecular prospective across all three Domains of life comes first. This understanding includes concepts like that of the developmental toolkit which so clearly demonstrates the universality of the molecular mechanisms which direct molecular biology in all organisms. The developmental biology lectures acquaint students with the development of various types of organisms from protists through the most advanced plants and animals. The class examines the diversity of developmental programs from perspectives including gross anatomy and molecular controls, with an introduction to the scientific literature of Developmental Biology. The laboratory complements the lecture by providing the student with concrete examples of the principles presented in those lectures, including longitudinal study of the development of several organisms.
  • BIOL-L 376 Biology of Birds (4 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. Avian systematics, distribution, evolution, ecology, and behavior. Emphasis on identification, communication, and reproductive behavior. Field trips will concentrate on interpretation of behavior and research methods.
  • BIOL-L 391 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected biological issues and problems. Topics vary from semester to semester. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • BIOL-L 403 Biology Seminar (1 cr.) P: Senior standing and 25 credits of upper level biology courses. Individual presentation of topics of current importance. May be repeated for credit.
  • BIOL-L 465 Advanced Field Biology (3 cr.) C: Recommended: BIOL-L 473 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Lectures and two to three weeks of fieldwork on various problems of ecosystem structure. May be repeated once for credit.
  • BIOL-L 473 Ecology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with C or better. C: BIOL-L 474. Distribution and abundance of animals and plants; interactions of organism and environment at levels of individual, population, and community from functional point of view.
  • BIOL-L 474 Laboratory in Ecology (2 cr.) P: BIOL-L 473 with C or better. C: BIOL-L 473. Introduction to research in ecology. Field and laboratory techniques in study of distribution and abundance or organisms.
  • BIOL-L 490 Individual Study (1-12  cr.) P: Written consent of biology faculty member.
  • BIOL-L 499 Internship in Biology Instruction (3 cr.) P: Consent of Instructor. An internship for biology majors desiring college teaching experience. Students will be provided training in lecture-laboratory presentations. Each student will present lectures and laboratories that will be videotaped for subsequent analysis and follow-up suggestions for improvement.
  • BIOL-Z 318 Developmental Biology Lab (2 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102 with a C or better. C: BIOL-L 317 A laboratory course about developing organisms, with special emphasis on embryology and organogenesis.
  • BUS-A 200 Foundations of Accounting (3 cr.) Survey of financial and managerial accounting topics that provide a foundation for students who are not pursuing a business concentration.
  • BUS-A 201 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 cr.) P: 12 credit hours, a GPA of 2.0 or higher and completion of MATH-M 102, MATH-M 117, or higher. Concepts and issues of financial reporting for business entities; analysis and recording of economic transactions.
  • BUS-A 202 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 201. Concepts and issues of management accounting, budgeting, cost determination and analysis.
  • BUS-A 301 Accounting: An Information System (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 201 and BUS-K 201. This course reviews the accounting cycle, using a business transaction cycle approach, to understand accounting as a data entry and information processing system. Emphasis on: Data Flow, Internal Control, Audit Trail, Financial Statement Relationships, and Special Reports.
  • BUS-A 310 Management Decisions and Financial Reporting (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 202. Provides students with a thorough understanding of the theoretical foundations underlying financial reporting, the rules used by accountants to measure the effects of business decisions and to report the effects to external parties, the use of judgment in financial reporting, and the transformation of cash flow decisions into accrual-based ad cash-based financial statements. Students are expected to develop technical, analytical, and interpretive skills related to economic transactions and accrual-based and cash-based financial statements. Accounting students should take A311 and A312 to satisfy accounting concentration requirements. Credit not given for both A310 and A311.
  • BUS-A 311 Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 202. P or C: BUS-A 301. Theory of asset valuation and income measurement. Principles underlying published financial statements.
  • BUS-A 312 Intermediate Accounting II (3 cr.) P: BUS-A311. Application of intermediate accounting theory to problems of accounting for economic activities.
  • BUS-A 325 Cost Accounting (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 202. Conceptual and technical aspects of management and cost accounting; product costing, cost control over projects and products; profit planning.
  • BUS-A 328 Taxation of Individuals (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 202. Internal Revenue Code and Regulations. Emphasis on income, exclusions from income, deductions, and credits. Use of tax forms in practical problem situations.
  • BUS-A 339 Advanced Taxation (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 328. Internal Revenue Code and Regulations; formation and liquidation of corporations, partnerships, estates, and trusts.
  • BUS-A 411 Accounting Information Systems (3 cr.) Design of the accounting system and subsystems as collectors and processors of data to implement effective planning and control for a variety of decision making problems. Emphasis on practical applications accomplished through microcomputer integration.
  • BUS-A 413 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 311. Financial management and accounting for nonprofit seeking entities; state, municipal, and federal governments; schools, hospitals, and philanthropic entities. Includes study of GAAP for these entities promulgated by the FASB and GASB.
  • BUS-A 414 Financial Statement Analysis and Interpretation (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 310 or BUS-A 311. Provides a broad framework for using financial statements to evaluate a firm's operating strategies, gain insights into performance, and predict future conditions. Topics include: ratios analysis, common size/vertical/trend analysis; competitive and industry norms; profitability and cash flow analysis; credit risks; earnings quality; and pro-forma forecasting.
  • BUS-A 424 Auditing (3 cr.) P: BUS-A 311. Provides an understanding of the audit environment and public expectations for an audit, risk analysis in conducting the audit, internal control, and the quality control procedures of public accounting organizations. Includes coverage of the code of professional conduct, the legal liabilities of CPAs, the auditing and attestation standards, statistical sampling in auditing, audit of operation cycles in a computerized environment, and the auditor's report.
  • BUS-A 490 Independent Study in Accounting (1-3 cr.) Students choose one of two options in completing this course: (1) Supervised individual study and research work. Students will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. (2) Supervised internship, application filed through Career Development Center; provides work experience in cooperating firms or agencies. Reporting requirements will be established by instructor. Pass/Fail grade only for internships.
  • BUS-C 104 Business Presentations (3 cr.) Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts.  The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments.
  • BUS-D 300 International Business Administration (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 and junior standing. Foreign environment for overseas operations; U.S. government policies and programs for international business; international economic policies; and management decisions and their implementation in international marketing, management, and finance.
  • BUS-D 301 International Business Environment (3 cr.) The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the environment in which international companies operate. Thus, participants should acquire awareness of, and an appreciation for, the diversity and complexity of the international environment.  More specifically, the successful completion of this course should enable them to understand and analyze environmental problems which challenge management.  Additional objectives of the course include: to explain how the international business environment affects us as citizens, consumers, and workers; to describe trade, investment, and financial links among countries; and to help interpret contemporary events from the perspective of international business.  While the emphasis of the course is on analysis, students will acquaint themselves with the special terms, concepts, and institutions encountered in international business.
  • BUS-D 490 Independent Study in International Business (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Students choose two options in completing this course: a supervised internship experience (application filed through Career Development Center) or individual study or research work. Reporting requirements will be established by the instructor. S/F grades only for internships.
  • BUS-F 151 Personal Finances of the College Student (1 cr.) Introduction to the basic planning tools and concepts for college-age financial literacy. Emphasis on financial decisions and challenges facing a typical college student. Topics include careers, goal setting, budgeting, tax planning and credit, including options for financing higher eduction. Foundation of the Financial Literacy curriculum.
  • BUS-F 260 Personal Finance (3 cr.) Financial problems encountered in managing individual affairs; family budgeting, use of credit, insurance, home ownership, investing in securities, retirement and estate planning.
  • BUS-F 301 Financial Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-C 104, ECON-E 150 or ECON-E 201, BUS-A 202, and ENG-W 231, ENG-W 234 or ENG-W 290 all with C- or better. Pre-Business students cannot register for this course. Corporate finance emphasizing investment, dividend, and financing decisions. Topics include analysis of financial statements, risk and rates of return, discounted cash flow analysis, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, short-term financial management.
  • BUS-F 302 Financial Decision (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301 and ECON-E 270. Application of financial theory and techniques of analysis in the search for optimal solutions to financial management problems.
  • BUS-F 410 Financial Institutions & Markets (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301. This course looks at the intermediary roles played by the various types of financial institutions and markets. Besides understanding the differences between different institutions, such as commercial banks, credit unions, savings associations, and insurance companies, the course also covers issues related to the management and regulation of financial institutions, role of central banking, and the conduct of monetary policy. Although the primary emphasis is on the functions of financial institutions, different types of financial markets, such as mortgage, money, and capital markets, and related issues are also covered.
  • BUS-F 420 Equity and Fixed Income Investments (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301 and ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202. Individual investment policy and strategy, security analysis and portfolio management, investment performance, measurement tools, basic and derivative securities used in the investment process, survey of ethics in the investment profession, and experience in trading practices through simulation.
  • BUS-F 490 Independent Study in Finance (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Students choose one of two options in completing this course: (1) Supervised individual study and research work. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. (2) Supervised internship, application filed through Career Development Center; provides work experience in cooperating firms or agencies. Both options require written report.  S/F grade only for internships.
  • BUS-F 494 International Finance. (3 cr.) P: BUS-F 301. Financial management of foreign operations of the firm. Financial constraints of the international environment and their effect on standard concepts of financial management. Study of international currency flows, forward cover, and international banking practices.
  • BUS-G 300 Introduction to Managerial Economics and Strategy (3 cr.) Microeconomic analysis and its applications to business decision making. Includes topics of demand and consumer behavior, production and costs, theory of firms, and public policy toward business. Focuses on the applied aspects of microeconomics.
  • BUS-H 411 Management of Long-Term Care Facilities (3 cr.) This course covers the organization and management of long-term care facilities, with particular emphasis on skilled care nursing homes.  Topics include community and client exchanges, the legal and regulatory environment, financing and reimbursement, clinical organization and processes of care delivery, and managing the organization.
  • BUS-J 401 Administrative Policy (3 cr.) P: Graduating Senior, BUS-F 301, BUS-K 321, BUS-M 301, BUS-P 301 and BUS-Z 302. Administration of business organizations; strategy formulation, organization, methods, and executive control. Should be taken in final semester. Authorization required.
  • BUS-J 490 Independent Study in Personnel Management and Organizational Behavior (1-3 cr.) Consent of instructor. Written report required.
  • BUS-K 201 The Computer in Business (3 cr.) P: Either BUS-A 201 or ECON-E 150 or ECON-E 201. Introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. Provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy includes use of a spreadsheet (Excel), a relational database (Access), and electronic communications software (e-mail and WWW browsers), as well as the applications of these skills to solve a variety of business problems.
  • BUS-K 321 Management of Information Technology (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121, ENG-W 231 or W-234, and a minimum of 45 credit hours. C: BUS-K 201. Pre-Business students cannot register for this course. Introduction to Management Information Systems (MIS), including the key building blocks of information systems, namely: hardware, software, telecommunications (including the Internet/intranet/extranet), databases and DBMS. The focus of this course is on using and managing information technologies to derive business value.
  • BUS-K 330 Special Topics : Information Tech. Mgmt. Issues (3 cr.) P: BUS-K 321. Focuses on key information technology issues that exist in the business world that must be managed, dealt with, and resolved. Such issues include running IT like a business, technology leadership and partnership, outsourcing, IT resources and staffing, client server systems management, telecommunications, and the IT infrastructure to support business initiatives.
  • BUS-K 335 Information Systems Analysis and Design (3 cr.) P: BUS-K 321. In-depth treatment of the theory and practice of management information systems including information requirements analysis, design methodology, and system implementation considerations.
  • BUS-K 340 Enterprise Resource Planning Systems (3 cr.) P: BUS-K 321. This course introduces students to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, software that runs all business areas of an organization. The topics include the managerial and technical issues in planning, designing, implementing, and extending enterprise systems and technologies. Hands-on exercises and discussions will be used to demonstrate process improvement methodologies, system integrations, and ERP implementations.
  • BUS-K 440 Business Intelligence (3 cr.) P: BUS-K 321. The objective of this course is to introduce students to Business Intelligence (BI), including the processes, methodologies, infrastructure, and current practices used to transform data into useful information for decision making purposes. The topics include data management principles, data models, and BI technologies for report design and development, data warehouse, data mining, and online analytical processing (OLAP). Practical, hands-on computer lab experience includes structured query language (SQL) and advanced usage of spreadsheet software. The major ideas and techniques are reinforced through class assignments on real-life business data analysis involving BI techniques and tools.
  • BUS-L 201 Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.) Examines the nature and functions of law as related to business. Specific areas covered include contracts, tort, corporate employment, international, product liability, property, securities, and antitrust.
  • BUS-L 303 Commercial Law II (3 cr.) P: BUS-L 201. Law of real and personal property. Legal problems encountered in marketing goods, including sale of goods, securing credit granted, nature and use of negotiable instruments.
  • BUS-M 300 Introduction to Marketing (3 cr.) Examination of the U.S. market economy and marketing institutions. Decision making and planning from a manager's point of view; impact of marketing actions from a consumer's point of view. Note: No credit toward a degree in business. This class is for non-business majors only.
  • BUS-M 301 Introduction to Marketing Management (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202, SPCH-S 121, ENG-W 231 or W 234, and a minimum of 45 credit hours. Pre-Business students cannot register for this course. Overview of marketing for all undergraduates. Marketing planning and decision making examined from firm's point of view; marketing concept and its company-wide implications; integration of marketing with other functions. Market structure and behavior and their relationship to marketing strategy. Marketing system viewed in terms of both public and private policy in a pluralistic society.
  • BUS-M 303 Marketing Research (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301 and ECON-E 280. Focuses on the role of research in marketing decision making. Topics include research ethics, problem formulation, research design, data collection procedures, design of data collection forms, sampling issues, data analysis, and the interpretation of results.
  • BUS-M 325 Selling (3 cr.) The role of selling in the economy, in the organization, and in marketing management.  Selling as a profession.  The dynamics of salesperson-customer interaction.  Skills, techniques, and strategies of selling.
  • BUS-M 330 Personal Persuasion Strategy and Customer Relations Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301 or BUS-M 300. This course is designed to provide insights into the sales profession by examining the role of persuasive communication and customer relationship management behaviors, principles, strategies, and actions. It will provide students an opportunity to plan, practice, and review those verbal behaviors associated with sales call success in order to persuade others to think differently regarding ideas, opinions, products, and services.
  • BUS-M 365 Internet Marketing (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 300 or BUS-M 301. Designed to prepare students to manage marketing efforts in digital environments. Provides comprehensive exposure to digital marketing concepts, and the opportunity to develop and apply strategies and tactics to digital marketing problems. Topics may include the internet value chain, digital positioning and branding, managing social networks, integrated communications on digital media, digital competition, virtual merchandising, and e-commerce strategies.
  • BUS-M 405 Consumer Behavior (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301 and Junior standing. Buyer behavior relevant to marketing decisions. Logic of marketing segmentation, recognizing customer heterogeneity. Buyer behavior analyzed in terms of decision making process and models of individual and aggregate behavior. Specific attention given to consumer behavior in retail markets and to procurement behavior in industrial markets.
  • BUS-M 405 Consumer Behavior (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 301. This course provides a detailed understanding of how marketers create value for customers, what motivates shoppers to buy, how consumers process information and make decisions, persuasion techniques, cross-cultural influences on consumer behavior, and the impact of sustainable business practices on consumer choice.
  • BUS-M 415 Advertising and Promotion Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 300 or BUS-M 301. Basic advertising and sales-promotion concepts. The design, management, and integration of a firm's promotional strategy. Public policy aspects and the role of advertising in marketing communications in different cultures.
  • BUS-M 421 Fundamentals of Negotiation (3 cr.) Provides exposure to the concepts of negotiations in both the national and international environments, including negotiation strategies and tactics, influence, third-party intervention, audience effects, nonverbal communication, and ethical and cultural aspects. Case studies, simulations, and guest speakers are used throughout the course.
  • BUS-M 425 Services Marketing (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 300 or BUS-M 301. This course explores the unique challenges of marketing services. Topics include the expanded marketing mix for services, the management of services, the evaluation of service quality, techniques for service improvement, the increased importance of the right people - both employees and customers - in service environments, and the use of marketing techniques to achieve service breakthroughs. Concepts from management and operations management are incorporated to provide a more holistic view of services marketing.
  • BUS-M 426 Sales Management (3 cr.) Students will engage in an interactive exploration of the strategic and tactical issues important to managing a professional sales organization.  Key topics will include organizing a sales force, recruiting, training, compensation, motivation, forecasting, territory design, evaluation, and control. Lectures and case studies.
  • BUS-M 450 Marketing Strategy and Policy (3 cr.) P: BUS-M 303 and BUS-M 405. Ideally taken in student's final semester. Capstone course for marketing majors. Draws on and integrates materials previously taken. Focuses on decision problems in marketing strategy and policy design and application of analytical tools for marketing and decision making.
  • BUS-M 490 Special Studies in Marketing (3 cr.) Supervised individual study and research in student's special field of interest. The student will propose the investigation desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Consent of instructor and written report required.
  • BUS-P 301 Operations Management (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121, ENG-W 231 or W 234, and a minimum of 45 credit hours. Pre-Business students cannot register for this course. Production and its relationship to marketing, finance, accounting, and human resource functions are described. Forecasting demand, aggregate planning, master scheduling, capacity planning, and material planning provide the basis for linking strategic operations plans. Other topics include facilities design, performance measurement, productivity improvement, quality control, JIT, TOC, and project management.
  • BUS-P 330 Project Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-P 301. This course will introduce the student to the full range of project management topics, concerns, problems, solution methods, and decision processes. These areas include: project selection, project organizational structures, negotiation, project planning, project scheduling and resource loading, project budgeting, project monitoring and control, project auditing, and project termination.
  • BUS-P 421 Supply Chain Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-P 301. This course focuses on the strategic design of supply chains with a particular focus on understanding customer value. Supply chain strategy examines how companies can use the supply chain to gain a competitive advantage. Students develop the ability to conceptualize, design, and implement supply chains aligned with product, market, and customer characteristics. The course approaches supply chain management from a managerial perspective and introduces concepts in a format useful for management decision making including using case analysis, team-based learning and business presentations.
  • BUS-P 430 Total Quality Management (3 cr.) P: BUS-P 301. Introduces students to concepts of total quality management. Methods and application of quality control techniques commonly used in manufacturing and service organizations are presented. Research and theory relevant to quality concepts such as the economics and measurement of quality, the evolution of total quality management, team building and employee empowerment, vendor relations, elementary reliability theory, customer relations and feedback, quality assurance systems, statistical quality control, preventive maintenance programs, and product safety and liability are discussed.
  • BUS-P 490 Independent Study in Production Management and Industrial Engineering (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. For production majors with a career interest in some area of production other than industrial engineering. Literature in student's special field of interest. Written report required.
  • BUS-W 211 Contemporary Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) Survey course designed to enable students to explore the vast opportunities of entrepreneurship. Multidisciplinary approach that examines the macro- and micro-conditions that encourage entrepreneurship. Course objectives are: (1) to learn the basic concepts of entrepreneurship; (2) to understand the human side of entrepreneurship; and, (3) to encourage entrepreneurial thinking by the student and enable the student to evaluate the personal prospects for entrepreneurship.
  • BUS-W 301 Principles of Management. (3 cr.) P: Junior or Senior Standing. Designed to synthesize knowledge of principles and functions of management: planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling, and decision making.
  • BUS-W 311 New Venture Creation (3 cr.) P: Junior or Senior standing. This course helps students identify viable career options in entrepreneurship, expand their basic knowledge of the entrepreneurial process, and develop a repertoire of venture management skills.
  • BUS-W 320 Leadership and Ethics (3 cr.) P: Junior or Senior Standing. Students are introduced to ethics concepts and leadership skills, with a particular emphasis on demonstrating how ethics and leadership are complementary areas of emphasis for an effective leader. Ethics and leadership must be considered together in order to produce leaders who have the foresight to consider issues of responsibility, accountability, and the full impact of their actions, as well as a skill set that will empower them to implement their vision.
  • BUS-W 406 Venture Growth Management (3 cr.) By the end of this course students should be able to identify and solve key challenges faced by growing firms A minimum of 75 hours completed.
  • BUS-W 430 Organizations and Organizational Change (3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 302, BUS-W 301. Analysis and development of organizational theories with emphasis on environmental dependencies, sociotechnical systems, structural design, and control of the performance of complex systems. Issues in organizational change, such as appropriateness of intervention strategies and techniques, barriers to change, organizational analysis, and evaluation of formal change programs.
  • BUS-W 490 Independent Study in Business Administration (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Supervised individual study and research in student's special field of interest. Students will propose the research topic desired and, in conjunction with the instructor, develop the scope of work to be completed. Written report required.
  • BUS-X 220 Career Perspectives (1 cr.) Assists students in developing career goals. Academic planning, career exploration, and planning in the fields of business and economics. Must be taken before the student completes 60 credit hours.
  • BUS-Z 301 Organizational Behavior and Leadership (3 cr.)

    This class introduces the principles of organization design - the blueprint by which different parts of the organization (e.g., production, marketing, financial, accounting, and computer information systems) fit together to create an effective organization. Organization design provides the means by which strategy and goals are implemented so it is as important to a firm's overall performance as financial performance, operational efficiencies or market share.

  • BUS-Z 302 Managing and Behavior in Organizations (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121, PSY-P 101, ENG-W 231 or W 234 and a minimum of 45 credit hours. Pre-Business students cannot register for this course. Integration of behavior and organizational theories. Application of concepts and theories toward improving individual, group, and organizational performance. Builds from a behavioral foundation toward an understanding of managerial processes.
  • BUS-Z 440 Personnel-Human Resource Management (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121, PSY-P 101 or P 102, ENG-W 231 or W 234. C: BUS-Z 302 Nature of human resource development and utilization in modern organizations. Establishment and operation of a total human resource program. Includes recruitment, selection, training and development, performance appraisal, reward systems, benefit programs, role of personnel department, and role of government.
  • BUS-Z 441 Wage and Salary Administration (3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 440 and ECON-E 270. Survey of problems faced by modern managers of compensation systems. In-depth look at the roles of company, government, union, and employee in the design and administration of total compensation systems. A description of the type of wage and salary systems currently in use, their advantages and disadvantages, and extent of current use.
  • BUS-Z 443 Developing Employee Skills (3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 440. Employee Skills Development is a broad, ongoing multifaceted set of activities (training activities among them) intended to bring someone, or an organization, up to another threshold of performance, often to perform some job or new role in the future. The course explores identifying gaps in performance, determining the best interventions to improve performance, and assessing the outcomes of those interventions.
  • BUS-Z 444 Personnel Research and Measurement (3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 440. Personnel research through review and evaluation of studies in appropriate journals, opportunity to master personnel measurement techniques. Job analysis, job evaluation, wage curve computation, predictor validation techniques, morale measurement, and personnel auditing.
  • BUS-Z 445 Human Resource Selection (3 cr.) P: BUS-Z 440. Prepares the student in effective ways to identify the best candidates for a position through a structured, job-focused interviewing process, where interviewers have effective interviewing skills and understand the legal aspects of employment practices.
  • CHEM-C 100 The World as Chemistry (3 cr.) The World as Chemistry is a general education course for non-science majors. It is designed to explore chemistry in the context of the real social, political, and environmental world around us. No previous chemistry experience is required.
  • CHEM-C 101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.) One year of high school algebra or equivalent is recommended. Introduction to chemistry. Usually taken concurrently with CHEM-C 121. Lectures and discussion. The two sequences, CHEM-C 101/121 and CHEM-C 102/122, usually satisfy programs that require only two semesters of chemistry. Admission to advanced courses on the basis of CHEM-C 101-C 121 and CHEM-C 102-C 122 is granted only in exceptional cases. May be taken by students who have deficiencies in chemistry background in preparation for CHEM-C 105 without credit toward graduation. Credit given for only one of the following chemistry courses: CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 104, CHEM-C 105.
  • CHEM-C 102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.) Continuation of CHEM-C 101. Usually taken concurrently with CHEM-C 122. The chemistry of organic compounds and their reactions, followed by an extensive introduction to biochemistry. Lectures and discussion. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 102 and CHEM-C 341.
  • CHEM-C 104 Physical Sciences and Society (3 -5 cr.) One year of high school algebra or equivalent is recommended. An integrated survey of modern applications and relationships of physical sciences to society developed from the basic concepts of motion, structure of matter, energy, reactions and the environment, and leading to considerations of specific problem areas such as pollution, drugs, energy alternatives, consumer products, and transportation. May be taken by students deficient in chemistry background without credit toward graduation in preparation for CHEM-C 105. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 104 and CHEM-C 101 or CHEM-C 105. The 5 credit hour version of this course includes laboratory work.
  • CHEM-C 105 Principles of Chemistry I (3 cr.) Two years of high school algebra or equivalent is recommended. Should be taken concurrently with CHEM- C 125. Basic principles, including stoichiometry, equilibrium, atomic and molecular structures. Lectures and discussion. Credit given for only one of these chemistry courses: CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 104, CHEM-C 105.
  • CHEM-C 106 Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 105 with a C or better. Should be taken concurrently with CHEM-C 126. Chemical equilibria, structures, and properties of inorganic compounds. Lectures and discussion.
  • CHEM-C 120 Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 100. C: CHEM-C 100. Illustration of chemical principles with applications to biology, the environment, and health. Repeatable up to 4 units.
  • CHEM-C 121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 101. C: CHEM-C 101. An introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 121 and CHEM-C 125.
  • CHEM-C 122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 102. C: CHEM-C 102. Continuation of CHEM-C 121. Emphasis on organic and biochemical experimental techniques. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 122 and CHEM-C 343.
  • CHEM-C 125 Experimental Chemistry I (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 105. C: CHEM-C 105. An introduction to laboratory experimentation, with particular emphasis on the molecular interpretation of the results. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 121 and CHEM-C 125.
  • CHEM-C 126 Experimental Chemistry II (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 125, CHEM-C 106 with a C or better. C: CHEM-C 106. A continuation of CHEM-C 125, with emphasis on synthesis and analysis of compounds.
  • CHEM-C 301 Chemistry Seminar 1 (1 cr.) Permission of instructor. Independent study and reading, with emphasis on basic chemistry and interdisciplinary applications. Research reports and discussions by students and faculty.
  • CHEM-C 302 Chemistry Seminar 2 (1 cr.) Permission of instructor. Independent study and reading, with emphasis on basic chemistry and interdisciplinary applications. Research reports and discussions by students and faculty.
  • CHEM-C 303 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 341 with a C or better. Selected topics in environmental chemistry such as atmospheric pollution, ozone hole, photochemical smog, acid rain, greenhouse effect, ground water pollution, water treatment, fate of toxic organic substances, metals in the environment, and treatment of hazardous wastes.
  • CHEM-C 305 Environmental Chemistry Seminar I (1 cr.) P: 25 credit hours of chemistry including CHEM-C 303 and CHEM-C 333 with a GPA of at least 2.5. C: CHEM-C 333. Independent study and reading, with emphasis on basic chemistry and environmental chemistry applications. Research report and discussion by students and faculty. The chosen topic must relate to the environment.
  • CHEM-C 315 Chemical Measurements and Laboratory (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 317, CHEM-C 318 with a C or better. C: CHEM-C 318. Experimental techniques in chemical analysis and instrumentation.
  • CHEM-C 317 Equilibria and Electrochemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106 with a C or better. MATH-M 215 recommended. Treatment of analytical data; chemical equilibrium; aqueous and nonaqueous acid-base titrimetry; complex formation titrations; gravimetric analysis, redox titrations, electrochemical theory; potentiometry; voltammetry; coulometry.
  • CHEM-C 318 Spectrochemistry and Separations (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 317 with a C or better. Ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and luminescence spectrophotometry; flame and electrical discharge techniques. Phase equilibria and extractions; countercurrent distribution; gas, thin-layer, liquid, and high-performance liquid chromatography.
  • CHEM-C 333 Experimental Environmental Chemistry (2 cr.) C: CHEM-C 303. A laboratory course of selected experiments that are relevant in the analysis and characterization of pollutants in air, soil, and water samples. Techniques that emphasize sampling and analytical procedure. Basic analytical principles and instrumentation. Field trips to water and wastewater treatment facilities.
  • CHEM-C 341 Organic Chemistry I Lectures (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106 with a C or better. Chemistry of carbon compounds. Nomenclature; qualitative theory of valence; structure and reactions. Syntheses and reactions of major classes of monofunctional compounds. Credit given for only one of the courses CHEM-C 102, CHEM-C 341.
  • CHEM-C 342 Organic Chemistry II Lectures (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 341 with a C or better. Syntheses and reactions of polyfunctional compounds, natural and industrial products; physical and chemical methods of identification.
  • CHEM-C 343 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 126, CHEM-C 341 with a grade of C or better. C: CHEM-C 341. Laboratory instruction in the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry and the use of general synthetic methods. Credit not given for both CHEM-C 122 and CHEM-C 343.
  • CHEM-C 344 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 343, CHEM-C 342 with a C or better. C: CHEM-C 342. Preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds; emphasis on qualitative organic analysis.
  • CHEM-C 361 Physical Chemistry of Bulk Matter (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, MATH-M 216, PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 with grades of C or better.. Thermodynamics laws, free energy and chemical potentials, gases and dilute solutions, phase transitions, colligative properties, chemical equilibria, ionic solutions, chemical kinetics and transport processes, current topics.
  • CHEM-C 362 Physical Chemistry of Molecules (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 106, MATH-M 216, PHYS-P 202, or PHYS-P 222 with grades of C or better. Quantum states and spectroscopy of molecules, statistical thermodynamics, and elementary kinetic theory, current topics.
  • CHEM-C 364 Introduction to Basic Measurements (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 361 or CHEM-C 362. C: CHEM-C 361 or CHEM-C 362. Graduated laboratory practice relating elementary principles of measurement technologies to current research applications.
  • CHEM-C 390 Special Topics (1-5 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Course content varies. Offered periodically.
  • CHEM-C 403 History of Chemistry I (1 cr.) P: Senior standing, consent of instructor. Development of significant chemical knowledge and concepts up to 1830. Lectures, student reports, discussion.
  • CHEM-C 409 Chemical Research (1-6 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. To be elected only after consultation with the course director and the undergraduate advisor. Cannot be substituted for any course required in chemistry major. A research thesis is required.
  • CHEM-C 430 Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 341 with a grade of C or better. CHEM-C 342. Structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, survey of chemistry of nonmetal and metal elements, coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, mechanisms and reactions.
  • CHEM-C 443 Organic Spectroscopy (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 342. Elucidation of molecular structures by use of IR, UV, NMR, mass spectroscopy, and other methods.
  • CHEM-C 444 Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory (2 cr.) P: CHEM-C 443 or consent of instructor. C: CHEM-C 443. Hands-on instrumentation experimental work concerning detailed structure elucidation of organic compounds using Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis), Infrared (IR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS).
  • CHEM-C 445 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory (3-5 cr.) P: CHEM-C 443 or consent of instructor. C: CHEM-C 443. Experimental problems in organic analysis and synthesis.
  • CHEM-C 470 Polymer Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 342 with a C or better. Introduction to syntheses, structures, properties, and uses of polymeric substances.
  • CHEM-C 484 Biomolecules and Catabolism (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 342 and BIOL-L 101, BIOL-L 102, or BIOL-L 100 with a C or better. The study of Biological structures and interactions; reactions, kinetics, and mechanisms; equilibrium and thermodynamics.
  • CHEM-C 485 Biosynthesis and Physiology (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 484 with a C or better. Biosynthetic pathways, expression of genetic information, molecular physiology.
  • CHEM-C 486 Biochemistry Laboratory (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 484. C: CHEM-C 484. Laboratory experience in biochemistry, including biomolecule isolation, purification, enzyme kinetics, and biomolecule characterization electrophoresis, centrifugation, spectroscopic methods, and chromatography.
  • CHEM-C 490 Individual Study (1-6 cr.) P: Written permission of faculty member supervising the study. Must complete written report of each semester's work.
  • CHEM-Y 398 Internship - Professional Practice in Chemistry (1-5 cr.) P: Junior or Senior standing in a bachelor degree (or second semester sophomore status in associate degree) and consent of faculty sponsor. Registration is required and authorization obtained from the Career Development Center. Designed to provide opportunity for students to receive credit for career-related work. Evaluation by employer and faculty sponsor. S/F Grading.
  • CJUS-P 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr.) P: Freshman or sophomore standing. Historical and philosophical background, structure, functions, and operations of the criminal justice system in the United States; introduction to and principles of formal behavior control devices.
  • CJUS-P 199 Careers in Criminal Justice (1 cr.) The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the career options available to them after completion of a Criminology and Criminal Justice degree. These options include work with a bachelor's degree both in and out of the criminal justice field. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of graduate degrees that can be earned after completion of a bachelor's degree. Students will be familiar with campus resources for career exploration and participate in activities designed to clarify their career goals. Finally, students will learn how to design their plans of study to meet the requirements for graduation with a degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice, and at the same time, to enhance their career objectives.
  • CJUS-P 200 Theories of Crime and Deviance (3 cr.) Critical examination of biological, psychological, and sociological theories of crime and deviance. Examination of individual, group, and societal reactions to norm-violating behaviors. Class must be taken on IUS campus.
  • CJUS-P 250 Issues in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) Thorough review and analysis of issues currently facing the criminal justice system. Topics vary each semester. Repeatable with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • CJUS-P 295 Criminal Justice Data, Methods, and Resources (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P100, CJUS-P200, ENG-W131, MATH-M118 all with a C or higher. This course examines basic concepts of criminal justice. Students become familiar with research techniques necessary for systematic analysis of the criminal justice system, offender behavior, crime trends, and program effectiveness. Students will learn to critically evaluate existing research. Students will become familiar with existing sources of criminal justice data and will learn to assess the quality of that data. Class must be taken on IUS campus.
  • CJUS-P 300 Topics in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. Extensive analysis of selected topics and themes in criminal justice. Topics vary each semester; see listing in the Schedule of Classes. Repeatable up to 9 units.
  • CJUS-P 301 Police and Contemporary Society (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100, CJUS-P295 with a grade of C or higher. Examination of the rules and responsibilities of the police, history of police organizations, relations between police and society, and determinations of police action.
  • CJUS-P 302 Courts and Criminal Justice (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100, CJUS-P295 with a grade of C or higher. Structure, organization, composition, functions, and procedures of courts in the United States. Role of lawyers and judges in the criminal justice system.
  • CJUS-P 303 Corrections and Criminal Justice (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100, CJUS-P295 with a grade of C or higher. Historical and comparative e-survey of prison confinement and the various alternatives within the scope of the criminal justice system's policies and methods of implementation.
  • CJUS-P 306 Drugs, Society, and Justice (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. Analysis of the political, economic, social and cultural factors that shape the use of consciousness-altering substances. Consideration of the way these factors influence the social and legal response to drug use.
  • CJUS-P 313 Conflict Management (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. This course will provide students with a fundament knowledge and understanding of the nature of interpersonal conflict associated with law enforcement professionals.  This course will begin by introducing students to the theories of human nature and build upon their understanding of conflict and conflict management for an organizational behavior perspective.  Based upon the perspectives of these two schools of thought, this course will identify the principles associated with conflict management (social responsibility, compassion, and fairness).  Finally, this course will identify the four characteristics or the 'plumbline' of conflict management (cultural intelligence, ethical behavior, effective interpersonal communication, and proficient use of power and authority) that provide the student with necessary skill to develop a personalized method for managing conflicts effectively on multiple levels.
  • CJUS-P 316 Crime in the Movies (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. This course is designed to examine the way that crime and criminals have been portrayed throughout the last 80 years in popular movies.  Crime has always been a favorite source of material for Hollywood, and we will be exploring the way that the depiction of criminal activity reflects the social mores of a particular era.  Thus, this course draws from a variety of disciplines as we critique the films and analyze the messages they convey about crime and criminals in society.
  • CJUS-P 320 Foundations of Criminal Investigations (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. The pertinence to criminal investigation of physical evidence, people, and documents. Discussion of ethical problems, impact of legal systems on investigative process, and elements of effective testimony. Lectures and case materials.
  • CJUS-P 325 Principles of Forensic Investigation (3 cr.) This course focuses on how a criminal offender is influenced by a variety of factors within the psychosocial environment. The class will examine the legal arenas and investigate procedures involved in dealing effectively with the system's most serious and chronic offenders.
  • CJUS-P 330 Criminal Justice Ethics (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. Study of major ethical theories with emphasis on their application to components of the criminal justice system. Personal and professional dilemmas and problem-solving will be emphasized.
  • CJUS-P 335 Race, Gender, and Inequality in the Criminal Justice System (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. This course is designed to examine the influence of gendered and race relations impacts on crime and justice.
  • CJUS-P 345 Terrorism (3 cr.) A survey of the incidence of terror with particular emphasis on public policy responses designed to combat terrorism. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the criminal justice system in combating domestic and foreign terrorism.
  • CJUS-P 362 Sex Offenders (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 and CJUS-P 200 with a C or higher. Examines a wide range of topics related to sex offenders, such as theories of deviance, sex crimes, sex addictions, pedophilia, adolescent offenders, rape and sexual assault, incest, legal responses, predator laws, risk assessment, and treatment. Content of interest to future investigators, prosecutors, police officers, and probation and treatment specialists.
  • CJUS-P 372 Evidence (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100. The rules of law governing proof at a trial of disputed issues of fact, burden of proof presumption and judicial notice; examination, impeachment, competency, and privileges of witnesses; hearsay rule and exception; all related as nearly as possible to criminal as opposed to civil process.
  • CJUS-P 373 Correctional Law (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100. Legal problems from conviction to release; pre-sentence investigations, sentencing, probation and parole, incarceration, loss and restoration of civil rights.
  • CJUS-P 374 Substantive Criminal Law (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a grade of C or higher. The development, limitations, and application of substantive criminal law utilizing the case study method.
  • CJUS-P 375 The American Juvenile Justice System (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100, CJUS-P295 with a grade of C or higher. Structure and operation of the juvenile justice system in the United States, past and present. Analysis of the duties and responsibilities of the police juvenile officer, the juvenile court judge, and the juvenile probation officer.
  • CJUS-P 376 Procedural Criminal Law (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a grade of C or higher. Criminal law application and procedure from the initiation of notice activity through the correctional process, utilizing the case-study method.
  • CJUS-P 407 Terrorism (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100. Terrorism is a serious challenge today and its policing demands varied responses. In this course we study how terrorists evolve and carry out their operations. The course will analyze police responses and debate the issues of legal boundaries and systems of checks and balances using case studies.
  • CJUS-P 411 Criminal Justice Management (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. Examination of the ideas and concepts from various disciplines contributing to modern administrative theory, and translation of these insights to the management of criminal justice agencies.
  • CJUS-P 413 Police-Community Relations (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a grade of C or higher. Examination of the relations between police and urban communities. Consideration of the social, economic, and political factors that shape these relations and alternative approaches to improving police-community relations.
  • CJUS-P 416 Capital Punishment (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a grade of C or higher. Consideration of issues raised by the use of the death penalty in the United States. Emphasis of critical thinking and open dialogue.
  • CJUS-P 423 Sexuality and the Law (3 cr.) Interdisciplinary analysis of topics pertaining to sexuality and the law. Examination of legal and cultural debates regarding sexual images and acts, the criminalization of motherhood, the international prostitution industry, and mass rape.
  • CJUS-P 457 Seminar on White-Collar Crime (3 cr.) The nature and incidence of white-collar crime. In addition to studying the etiological theories relating to white-collar crime, the course will also focus on both the criminal and civil (regulatory) process used to control corporate, organizational, and elite misconduct.
  • CJUS-P 458 Wrongful Conviction (3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a grade of C or higher. Investigates the factors associated with wrongful convictions and discusses possible remedies for minimizing such miscarriages of justice.  The goal of this course is to systematically describe, explain, analyze and evaluate the factors associated with, and the consequences of, the wrongful prosecution, conviction, and incarceration of the innocent in the American criminal justice system.  Includes a review of actual allegations of innocence by inmates currently in our prisons, and case-studies of wrongly convicted individuals who have been exonerated.
  • CJUS-P 470 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) P: Senior standing (permission only); CJUS-P 100, CJUS-P295 with a grade of C or higher. A detailed examination of the major efforts designed to control or reduce crime, a review of existing knowledge is followed by an investigation of current crime control theories, proposals and programs.
  • CJUS-P 471 Comparative Study of Criminal Justice Systems (3 cr.) Comparison of the American criminal justice system with those of other federated nations and of selected unitary states.
  • CJUS-P 493 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected problems in criminal justice. Topics will vary. May be repeated for a total of 9 credit hours with different topics.
  • CJUS-P 495 Individual Readings (1-6 cr.) P: CJUS-P 495 with a C or higher. Individual study project under guidance of faculty member or committee.  Students and instructor will complete a form agreeing on responsibilities at the beginning of the relevant semester. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • CJUS-P 496 Research Internship (1-3 cr.) P: CJUS-P 100 with a C or higher. Active participation in a research project and related activities under the direction of a faculty member. Students and instructor will complete a form agreeing on responsibilities at the beginning of the relevant semester. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • CMCL-C 202 Media in the Global Context (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 122,TEL-T 102 and sophomore standing; or consent of the instructor. This course focuses on the present and the future of global media and international advertising: understanding worldwide markets and strategic communication practices in very different cultural, regulatory and competitive conditions.
  • CMCL-C 290 Hollywood I (3 cr.) An overview of film history from its beginnings to the present, emphasizing major developments in narrative cinema. Credit given for only one CMCL-C 290 or CMLT-C 290.
  • CMCL-C 315 Advertising & Consumer Culture (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 122 and TEL-T 102 or consent of the instructor . Critical examination of advertising's role in modern societies. Focuses on marketing and consumption as central activities in shaping personal identity and social relations.
  • CMCL-C 337 New Media (3-6 cr.) Develops frameworks for understanding new media technologies in social contexts. Compares computing, networked digital media, and social media to prior eras of technological change, focusing on interactions among technological, industrial, regulatory, social, and cultural forces. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • CMCL-C 392 Media Genres (3 cr.) May repeat once for credit.
  • CMCL-C 424 Communication Research Methods (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 290 or TEL-R 311; MATH-A 118 or M 118 or higher with grade of C or better, and Junior standing; or consent of instructor. Focuses on the objective appraisal of behavioral data in the study of speech communication. Introduces the theoretical foundation of empirical social science and offers guidelines for conducting descriptive and experimental studies.
  • CMCL-C 427 CROSS CULTURAL COMMUNICATION (3 cr.) A survey study of national, cultural, and cross-cultural persuasion in theory and practice.
  • CMCL-C  324 Persuasion (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 102 and Junior standing or consent of instructor. This course is designed to introduce students to the theories, principles and practice of persuasive communication. First, students will review the basic principles of oral communication. Second, the course will familiarize students with key persuasion concepts and will provide an overview of theoretical approaches to the study and practice of persuasion. Third, the course will focus on factors that influence the success or failure of persuasive strategies and techniques in contexts of advertising, marketing, branding, and public relations. Students will have ample opportunities to directly apply knowledge acquired through the lectures, readings and in-class interactions to the analysis and production of persuasive materials.
  • CMCL-C  337 New Media (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 102 and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Develops frameworks for understanding new media technologies in social contexts. Compares computing, networked digital media, and social media to prior eras of technological change, focusing on interactions among technological, industrial, regulatory, social, and cultural forces. Repeatable for credit up to 6 credit hours.
  • CMLT-C 145 Major Characters in Western Literature (3 cr.) Comparative analysis of the literary treatment of mythical and archetypal characters in different periods and traditions, such as: Electra (Euripides, O'Neill, Giraudoux), Tristan (Gottfried, Tennyson, Wagner), Faust (Marlowe, Goethe), Don Juan (Tirso de Molina, Molière, Pushkin, Shaw).
  • CMLT-C 146 Major Themes in Western Literature (3 cr.) Comparative analysis of recurrent themes and motifs in Western literature, such as the French Revolution or the quest (man's search for material or spiritual values). Selected works from diverse genres and historical periods, ranging from the ancient epic to the contemporary novel and drama.
  • CMLT-C 190 An Introduction to Film (3 cr.) Nature of film technique and film language; analysis of specific films and introduction to major critical approaches in film studies.
  • CMLT-C 205 Comparative Literary Analysis (3 cr.) Introduction to basic concepts of literary criticism through comparative close readings of texts from a variety of literary genres, fiction, poetry, drama, essay; and from diverse traditions.
  • CMLT-C 216 Science Fiction, Fantasy, and the Western Tradition (3 cr.) Historical and comparative survey of science fiction and fantasy narrative from antiquity to the present. The origin of scientific narrative in ancient Greek literature, its relation to ancient myths, and its history and development. Emphasis on philosophical, cognitive, and scientific aspects of the genre.
  • CMLT-C 217 Detective, Mystery, and Horror Literature (3 cr.) Origins, evolution, conventions, criticism, and theory of the detective mystery story; history of the Gothic novel; later development of the tale of terror; major works of this type in fiction, drama, and film.
  • CMLT-C 313 Narrative (3 cr.) Historical and analytical study of various forms of narrative literature. Examination of narrative as a primary literary genre and analysis of such diverse forms as myth, folktale, epic, romance, gospel, saint's life, saga, allegory, confession, and novel.
  • CMLT-C 335 Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism (3 cr.) The rise of Realism in 19-century fiction and its development into Naturalism and Impressionism; the Symbolist reaction in poetry; the re-emergence of the drama as a major genre. Such authors as Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Mallarme, Ibsen, Hauptmann, Strindberg, Chekhov.
  • CMLT-C 392 Genre Study in Film (3 cr.) Topic varies; the evaluation of typical genres; problems of generic description or definition; themes, conventions, and iconography peculiar to given genres, etc.
  • CMLT-C 393 History of European and American Films 1 (3 cr.) A survey of development of cinema during the period 1895-1926 (the silent film era). Particular attention paid to representative work of leading filmmakers, emergence of film movements and development of national trends, growth of film industry, and impact of television.
  • CMLT-C 394 History of European and American Films 2 (3 cr.) A survey of European and American cinema since 1927. Particular attention paid to representative work of leading filmmakers, emergence of film movements and development of national trends, growth of film industry, and impact of television.
  • CMLT-C 490 Individual Studies in Film and Literature (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of chairperson of film committee. May be repeated once with a different topic.
  • CMLT-C  151 Introduction to Popular Culture (3 cr.) The serious study of entertainment for mass consumption, including popular theatre and vaudeville, bestsellers, mass circulation magazines, popular music, phonograph records, and popular aspects of radio, film, and television. Provides the basic background to other popular culture courses in comparative literature.
  • CMLT-C  391 Film Theory and Aesthetics (3 cr.) Study of classical and contemporary schools of film theory.
  • COAS-I 400 International Studies Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) P: Department Consent. Students will complete a senior thesis or project within their area of concentration. This may be as an independent study for the purpose of writing a research paper or may be through a faculty-led seminar, if offered.
  • COAS-J 151 Career Exploration and Development (1 cr.) Provides an opportunity to explore career options and define career objectives through the use of recognized occupational preference tests, self-evaluation techniques, guest lecturers, and outside readings. Intended for freshmen and sophomores.
  • COAS-Q 161 Library Skills and Resources (1 cr.) Discuss the techniques and skills for researching term papers, speeches, and other library projects, and give students the opportunity to explore the potential of a large academic library. Students learn to identify and locate information in libraries for class assignments and personal interests.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - Ballroom 1: Waltz & Rumba (1 cr.) This workshop provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of Waltz and Rumba. Repeatable for credit.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - Ballroom 2: Tango & Mambo (1 cr.) This course provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of Tango and Mambo.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - Ballroom 3: Foxtrot & Cha Cha (1  cr.) This course provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of Foxtrot and Cha Cha. Repeatable for credit up to 15 credits.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - Rhythm I: Merengue & West Coast Swing (1 cr.) This course provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of Merengue and West Coast Swing. Repeatable for credit up to 15 units.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - Rhythm 2: East Coast Swing & Samba (1 cr.) This course provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of East Coast Swing and Samba. Repeatable for credit up to 15 credits.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - New York Hustle & Bolero (1 cr.) This course provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of New York Hustle and Bolero. Repeatable for credit up to 15 credits.
  • COAS-S 100 Topic - Rhythm 4: Waltz and Slow Dance. (1 cr.) This course provides instruction and practice in the dance steps and rhythms of Viennese Waltz and Slow Dance. Repeatable for credit up to 15 credits.
  • COAS-S 100 Workshop: Variable Title (1 cr.) 1-unit workshop with variable titles, corresponding to specific special and current topics in the arts and sciences, nursing, health and physical recreation, and career and academic exploration. Repeatable for credit under different topics up to 15 credits.
  • COAS-S 154 Pathways (1 cr.) This course teaches students how to use tools available to aid them in their academic planning, explore course majors and interests, increase their academic problem solving skills, enhance their social networking skills, and expand their financial planning skills as it relates to college success.
  • COAS-S 200 Workshop in Special Topics (0-3 cr.) Specialized workshops on a topical basis to be offered to non-traditional populations. May be offered by TV, radio, weekend college, etc. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • COAS-S 399 INTERNSHIP (0-6 cr.) An internship is an educational experience related to a student's degree program and career plan which applies what the student has learned to work situations. It involves a student, employer, and university sponsor. See Career Development Center for more information and to register. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • COAS-S 399 Internship in History (3 cr.) P: At least junior standing and 12 credit hours of related work; prior arrangement with individual faculty member. Faculty-supervised experience in museum work, history preservation, historical societies, oral history, or other history-related fieldwork in private and public institutions.  May be taken only once.
  • COAS-S 399 Internship Political Science (Topic ID 25) (1-6 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing, approval of the dean and the Career Development Center. Designed to provide opportunities for student to receive credit for selected career-related work. Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • COAS-S 400 Workshop in Special Topics (1-6 cr.) Repeatable up to 12 units.
  • COAS-S  399 Internship in Informatics Professional Practice (1-3 cr.) P: Approval of Informatics Coordinator and completion of 100- and 200-level requirements in informatics. Students gain professional work experience in an industry or research organization setting, using skills and knowledge acquired in informatics course work. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.
  • COAS-W 100 Introduction to Business (3 cr.) A survey of the business field and its operations in the contemporary economic, political and social environment.
  • CSCI-A 121 Cyberspace Influences on Privacy, Security and Society (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. Examines the impacts of computerization in the United States. From family life, private organizations, and public organizations to government at all levels, computerization is affecting and creating the complex interdependencies between technology and social groups. We will survey recent changes to many topics, including intellectual property rights, e-government, online security, online privacy, digital currency, online gambling, universal access, online education, medical devices, and media convergence.
  • CSCI-A 201 Introduction to Programming (3 cr.) MATH-M 101 or high school equivalent is recommended. Fundamental programming constructs, including loops, arrays, classes, and files. General problem-solving techniques. Emphasis on modular programming, user-interface design, and developing good programming style. Not intended for computer science majors or minors.
  • CSCI-A 202 Computer Programming (3 cr.) P: CSCI-A201 or CSCI-C 201 with a C or better. Computer programming, algorithms, program structure, arrays, stacks-procedures, functions, modularization parameter-passing-mechanisms, recursion vs. iteration, and issues of programming style. Computer solutions of problems in diverse fields.
  • CSCI-A 211 Word Processing Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. This course introduces the student to word processing techniques used in creating letters, forms, and reports. The student will use styles, outlines, tables, and field codes in documents and templates. Advanced topics include merging documents, customizing the Word environment, and integrating the features of Word with other software applications.
  • CSCI-A 212 Spreadsheet Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. This course introduces the student to spreadsheet techniques used in creating professional-looking worksheets. Students will use formulas, functions, charts, graphs, and logical functions. Advanced topics include advanced filtering, importing data, creating pivot tables, database functions, and integrating Excel with other software applications.
  • CSCI-A 213 Database Applications (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. This course introduces the student to database techniques. The student will develop tables, custom forms, reports, and queries. Advanced topics include developing ASP pages for the World Wide Web, developing and understanding relationship database design, macros, managing, securing a database, and integrating Access with the Web and other programs.
  • CSCI-A 221 Multimedia Programming (1.5 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. This course introduces the student to creating dynamic Web pages. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving techniques using a Web-based programming language. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-A 247 Network Technologies and Administration (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. Introduction to network principles and current network technology, both hardware and software. Network administration tools and techniques. Laboratory provides practical experience.
  • CSCI-A 348 Mastering The World Wide Web (3-4 cr.) P: Two semesters of programming experience, or equivalent, and some knowledge of operating systems. Project-oriented course leading to ability to maintain a fully functional web site. Topics include internet network protocols and web programming, server administration, protocols, site design, and searching and indexing technologies.
  • CSCI-B 438 Fundamentals of Computer Networks (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 202 or INFO-I 211 with a C or better. Theory and practice of data communications between computing devices. Topics include network architecture and topology, wide-area networks, local-area networks, and ISO network layers.
  • CSCI-B 461 Database Concepts (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 251 or INFO-I 201, CSCI-C 335 and CSCI-C 343 with grades of C or better. Introduction to database concepts and systems. Topics include database models and systems: hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented; database design principles; structures for efficient data access; query languages and processing; database applications development; views; security; concurrency; recovery. Students participate in a project to design, implement, and a query a database, using a standard database system.
  • CSCI-B 481 Interactive Graphics (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343, MATH-M 303. Computer graphics techniques. Introduction to graphics hardware and software. Two-dimensional graphics methods, transformations, and interactive methods. Three-dimensional graphics, transformations, viewing geometry, object modeling, and interactive manipulation methods. Basic lighting and shading. Video and animation methods. Credit given for only one of CSCI-B 481 and CSCI-B 581.
  • CSCI-B 545 Enterprise Hardware Infrastructure (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 335 and CSCI-B 438 with grades of C or better, or instructor consent. This course explores the management of technology resources across the infrastructure with a focus on hardware. Topics include network architecture and its management, the relationship of network hardware to operating systems and network protocols, and infrastructure communication.
  • CSCI-C 100 Computing Tools (1 cr.) An introduction to computing applications useful in college and career work. Topics include microcomputer operating systems; word processing; spreadsheet, database, and communications software; and other software applications.
  • CSCI-C 105 Introduction to C/C++ Programming (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to computer programming using C/C++. The emphasis is on structured programming principles, and understanding the basic concepts that apply to scientific and engineering problems. Among topics covered in this course are: problem solving using top down design, using flowcharts to explain the program logic, selection structure, repetition structure, bitwise operations, arrays, pointers, strings, passing arguments, and sequential files.
  • CSCI-C 106 Introduction to Computers and Their Use (3 cr.) An introduction to computers and their use in information systems: use of standard application programs; foundations of information systems design and development; survey of programming languages. Satisfies the basic computer literacy requirement.
  • CSCI-C 201 Computer Programming II (4 cr.) Two years of high school mathematics and some programming experience is recommended. Computer programming and algorithms. Basic programming and program structure. Computer solutions of problems. A computer language will be taught. Lecture and discussion.
  • CSCI-C 202 Computer Programming (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201 or INFO-I 210 with a C or better. Computer programming, algorithms, program structure, arrays, stacks, queues, binary trees; procedures, functions, parameter-passing mechanisms, recursion vs. iteration, and issues of programming style. Computer solutions of problems such as data analysis, sorting, searching, and string and text manipulation.
  • CSCI-C 203 Cobol and File Processing (3-4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201. Computer programming and algorithms. Application to large file processing functions of an organization.
  • CSCI-C 237 Operating Systems and Job Processing (3-4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 202, CSCI-C 335. A functional level approach to the study of operating systems. The major components of at least two operating systems are studied. Various jobs are run under these operating systems.
  • CSCI-C 251 Foundations of Digital Computing (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201 or INFO-I 210 and MATH-M 118 or higher with grades of C or better. MATH-M 119 is recommended. Boolean algebra and propositional logic. Set algebra, including mappings and relations. Elements of graph theory and statistical analysis. Application of all topics to computer programming.
  • CSCI-C 311 Programming Languages (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 202 or INFO-I 211 and CSCI-C 335 with grades of C or better. Systematic approach to programming languages. Relationships among languages, properties and features of languages, and the computer environment necessary to use languages. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-C 335 Computer Structures (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201 or INFO-I 210 with a C or better. CSCI-C 202 or INFO-I 211 is recommended. Structure and internal operation of computers, stressing the architecture and assembly language programming of a specific computer. Additional topics include digital hardware and microprogramming. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-C 343 Data Structures (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 202 or INFO-I 210 and CSCI-C 251 or INFO-I 201 with grades of C or better. Systematic study of data structures encountered in computing problems, structure and use of storage media, methods of representing structure data, techniques for operation on data structures. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-C 346 Software Engineering (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343 with a C or better. The theory and practice of software engineering applied to the design and implementation of software systems. Course topics include practical issues of software requirement analysis and specification, design, modeling, tools, project management, construction, testing, deployment, and operation and maintenance, as well as computing ethics and professional practice.
  • CSCI-C 390 Individual Programming Laboratory (1-3 cr.) P: Department consent. Before enrolling, a student must arrange for an instructor to supervise the activity. Student will design, program, verify, and document a special project assignment selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits.
  • CSCI-C 421 Digital Design (3-4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 251, CSCI-C 335. Organization and logic design of digital systems. Course presents a structured design philosophy, emphasizing hardware building blocks, circuit synthesis, microprogramming. In the laboratory students build, study, and debug a working minicomputer from elementary hardware components. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-C 431 Assemblers and Compilers I (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 311, CSCI-C 335, and CSCI-C 343 with grades of C or better. Design and construction of assemblers, macroprocessors, linkers, loaders, and interpreters. Compiler design and construction, including lexical analysis, parsing, code generation, and optimization.
  • CSCI-C 445 Information Systems I (3-4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343. Analysis, design and implementation of information systems from user needs to a running system. Hardware organization and its impact on storage structures. Structures and techniques for accessing and updating information: primary and secondary indices, sequential and multilinked files. Computer modeling of information using hierarchal, network and relational techniques and operations with these models. Current database system and query languages.
  • CSCI-C 455 Analysis of Algorithms (4 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 or MATH-M 120 and CSCI-C 343 with grades of C or better. Models, algorithms, recurrences, summations, growth rates. Probabilistic tools, upper and lower bounds; worst-case and average case analysis, amortized analysis, dynamization. Comparison-based algorithms: search, selection, sorting, hashing. Information extraction algorithms (graphs, databases). Graph algorithms: spanning trees, shortest paths, connectivity, depth-first search, breadth-first search.
  • CSCI-C 458 Intelligent Robots (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343 with C or better or consent of instructor. This course presents a broad overview of robotics in practice and research with topics including: robot control, perception, localization, planning, mapping, navigation, learning, and swarm approaches. The course focuses on a hands-on approach to introducing the concepts in robotics, using autonomous mobile robots.
  • CSCI-C 463 Artificial Intelligence I (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 311 and CSCI-C 343 with grades of C or better. Historical roots, philosophical thesis, and goals of artificial intelligence research. Basic problem-solving methods. Heuristics and heuristic search. Game-playing programs. Reasoning and knowledge representation. Predicate calculus, semantic networks, frames, and other representation systems. Introduction to production systems. Goal-directed systems.
  • CSCI-C 490 Seminar in Computer Science (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Special topics in computer science. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • CSCI-N 211 Introduction to Databases (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 106 or EDUC-W 200 with a C or better. Summary of basic computing topics. Introduction to database design concepts, creation of user forms, development of databases, querying techniques, and building reports. Focus on relational database systems from development and administration point of view. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-N 341 Introduction to Client-side Web Programming (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201 or INFO-I 210 with a C or better. Introduction to programming focusing on the client sided programming environment. Essential algorithm design, client-side programming using languages commonly embedded in Web browsers. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-N 342 Server-side Programming for the Web (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 201 or INFO-I 210 with a C or better. Designing and building applications on a Web server. Focuses on issues of programming applied to Web servers. Emphasis on relational databases concepts, data design, languages used on the server, transaction handling, and integration of data into Web applications.
  • CSCI-P 422 Web Enterprise Systems (4 cr.) In this class, you will learn to use various software packages that support web programming systems. Topics include appropriate programming language essentials, database design and development, application configuration, web controls, user authentications, form validations, master pages, email notifications, payment handling, transaction security, etc. Students will develop an advanced web/database application with respect to current industry standards of web/database applications.
  • CSCI-P 434 Distributed Systems (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343 and CSCI-C 237. Principles of distributed systems including system design, distributed algorithms, consistency and concurrency, and reliability and availability. The role of these foundational issues in distributed file systems, distributed computing, and data-driven systems.
  • CSCI-P 436 Introduction to Operating Systems (4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 343 & CSCI-C335 with a C or better. C: CSCI-C311. Organization and construction of computer systems that manage computational resources. Topics include specification and implementation of concurrency, process scheduling, storage management, device handlers, and mechanisms for event coordination. Lecture and laboratory.
  • CSCI-P 445 Capstone Project I Design (2-4 cr.) P: CSCI-C 346 and ENG-W 234 or ENG-W 290 with grades of C or better. Student teams, under supervision of university faculty or an external sponsor, choose a design project, investigate alternate solutions and submit a preliminary project design. Periodic oral and written project progress reports are required. Course topics include practical issues of software design, development, quality assurance, and deployment, as well as computing ethics and professional practice. This course should be completed in the student's final Fall semester. CSCI-P445 and P446 must be completed as a Fall/Spring Sequence. If a student fails to complete CSCI-P446 the semester immediately following the completion of CSCI-P445, the student must repeat CSCI-P445 in a future semester in order to complete the sequence.
  • CSCI-P 446 Capstone Project II Implementation (2-4 cr.) P: CSCI-P 445 with a C or better in the semester immediately preceding enrollment in P446. Student teams, under the supervision of university faculty or an external sponsor, complete the design and implement the project began in CSCI-P 445. Periodic oral and written project progress reports are required. The project will result in a software application, written report, and final presentation. Course topics include practical issues of software design development, quality assurance, and deployment, as well as computing ethics and professional practice. This course should be completed in the student's final Spring semester. CSCI-P445 and P446 must be completed as a Fall/Spring Sequence. If a student fails to complete CSCI-P446 the semester immediately following the completion of CSCI-P445, the student must repeat CSCI-P445 in a future semester in order to complete the sequence.
  • EALC-J 101 Elementary Japanese 1 (4 cr.) Introduction to the spoken and written Japanese language and to Japanese culture and civilization. Emphasis on practical use and understanding of everyday Japanese language and customs, to prepare the student for life in Japan or for interacting with Japanese people in the United States.
  • EALC-J 102 Elementary Japanese 2 (4 cr.) P: EALC-J 101 or Instructor Consent. Continuing introduction to the spoken and written Japanese language and to Japanese culture and civilization. Emphasis on practical use and understanding of everyday Japanese language and customs, to prepare the student for life in Japan or for interacting with Japanese people in the United States.
  • EALC-J 201 Second-Year Japanese 1 (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 102 or Instructor Consent. Continuation of EALC-J 102. Mainly practical spoken and written Japanese, and understanding Japanese lifestyles and ways of thinking.
  • EALC-J 202 Second-Year Japanese 2 (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 201 or Instructor Consent. Continuation of EALC-J 201. Mainly practical spoken and written Japanese, and understanding Japanese lifestyles and ways of thinking.
  • EALC-J 301 Third Year Japanese 1 (3. cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent or Instructor Consent. Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second year Japanese. More advanced level of speaking, reading, writing, and listening proficiency.
  • EALC-J 302 Third Year Japanese 2 (3-4 cr.) P: EALC-J 301 or Equivalent or Instructor Consent. Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second year of Japanese. More advanced levels of speaking, reading, writing and listening proficiency.
  • EALC-J 401 Fourth-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 302 or equivalent or Intstructor Consent. Emphasis on advanced reading skills.
  • EALC-J 402 Fourth-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 401 Continuation of J401. To develop advanced skills in Japanese for speaking, reading, and writing.
  • EALC-J 498 Individual Studies in Japanese (1-3 cr.) P: Instructor Consent. A faculty directed study in Japanese taylored to student interests and needs, pre-arranged between instructor and student.  Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • EALC-J  491 Humanities Topics in Japanese (3 cr.) P: Sophomore Standing. A course focused on teaching English in elementary school and the lower grades of Japanese junior high school, for students seeking to teach English in Japan. Students build actual skills in teaching English; making syllabi, lesson plans, exams, and grading rubrics. Students explore materials to cultivate understanding of the nature of teacher-student relationships in Japan; and how to conduct themselves in the proper manner in the Japanese school setting. Taught in English. Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • EALC-J  492 Hist/Cultural Topics Japanese (3 cr.) P: Sophomore Standing. Emphasis on a topic in Japanese history or culture. Content selected to enhance specific language skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening). Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • ECON-E 101 Survey of Economic Issues & Problems (3 cr.) For non-Business and non-Economics majors only. This is the first semester of a principles of Economincs course for those who only need one Economics course. Basic economic principles applied to current social issues and problems. Topics covered will typically include inflation, unemployment, wage and price controls, welfare, social security, national debt, health programs, food prices, pollution, crime, mass transit, revenue sharing, multinationals, population, and energy. Not open to those with previous college-level economics courses.
  • ECON-E 200 Fundamentals of Economics and an Overview (3 cr.) Study of the basic institutions of market economy and the role they play in defining and pursuing economic goals in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed upon the effects of existing economic institutions; current economic policy alternatives as they affect both the individual and the society.
  • ECON-E 201 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 102, M110, M112, M114, M118, A118, T101 or above with a C- or higher. Scarcity, opportunity cost, competitive and non-competitive market pricing, and interdependence as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as poverty, pollution, excise taxes, rent controls, and farm subsidies.
  • ECON-E 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. Measuring and explaining aggregate economic performance, money, monetary policy, and fiscal policy as an analytical core. Individual sections apply this core to a variety of current economic policy problems, such as inflation, unemployment, and economic growth.
  • ECON-E 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory in Economics and Business (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 122 or MATH-M118 and BUS-K 201 or EQUIVALENT EXCEL SKILLS. This course must be completed in the first 80 credit hours. Review of basic probability concepts, sampling, inference and testing statistical hypotheses. Applications of regression and correlation theory, analysis of variance and elementary decision theory.
  • ECON-E 280 Applied Statistics for Business and Economics I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 122 and BUS-K 201 or equivalent Excel skills. Summary measures of central tendency and variability. Basic concepts in probability and important probability distributions. Sampling, sampling distributions and basic estimation concepts such as confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing. B.S. in Business students must complete ECON-E 280 and ECON-E 281 in first 80 hours of course work.
  • ECON-E 281 Applied Statistics for Business and Economics II (3 cr.) P: BUS-K 201, MATH-M 119 and ECON-E 270 or MATH-K 300 Balanced coverage of statistical concepts and methods, along with practical advice on their effective application to real-world problems. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, time-series analysis, statistical process control and decision making. Use of Excel in statistical applications required. B.S. in Business students must complete ECON-E 281 in first 80 hours of course work.
  • ECON-E 321 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202. Consumer and producer theory; pricing under conditions of competition and monopoly; allocation and pricing of resources; partial and general equilibrium theory and welfare economics.
  • ECON-E 322 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202. Theory of income, employment, and the price level. Study of counter-cyclical and other public policy measures. National income accounting.
  • ECON-E 323 Urban Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202 and ECON-E 280 or ECON-E 270 and Junior standing. Introduction to basic concepts and techniques of urban economic analysis to facilitate understanding of urban problems; urban growth and structure, poverty, housing, transportation, and public provision of urban services.
  • ECON-E 333 International Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202. Forces determining international trade, finance, and commercial policy under changing world conditions; theory of international trade, monetary standards, tariff policy, trade controls.
  • ECON-E 338 Business & Economic Applications of Geographical Information Systems (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202 and ECON-E 280 or ECON-E 270 and Junior standing. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has become a standard feature amongst government and corporate agencies either for resource management or planning. In the corporate world, GIS is heavily used in locating businesses or retail outlets, food industries, transportation networks, etc. In this course students will be exposed to various applications of GIS with a primary focus on business and economic issues. This course does not cover GIS programming and development of application programs.
  • ECON-E 340 Introduction to Labor Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202. Economic analysis of labor markets, including market structure and labor market policies. Topics include minimum wage, mandated benefits, labor unions, discrimination, welfare policy.
  • ECON-E 350 Money and Banking (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202. Monetary and banking system of the United States; problems of money and prices, of proper organization and functioning of commercial banking and Federal Reserve systems, of monetary standards, and of credit control; recent monetary and banking trends.
  • ECON-E 470 Econometric Theory and Practice (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 200 or ECON-E 202 and ECON-E 281 The purpose of this course is to teach students to model and estimate economic problems effectively. Classical regression analysis and its most important exceptions (special cases) will be addressed. Understanding the intuition behind modeling the system and the subsequent results will also be heavily emphasized.
  • ECON-E 490 Advanced Undergraduate Seminar in Economics (3 cr.) Advanced intensive study of a topic area in economics. Topics will vary.
  • EDUC-A 399 Internship (0-6 cr.) An internship is an educational experience related to a student's degree program and career plan which applies what the student has learned to work situations.  It involves a student, employer, and university sponsor.  See Career Services for more information and to register.
  • EDUC-A 500 Introduction to Educational Leadership (3 cr.) P: Permission required. Organization and structure of the school system; legal basis of school administration; agencies of administration and control; and standards for administration in the various functional areas.
  • EDUC-A 508 School Law and the Teacher (1-3 cr.) P: Permission required. Overview of the legal framework affecting teachers, students, and the public school classrooms, including students' and teachers' rights as governed by case and statutory law; tort liability; and issues related to church-state, discipline, and child abuse/neglect.
  • EDUC-A 510 School-Community Relations (3 cr.) P: Permission required. Characteristics of the community school; school culture; adapting the educational program to community needs; use of community resources in instruction; and planning school-community relations programs.
  • EDUC-A 590 Independent Study in Educational Leadership (1-3 cr.) Individual research or study with an educational leadership faculty member, arranged in advance of registration.
  • EDUC-A 608 Legal Perspectives on Education (3 cr.) P: Permission required. Overview of the legal framework affecting the organization and administration of public schools, including church-state issues, pupil rights, staff-student relationships, conditions of employment, teacher organization, tort liability, school finance, and desegregation.
  • EDUC-A 625 Administration of Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500. Permission required. Role of the principal as professional teacher in development and operation of school program. Topics addressed include those specific to the Elementary school and other related to P-12 leadership.
  • EDUC-A 627 Secondary School Administration (3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500. Permission required. Role of the principal as professional teacher in development and operation of school program. Topics addressed include those specific to the Secondary school and others related to P-12 leadership.
  • EDUC-A 635 Public School Budgeting and Accounting (3 cr.) P: Permission required. Preparation and use of budget for a public school system as a controlling instrument for revenue, appropriations, expenditures, and unencumbered balances. Based on requirements of the Indiana and Kentucky laws and regulations.
  • EDUC-A 638 Public School Personnel Management (3 cr.) P: Permission required. The background, present conditions, and future directions of school personnel management; development and implementations of a school personnel management program; examination of problems and issues;teacher evaluation.
  • EDUC-A 695 Practicum in School Administration (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of program coordinator. Provides closely supervised clinical experiences in various areas of educational leadership.
  • EDUC-E 325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Development of objectives, teaching strategies, resources, and assessment procedures that facilitate the social learning of children in an integrated curriculum. Special attention is given to cognitive, affective, and psychomotor facets through concept learning, inquiry, decision making, values analysis, cooperative learning, and multicultural education. Students will participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-E 328 Science in th Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Objectives, philosophy, selection, organization, and evaluation of teaching methods and instructional materials. Inquiry teaching, concept development, field trip experiences, and use of multidisciplinary materials are stressed. Analysis of individual and group assessment processes are emphasized. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-E 337 Classroom Learning Environments (3 cr.) P: EDUC-F 200, EDUC-P 250, EDUC-P 251. This course focuses on the curriculum aspects of early childhood programs designed to meet ethnic and cultural differences and on planning, utilizing, and evaluating learning environments. Selection of materials and activities and the acquisition of skills for using these to stimulate children's development are major focuses.
  • EDUC-E 338 The Early Childhood Educator (3 cr.) Includes the role of the teacher as a professional educator including professional responsibilities, legal rights and responsibilities of teachers and students, school and community relations, and involvement in professional organizations. A major emphasis is on parent involvement and parent education.
  • EDUC-E 339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Development of language in the child with emphasis on linguistics, creative language, dramatics, usage, handwriting, spelling, listening, and writing process. Attention given to individual and group processes of teaching, to the whole language approach, to disability and cultural awareness, and to appropriate kinds of hardware and software. Students will participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-E 340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. General overview of the reading program with emphasis on development, content, word recognition and comprehension skills and strategies, the whole language approach, and instructional processes as applied to classroom teaching. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-E 341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Diagnostic and prescriptive methods and materials for use in corrective instruction in reading, including minority and special needs groups, with development of an appreciation for hardware and software that will facilitate instruction. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-E 343 Mathematics in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Focus is on individualized and cooperative learning techniques used in a diagnostic/prescriptive mathematic laboratory program for all learners with attention to implementation of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics curriculum and evaluation standards for school mathematics. Stresses the design of appropriate and innovative affective, psychomotor, and cognitive experiences. Gives emphasis to the developmental approach to mathematic learning and teaching.
  • EDUC-E 449 Trade Books and the Teacher (3 cr.) P: EDUC-P 250 and EDUC-E 339. C: EDUC-E 339, EDUC-E 440.

    Emphasis on the use of trade books for teaching language arts and reading, K-8. Historical and contemporary literature will be used to examine objectives and techniques of instruction.

  • EDUC-E 490 Research in Elementary Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research.
  • EDUC-E 495 Workshop in Elementary Education (1-6 cr.) For elementary school teachers. Gives 1 credit hour for each week of full-time work.
  • EDUC-E 506 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) Planning the curriculum and selecting and evaluating learning experiences for children ages three through eight years with reference to relevant research. Organizing the classroom to provide maximum integration among experiences in different academic areas.
  • EDUC-E 507 Evaluation of Classroom Behavior (3 cr.) The child as a learner; goals for early childhood programs; organizing the instructional setting including teacher roles and methods of assessing behaviors, Use of this knowledge in organizing and evaluating self and a child in a program.
  • EDUC-E 508 Seminar in Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) Seminar will be based upon current interests of students and will serve as a means of synthesizing their experiences. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken to explore current issues and problems in early childhood education, current happenings as they relate to the issues, and major research efforts to support programs.
  • EDUC-E 513 Social Studies in the Elementary School (2 cr.) Development of objectives, teaching strategies, resources, and assessment procedures that facilitate the social learning of children in an integrated curriculum. Special attention is given to cognitive, affective, and psychomotor facets through concept learning, inquiry, decision making, values analysis, cooperative learning, and multicultural education.
  • EDUC-E 514 Workshop in Elementary Language Arts (1-6 cr.) Means for improving the teaching of language arts in the elementary school.
  • EDUC-E 515 Workshop in Elementary Reading (1-6 cr.) Means for improving the teaching of reading in the elementary school.
  • EDUC-E 516 Workshop in Elementary School Science (1-6 cr.) Means for improving the teaching of science in the elementary school.
  • EDUC-E 518 Workshop in General Elementary Education (1-6 cr.) Individual or group study of problems within the field of elementary education.
  • EDUC-E 524 Workshop in Early Childhood Education (1-6 cr.) Individual and group study of the problems of nursery school and kindergarten education.
  • EDUC-E 545 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) For experienced teachers. Review of developmental reading program in the elementary school, use of reading in various curriculum areas, appraisal of reading abilities, and techniques and materials for today's classroom.
  • EDUC-E 547 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) For experienced teachers. Goals and functions of social studies and underlying principles that influence the teaching of social studies; content, resources, and methodology that facilitate the implementation of these.
  • EDUC-E 548 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Science in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) Helps experienced teachers gain proficiency in the teaching of science in the elementary school. Characteristics of good elementary school science programs.
  • EDUC-E 549 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Language Arts in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) Helps experienced teachers gain further insight into how best to teach language arts. Emphasizes basic communication skills and significant strategies, trends and materials.
  • EDUC-E 590 Independent Study or Research in Elementary Education (1-3 cr.) P: Permission required. Capstone course for Teacher as Researcher Paper; or the individual research or study with a faculty member as arranged in advance of registration.
  • EDUC-F 100 Topical Exploration in Education (1-3 cr.) This introductory course for prospective teachers provides an orientation to the teaching profession. Covers program and state requirements, diversity as it relates to schools, teaching, and learning; and presents skills necessary for becoming a successful student/teacher. Includes a service learning component.
  • EDUC-F 200 Examining Self as Teacher (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a C (2.0) or above. Designed to help student make a career decision, better conceptualize the kind of teacher the student wishes to become, and reconcile any preliminary concerns that may be hampering a personal examination of self as teacher. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences in schools. A significant paper will be required.
  • EDUC-F 201 Exploring the Personal Demands of Teaching (2 cr.) This course examines the personal demands of teaching in an Interpersonal Process Laboratory. Particular emphasis is put on interpersonal communication skills (self-disclosure, active listening, questioning, observation). It also explores the nature of teaching in American schools with emphases on the nature of the profession and of teacher education programs; school curricular issues, societal issues impacting schools, the legal aspects of teaching; and on how schools are organized and financed.
  • EDUC-F 202 Exploring the Personal Demands of Teaching Practicum (1 cr.) This course expands the skills gained in F201 into a field experience (school classroom). Designed to assist students in career decision-making through a self-examination and discussions of the pre-service teacher's interactions, understanding, and communication with students in the classroom. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-F 203 Topical Exploration in Education (1-3 cr.) This number identifies a one-semester course on a particular topic, established at the request of a faculty member and by the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee. Applies only as elective credit. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • EDUC-F 401 Topical Explorations in Education (0-3 cr.) This course will explore various topics of relevance to education, both in the United States and abroad.
  • EDUC-F 500 Topical Explorations in Education (1-3 cr.) Variable title and topic; course for experimental courses.
  • EDUC-G 500 Orientation to Counseling (3 cr.) Focus is on the student, self-concept, interpersonal relationship skills, and an overview of the field of counseling. Philosophical, ethical, and social cultural basis of helping relationships.
  • EDUC-G 504 Counseling Theory and Techniques II (3 cr.) Analysis of major behavioral and family counseling theories emphasizing didactic and experimental activities designed to model application of process, procedures, and techniques of behavior and family approaches to professional practice.
  • EDUC-G 505 Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures (3 cr.) An analysis of statistical, psychometric, sociometric, and clinical principles crucial to professional interpretation of standardized and informal data regarding individual clients. Current issues and controversies about ethnic, sex, cultural, and individual differences will be examined.
  • EDUC-G 507 Lifestyle and Career Development (3 cr.) Includes such areas as vocational choice theory, relationship between career choice and lifestyle, sources of occupational and educational information, approaches to career decision processes, and career development exploration techniques.
  • EDUC-G 523 Laboratory in Counseling (3 cr.) Laboratory experience in counseling, analysis of counseling interviews, role playing, and closely supervised counseling in a laboratory setting.
  • EDUC-G 524 Practicum in Counseling (3 cr.) C: EDUC-G 532. Requires acceptance into the clinical cohort. Closely supervised counseling practice with clients in selected mental health or school settings.
  • EDUC-G 532 Introduction to Counseling (3 cr.) Requires acceptance into the clinical cohort. An introduction to group counseling with focus on historical development, fundamentals of group theory and process, styles of leadership behavior, membership responsibility, stages of group development, and ethical issues.
  • EDUC-G 542 Organization and Development of Counseling Programs (3 cr.) Requires acceptance into the clinical cohort. Environmental and population needs assessment for program planning. Procedures for counseling program development and accountability/evaluation.
  • EDUC-G 550 Internship in Counseling (3 cr.) Requires acceptance into the clinical cohort. Counseling experience in actual agency or school situation. Under direction and supervision of the counselor, students practice counseling, interviewing, in-service training, orientation procedures, and data collection. May be repeated, not to exceed a total of 12 credit hours, with consent of School of Education.
  • EDUC-G 562 School Counseling: Interventions, Consultation, and Program Development (3 cr.) Requires acceptance into the clinical cohort. Foundations and contextual dimensions of school counseling. Knowledge and skills for the practice of school counseling.
  • EDUC-G 570 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) This is an introductory graduate-level course dealing with all areas of human sexuality that a person might encounter in day-to-day living. Topics will include sexual terminology, the human body, expressing our sexuality, heterosexuality, homosexuality, pornography, sex education, sex offenses, sexual dysfunction, and sex therapy.
  • EDUC-G 575 Multicultural Counseling (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide both a cognitive and guided training opportunity. It examines the influence of cultural and ethnic differences of counselor and client in counseling. Attention is given to theory, research, and practice.
  • EDUC-G 585 Contemporary Issues in Counseling (3 cr.) Focuses on the goals and objectives of professional organizations, codes of ethics, legal considerations, standards of preparation, certification, licensing, and role identity of counselors and other personnel services specialists. Students will conduct research on emerging developments reported in the counseling literature.
  • EDUC-G 590 Research in Counseling & Guidance (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Individual research for students in the clinical cohort or post masters counseling students.
  • EDUC-G 592 Seminar in Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention (3 cr.) Introduction to etiology and symptomology of drug/alcohol abuse and methods of prevention or remediation. Includes dynamics of adult children of alcoholics/abusers and families of abusers.
  • EDUC-G 596 Counseling Supervision (3 cr.) Limited to post masters students in counseling. Introduction to counseling supervision theory, methods, and techniques. Special attention to ethical and legal obligations. Closely directed experience in supervising beginning graduate students.
  • EDUC-H 427 Education Through Travel (2-6 cr.) Provides an opportunity to visit historical and cultural areas in foreign countries. Individually arranged.
  • EDUC-H 520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.) Identification and analysis of major issues in education as related to the pluralistic culture of American society.
  • EDUC-H 553 Travel Study (1-6 cr.) Provides an opportunity to visit historical and cultural areas of the United States and many foreign countries.
  • EDUC-J 500 Instruction in the Context of Curriculum (3 cr.) Extends concepts introduced in undergraduate teacher preparation. Topics include conceptions and definitions of curriculum and instruction and their impact on social contexts, learning theories, and schooling practices. Elementary and secondary contexts are studied.
  • EDUC-J 511 Methods of Individualizing Instruction (3 cr.) Students will critically examine several approaches to individualizing instruction. Emphasis is on developing strategies for determining characteristics of the learner and on creating a variety of classroom strategies designed to individualize learning (K-12). Course project is development of classroom instructional materials, in-service program design, or proposal for research.
  • EDUC-K 200 Introduction to Practicum in Special Education (0-1 cr.) Structural practicum in public and/or private and regular special education programs. Emphasis on seminar sessions focusing on prevalence and general functions levels of exceptional individuals.
  • EDUC-K 205 Introdution to Exceptional Children (2-3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Definition, identification, prevalence, characteristics, and educational provisions of the various types of exceptional children; with attention to disability awareness and appropriate instructional processes.
  • EDUC-K 343 Education for the Socially and Mentally Disturbed I (3 cr.) A basic survey of the field of emotional disturbance and social maladjustment. Definitions, classifications, characteristics, and diagnostic and treatment procedures are discussed from a psycho-educational point of view.
  • EDUC-K 344 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed II (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. A basic survey of educational curricula, procedures, and materials for socially and emotionally disturbed children; stresses development of individual teaching skills; emphasizes classroom experiences with disturbed children.
  • EDUC-K 345 Academic and Behavioral Assessment of the Mildly Handicapped (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the application of formal and informal assessment information in making decisions regarding classification and placement of educable mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed children.
  • EDUC-K 352 Educating Students with Learning Disorders. (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Educational programs for optimum growth and development of mildly mentally handicapped and learning disabled students. Study and observation of curriculum content, organization of special schools and classes, and teaching methods and materials.
  • EDUC-K 453 Management of Academic and Social Behavior (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Surveys principles of behavior management as they pertain to educational environments. Students will learn how to define, observe, measure, record, and change academic and social behavior.
  • EDUC-K 480 Student Teaching in Special Education (9-12 cr.) P: Successful completion of SDP3. Provides experiences with students with exceptional needs in school setting under the direction of a supervising teacher.
  • EDUC-K 488 Supervised Teaching in Special Education (3-12 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to teach exceptional children under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher and a University special education supervisor. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • EDUC-K 490 Research in Special Education (3 cr.) Variable title course. Focus is on what special educators need to know and be able to do.
  • EDUC-K 490 Topic: Partnerships (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Active exploration of community, social agencies, school and family as stakeholders and contributors to services for students with exceptional needs. Collaboration, consultation, conflict resolution, and grant initiatives.
  • EDUC-K 490 Topic: Assistive Technology, TBI, Autism, Functional Curriculum (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Study of nature and needs of students with traumatic brain injury, autism, and related conditions. Overview of age-appropriate skills likely to increase the ability of students with exceptional needs to function in present and future environments. Study of low and high assistive technology for routine and customized access to general education curriculum.
  • EDUC-K 495 Laboratory/Field Experiences in Special Education (1-3 cr.) C: Consent of instructor.
  • EDUC-K 505 Introduction to Special Education for Graduate Students (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Basic special education principles for graduate students with no previous course work in special education.
  • EDUC-K 535 Assessment/Remediation of Mildly Handicapped I (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. This course focuses on the collection and use of formal and informal assessment information for designing the content of individual educational plans for handicapped children in various academic areas such as reading and mathematics.
  • EDUC-K 544 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed II (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Definitions, classifications, and diagnostic treatment procedures discussed from medical, psychological, sociological, and educational points of view.
  • EDUC-K 553 Classroom Management and Behavior Support (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Surveys principles of behavior management as they pertain to educational environments. Students will learn how to define, observe, measure, record, and change academic and social behavior.
  • EDUC-K 588 Supervised Teaching in Special Education (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Provides for an opportunity to student teach in ED, EMR, or LD classrooms.
  • EDUC-K 590 Independent Study or Research in Special Education (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Variable title course. Topics focus on what special educators need to know and be able to do.
  • EDUC-K 590 Topic: Partnerships (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Active exploration of community, social agencies, school, and family as stakeholders and contributors to services for students with exceptional needs. Collaboration, consultation, conflict resolution, and grant initiatives.
  • EDUC-K 590 Topic: Assistive Technology, TBI, Autism, Functional Curriculum (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Study of nature and needs of students with traumatic brain injury, autism, and related conditions. Overview of age-appropriate skills likely to increase the ability of students with exceptional needs to function in present and future environments. Study of low and high assistive technology for routine and customized access to general education curriculum.
  • EDUC-K 590 Topic: Methods of High Incidence (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Application of research-based best practices in designing, delivering, and monitoring specialized instruction for students with exceptional needs across settings. Instruction focusing on general education outcomes with or without adaptations and modifications.
  • EDUC-K 595 Supervised Teaching in Special Education (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Provides for closely supervised field experiences in various areas of special education.
  • EDUC-L 403 Assessment Literacy for Cultural and Linguistic Diversity (3 cr.) Define assessment literacy for working with culturally and linguistically diverse students.  Topics include the assessment process, curriculum design, backwards planning, ongoing, traditional, and alternative classroom assessment, high stakes testing, language proficiency testing, and principles of designing useful, meaningful, and equitable classroom assessments for and of learning.
  • EDUC-L 511 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Writing in Elementary Schools (3 cr.) The study of trends, issues, theories, research, and practice in the teaching and evaluation of written composition in elementary schools. The emphasis is on alternative methods for the teaching of writing and for the evaluation of progress (growth) in writing.
  • EDUC-L 520 Advanced Study of Foreign Language Teaching (3 cr.) Instructional techniques that support teaching English Learners (ELs). Emphasis will be on research-supported strategies for teaching ELs in K-12 settings and adapting curriculum in mainstream classrooms.
  • EDUC-L 524 Language Issues in Bi- and Multi-Lingual Education (3 cr.) A survey of language education issues related to the linguistic abilities and educational needs of students requiring bilingual or bidialectal instruction. Topics discussed include language acquisition, language pedagogy, program models, cultural influences, teacher training, and research directions.
  • EDUC-L 530 Topical Workshop in Language Education (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Individual and group study of special topics in the field of language education. Updating and improving the teaching of English, English as a second or foreign language, foreign languages, and reading.
  • EDUC-L 535 Teaching Adolescent Literature (3 cr.) What adolescent literature is, how it has changed since its inception, and how adolescent processes are related to reader needs and interests. Designed to provide the secondary classroom teacher with training in how this genre of literature can be incorporated into instructional programs.
  • EDUC-L 559 Trade Books and the Teacher (3 cr.) A comprehensive survey of children's literature covering the major authors and their works; special emphasis is given to picture books, poetry, biography, the classics, holiday books, series books, nonfiction books, periodicals, popular culture, and multi-cultural and international books.
  • EDUC-M 101 Laboratory/Field Experiences (0-3 cr.) A laboratory or field experience in education for freshmen. May be repeated.
  • EDUC-M 201 Laboratory/Field Experiences (0-3 cr.) A laboratory or field experience in education for freshmen. May be repeated.
  • EDUC-M 300 Teaching in a Pluralistic Society (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to teaching as a profession. Students focus upon the self as teacher, learning styles, cultural pluralism, and classroom teaching strategies that respond positively to the personal and ethnic diversity of the learner.
  • EDUC-M 301 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-1 cr.) A laboratory or field experience. May be repeated.
  • EDUC-M 303 Lab/Field Experience: Junior High/Middle School (0-3 cr.) Laboratory or field experiences at the junior high or middle school level.
  • EDUC-M 310 General Methods (2-3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. An introduction to instructional design, media, and methodology appropriate to all teaching levels. Provides an orientation to lesson planning and curriculum development, classroom management and organization, theories of development, individual needs of children, cultural pluralism, legal rights and responsibilities of professionals, evaluation, parent involvement, individual elementary-age learning styles, use of technology, professional development, and characteristics of effective teachers.
  • EDUC-M 314 General Methods for Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Teachers (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Individualized and interdisciplinary learning methods, hardware and software, ethnic and minority factors, measurement and evaluation, teaching and curriculum development, and organization of the secondary school.
  • EDUC-M 323 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary Schools (2 cr.) P: EDUC-E 241, EDUC-M 310, EDUC-M 311, EDUC-M 301. Not open to music majors. Fundamental procedures of teaching elementary school music, stressing material suitable for the first six grades. Repeatable up to 4 units.
  • EDUC-M 333 Arts Experiences for the Elementary Teachers (2 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. This course provides basic skills and processes for creating, refining, and presenting works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art and for integrating these processes and works with learning experiences across other content areas. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-M 350 Integrating The Arts and Physical Education Into The Elementary Classroom (3 cr.) Develop a knowledge base to work collaboratively with special area elementary teachers on integrating the arts and physical education in elementary classrooms.
  • EDUC-M 356 Health & Wellness for Teachers (2 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. This course provides health and wellness information and stresses the role of early and middle childhood teachers in promoting good health and physical fitness, providing a safe environment, and understanding basic nutrition concepts. The effects of these health and wellness concepts on child development and learning are examined. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-M 401 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) Laboratory or field experience for seniors.Laboratory or field experience for seniors. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • EDUC-M 425 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (0-12 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Classroom teaching and other activities associated with the work of a full-time elementary classroom teacher. One course may normally be taken concurrently if the responsibilities of the course do not interfere with the student teaching responsibilities. S/F grades are given.
  • EDUC-M 441 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Social Studies (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Concerns and problems of teaching social studies, including the methods, procedures, devices, materials, and outstanding research in the field.
  • EDUC-M 446 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Science (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Concerns and problems of teaching science, including the methods, procedures, devices, materials, and outstanding research in the field.
  • EDUC-M 452 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School English (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Concerns and problems of teaching English, including the methods, procedures, devices, materials, and outstanding research in the field.
  • EDUC-M 457 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Concerns and problems of teaching mathematics, including the methods, procedures, devices, materials, and outstanding research in the field.
  • EDUC-M 464 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Reading (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Curriculum, methods, and materials for teaching students to read more effectively in the subject content areas.
  • EDUC-M 470 Practicum (3-8 cr.) P: EDUC-S 486. Teaching or experience under the direction of an identified supervising teacher and with University provioded supervision in the endorsement or minor area and at the level appropriate to the area and in an accredited school within the State of Indiana unless the integral program includes experience in an approved and accredited out-of-state site. The practicum may be full or part-time but in every instance the amount of credit granted will be commensurate with the amount of time spent in the instructional setting. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • EDUC-M 480 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (10 cr.) Under the direction of the supervising teacher, each student assumes responsibility for teaching in the student's own subject matter area in a cooperating secondary school. Requires a minimum of 10 weeks full time. Must be taken the same semester as secondary methods.
  • EDUC-M 500 Integrated Professional Seminar (1 cr.) This seminar is linked to courses and field experiences included in the Transition to Teaching (T2T) program. It will allow for collaboration among school-based mentors, university-based instructors, and T2T candidates in offering academic content appropriate to the program. The seminar will provide a technology-rich and performance-based professional experience.
  • EDUC-M 501 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) A laboratory field experience in Education for graduate students.
  • EDUC-M 514 Workshop in Social Studies Education (1-6 cr.) Special topics in methods and materials for improving the teaching of social studies in middle, junior high, and high school. May be repeated twice.
  • EDUC-M 550 Graduate Practicum (Special Education or Kindergarten or Junior High/Middle School) (3-6 cr.) P: Characteristics and methods courses with a minimum grade of B (3.0), and permission of instructor. This course provides teaching experience in an accredited school. Student evaluated on S/F basis only.
  • EDUC-N 443 Teaching Elementary School Math Problem Solving (2 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. The purpose of this course is to enhance the pedagogical content knowledge of elementary education teachers when teaching mathematics to students in grades preK-6. Specifically, the course is designed to enhance pre-service teachers' understanding of the learning and teaching of mathematics by providing them the opportunity to closely examine: (a) students' reasoning, (b) instructional strategies, (c) assessment procedures, and (d) curriculum materials. Furthermore, in the course students examine diagnostic and remedial instructional techniques for the teaching of mathematics across the grade levels. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-N 517 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Completion of an undergraduate methods course and teaching experience, or permission of instructor. Methods, materials, literature; laboratory practice with mathematics equipment; evaluation techniques; standards; and determination of essentials of content. Developing mathematics programs for specific school situations.
  • EDUC-N 523 Workshop in Elementary Modern Math (1-6 cr.) Means for improving the teaching of mathematics in the elementary school. One credit hour is offered for each week of full-time work.
  • EDUC-N 524 Math Teachers Workshop (1-6 cr.) For experienced teachers. Ideas on curriculum trends and teaching techniques; recent source materials; analysis of problems; development of new educational materials. One credit hour is offered for each week of full-time work.
  • EDUC-N 543 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Mathematics (3 cr.) Designed to help the experienced teacher improve the teaching of mathematics. Opportunities will be provided for individual and group study of content, methodology, and instructional materials for modern mathematics programs.
  • EDUC-P 248 Elementary School Child Development (2 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. This course provides an understanding of physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development in a school marked by a diversity of cultural, social and personal traits. Also, the role of the teacher in supporting positive development in students. The selection of materials and activities that respond to and stimulate children's development will be emphasized. Evaluating the physical environment of the school and classroom will also receive priority. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-P 250 General Educational Psychology (1-4 cr.) P: EDUC-F 200 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). The study and application of psychological concepts and principles as related to the teaching-learning process, introduction to classroom management, measurement/evaluation, and disability awareness. Repeatable up to 8 units.
  • EDUC-P 251 Education Psychology for Elementary Teacher (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. The study and application of psychological concepts and principles as related to the teaching-learning process, motivation, intelligence, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, disability awareness, and multicultural components. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-P 312 Learning: Theory into Practice (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. This course is concerned with understanding the process of teaching and learning, particularly within a secondary school context. Preservice teachers will be helped to see that learning takes place as an interaction of social, emotional, developmental, and cognitive forces. Units focus on theories of learning and teaching, motivation, the learning process, and assessment.
  • EDUC-P 313 Adolescents in a Learning Community (2 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. For students seeking admission to a teacher education program. Adolescent development in a school context. Understanding adolescents as people and how they function in a community of learners, with particular emphasis on their interaction with others in a school environment marked by a diversity of cultural, social, and personal traits. Also, the role of the teacher in understanding and responding to adolescent needs in this environment.
  • EDUC-P 320 Classroom Assessment (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. The purpose of this course is to build a foundation for understanding the nature, purpose, and philosophies that drive assessment in schools. The predominant goal of Classroom Assessment is to ensure careful, introspective, analytical thought concerning best practices in this area of education. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-P 407 Psychological Measurement in the Schools (2-3 cr.) P: EDUC-P 250. Application of measurement principles in classroom testing; construction and evaluation of classroom tests; evaluation of student performance; interpretation and use of measurement data; assessment of aptitudes, achievement, and interests via standardized tests; school testing programs. Repeatable up to 3 units.
  • EDUC-P 507 Assessment in Schools (3 cr.) This course is an introductory assessment course for teachers and school administrators. Topics of study include principles of assessment, formal and informal classroom assessment instruments and methods, formative and summative assessment, interpretation and use of standardized test results, social and political issues in assessment, use of student data based in school.
  • EDUC-P 510 Psychology in Teaching (3 cr.) Basic study of psychological concepts and phenomena in teaching. Analysis of representative problems and of the teacher's assumptions about human behavior and its development.
  • EDUC-P 515 Child Development (3 cr.) Major theories and findings concerning human development from birth through the elementary years as they relate to the practice of education. Topics include physical development, intelligence, perception, language, socioemotional development, sex role development, moral development, early experience, research methods, and sociodevelopmental issues relating to education.
  • EDUC-P 516 Adolescent Behavior and Development (3 cr.) Research and theory related to adolescents in the intellectual, physical, social-personal, and emotional areas of development.
  • EDUC-P 570 Managing Classroom Behavior (3 cr.) An analysis of pupil and teacher behaviors as they relate to discipline. Attention is given to the development of such skills as dealing with pupils' problems and feelings, behavior modification, reality therapy, assertiveness in establishing and maintaining rules, and group processes. Designed for teachers, administrators, and pupil personnel workers.
  • EDUC-Q 200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (1-3 cr.) Course provides the elementary education major with background in the science process skills needed to complete required science courses. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • EDUC-Q 213 Earth and Environmental Teaching Methods (2-3 cr.) This course prepares students to teach environmental and geology-astronomy topics. Science activities that develop elementary level understanding will be presented in class and utilized in field teaching and field trip situations. Modules for outdoor and laboratory experiences constitute the elective hour.
  • EDUC-Q 450 Science, Technology and Society in a Changing World (3 cr.) Critical perspectives on the social aspects of science and technology in our lives in the world around us, and throughout history. Issues include economic development, the environment, communication and war.
  • EDUC-Q 490 Research in Science Education (1-6 cr.) Individual research and study in Science Education. Repeatable for credit up to maximum if six credits.
  • EDUC-Q 514 Workshop in Junior High School/Middle School Science (1-3 cr.) For experienced teachers. Ideas on curriculum trends and instructional techniques; new resource materials; development of new educational materials; and analysis of problems.
  • EDUC-Q 550 Science, Technology and Society in a Changing World (3 cr.) Critical perspectives on the social aspects of science and technology in our lives in the world around us, and throughout history. Issues include economic development, the environment, communication and war.
  • EDUC-Q 590 Independent Study or Research in Science Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research or study with a science education faculty member, arranged in advance of registration.
  • EDUC-R 505 Workshop in Instructional Systems Technology (1-6 cr.) P: EDUC-R 531 or consent of the Computer Licensure Coordinator. Participants will learn to create and use a variety of contemporary multimedia applications and resources when used with a variety of operating systems in the P-12 school curriculum.
  • EDUC-R 531 The Computer in Education (3 cr.) Required of all students pursuing teacher certification. Introductory course on computing which includes Web, computer applications and hardware. Participants will learn to create and use a range of digital and Web tools to promote student learning in the P-12 educational settings and personal productivity. Contemporary digital instructional issues will be addressed.
  • EDUC-S 486 Principles of Junior High and Middle School Education (3 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. Background, purposes, and developing roles of the junior high school and middle school. Emphasizes the curriculum and its organization, the student activity program, and guidance. For all students planning to teach in junior high and middle schools. Includes field experience.
  • EDUC-S 490 Research in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research in Secondary Education. Must be taken for a letter grade; no S/F option. Repeatable for credit up to three credits.
  • EDUC-S 508 Problems in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) Group analysis of a common problem in the field of secondary education. May be repeated.
  • EDUC-S 512 Workshop in Secondary Education (1-6 cr.) Individual and group study of issues or concerns relating to the field of secondary education. Workshop format.
  • EDUC-S 514 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading in the Junior High and Secondary Schools (3 cr.) For junior high/middle school and secondary teachers as well as Reading Program candidates. The developmental reading program in junior high/middle school and secondary schools; use of reading in various curriculum areas, appraisal of reading abilities, and techniques and materials for helping reluctant readers.
  • EDUC-S 516 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School English Language Arts (3 cr.) Current methods and materials for junior high and secondary school English/Language Arts courses; guiding reading to meet literary, historical, vocational, or scientific interests.
  • EDUC-S 518 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Science (3 cr.) For science teachers. Improved techniques, current literature, textbooks, and free and low-cost materials. Solutions to specific practical problems confronting science teachers in the classroom and laboratory.
  • EDUC-S 519 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Social Studies (3 cr.) For experienced teachers. Restudying the purposes of high school social studies, evaluating recent developments in content and instructional procedures, and developing social studies programs for specific school situations.
  • EDUC-S 590 Independent Study or Research in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) P: Permission. Capstone course for Teacher as Researcher Paper; or the individual research or study with a faculty member as arranged in advance of registration.
  • EDUC-U 207 Leadership Training (1-3 cr.) Leadership development and training. Topics may include theories of leadership, group dynamics, organizational theory, and other issues of interest to current or potential student leaders.
  • EDUC-U 495 Seminar in Leadership Training (1-3 cr.) The theory and practice of group work, leadership techniques, communication, human relations, problem solving, and decision making (student leader course).
  • EDUC-W 200 Using Computers in Education (3 cr.) Introduction to instructional computing including Web, computer applications and hardware. Participants will learn to create and use a range of digital tools to promote student learning in educational settings and personal productivity. Contemporary digital instructional issues will be addressed.
  • EDUC-W 201 Beginning Technology Skills (1 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. This course introduces instructional computing including Web, computer applications and hardware.
  • EDUC-W 301 Integrating Technology into Teaching I (1 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. The purpose of this course is to enhance the pedagogical, technological and content knowledge of elementary education teachers when using digital applications and hardware resources with students in grades preK-6. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-W 310 Integrating Technology K-12 (3 cr.) Explores various pedagogical approaches, design and implement technology-based lessons or K-12 classrooms, participate in professional development activities, and reflect on the integration of technology in the classroom.  Learning will be documented and assessed through written assignments, and a teaching portfolio.
  • EDUC-W 401 Integrating Technology into Teaching II (1 cr.) P: Formal admission into teacher education. The purpose of this course is to enhance the pedagogical, technological and content knowledge of elementary education teachers when using digital applications and hardware resources with students in grades preK-6. Students will be expected to participate in appropriate field experiences.
  • EDUC-W 505 Professional Development Workshop (1-6 cr.) Workshop to meet specific professional needs.
  • EDUC-W 506 Using the Internet in K-12 Classrooms (3 cr.) P: EDUC-R 531 or the consent of the Computer Licensure Coordinator. Participants will learn to access, and use a variety of contemporary Web-based applications and resources for the P-12 school curriculum. Students will gain experience in utilizing the primary Internet communication media.
  • EDUC-W 520 Technical Issues in Computer-Based Education (3 cr.) P: EDUC-R 531 or consent of Computer License Coordinator. An examination of advanced uses of educational technology digital tools, resources in a K-12 classroom setting, and rudimentary coding.
  • EDUC-W 540 Computer-Based Teaching Methods (3 cr.) P: EDUC-R 531, R505, W506, and W520. Capstone course for the Computer Licensure Program. Focuses on the design, implementation, and assessment of computer and digital technologies when used to enhance student learning in the P-12 school curriculum, as well as professional development techniques.
  • EDUC-W 551 Education and Psychology of the Gifted and Talented (3 cr.) Develops an understanding of the nature and needs of gifted and talented individuals. Emphasizes gifted and talented identification and selection strategies, characteristics, and educational opportunities.
  • EDUC-W 552 Curriculum for the Gifted and Talented (3 cr.) Describes and evaluates gifted and talented curricular theories and models as well as traditional subject matter modifications. Also critically examines implementation and organization of programs.
  • EDUC-W 553 Methods and Materials for the Gifted and Talented (3 cr.) Concentrates on the teaching techniques that benefit the gifted learner. Teacher and learner styles are discussed as well as those skills necessary to deal adequately with these students. The course also examines selection, development, and evaluation of materials for use with the gifted student.
  • EDUC-W 595 Practicum: Giften and Talented (3 cr.) Provides supervised field experience with gifted and talented learners. Participants will be given responsibility for planning, directing, and evaluating activities for gifted students.
  • EDUC-X 100 Practice in Reading and Study for Self Improvement (1-3 cr.) Individually guided computer instruction for self-improvement in reading/study related skills, such as grammar, speed reading, and spelling. Students complete tutorials at their own pace, followed by review and testing by assigned instructor. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • EDUC-X 101 Techniques in Textbook Reading (2-3 cr.) Instruction and guided practice in techniques for learning from printed materials. Emphasis is on graining information from text and practical retrieval and discussion of concepts. Much of the work is done on an individual basis. Repeatable up to 3 units.
  • EDUC-X 150 Reading/Learning Techniques I (1-3 cr.) Emphasis on mechanics of reading, flexibility in reading, styles of learning, listening comprehension, vocabulary development, word attack, reading comprehension, and reading rate. Contact the Student Development Center for more information.
  • EDUC-X 461 Topical Explorations in Books for Children (0-2 cr.) A survey of topics related to the use of books for children in the classroom. Course topics might include: a specific genre; reader-response theory; multicoultural and international literature; books for toddlers and preschoolers; early readers and transtional chapter books; illustration as art;special needs; technology; media influences. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • EDUC-X 490 Research in Reading. (1-6 cr.) Individual research.
  • EDUC-X 504 Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties in the Classroom (3 cr.) P: EDUC-E 545, or EDUC-S 514. Treats the theory, correlates, instruments, and techniques of diagnosing reading difficulties in the classroom.
  • EDUC-X 525 Practicum in Reading (1-6 cr.) P: EDUC-E 545, EDUC-X 504, and other courses required for reading certification program, three years of teaching experience, and/or permission of the instructor. Application required. Diagnostic testing, reading interventions, compiling student records, and working with groups and individuals under supervised conditions.
  • EDUC-X 590 Research in Reading (1-3 cr.) P: Permission required.

    Capstone course for Teacher as Researcher Paper; or the individual research or study with a faculty member as arranged in advance of registration.

  • ENG-G 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Acquaints the student with contemporary studies of the nature of language in general and of the English Language in particular.
  • ENG-G 207 English Grammar and Usage (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. A brief look at English grammar, with emphasis upon current American usage; students will review verb usage, subject-verb agreement, pronoun usage, modifier usage, punctuation, and sentence structure.
  • ENG-G 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Historical and structural analysis of English language in stages of its development. Political and social events affecting development of language, interrelationship of language and literature, evolution of modern phonology and syntax.
  • ENG-L 101 Ancient and Medieval World Literature (3 cr.) Literary masterpieces from Homer to Dante.  Approved Arts and Sciences for the Western Tradition culture studies requirement of IU Students.
  • ENG-L 102 Modern World Literature (3 cr.) Literary masterpieces from Homer to the present. Aims to teach thoughtful, intensive reading, to introduce students to aesthetic values in literature, and to make students aware of the enjoyment of reading.
  • ENG-L 103 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) Significant plays from various times and countries to acquaint students with the conventions and types of drama; works by such playwrights as Sophocles, Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Miller, and Albee.
  • ENG-L 104 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.) Introduction to representative fiction and theories for interpreting fiction.
  • ENG-L 105 Appreciation of Literature (3 cr.)

    An introduction to drama, fiction, and poetry, stressing the enjoyment and the humane values of each form. The course will provide experiences in listening to and studying visual adaptations of poems, novels, and dramas.

  • ENG-L 106 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.) Representative poems in English; a course that enables students to read poetry with pleasure and to talk or write about it with ease.
  • ENG-L 107 Oriental World Masterpieces (3 cr.) Literary masterpieces from the Arabic, Persian, Indian, Japanese, Chinese, and Malay cultures.
  • ENG-L 140 Introduction to English Studies (3 cr.) A comprehensive orientation to the field of English studies. In addition to providing academic advising, the course offers an overview of our curriculum, which includes our two concentrations in writing and literature, career opportunities related to the degree, and the kinds of reading, writing, and oral skills that are needed for success as a major and in a variety of professions.
  • ENG-L 201 Special Studies in Literature (3 cr.) Reading of literary works in relation to special themes and topics. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.) AHLA development of critical skills essential to participation in the interpretive process. Through class discussion and focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with historical, generic, and/or cultural concerns.
  • ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) Representative group of significant plays to acquaint students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature.
  • ENG-L 204 Introduction to the Novel and Short Story (3 cr.) Representative works of fiction; stresses structural technique in the novel, theories and kinds of fiction, and thematic scope of the novel.
  • ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.) A basic course that will enable students to talk and write about poetry.
  • ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Issues and approaches to critical study of women writers and treatment in British and American literature.
  • ENG-L 208 Topics in English and American Literature and Culture (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Selected works of English and/or American literature in relation to a single cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 209 Topics in American Literature and Culture (3 cr.) Selected works of American literature taught in relation to a single cultural problem or theme. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 210 Studies in Popular Literature and Mass Media (3 cr.) Popular literary modes in England and America, such as detective, western, fantasy; history and theories of "mass" or "popular" culture; uses of literacy. Literary analysis of particular mass media forms, including television drama. Topic varies.
  • ENG-L 211 English Literature to 1700 (3 cr.) Representative selections, with emphasis on major writers from Chaucer to 1700.
  • ENG-L 212 English Literature Since 1700 (3 cr.)
  • ENG-L 214 Literary Masterpieces (3 cr.) L214 covers major Western literary works from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century.  Texts are selected from a variety of genres and nations, with an emphasis on works that have been particularly famous and influential.  Works by Cervantes, Voltaire, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Mann, Ibsen, Kafka, and others are typically included.  Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills.  Non-English works will be read in English translation.
  • ENG-L 220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.) A survey of Shakespeare's greatest plays and poems.
  • ENG-L 230 Science Fiction (3 cr.) Study of the kinds, conventions, and theories of science fiction. Course may include both literature (predominantly British and American) and film.
  • ENG-L 295 American Film Culture (3 cr.) Film in relation to American culture and society. Topic varies. Works of literature may be used for comparison, but the main emphasis will be on film as a narrative medium and as an important element in American culture.
  • ENG-L 297 English Literature to 1600 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. R: Any ENG-L 100-level course and ENG-L 202/371. Representative selections, with emphasis on major writers from Chaucer to Shakespeare and on their cultural context.
  • ENG-L 298 English Literature from 1600 to 1830 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. R: Any ENG-L 100-level course and ENG-L 202/371. Representative selections, with emphasis on major writers from Donne to Byron and on their cultural context.
  • ENG-L 299 English Literature since 1830 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. R: Any ENG-L 100-level course and ENG-L 202/371. Representative selections, with emphasis on major writers from Carlyle to the present and on their cultural context.
  • ENG-L 303 Medieval English Literature in Translation (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Literature and civilization of medieval England. Selected works from Old and Middle English with attention to their relations with art, history, and other aspects of medieval culture.
  • ENG-L 305 Chaucer (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Chaucer's works, with special emphasis on The Canterbury Tales.
  • ENG-L 308 Elizabethan Drama and Its Background (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. English drama from Middle Ages to 1642; principal Elizabethan and Caroline dramatists and their best plays.
  • ENG-L 309 Elizabethan Poetry (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Major Elizabethan poets, with special attention to Spenser.
  • ENG-L 313 Early Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Close reading of at least seven early plays of Shakespeare.
  • ENG-L 314 Late Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Close reading of at least seven later plays of Shakespeare.
  • ENG-L 317 English Poetry of the Early Seventeenth Century (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Chief poets in England, 1600-1660.
  • ENG-L 318 Milton (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Poetry and prose of John Milton, with special attention to Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.
  • ENG-L 320 Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Major poetry and prose, 1660-1730, with emphasis on Dryden, Swift, and Pope.
  • ENG-L 327 Later Eigthteenth-Century Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Major poetry and prose, 1730-1800, with emphasis on Johnson and Boswell.
  • ENG-L 328 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Development of English drama from the Puritan closing of playhouses to the beginning of the nineteenth century.
  • ENG-L 329 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Major Romantic writers, with emphasis on two or more of the following: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats.
  • ENG-L 330 Major Romantic Writers 2 (3 cr.)
  • ENG-L 332 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) British literature and culture in the age of Romanticism and the revolutionary era (ca. 1780-1830). Poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction writings from major and minor authors, such as Austen, Blake, Byron, Coleridge, Scott, the Shelleys, Keats, Wollstonecraft, and the Wordsworths.
  • ENG-L 333 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) Will focus on one major Victorian writer's body of works (e.g. Dickens, Tennyson, Eliot, or Hardy) or family of writers (e.g. the Brontes, the Brownings). It is intended for English majors or for those with some literature and writing background.
  • ENG-L 335 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Major poetry and prose, 1830 to 1900, studied against the social and intellectual backgrounds of the period.
  • ENG-L 345 Twentieth-Century British Poetry (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Modern poets, particularly Yeats, Eliot, and Auden; some later poets may be included.
  • ENG-L 346 Twentieth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Modern fiction, its techniques and experiments, particularly Joyce, Lawrence, and Woolf; some later novelists may be included.
  • ENG-L 347 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such authors as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne.
  • ENG-L 348 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such Romantic and Victorian authors as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
  • ENG-L 351 American Literature to 1865 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. R: Any ENG-L 100-level course and ENG-L 202/371. American writers to 1865: Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 352 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. R: Any ENG-L 100-Level course and ENG-L 202/371. American writers, 1865-1914: Mark Twain, Dickinson, James, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 354 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. American writers since 1914: Faulkner, Hemingway, Eliot, Frost, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 355 American Novel: Cooper to Dreiser (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Representative nineteenth-century American novels.
  • ENG-L 356 Americna Poetry to 1900 (3 cr.)
  • ENG-L 357 Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. American poetry since 1900, including such poets as Pound, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Williams, and Lowell.
  • ENG-L 358 Twentieth-Century American Fiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. American fiction since 1900, including such writers as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Bellow.
  • ENG-L 360 American Prose (Excluding Fiction) (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Major nonfiction prose forms, including the essay, the journal, and the sermon, as well as the literary aspects of biography, criticism, and historical writing.
  • ENG-L 361 Studies in 19th Century American Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Study of 19th century American literature focused on a particular literary, cultural, or thematic movement or issue of the time.
  • ENG-L 363 American Drama (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Main currents in American drama to the present.
  • ENG-L 364 Native American Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian in both native and white literature.
  • ENG-L 365 Modern Drama: Continental (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Special attention to Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, and Sartre.
  • ENG-L 367 Literature of the Bible I (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. The Bible as a great masterpiece of literature. Focus on Old Testament.
  • ENG-L 369 Studies in British and American Authors (3 cr.) P: ENG-W131 with a grade of C or higher. Individual authors, topics may vary.
  • ENG-L 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Exploration of the most recent black American authors, analyzing the ways in which these authors interpret their human condition and aesthetically analyzing how the authors use the tools of their craft to develop their themes.
  • ENG-L 371 Critical Practices (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Literary criticism from ancient to modern times.
  • ENG-L 373 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature, 1890 to the present. Topics may vary and include, for example, Freud and literature, responses to revolution, and the literature of technology.
  • ENG-L 374 Ethnic American Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Literature about the American ethnic experience, selected from among works by African American, Jewish American, Italian American, Irish American, Native American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and other ethnic authors.
  • ENG-L 378 Studies in Women and Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. British and American authors, such as George Eliot, Gertrude Stein; groups of authors, such as the Bronte sisters, recent women poets; or genres and modes, such as autobiography, film, criticism. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 379 American Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr.) A survey of representative authors and works of American ethnic and minority literature with primary focus on Black, Hispanic, and Native Americans.
  • ENG-L 380 Literary Modernism (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Phenomenon of modernism in early twentieth-century transatlantic literature, with emphasis on such writers as Joyce, Pound, Woolf, Stein, Lawrence, and Faulkner, studied in relation to social and artistic movements.
  • ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include relevant groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctively ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups.
  • ENG-L 383 Studies in British or Commonwealth Culture (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Study of a coherent period of British or Commonwealth culture (such as medieval, Elizabethan, or Victorian England, or modern Canada), with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual milieu.
  • ENG-L 384 Studies in American Culture (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Study of a coherent period of American culture (such as the Revolution, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression) with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual or social milieu.
  • ENG-L 389 Feminist Literary and Cultural Criticism (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Selected critical approaches to the issue of gender over time and in various cultural settings. Topics vary, including feminist criticism and popular culture, the history of feminist expository prose, deconstructionism, and feminism.
  • ENG-L 391 Literature For Young Adults (3 cr.) Study of books suitable for junior high and high school classroom use. Special stress on works of fiction dealing with contemporary problems, but also including modern classics, biography, science fiction, and other areas of interest to teenage readers.
  • ENG-L 394 Film and Literature (3 cr.) The course approaches the analysis of films through the cinematic equivalents of the tools of literary criticism.  It will introduce students to the elements of filmmaking and the methods of literary analysis as a way of reaching an understanding of how films mean.
  • ENG-L 395 British and American Film Studies (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Intensive study of specific topics related to film narratives; emphasis on American or British film as a cultural phenomenon. Topic varies.
  • ENG-L 406 Topics in African American Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Intensive study of specific topics in African American literature. Topic varies.
  • ENG-L 450 Seminar: British and American Authors (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Intensive study of a major author or a school of closely related authors.
  • ENG-L 460 Seminar: Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.) P: ENG-L 202/371 and three additional ENG-L courses or permission of instructor. Study of texts written in several historical periods united by a common mode or form (narrative, romanticism, lyric, etc.), or by a common theme (bildungsroman, the city and the country, the two-cultures question, the uses of literacy, etc.).
  • ENG-L 470 Seminar: Literature and Interdisciplinary Studies (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Study of a body of English or American literature in relation to another discipline (philosophy, art, history, linguistics, psychology, etc.), or in light of critical theory (structuralist, psychoanalytic, genre theory, etc.)
  • ENG-L 480 Seminar: Literature and History (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Study of a body of literature in relation to a period of history, to a theory of history, or to an historical theme.
  • ENG-L 495 Individual Reading in English (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 498 Internship in English (1-3 cr.) Supervised experience in teaching undergraduate English course or in editing departmentally based journal or allied publication. Repeatable up to 3 units.
  • ENG-W 100 Developmental Composition (3 cr.) P: Placement according to the IU Southeast English Placement Process. Emphasizes writing paragraphs and larger compositions; learning and practicing forms of academic writing; developing varied sentence structure; review of mechanics and usage. This is a student development course, and credit does not apply toward a degree.
  • ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (3 cr.) P: Placement according to the IU Southeast English Placement Process. For students who need a semester of writing instruction before taking ENG-W 131. Practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences. Attention to sentence and paragraph structure.
  • ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, & Inquiry I (3 cr.) P: Placement according to the IU Southeast English Placement Process. W131 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students' abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students' own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.
  • ENG-W 132 Elementary Composition 2 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Progresses from practice of simple description, narration, and exposition to practice of persuasion and documentation in support of a thesis.
  • ENG-W 203 Creative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Exploratory course in writing in which students write both poetry and fiction. Taught as a workshop. May be repeated once for credit. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 206 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 cr.) Provides students with the opportunity to develop their creative writing skills, and gives them a working knowledge of the basic principles of fiction, poetry and drama.
  • ENG-W 207 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. An introduction to the techniques and principles of fiction writing. Written assignments, workshop discussions of student work in progress, seminar study of classic and contemporary examples of the genre.
  • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher or equivalent. To develop writing skills requisite for most professional activities. Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and writing techniques useful in preparing business and professional memos, letters, reports, and proposals.
  • ENG-W 234 Technical Report Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Instruction in preparing engineering and other technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics.
  • ENG-W 250 Writing in Context (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or equivalent. A course designed to provide a subject-matter context for reading, writing, and research assignments of increasing complexity. Topics of general interest (e.g., autobiography, nature writing, science and society, teacher and child, American business, prison life, etc.) vary from section to section.
  • ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Offers instruction and practice in writing argumentative essays about complicated and controversial issues. The course focuses on strategies for identifying issues, assessing claims, locating evidence, deciding on a position, and writing papers with clear assertion and convincing arguments.
  • ENG-W 290 Writing in the Arts and Sciences (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. An introduction to academic writing as a means of discovery and record. Study of and practice in the procedures, conventions, and terminology of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Research-intensive.
  • ENG-W 300 Writing for Teachers (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. The study of writing in relation to the teaching of writing in the schools. Students will evaluate their own writing strengths and weakness and complete a series of writing assignments meant to improve their writing skills. Additionally, students will read current, selected works in composition theory and learn how to apply their new understandings about writing to various teaching situations.
  • ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 203 and ENG-W 206. May be repeated once for credit. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 203 and ENG-W 206. May be repeated once for credit. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 311 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 203 and ENG-W 206. Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, or documentary. May be repeated once. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. This course introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers - hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing - and explores what impact these forms will have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.
  • ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Emphasis on proposals, presentations, collaborative and individual reports needed within a business, administrative, or organizational setting. Students discover how the process and products of writing shape organizational culture by studying documents organizations use, from hiring to setting ethical standards, as they communicate both internally and globally.
  • ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher or equivalent. Close examination of assumptions, choices, and techniques that go into a student's own writing and the writing of others.
  • ENG-W 364 The Art of Magazine Editing for Publication and Production (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Examines the writing process from the perspective of the manager who supervises the writing of texts that become products: books, newsletters, websites, etc. It explores the document production process, focusing on design, desktop publishing, web publishing, and the stages of writing project management.
  • ENG-W 395 Individual Study of Writing (1-3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Exercise in the study of written expression and communication in informative, persuasive, or imaginative writing. May be repeated once for credit. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 397 Writing Center Theory and Practice (3 cr.) This course will introduce student tutors to research and theory on the writing process, revision, and writing centers, which assumed an important place in composition studies, as writing centers have been an entry point into the field for many scholars/teachers. Areas of focus are scholarship and pedagogy, politics of literacy education and development of reflective tutoring practices.
  • ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (1-3 cr.) Combines study of  writing with practical experience of working with professionals in journalism, business communication, or technical writing. Researched reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor and instructor. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • ENG-W 401 Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in ENG-W 203/ENG-W 206, and ENG-W 301. Focused work in the art and profession of fiction writing. May be repeated once for credit. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 403 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in ENG-W 203/ENG-W 206, and ENG-W 303. Focused work in the art and profession of poetry writing. May be repeated once for credit. May not be counted twice for the major.
  • ENG-W 405 Writing Prose Nonfiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of c or higher. Variable topics related to the production of non-fiction prose. Includes an intensive written project that may involve research as well as production of essays.
  • ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.) Description of project as assigned by instructor consenting to direct it. Individual critical projects worked out with faculty member. Credit varies with scope of the project.
  • ENG-W 420 Argumentative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Presents argument as a process of inquiry. Applies critical and creative thinking to analyzing and composing effective argument. Addresses contexts and ideologies as a component of audience receptivity to ideas. Writers form and test ideas from pluralistic perspectives on controversial issues about which reasonable people disagree, including culture-sensitive issues such as gender, race, ethnicity, etc.
  • ENG-W 490 Writing Seminar (3 cr.) P: Writing concentration majors must complete A) ENG-W 290, B) ENG-W 350 or ENG-W 420; and C) at least one other writing course (ENG-W) at the 200 level or above before enrolling in W490. W290 should be taken in the sophomore year. A capstone writing seminar for English writing concentration majors. Students will produce a major research-based project in nonfiction prose that will be presented in a public forum (such as a student research conference) or that contains another applied learning component to be approved by the instructor.
  • ENG-W 500 Teaching Composition: Issues and Approaches (4 cr.) P: Graduate standing. Consideration of fundamental issues in the teaching of writing and the major approaches to composition instruction. Specific topics include teaching intervention and revision, diagnosing errors, teaching style and organization, making assignments, and evaluating student writing.
  • FINA-A 101 Ancient and Medieval Art (3 cr.) A survey of major styles and monuments in art and architecture from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages.
  • FINA-A 102 Renaissance through Modern Art (3 cr.) A survey of major artists, styles, and movements in European and American art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present.
  • FINA-A 150 Africa, New World, and Oceanic Art (3 cr.) A survey of the arts and cultures of the native peoples of Africa, North and South America, and the South Pacific. FINA-A 150 and FINA-A 458 may not both be taken for credit.
  • FINA-A 215 Ideation and Process (3 cr.) This course is designed to help Fine Arts/Design students develop their creative process deliberately and effectively. Working and researching both independently and collaboratively students will analyze, establish, and put into practice, strategies for concept development and creative problem solving as well as developing tools to help them approach, apply, and track a creative process from idea through construction and then to post-production assessment. Students will research and discuss their own creative practices as well as that of their peers and professional contemporaries. The course will include discussions, presentations and critiques, exercises, lectures, research, writing, and readings.
  • FINA-A 270 Women in the History of Art (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Women artists from the Renaissance through modern times and the problems affecting women artists during these periods. Does not count as part of art history requirements for art majors.
  • FINA-A 315 Art of the Ancient World (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. A study of the architecture, sculpture, painting, and ceramics of the ancient world. Emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome.
  • FINA-A 322 Romanesque and Gothic Arts (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. Survey of the art of the high Middle Ages from the eleventh through the fifteenth centuries, with an emphasis on architecture and sculpture in England, France, Germany, and Italy.
  • FINA-A 343 American Art (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. The history of American art from colonial times to the present.
  • FINA-A 362 The Art of Japan (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. A survey of Japanese art from the Jomon to the nineteenth century.
  • FINA-A 400 Senior Seminar in Art History (4 cr.) P: Required of Art History majors. Senior standing and consent of instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in art history. May be repeated once.
  • FINA-A 401 Art Theory-Senior (3 cr.) Required of BA studio majors. Must be taken during the 400-level studio sequence. This course is designed to cover a broad range of concerns vital to the art major, including graduating senior exhibition, contemporary theory, continued study in graduate school, and/or careers in the professional art world.
  • FINA-A 402 Arts of Native North America (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. A survey of the history of North American First Nations peoples' art from archaic to contemporary times.
  • FINA-A 403 Baroque and Rococo Art (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. The history of the art of both northern and southern Europe during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.
  • FINA-A 404 Modernism: Art, Politics, and Innovation, 1850 to 1900 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W290. This course will examine Western art from the mid- to the end of the nineteenth century. Topics will include Realism and Naturalism, the origins of the avant-garde, the emergence of photography, architecture and design in the age of industry, Impressionism, Post- and Neo-Impressionism, the appeal of the modern and modernity, newly developing modes of abstraction, symbolism, and the origins of the twentieth century artistic avant-gardes.
  • FINA-A 405 Art of the Northern Renaissance (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. The history of painting and sculpture outside Italy during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
  • FINA-A 406 Art of the Italian Renaissance (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. The history of Italian art beginning with the Proto-Renaissance in the thirteenth century through the High Renaissance of the sixteenth century.
  • FINA-A 439 The Historical Avant-Gardes: Art from 1900 to 1945 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. This course familiarizes students with the major historical avant-garde art movements from 1900 to 1945. Students will be introduced to Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada, Suprematism, Constructivism, and Surrealism, among others. Although the course focuses on Europe, the international manifestations of these movements will also be introduced.
  • FINA-A 440 Nineteenth-Century Painting 1 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. Major painters and artistic movements in Western Europe and the United States during the nineteenth century.
  • FINA-A 451 Art of the South Pacific (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. A survey of the arts of Pacific island groups. Emphasis on Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia.
  • FINA-A 452 Art of Pre-Columbian America (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. A survey of pre-contact arts of the Americas south of the Rio Grande.
  • FINA-A 456 The Art and Culture of Samoa, Western Polynesia (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. The program will take place in the independent Pacific nation of Samoa and will introduce students to Samoan art and culture. The course work is designed to provide the student with two options: a series of hands-on workshops on the heritage arts of textile creation and decoration led by specialist artists, or the development of an individual research or creative project.
  • FINA-A 457 Experimental Art Since 1945 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. This course familiarizes students with major art movements in contemporary art since 1940 in Europe and the United States, and globally since 1980, introducing avant-garde art movements and related transnational developments. It presents concepts of modernism and postmodernism, among others.
  • FINA-A 458 Topics in the Ethnographic Arts: The Art of Africa, the Pacific, and the Americas (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. Specific topics of particular interest in the ethnographic arts. Topics thematically based. FINA-A 150 and A 458 may not both be taken for credit.
  • FINA-A 490 Topics in Art History (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290. Individual topics vary. Will be listed in course schedule. May be repeated with consent of instructor.
  • FINA-A 495 Reading and Research in Art History (1-4 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, ENG-W 290 and consent of instructor. Individual-directed study of art history topics. May be repeated for a total of 8 credit hours.
  • FINA-D 210 Digital Art: Survey and Practice (3 cr.) Beginning class on digital media's role in the world of art production and reception. Class emphasizes learning to use digital media to produce original, creative artwork. Topics include digital imaging, communicative art, and interactivity. May be taken concurrently with FINA-F 100, FINA-F 101, or FINA-F 102.
  • FINA-D 310 Interactive Multimedia (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 217. A study of the principles and fundamental techniques for creating multimedia projects that explore their potential for critical artistic expression. The course will examine issues specific to onscreen interaction and time-based media. Tools such as Flash, Dreamweaver, and other supporting programs will be covered.
  • FINA-D 410 Advanced Multimedia (3 cr.) P: FINA-D 310. A broad range of aesthetic and conceptual issues related to digital material and electronic interactivity. Students are encouraged to develop art projects using digital multimedia, video, hypertext, or the incorporation of object-based media. Dialogue of timely issues through readings, screenings, websites, and gallery visits.
  • FINA-D 412 B.F.A. Digital Art (1-6 cr.) P: Admission into the B.F.A. program in digital art. Directed, advanced study and production of a body of work leading to B.F.A. exhibition. Students meet independently with instructor and in group critiques to maintain a dialogue and provide technical advice. May be repeated for a total of 15 credit hours.
  • FINA-F 100 Fundamental Studio - Drawing (3 cr.) A basic course for the development of visual awareness and coordination of perceptual and manual skills; seeing, representing, and inventing on an experimental, exploratory level on a two-dimensional surface. Problems in composition as well as hands-on work with the formal elements of art: line, shape, space, value, texture. May be taken concurrently with FINA-F 101, FINA-F 102, or FINA-D 210.
  • FINA-F 101 Fundamental Studio - 3D (3 cr.) A basic course in the area of three-dimensional design, with emphasis on the art elements of line, plane, and volume. Development of skills in basic media, techniques, and tools commonly used in the creation of three-dimensional art forms. Projects involve the three-dimensional processes of substitution and the additive and subtractive methods, including casting, modeling, carving, and constructing, through the use of a variety of sculptural materials. May be taken concurrently with FINA-F 100, FINA-F 102, or FINA-D 210.
  • FINA-F 102 Fundamental Studio - 2D (3 cr.) Emphasis on color theory and color relationships along with the principles and dynamics of two-dimensional design. May be taken concurrently with FINA-F 100, FINA-F 101, or FINA-P 273.
  • FINA-G 400 B.F.A. Final Review (0 cr.) Final portfolio review for B.F.A. program.
  • FINA-G 405 B.A. Senior Exhibition (0 cr.) Preparation of required senior exhibition of student artwork. Students will create, prepare and install creative works. Students will also design and distribute an announcement for exhibit.
  • FINA-H 100 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. C: ENG-W 131 The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with outstanding works of art and provide an approach to appreciation through knowledge of purposes, techniques, forms, and content.  Does not count toward the Fine Arts major.
  • FINA-N 108 Introduction to Drawing for Non-Majors (3 cr.) Drawing Fundamentals introduces the student to the basic elements of drawing. Line, shape, value, and perspective will be studied before moving on to the more complex use of color, landscape, and still life will be the source of subject matter for the semester. Repeatable up tok 6 units.
  • FINA-N 110 Introduction to Studio Art (3 cr.) A general introduction to painting, drawing, printmaking, and ceramics for the nonmajor.
  • FINA-N 274 Digital Imaging (3 cr.) A course designed for non-art majors. Students will learn to apply basic art and design fundamentals to the personal computer. Areas such as page layout and illustration will be covered in assigned problems.
  • FINA-P 323 Introduction to Web Design (3 cr.) P: FINA-D 210 Recommended. Explore the vast potential and role of technology and graphics in web design, both as a platform for creating entire website prototypes and individual visual elements. An emphasis will be placed on obtaining strong conceptualization, content, functionality and software knowledge. This course aims to prepare the students for future website development. Knowledge of Mac Platform recommended.
  • FINA-S 165 Ceramics for Nonmajors (3 cr.) Introduction to ceramics through hand-building techniques, glazing and firing, and clay body preparations. Lectures and discussion included on ceramic techniques, aesthetics, and theory.
  • FINA-S 200 Drawing 1 (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100. Introduction to drawing through a variety of drawing media, stressing basic visual awareness; seeing, representing, and technical command on a two-dimensional surface. Problems in handling placement, line, space, volume, value, and formal articulation.
  • FINA-S 210 Printed and Dyed Textile Design I (3 cr.) Introduction to continuous yardage design on fabrics by block printing. Experiments with small silkscreens, tie-dye, and batik.
  • FINA-S 217 Video Art (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-D 210. Exploration of the medium of video as an aesthetic expression. Time and sound are elements incorporated into visual composition's traditional concerns. Emphasis on technical command of video camera and digital editing procedures in conjunction with development of a visual sensitivity. Reading and a research project are required.
  • FINA-S 230 Painting 1 (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-F 102. Introduction to painting in oil. Study of the spatial and expressive qualities of color, with an emphasis on composition and pictorial design. Development of technical skills in image making through exploration of traditional and modern methods of paint application. Introduction to surface preparation, framing, and display of paintings.
  • FINA-S 240 Printmaking 1 (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-F 102. Introduction to printmaking. Study of traditional and contemporary techniques, including, but not limited to intaglio (etching), monotype, and relief. Problems in pictorial composition will be emphasized along with understanding of technique. Appreciation and sensitivity to the art of the print will be cultivated.
  • FINA-S 250 Graphic Design 1 (3 cr.) Drawing and perception in the history and practice of visual communication, including a basic introduction to the field and exercises with pencil, marker, computer, and other tools, to produce symbols, letter forms, and symbol-letter combinations.
  • FINA-S 254 Beginning Typography (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-F 101, and FINA-P 273. The study of the art of typography. The course focuses on learning and applying basic typographical terminology as it relates to the field of graphic design.
  • FINA-S 260 Ceramics 1 (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-F 101. Introduction to ceramics through hand building techniques, glazing and firing, and clay body preparation. Lectures and discussion included on ceramic techniques, aesthetics, and theory.
  • FINA-S 270 Sculpture 1 (2-3 cr.) Foundation in basic technical and formal methods of traditional and contemporary sculpture. Use of tools and equipment for additive and subtractive techniques include: wood construction, steel fabrication, clay modeling, plaster mold making and cold casting, and assemblage. Emphasis placed on technical execution, conceptualization and creative problem solving. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • FINA-S 291 Fundamentals of Photography (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 217. Basic practice of digital camera operation, exposure calculation, exposing, image file management, image optimization and digital printing. Guidance toward establishment of a personal photographic aesthetic.
  • FINA-S 301 Drawing 2 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 200. Intermediate course in drawing from the model and other sources. Emphasis on technical command of the media in conjunction with the development of visual awareness. Continued problems from FINA-S 200 with additional emphasis on individual awareness and sensitivity to media, surface, and content.
  • FINA-S 305 Internship: Graphic Design (1-12 cr.) P: Permission of instructor required. Practical experience in graphic design. May be repeated.
  • FINA-S 306 Digital Illustration (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-D 210. An introduction to digital drawing and painting. Emphasis is on developing conceptual skills and narrative compositions.
  • FINA-S 310 Photogrphy (3 cr.) Photography introduces students to the digital darkroom. The course offers an overview of digital photography and imaging software used to enhance, manipulate and montage photographs. Students will explore a variety of ways to express visual ideas through digital images. Assignments explore visual creative problem solving and creative output of fine art photographs.
  • FINA-S 331 Painting 2 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 230. Intermediate course in painting, with an emphasis on the technical command of both oil and acrylic media. Continued study in composition and pictorial design in painting. Further development in traditional and modern methods of paint application with an emphasis on individual experimentation.
  • FINA-S 341 Printmaking 2: Intaglio (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 240. Continuation of intaglio study begun in FINA-S 240, with emphasis on traditional and contemporary modes of expression. Semester work includes experimentation with color printing techniques. Problems in pictorial composition will be stressed with emphasis on technical competency.
  • FINA-S 343 Printmaking 2: Lithography (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 240. Advanced study with emphasis on plate and stone lithography. Problems in pictorial composition, drawing issues, and experimentation with technique will be stressed.
  • FINA-S 344 Printmaking 2: Silkscreen (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 240. Intermediate screen-printing techniques.
  • FINA-S 345 Life Drawing (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 200. Detailed study of the human form. Emphasis will be on rendering, mood, expression, and skeletal and muscular structure.
  • FINA-S 348 Printmaking 2: Relief (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 240. Intermediate relief printing techniques.
  • FINA-S 351 Graphic Design 2 (3 cr.) P: FINA-F 100, FINA-D 210. Studies in visual communication concentrating on typography as it relates to other design elements in practical design application.
  • FINA-S 352 Graphic Design 3 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 250, FINA-S 351. Graphic design course emphasizing production techniques.
  • FINA-S 361 Ceramics 2 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 260. Continued practice in ceramics and introduction to throwing on the wheel. Lectures and discussion included on techniques, aesthetics, and theory. May be repeated once in fulfilling the BA in Fine Arts only.
  • FINA-S 371 Sculpture 2 (3 cr.) Development of skills in both traditional and contemporary sculpture methodology. Rotating semester topics include figurative sculpture, carving, casting, steel/wood construction, computer-aided machining and rapid prototyping, installation art, and public art. Emphasis on the exploration of ideas through the sculptural form and knowledge of materials and historical traditions. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • FINA-S 392 Intermediate Photography (3 cr.) Practice of black and white photography: camera work, darkroom practices, appreciation of photographs and experience in expressive use of the medium.
  • FINA-S 401 Drawing 3 (3 cr.) P: 6 hours in FINA-S 301. Advanced drawing from the model and other sources using a variety of media, both conventional and invented. Craftsmanship, content, and personal style are stressed.
  • FINA-S 405 B.F.A. Drawing (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 200 and accepted into B.F.A. studio major. Continuing opportunity for extensive practice in the drawing craft. Craftsmanship, content, and personal style are stressed. May be repeated for a total of 15 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 417 Hand Papermaking (3 cr.) This course will introduce students to the basic techniques of creating hand-made sheets of paper from both recycled and beaten fibers. Students will experiment with various fibers, additives, pigments, and pulp painting techniques to create one-of-a-kind sheets of hand-formed papers.
  • FINA-S 431 Painting 3 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 331. Advanced course in painting aimed at the continued mastery of technical skills, with an emphasis on individual solutions to pictorial and conceptual problems in painting.
  • FINA-S 432 B.F.A. Painting (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 230 and accepted into B.F.A. studio major. Concentrated studio projects within the framework of the B.F.A. painting program. Attention to content, craftsmanship, intent, and resources. May be repeated for a total of 15 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 438 Water Media (3 cr.)

    This class is intended to give students experience in painting with water-based media, including acrylic, watercolor, and mixed media. This course is comprised of studio practice  (both in-studio and outside),demonstrations, slide presentations and critiques.

    May be repeated up to 9 credits
  • FINA-S 441 Printmaking 3: Intaglio (3 cr.) P: 6 credits in FINA-S 341 or FINA-S 343. Advanced problems in intaglio and color printing techniques for qualified students.
  • FINA-S 442 B.F.A. Printmaking (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 240 and accepted into B.F.A. studio major. Directed advanced study in printmaking. May be repeated for a total of 15 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 443 Printmaking 3: Lithography (3 cr.) P: 6 credits in FINA-S 341 or FINA-S 343. Advanced work in lithography, including color-printing techniques for qualified students. May be repeated once in fulfilling the BA in Fine Arts only.
  • FINA-S 444 Printmaking III Silkscreen (1-20 cr.) Advanced work in silkscreen for qualified students. Also open for non-M.F.A. printmaking students on the graduate level. Repeatable up to 20 units.
  • FINA-S 445 Relief Printmaking Media (1-3 cr.) Relief printmaking media: woodcut, linocut, monotype, and collograph. Students create prints in each medium in both black-and-white and color using a variety of traditional and innovative techniques such as photo and the computer. Repeatable up to 20 units.
  • FINA-S 451 Graphic Design 4 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 250, FINA-S 351, FINA-S 352. Professional problem solving in graphic design. May be repeated once.
  • FINA-S 452 B.F.A. Graphic Design (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 250 and accepted into B.F.A. studio major. Directed, advanced study in graphic design. May be repeated for a total of 15 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 461 Ceramics 3 (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 361. Advanced study in ceramic studio practice. Advanced study of finishing techniques, clay body preparation, and glaze formulation. Lectures and discussion included on techniques, aesthetics, and theory. Individualized course of study with a concentration on artistic development.
  • FINA-S 462 B.F.A. Ceramics (1-6 cr.) P: FINA-S 260 and accepted into B.F.A. studio major. Continuing opportunity for extensive practice in clay techniques. May be repeated for a total of 15 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 463 Topics in Studio Ceramics (3 cr.) P: FINA-S 260 or consent of instructor. Selected specialized topics in studio ceramics. May be repeated twice for a total of 9 credit hours.
  • FINA-S 490 Advanced Photography I (3 cr.) Repeatable up to 60 units.
  • FINA-S 492 Advanced Photography 2 (1-20 cr.) Repeatable up to 20 units.
  • FINA-S 495 Advanced Photo Systems (3-5 cr.) The photographic process as a system, study of the nature and behavior of its several components, and the manner and means of their interaction.
  • FINA-S 497 Independent Study in Studio Art (1-6 cr.) Advanced independent work in studio area of student's choice. Emphasis on self-motivation and self-direction in addition to intensive furthering of skills and concepts already obtained in studio classes. Repeatable up to 21 units.
  • FINA-T 338 Special Topics in Digital Media (3 cr.) Various topics in new media. May be repeated once.
  • FINA-U 400 B.F.A. Seminar: Sources and Resources - Professional Skills in Fine Arts (3 cr.) Focuses on both personal and cultural issues in aesthetics and on building professional skills for careers in art.
  • FINA-U 401 Special Topics in Studio Art (3 cr.) Special topics in studio art not ordinarily covered in other Fine Arts program courses.
  • FREN-F 100 Elementary French I (4 cr.) Students who have studied French must take a placement test before enrolling. Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Some online work will be required.
  • FREN-F 150 Elementary French II (4 cr.) P: FREN-F 100 or by placement test. Students who have studied French must take a placement test before enrolling. Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Some online work will be required.
  • FREN-F 200 Second-Year French I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 150 or by placement test. Grammar, composition, and conversation coordinated with the study of expository, literary, and cultural texts. Some online work will be required.
  • FREN-F 250 Second-Year French II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 200 or by placement test. Grammar, composition, and conversation coordinated with the study of expository, literary, and cultural texts. Some online work will be required.
  • FREN-F 300 Lectures et analyses littéraires (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 250. Preparation for more advanced work in French literature. Readings and discussions of one play, one novel, short stories or essays, and poems.
  • FREN-F 305 Chefs-d’oeuvre de la littérature française I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 250. Drama and literature of ideas. Dramatists such as Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Beaumarchais, and Sartre; essayists and philosophes such as Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire, Diderot, and Camus. Lectures and discussion in French.
  • FREN-F 306 Chefs-d’oeuvre de la littérature française II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 250. Novel and poetry. Novelists such as Balzac, Flaubert, and Proust; readings in anthologies stressing sixteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century poetry. Lectures and discussion in French.
  • FREN-F 312 Readings in French Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Representative readings emphasizing a particular author, genre, or topic in French literature. The subject may vary with each listing, and is identified in the Schedule of Classes. No credit in the concentration area for French majors. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • FREN-F 313 Advanced Grammar and Composition I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 250. Detailed review of grammar. Writing practice.
  • FREN-F 314 Advanced Grammar and Composition II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 313. Detailed review of grammar. Writing practice.
  • FREN-F 315 French Conversation and Diction I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 250. Course devoted to more advanced oral and continual work with phonetics.
  • FREN-F 316 French Conversation and Diction II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 315. Course devoted to more advanced oral and continual work with phonetics.
  • FREN-F 320 Travaux Pritiques De Pron Fr (2 cr.) P: FREN-F 250. In-depth study of the French sound system and refinement of pronunciation through practical exercises.
  • FREN-F 363 Introduction à la France moderne (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 313. The development of French culture and civilization in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on the events that shaped modern France, the structure of daily life, and its institutions.
  • FREN-F 391 Studies in French Film (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 313 or permission of instructor. Analysis of major French art form, introduction to modern French culture seen through medium of film art, and study of relationship of cinema and literature in France.
  • FREN-F 415 La Culture francophone (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 363 or permission of instructor. Francophone cultures outside of Europe will be the focus of this course. A comparative approach will serve to underline similarities and differences among different francophone communities and also to compare them with Franco-European culture. A variety of resources, from cultural and literary readings to musical/film selections will be exploited.
  • FREN-F 461 La France contemporaine (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 363. France since 1945; political, social, economic, and cultural aspects.
  • FREN-F 474 Theme et version (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 313. Translations of selected passages, alternating between English and French, to teach students to write with precision and clarity in both languages.
  • FREN-F 475 Le Français Oral: Cours Avancé (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 315 or permission of instructor. This course will build upon the oral and aural skills developed in intermediary level courses in French with intensive oral/aural practice both inside and outside the classroom.
  • FREN-F 495 Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.) Repeatable up to 3 units.
  • GEOG-G 107 Physical Systems of the Environment (3 cr.) An examination of the physical environment as the home of human beings, with emphasis on the distribution and interaction of environmental variables and energy flow through the system.
  • GEOG-G 108 Physical Systems of the Environment - Lab (2 cr.) Concurrent or previous enrollment in GEOG-G 107 recommended. Laboratory study of the physical environment.
  • GEOG-G 110 Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr.) An exploration of social and cultural phenomena as these are expressed and distributed across the earth's surface. Topics include population, migration, language, religion, customs, political divisions, agriculture, industry, and urbanization.
  • GEOG-G 201 World Regional Geography (3 cr.) Geographical analysis of regions occupied by European cultures and of indigenous spatial developments in non-Western areas.
  • GEOG-G 213 Introduction of Economic Geography (3 cr.) Principles of economic geography, including theories concerning industrial location, competition for land, economic nature of resources, and geographic background of interregional trade.
  • GEOG-G 304 Meteorology and Physical Climatology (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 107 with a C or better. Study of weather elements, processes, and patterns. Weather observation, analysis, and forecasting. Systematic and regional study of world climates. Relationship of climate to human activity.
  • GEOG-G 307 Biogeography (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 107 with a C or better. An analysis of the spatial distribution of natural biota with regard to physical and ecological processes.
  • GEOG-G 308 Natural/Human-Induced Disasters (3 cr.) P: Minimum of 6 credit hours in one or a combination of physical and biological sciences. Study and analysis of the causes, nature, and geographical occurrence of natural and human-induced disasters. Examines the workings and consequences of disasters and hazards facing humankind.
  • GEOG-G 315 Environmental Conservation (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 107 with a C or better. The study of the conservation of natural resources, including soil, water, air, wildlife, and forests, as interrelated components of the natural and human environments, emphasizing a unified ecological approach. Current problems relating to pollution and environmental quality.
  • GEOG-G 321 Geography of Europe (3 cr.) Geographical analysis of the physical features of the European environment and the spatial patterns and interrelationships of the cultural, economic, and political landscapes. Emphasis placed on the impress of man on the environment through long-term occupancy.
  • GEOG-G 323 Geography of Latin America (3 cr.) Geographical analysis of the terrain, resources, climate, culture, and historical and economic development of the nations south of the Rio Grande.
  • GEOG-G 326 Geography of North America (3 cr.) Continental and regional variations in terrain and climate and the economic and social life of the United States and Canada, with emphasis on geographical principles, sources of data, and techniques of investigation.
  • GEOG-G 333 Introductory Cartography (3 cr.) Use, interpretation, and sources of topographic maps, thematic maps, vertical aerial photographs, and related materials. Includes projections and grids, relief symbolization, map classification, mapping agencies, and the history of maps and mapping.
  • GEOG-G 338 Geographic Information Science (3 cr.) Overview of the principles and practices of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will deal with issues of spatial data models, database design, introductory and intermediate GIS operations, and case studies of real-world GIS applications. Laboratory exercises will provide significant hands-on experience.
  • GEOG-G 345 Field Study in Geography (1-3 cr.) Faculty supervised fieldwork in selected areas of geography. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • GEOG-G 369 The Geography of Food (3 cr.) Promotes understanding of the history and geographic distribution of the world's food cultures. Focuses on the material aspects of food and food's relationship to society. Increases knowledge of food and cultures through reading, discussion and cooking.
  • GEOG-G 404 Soils Geography (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 107 or GEOL-G 100 with a C or better. Soil genesis, morphology, and classification; soil's physical, chemical, mechanical and biological properties. Soil maps and related data in land use analysis and the planning process.
  • GEOG-G 418 Historical Geography (3 cr.) Migration and diffusion, rural and urban settlement, industrialization, and transport development as spatial processes shaping the landscapes and geopolitical relationships of past places and peoples.
  • GEOG-G 425 Africa: Contemporary Geographic Problems (3 cr.) Contemporary geographic problems confronting the countries of sub-Saharan Africa are examined. Topics include urbanization, rural-urban migration, unemployment, agriculture, healthcare, analysis of terrain, resources, and aspects of the natural environment.
  • GEOG-G 432 Current Issues in Environmental Conservation (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 315 with a C or better. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of topics of special importance in regard to environmental quality, including such topics as air and water quality, radiation, energy, and waste disposal.
  • GEOG-G 438 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 338 with a C or better. Basic concepts and principles underlying polygon and grid-based geographic information systems are explored. Computerized data capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display techniques, as applied to geographic information, are explored through the development of individual student projects.
  • GEOG-G 439 Seminar in Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 438 with C or better and consent of instructor. Extension of GEOG-G 438 that develops advanced methods of spatial data analysis in the context of GIS. Emphasis on applications and individualized projects.
  • GEOG-G 450 Undergraduate Readings and Research in Geography (1-3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. Individualized readings and research in geography.
  • GEOG-G 460 Geography Internship (1-6 cr.) P: Junior or Senior standing and departmental coordinator consent. Requires 40 hours of work per 1 hour of credit. Supervised field experience in geography, normally in conjunction with approved work at a government agency or private firm.
  • GEOG-G 490 Senior Seminar in Geography (3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. Open to majors only. Research in selected problems and study of geographic thought.
  • GEOL-G 100 General Geology (5 cr.) Broad study of the earth. The earth in the solar system, earth's atmosphere. Formation and modification of earth materials, landforms, continents, and oceans throughout geologic time. Geological records in selected areas. Lectures, laboratory, field trips. Credit given for only one of the following geology courses: GEOG-G 100, GEOG-G 103, or GEOL-G 110.
  • GEOL-G 180 Dinosaurs (3 cr.) A survey of the characteristics and evolution of dinosaurs. Topics include the occurrence of dinosaur remains in the fossil record, basic anatomy, principles used in classification, types of predatory and plant-eating dinosaurs, environments occupied during life, behavior, extinction theories, dinosaurs in the media and the public eye. Credit not given for both GEOL-G 180 and GEOL-G 301.
  • GEOL-G 210 Oceanography (3 cr.) Study of the physical and biological features of the ocean environment.
  • GEOL-G 221 Introductory Mineralogy (4 cr.) P: GEOL-G 100 with a C or better. The study of minerals, including chemical composition, classification, crystallography, description, identification, occurrence, origin, and physical properties.
  • GEOL-G 222 Introduction to Petrology (4 cr.) P: GEOL-G 221 with a C or better. The study of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks: composition, occurrence, characteristics, classification, origin, description, and identification.
  • GEOL-G 300 Environmental and Urban Geology (3 cr.) P: GEOL-G 100 with a C or better. Significance of regional and local geologic features and processes in land use. Use of geologic factors to reduce conflict in utilization of mineral and water resources and damage from geologic hazards. Credit not given for both GEOL-G 300 and GEOG-G 315.
  • GEOL-G 334 Principles of Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4 cr.) P: GEOL-G 221 with a C or better. Interrelationship of sedimentation and stratigraphy; processes and factors influencing genesis of sedimentary strata; provenance, depositional environment, sedimentary facies, paleoecology; analytical techniques; application of principles of interpretation of stratigraphic record. Laboratory study of sediments and sedimentary rocks.
  • GEOL-G 341 Natural History of Coral Reefs (3 cr.) P: Department consent required. Introduction to principles of biology, ecology, and geology as applied to coral reef ecosystems.
  • GEOL-G 400 Energy: Sources and Needs (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 107 with a C or better. Scientific and political constraints on the production and utilization of energy from various sources. Energy balance of the United States.
  • GEOL-G 409 Independent Study in Geology (1-3 cr.) P: Department consent required. Supervised independent study of topics and techniques in geology that are not available in formal courses in the department.
  • GEOL-G 410 Undergraduate Research in Geology (1-3 cr.) P: Junior/Senior standing and consent of instructor. Field and laboratory research in selected problems in geology. May be repeated.
  • GEOL-G 411 Invertebrate Palentology (3 cr.) Structure, classification, habitats, and geological history and significance of the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory study of fossils.
  • GEOL-G 415 Geomorphology (3 cr.) P: GEOL-G 100 with a C or better. Origin, classification, description, and interpretation of landforms. Natural processes that form landscapes, surficial geologic materials, and soils. Credit not given for both GEOL-G 415 and GEOG-G 407.
  • GEOL-G 419 Sedimentary Geology of Dinosaur-Bearing Rocks (2 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Five-day, six-night field course in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. Focus is on presenting simple concepts of geology and paleontology utilized in reconstructing the ancient landscape, climate and environments of deposition of important dinosaur-bearing formations.
  • GEOL-G 420 Regional Geology Field Trip (1-3 cr.) P: One course in geology and consent of instructor. Seminar and field investigation of selected regions for study of mineralogic, lithologic, stratigraphic, structural, paleontologic, geomorphologic, or other geological relationships. May be repeated.
  • GEOL-G 424 Geographic Information Systems Applications in Geology (3 cr.) Concepts and use of Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies are introduced during intensive laboratory sessions. Field work, conducted in the Indiana University Research and Teaching Preserve, involves mapping of pertinent features using GPs units, followed by additional data collection aimed at attributing specific mapped features.
  • GEOL-G 427 Introduction to X-ray Mineralogy (3 cr.) C: GEOL-G221. Instructor Permission. Theory and practice of X-ray powder diffraction and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis. Diffractometer and Dispersive X-ray methods and their application to the identification and the characterization of minerals.
  • GEOL-G 435 Glacial and Quartenary Geology (3 cr.) The Quaternary Period is examined with a focus upon the last glaciation with specific reference to Northwest Indiana. Topics include glacier processes, glacial sediments, glacial landforms and landform assemblages, specific glacial lake processes, sediments and drainage events, dating methods, soil mechanics and environmental applications. Field trips are mandatory.
  • GEOL-G 451 Elements of Hydrogeology (3 cr.) P: GEOL-G 100 & GEOL-G 107 with a C or better. Physical and chemical properties of water, chemical equilibria and stable isotopes in groundwater; acid drainage, landfills, and agricultural pollution; Darcey's Law, fluid potential, unsaturated flow, fluid and aquifer properties affecting groundwater flow; fluid mass balance and its application; contaminant transport.
  • GEOL-G 460 Internship in Geology (3 cr.) P: Junior/Senior standing & department coordinator consent. Industrial or similar experiences in geologically oriented employment. Projects jointly arranged, coordinated, and evaluated by faculty and industrial/governmental supervisors. Can be repeated with instructor's permission.
  • GER-G 100 Elementary German I (4 cr.) Students who have studied German must take a placement test before enrolling. Introduction to present-day German and selected aspects of German culture. Survey of the language: structure and meaning. Introduction to German grammatical forms and their function. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills. Attendance in the language lab may be required.
  • GER-G 150 Elementary German II (4 cr.) Students who have studied German must take a placement test before enrolling. Introduction to present-day German and selected aspects of German culture. Survey of the language: structure and meaning. Introduction to German grammatical forms and their function. Development of listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading and writing skills. Attendance in the language lab may be required.
  • GER-G 200 Intermediate German I (3 cr.) P: GER-G 150 or equivalent. Further development of oral and written command of language structures. Reading of literary and nonliterary texts. Attendance in the language lab may be required.
  • GER-G 250 Intermediate German II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 200 or equivalent. Review of selected grammatical items. Reading of modern German prose and plays with stress on discussion in German. Writing of descriptive and expository prose based on the reading material. Attendance in the language lab may be required.
  • GER-G 255 Tradition & Innovation in German Lit (3 cr.) Recommended for students with no knowledge of German or those in first- and second-year language courses who wish to gain early acquaintance with German literature. Emphasis on such writers as Kafka, Brecht, Hesse, Mann, Goethe, Schiller, and Lessing. No credit given for German majors.
  • GER-G 275 Deutsch: Mittlestufe I (3 cr.) P: GER-G 250 Intensive review of selected grammatical topics and continuned practice of composition and conversation. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G 305 Introduction to German Literature: Types (3 cr.) P: GER-G 250. Study of literary genres (narrative, dramatic, lyric), with examples of each selected from two or more periods.
  • GER-G 306 Introduction to German Literature: Themes (3 cr.) P: GER-G 305. Study of a single literary theme (such as music, generational conflict, love, revolution) as presented in two or more periods.
  • GER-G 310 Deutsch: Mittelstufe II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 275 Advanced oral and written communication. Study of selected advanced grammatical topics. Reading of primarily nonliterary texts. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G 311 Composition and Conversation (3 cr.) P: GER-G 250 or equivalent. Conversation, writing, and vocabulary building coordinated with readings of contemporary concerns, both nonfiction and fiction. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G 345 Introduction to Practical Translation Techniques I (3 cr.) P: GER-G 250, equivalent placement score, or permission of the department. German 345 is the first part of a two-course sequence that perfects the knowledge and skills acquired in the first four semesters while emphasizing the practical application of the language when translating into and out of English. Although the course will strive to achieve a balanced development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, as well as acquire a renewed appreciation for the history and culture of German-speaking nations, there will be a focus on the written aspect of German and its relevance to speakers of English in an academic and professional environment. After briefly reviewing the history and basic theory of translation, as well as contemporary approaches to the discipline as pertains to English-speaking societies, most specifically that of the United States, this course will further develop skills from a translator's point of view, realizing that effective communication and understanding require constant practice. Meaningful written and oral translation activities within the contextualized study of German-speaking societies, and their geography, literature and current events will form integral parts of the learning process so as to enhance abilities specifically geared toward the work place and advanced studies. The teaching techniques are student-centered, with the instructor as the facilitator, and the pedagogical goal is to solidify students' base as independent users of the language with a solid understanding of German and English translation, cognizant of the fact that translation is a serious skill and more than a just an ability that results as a byproduct of language acquisition.
  • GER-G 346 Introduction to Practical Translation Techniques II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 250. German 346 is the second part of a two-course sequence that perfects the knowledge and skills acquired in the first four semesters while emphasizing the practical application of the language when translating into and out of English. Although the course will strive to achieve a balanced development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, as well as acquire a renewed appreciation for the history and culture of German-speaking nations, there will be a focus on the written aspect of German and its relevance to speakers of English in an academic and professional environment. The first course introduced translation from a theoretical perspective and began developing the basic skills in translating. This course will further develop these skills with emphasis on specialized fields of translation as well as translation into different registers. Meaningful written adn oral translation activities within the contextualized study of German-speaking societies, and their geography, literature and current events will form integral parts of the learning process so as to enhance abilities specifically geared toward the work place and advanced studies. The teaching techniques are student-centered, with the instructor as the facilitator, and the pedogogical goal is to solidify students' base as independent users of the language with a solid understanding of German and English translation, cognizant of the fact that translation is a serious skill adn more than just an ability that results as a byproduct of language acquisition.
  • GER-G 362 Introduction to Contemporary Germany (3 cr.) An overview of contemporary German civilization, with attention to the other German-speaking countries. Political, economic, and social organization. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G 363 Introduction to German Cultural History (3 cr.) P: GER-G 250. A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, with reference to its social, economic, and political context. Lectures in German; discussions in German or English.
  • GER-G 403 Medieval German Literature (3 cr.) P: GER-G 305 or GER-G 306. Historical survey of major literary developments from the Middle Ages to romanticism.
  • GER-G 404 Modern German Literature (3 cr.) P: GER-G 305 or GER-G 306. Historical survey of major literary developments from young Germany to recent writing in German-speaking Europe.
  • GER-G 415 Perspectives on German Literature (3 cr.) P: GER-G 306 or GER-G 306. Study of one aspect of German literature: formal, historical, political, psychological, etc. Relation to wider concerns in and outside of literature. Topic announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • GER-G 416 Studies in German Authors (3 cr.) P: GER-G 305 or GER-G 306. Life and works of a major author or group of authors. Topic announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • GER-G 418 German Film and Popular Culture (3 cr.) P: GER-G 305 or GER-G 306. Study of German film and/or other manifestations of German popular culture (television, music, cabaret, trivial literature of the twentieth century).
  • GER-G 464 German Culture and Society (3 cr.) P: GER-G 363. The interaction of social, intellectual, and artistic forces in German life of the past two centuries, with stress on important developments and figures. May be repeated once with a different topic for maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G 495 Individual Readings in Germanic Literature (1-3 cr.) Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • GER-V 415 Individual Readings in German Studies (1-3 cr.) May be repeated.
  • GNDR-G 701 Grad Topics in Gender Studies (1-4 cr.) Graduate students only. Selected topics with an interdisciplinary focus. Research paper required.
  • GNST-G 400 General Studies Capstone (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 290 with a grade of C or better. This course is a senior seminar for the Bachelor of General Studies degree. Taught in a hybrid format, it alternates between face to face meetings/interactions and use of the internet. It centers in two vital areas for today's graduate: advanced communication skills and sound preparedness for life and work beyond college. Students will review their primary coursework, explore and analyze employment trends relevant to their field, and write well-researched, cohesive papers about them. A group project will offer timely practice in collaboration and presenting in class. Frequent peer review and response to peer evaluations of their own work will also be expected.
  • HIM-M 108 Introduction to Health Information Management (3 cr.) This course introduces the health information management profession and healthcare delivery systems. Topics include healthcare settings, the patient record, electronic health records (EHRs), data collection standards, legal aspects of health information, coding, and reimbursement. Students gain hands-on experience with a virtual EHR and examine the impact of EHRs on healthcare.
  • HIM-M 270 Healthcare Financial Management (2 cr.) P: HIM-M 108, HIM-M 114 with a C or better. Course focuses on the administration of foundational principles of management within a health information department.  Students will gain an understanding of the language of quantitative methods as well as the processes that are required for health information managers to function is a healthcare environment which demand competency to the areas of profit margins, management of financial resources and complex reimbursement processes.
  • HIM-M 325 Health Information Requirements and Standards I (3 cr.) P: HIM-M 108 with a C or better. C: HIM-M 326. Course will explore the scientific and social aspects of three common diseases: diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. Students will learn about these diseases through didactic lecture from a medical doctor. Students will observe clinics, doctors, and patients.
  • HIM-M 326 Laboratory Enrichment For Healthcare Information Requirements/Standards (3 cr.) P: HIM-M 108 With a C or better. C: HIM-M 325. This course consists of exercises that reinforce the lectures in HIA-M 325.  Students explore up-to-date Web resources used to the Healthcare field as well as perform database searches.  Students engage in laboratory exercises that consist of evaluating health records for completeness, regulatory compliance and documentation.
  • HIM-M 327 TitleHealthcare Information Requirements and Standards II (3 cr.) P: HIM-M 325, HIM-M 326 with a C or better.

    This course is a continuation of HIM-M 325 and includes the ongoing review of health record documentation, in particular secondary data bases such as cancer registry, long term care and other healthcare settings. Healthcare information resources, both in print and on the World Wide Web are researched and examined extensively.

  • HIM-M 328 Laboratory Enrichment for Healthcare Information Requirements and Standards II (1 cr.) P: HIM-M 325, HIM-M 326 with a C or better.

    This course consists of exercises that reinforce the lectures in HIA-M 327. Students explore Web resources used in the healthcare field and perform extensive database searches.

  • HIM-M 400 Health Information Research and Analysis Methods (3 cr.) P: HIM-M 108, AHLT-M 325, HIM-M 326 with a C or better. This course introduces methods of research and data analysis for inquiry in health information management. Students develop skills in planning, conducting, reporting, and assessing research and data analysis. These skills are then applied to biomedical data to support healthcare-related decision-making.
  • HIM-M 443 Professional Practicum in Health Information Management I (2 cr.) P: Approval by HIM Program director.

    This course is designed to provide professional practice experience in an approved clinical site under the direction of an HIA faculty member and an onsite clinical instructor. Students also receive didactic and practicum experience in the classroom. Emphasis on clinical science, health information management, business administration and information systems.

  • HIM-M 444 Professional Practicum in Health Information Management II (2 cr.) P: Approval by HIM Program director.

    This course is designed to provide professional practice experience. Students will complete the project-based practicum under the direction of the assigned site supervisor. The student will provide a deliverable project to the site in a presentation format. The student will conduct all necessary research and apply project management tools and skills in completing the project work.

  • HIM-M 470 Healthcare Reimbursement System (3 cr.) P: AHLT-M 390, AHLT-M 391 with a C or better. This course will present data elements that apply to prospective payment systems. It will allow the student to gain the knowledge of correct reimbursement systems and to identify issues, patient types in meeting medical necessity guidelines.
  • HIM-M 490 RHIA Exam Preparation (3 cr.) P: Approval by HIM Program director.

    This course reviews technical and administrative aspects of domain topics required to pass of the Registered Health Information Administrator (RHIA) examination. (Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the RHIA exam concurrently.)

  • HIM-M  302 Health Law II and Ethics (3 cr.) Detailed study of legal issues in health informatics and information management. HIPAA and other statutory and regulatory requirements are studied. Study and application of ethics within health informatics and HIM.
  • HIST-A 260 Early American Women’s History (3 cr.) P: HIST-H 105, HIST-H 106 or consent of instructor. An examination of the economic, family and political roles of colonial, slave, immigrant and frontier women in early North American history to 1880.
  • HIST-A 261 Modern American Women’s History (3 cr.) Surveys the diversity of women's experiences in modern United States history. An examination of women's changing roles in working class and middle class families, the effect of industrialization on women's economic activities and status, and women's involvement in political and social struggles, including those for women's rights, birth control, and civil rights.
  • HIST-A 301 Colonial North America, 1500-1763 (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Native American society before and after conquest, colonization of New World by Spain, France, Dutch, and English; development of economic, social, cultural, and political societies in New World.
  • HIST-A 302 Revolutionary America, 1763-1791 (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Tensions between British North American colonies and England, political, cultural, and economic world of colonies before American Independence; creation of state and national governments after 1776; struggle for unity after American Independence.
  • HIST-A 303 United States 1792-1829 (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Struggle for continental unity following American Independence; westward expansion; United States wars with American Indians and the British; development of American presidency and government systems; cultural, social, economic, and political ramifications and growth during early national era.
  • HIST-A 304 United States, 1830-1865 (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Analysis of westward expansion, American Indian relations, slavery, reform movements, the Spanish American War, and the Civil War.
  • HIST-A 307 American Cultural History (3 cr.) P: HIST-H 105 or HIST-H 106 or consent of instructor. Major themes in American cultural life since the Civil War. Focus on the cultural expressions of immigrants, racial minorities, religious groups, social classes, women, artists, and professional groups in response to changing conditions.
  • HIST-A 310 Survey of American Indians I (3 cr.) The Native American experience from the pre- Columbian period through the American Civil War. Course will focus on Native American cultural patterns, and the Native American response to French, British, and American Indian policies.
  • HIST-A 311 Survey of American Indians II (3 cr.) Native American/white relations from Civil War through the 1990s. Focus on Native American attempts to defend their homelands in American West, establishment of Indian reservations in the late nineteenth century, impact of U.S. government policies, urbanization of Native Americans in the twentieth century.
  • HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. U.S. political, social, economic, and cultural history from 1865 to 1919. Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, World War I.
  • HIST-A 314 Recent United States History I (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. 1919-1945: The twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, World War II.
  • HIST-A 315 Recent United States History II (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. 1945-present: Cold War, Vietnam War, problems of contemporary America.
  • HIST-A 317 American Social History, 1865-Present (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Development of modern American intellectual and social patterns since 1880. Social thought, literature, science, the arts, religion, morals, education.
  • HIST-A 321 History of American Thought I (3 cr.) Major themes in American intellectual history, including systems of ideas such as Puritanism, natural rights philosophy, transcendentalism, Social Darwinism, and Pragmatism, and particular concepts such as vision of New World, myth of West, and liberal versus conservative interpretations of American experience.
  • HIST-A 337 American Frontier I (3 cr.) I.The Turner thesis: frontier and American character. America as frontier of Europe and Africa, 1500-1720. The frontier-rural mode of American life, 1720-1860: public domain, population growth, migration. II.The trans-Mississippi West. Frontier in literature and music. Miners, cowboys, Indians, settlers. The Hispanic West. The West becomes metropolitan.
  • HIST-A 338 American Frontier II (3 cr.) I.The Turner thesis: frontier and American character. America as frontier of Europe and Africa, 1500-1720. The frontier-rural mode of American life, 1720-1860: public domain, population growth, migration. II.The trans-Mississippi West. Frontier in literature and music. Miners, cowboys, Indians, settlers. The Hispanic West. The West becomes metropolitan.
  • HIST-A 339 History of the South I (3 cr.) P: HIST-H 105 or consent of instructor. Examination of the major themes and issues in the history of the southern United States, from the first European settlement to the Civil War. Motivations for settlement, white-Indian interaction, the rise of slavery, the American Revolution in the South, southern identity, the coming and impact of the Civil War. The course will also introduce students to competing interpretations of the Old South and the methods by which historians construct historical arguments and interpretations.
  • HIST-A 345 American Diplomatic History I (3 cr.) P: HIST-H 105 and HIST-H 106 or consent of instructor. American diplomacy from 1775 to 1823; diplomacy of American continental expansion to 1898.
  • HIST-A 346 American Diplomatic History II (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. America as a world power. Involvement in world affairs after 1898; diplomacy of World Wars I and II; Cold War and background of contemporary foreign policy issues.
  • HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Evolution of cities and urban life in the United States from the colonial times to the present. Rise of cities, creation of modern urban districts (ghettos, suburbia); city planning; political and economic power structures; ethnic and race relations; law and order.
  • HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) The origins, course, and consequences of the American Civil War.
  • HIST-A 353 American Economic History I (3 cr.) The historical evolution of a fragmented, essentially agricultural economy in the 17th century to the threshold of industrial domination by the mid-19th century.
  • HIST-A 355 African-American History I (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. History of blacks in the United States. Slavery, abolitionism, the Civil War; Reconstruction, post-Reconstruction to 1900.
  • HIST-A 356 African-American History II (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course of consent of instructor. History of blacks in the United States. 1900 to present; the Great Migration; NAACP, Harlem Renaissance, postwar civil rights movement; affirmative action.
  • HIST-A 361 Studies in American History for Teachers I (3 cr.)
  • HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. A survey of Indiana history and culture from the original inhabitants to recent times with emphasis on the growth of a distinctive Hoosier culture. Examination of Hoosier culture within the context of small-town America and mid-America, with attention to journalism and education.
  • HIST-A 381 Civil Rights Era in the U.S. (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Examination of race and racial protest and gender protest after 1941. Analyzes several protest movements, key social battles, individual leaders, civil rights policy, and law; as well as, the struggle to end racial segregation and exclusion in education, politics, public accommodations, the workplace and housing. In addition, the class analyzes the growth of the feminist movement and the divisions between liberal and radical feminists, as well as government policy.
  • HIST-B 309 Britain before 1688 (3 cr.) Development of Britain and its institutions from the Bronze Age to the Glorious Revolution, with emphasis on Celtic Britain, the Norman Conquest, the rise of Parliament, the Tudor era, and the turbulent seventeenth century.
  • HIST-B 312 History of the European City in the Modern Era (3 cr.) This course examines the history of European cities in the Modern Era, with a focus on competition between social classes and the impact of economic change on cities. We begin by examining the transition from the early Modern to the Modern city, examining the changes that created revolutionary Paris. The impact of the industrial revolution on European cities is also discussed. Cities are examined as sites of social conflict - whether in the form of contestation from below, in the form of revolution, or efforts to control the population from above - through urban planning, reform, and policing. Different efforts to re-imagine cities as places devoid of social conflict are compared. We dwell in particular on the Modernist model which became particularly widespread after the Second World War, in connection with the postwar economic boom. The Cold War also left its mark on the European urban landscape: urban planning problems and strategies in various Eastern Bloc states are considered, as is the divided city of Berlin. Finally, we end on a contemporary case of social conflict in the European city: the place of migrant workers and immigrants in their host societies.
  • HIST-B 351 Western Europe in The Early Middle Ages (3 cr.) Evolution of European civilization from the fall of Rome, development of Christianity and Germanic invasions through Charlemagne's Empire and the subsequent development of feudalism, manorialism, papacy, and Romanesque architecture. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.) Crisis of Old Regime; middle class and popular revolt; from constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the Reign of Terror and revolutionary government; expansion of revolution in Europe; rise and fall of Napoleonic empire.
  • HIST-B 359 Europe, 1789-1848 (3 cr.) European history between 1789 and 1848, including the French Revolution; Napoleon; the Industrial Revolution; conservatism, liberalism, socialism and nationalism; and the 1848 revolution.
  • HIST-B 360 Europe, 1848-1914 (3 cr.) European history between 1848 and 1914, including the unification of Italy and Germany; struggles for democracy and social welfare, populism, and imperialism; anticlericalism; the emergence of mass consumption; nationalist rivalries; and the background to World War I.
  • HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century, 1914-1945 (3 cr.) European history from 1914 up to 1945 including World War I and its aftermath; the cultural history of the 1920s and 1930s; economic turmoil; political developments in Western Europe; the rise of extremisms; World War II.
  • HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century, since 1945 (3 cr.) European history from 1945 to present, including the aftermath of World War II; the Cold War in Europe, the postwar economic boom; the emergence of leftist movements; European integration; the end of the Cold War; the impact of immigration and the expansion of the European Union.
  • HIST-B 377 History of Germany Since 1648 I (3 cr.) Political, economic, and cultural states of Germany between 1648 and 1871; growth of the absolutist Hapsburg and Hohenzollern dynasties; economic and cultural development under absolutism; impact of the French Revolution; struggles between reaction and liberalism; and unification.
  • HIST-B 378 History of Germany Since 1648 II (3 cr.) The beginnings of the new imperial German state, industrialization; imperialism; international friction; internal political conflicts; World War I; the Weimar Republic; the Third Reich; the two Germanies in the Cold War; re-unification and its aftermath.
  • HIST-D 308 Empire of the Tsars (3 cr.) Political, religious, intellectual, economic, and diplomatic development of Russia as a European and Asian state from the reign of Alexander I to World War I. Emphasis on cultural history and conflict between established and revolutionary views.
  • HIST-D 310 Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3 cr.) Russia on the eve of World War I; revolutions that have swept Russia; principal developments in government, economy, cultural and social life, and international policy under the Communist regime; expansion and contraction of Russian and Communist power; collapse of the Soviet Union.
  • HIST-D 330 Eastern Europe 1944-present (3 cr.) Diplomatic, political, social, and cultural development of Eastern European societies between the end of World War II in Europe to the expansion of the European Union.
  • HIST-D 410 Russian Revolutions and Soviet Regime (3 cr.)
  • HIST-E 100 Introduction to African History (3 cr.) Survey of selected historical issues and problems. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods.
  • HIST-F 100 Issues in Latin American History: Introduction (3 cr.) The coming together of the three races in the New World; the construction of a social, political, and economic order; the resilience and/or fragility of the social, political, and economic order in modern times.
  • HIST-F 216 History of Slaves in the Americas (3 cr.) Slavery in the New World is explored by comparing its forms in North America and in the Caribbean and South America. Special attention is paid to the mechanisms by which slaves were held in slavery, and the adaptation and accommodations that were made by both masters and slaves.
  • HIST-F 232 Upheaval in 20th-Century Latin America (3 cr.) An examination of major breaks in the continuities of Latin American history, revolutions both on the right and on the left, as well as the great popular uprising in Mexico with which such folk heroes as Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata are associated.
  • HIST-F 341 Latin America: Conquest and Empire (3 cr.) The construction of this new world; Spanish, Indian, and African backgrounds; discovery, conquest, and settlement; the political, economic, and social structure of colonial Latin America.
  • HIST-F 342 Latin America: Evolution and Revolution (3 cr.) The construction of nation-state foreign relations; ethnic and racial diversities, city-country balances; role of religion; sources of political authority; immigrant populations; role of elites; popular movements.
  • HIST-G 100 Introduction to Asian History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in Asian societies; especially important are their political institutions, economic development, ideological and religious foundations, and social changes.
  • HIST-G 200 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of importance in Asian societies, such as China and Japan. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit.
  • HIST-G 300 Issues in Asian History (3 cr.) In-depth study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of importance in Asian societies, such as China and Japan.  Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit.
  • HIST-G 385 Modern China (3 cr.) From the decline of the last empire to the establishment of the People's Republic of China, modern China struggled with many issues, such as traditionalism, nationalism, imperialism, republicanism, and communism.
  • HIST-G 387 Contemporary China (3 cr.) Focusing on the People's Republic of China, this course will illustrate the triumphs and failures of the communist regime, investigate the causes, and explain the direction that China is taking. The course will also cover Chinese society in Hong Kong and Taiwan.
  • HIST-G 451 The Far East 1 (3 cr.) Social, cultural, political, and economic development from ancient to modern times, including China, Japan, Korea, Indo-China, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines.
  • HIST-G 457 Nationalism in Japan and China (3 cr.) P: One Asian history course at the 100 level or consent of instructor. This course traces the emergence of nationalism in China and Japan in the context of their struggle for modernization, follows their development from the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century, and analyzes its contemporary political culture.
  • HIST-H 101 The World in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) Survey of major global events and developments in the twentieth century: imperialism, World War I, Russian and Chinese revolutions, Great Depression, World War II, Cold War, decolonization, the end of the Cold War, and the resurgence of nationalism.
  • HIST-H 103 Europe: Renaissance to Napoleon (3 cr.) Major developments in European thought during the Renaissance, the Reformation, the scientific revolution, and the Enlightenment; traditional politics, economy, and society and their transformation by enlightened despotism, the French Revolution, and Napoleon.
  • HIST-H 104 Europe: Napoleon to the Present (3 cr.) The development of European society from the downfall of Napoleon in 1815 to the present. The impact of the industrial revolution; the rise of the middle class; liberalism, Marxism, and mass politics; nationalism and imperialism; international communism and fascism.
  • HIST-H 105 American History: General Course I (3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Europe and America before colonization; the colonial era and the contact of cultures; the Revolutionary Era; the Early Republic; the Antebellum Era and the Civil War.
  • HIST-H 106 American History: General Course II (3 cr.) Combines social, cultural, and economic approaches to explore Reconstruction and the New South; the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, WWI, the Depression, New Deal, and WWII; and America since 1945 (the Cold War and its end, progressive social movements, the New Right, etc.).
  • HIST-H 199 Careers for History Majors (1 cr.) The major objective of the course is to offer students the opportunity to consider career opportunities with an undergraduate degree in history.  Some of the topics to be considered in the course include the nature and acquisition of skills with a history major; the resources within the history department, offices across campus, and in the community available to students to gain stills and learn about job prospects; and the value of and procedures for developing a career plan and attaining a job.
  • HIST-H 201 Russian Civilization I (3 cr.) From the earliest times to Peter the Great. Christianization of the Russian people, Kievan Rus; the Mongol conquest; the Grand Dukes of Muscovy; Ivan the Terrible; Time of Troubles; Romanov dynasty.
  • HIST-H 202 Russian Civilization II (3 cr.) From Peter the Great to the present era. Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Russian expansion; emancipation of the serfs; Westernization; industrialization; Russian revolutions; Stalin; Cold War; collapse of the Soviet Union.
  • HIST-H 205 Ancient Civilization (3 cr.) Political, cultural, and economic development of ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome from the Bronze Age to the end of the Classical Period.
  • HIST-H 206 Medieval Civilization (3 cr.) European institutions and social and intellectual history from late Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Greco-Roman legacy, Christian institutions, Byzantine and Islamic influences, town revival and trade, rise of universities, emergence of national states and literatures.
  • HIST-H 207 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.) Focus on China, Japan, and Korea in the twentieth century. Explores the history of each individual country and the experiences shared by all three. Traditional values challenged by modernism, interactions with the West, domestic strife.
  • HIST-H 208 American-East Asian Relations (3 cr.) Interaction of the United States and East Asia from the founding of the republic to the present. First contacts, growing economic ties, political considerations, U.S. occupation of the Philippines, role of the U.S. military, growing tensions during the 1920s and 1930s, World War II, East Asia during the Cold War, growing interdependency between East and West in modern times.
  • HIST-H 214 Comparative Women's History (3 cr.) An examination and comparison of the history of women in different regions of the world, addressing universal issues and issues specific to regions. The course traces the social, economic, and political roles of women from the premodern past to the transformations of the twentieth century. Topics include work, home, education, sexual patterns, and gender relations.
  • HIST-H 218 History of Motion Pictures (3 cr.) History of English-language films from the silent era to the modern period. Attention is paid to directors and producers, actors and dialogue, and to the evolution of film technology.
  • HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.) P: HIST-H 105, HIST-H 106. From settlement of colonies to the present. European background; colonial militia; American Revolution, Indian wars; Civil War; principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized, with some attention to navy, marines, and air force.
  • HIST-H 222 Renaissance and Reformation Europe (3 cr.) Society and civilization in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Transition from medieval to modern life in political and economic behavior, high and popular culture, theology and religion, discoveries and expansion, occult and scientific worldviews.
  • HIST-H 225 Special Topics in History (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit.
  • HIST-H 226 Origins and History of the Cold War (3 cr.) Study and analysis of the ideological, historical, and geopolitical factors underlying the Cold War. Special focus on the former Soviet Union and Red China under Mao Zedong, as well as the breakup of the Soviet Union and the lingering effects of the Cold War on the contemporary world.
  • HIST-H 228 The Vietnam War (3 cr.) Vietnamese history and culture, French colonization, nationalism, WWII. War with France 1946-1954, U.S. involvement, Geneva Accords, U.S. support to Diem government. Increased U.S. commitment, Cold War dynamics, American political responses, U.S. withdrawal, fall of the South. International repercussions, war veterans, media portrayal.
  • HIST-H 231 Women, Men and Family in History (3 cr.) The course will examine changes in relationships within the family and the changing role of the family in society. Changes in gender roles will be highlighted. Among the topics to be discussed are courtship, marriage, inheritance, child-bearing, child labor, the origins of family limitation and birth control, and the effects of other institutions on the family.  This course can be authorized for a variable course title so that different regions of the world can be specified, such as: "Women, Men and Family History: Latin America," or "Women, Men and Family in History: Asia."
  • HIST-H 233 Sports in History (3 cr.) Examines the historical conditions in which sports have developed from ancient to contemporary times, with particular emphasis on modern American society and sport.
  • HIST-H 236 The Historian's Craft (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. To be taken within a year of student’s declaring a history major. Introduction to the skills and methodology of analysis, research, writing, and oral communication within the discipline of history.
  • HIST-H 309 Tudor England (3 cr.) Political, social, economic, and cultural development in England, 1485-1601.
  • HIST-H 373 History of Science and Technology (3 cr.) Survey of the intellectual and institutional development of science and technology in the United States from colonial times to 1865, with special emphasis on the relationship between science and technology, the role of technology in early American economic growth, and the inevitability and desirability of technological change.
  • HIST-H 407 Oral History (3 cr.) A survey of theory, methods, and applications of oral history, including research, interview preparation and execution, legal and ethical issues, and transcription and preservation of interviews. Emphasis will be placed on persons and topics relevant to local and regional history.
  • HIST-H 408 Independent Study in Community History (1-3 cr.) P: One 100-level history course or consent of instructor. Students have the opportunity to develop and execute original research projects involving topics in community history, with particular emphasis on the regional campus service area. Projects must reflect sound conceptual and contextual grounding, including awareness of appropriate secondary literature, and incorporate primary research in local and regional archival repositories. Appropriate incorporation of oral history is encouraged. Both individual and group projects are permissible.
  • HIST-H 411 Historical Editing (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in history or consent of instructor. Study and analysis of historical writing; editing documents and visual material; process of publishing historical works.
  • HIST-H 412 Historic Preservation (3 cr.) History of building and decorating techniques; study of politics and economics of historic preservation; processes of renovating or restoring historic buildings; techniques of adaptive reuse of historic buildings.
  • HIST-H 425 Topics in History (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary but will usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated once for credit.
  • HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Selected topics of history.
  • HIST-K 495 Readings in History (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Selected topics. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours when topics vary.
  • HIST-W 101 World Civilizations to 1500 (3 cr.) Presents the key individuals, events and schools of thought, which have most greatly impacted societal development and world history up to 1500. The target civilizations of study include Asia, the Middle East, Western Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Discusses the political, economic, social and cultural evolution of human civilization.
  • HIST-W 102 World Civilizations 1500 To Present (3 cr.) Presents the key individuals, events and schools of thought, which have most greatly impacted societal development and world history from 1500 to the present. The target civilizations of study include Asia, the Middle East, Western Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Discusses the political, economic, social and cultural evolution of human civilization.
  • HIST-W 300 Issues in World History (3 cr.) In-depth study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of importance in world history. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit, up to 6 units.
  • HON-H 103 Honors Seminar: Common Intellectual Experience I (3 cr.) P: Admission to the Honors Program. A skills course emphasizing writing, reading, speaking, thinking skills, collaborative learning, diversity, research, and the use of technology in an academic setting. Readings and discussion of texts-in-common selected by Honors faculty and studied in preparation for possible project presentation at the Mid-East Honors Conference in the spring. Ordinarily taken during the first semester of study at IU Southeast. Part one of the required two-semester seminar sequence for Tier One students.
  • HON-H 104 Honors Seminar: Common Intellectual Experience II (3 cr.) P: Admission to the Honors Program. Continuation of HON-H 103. Builds on skills attained in the first semester with continued reading and discussion of texts-in-common. Students will begin to envision, research, and refine projects for possible presentation at the Mid-East Honors Conference in the spring. Ordinarily taken during the second semester of study at IU Southeast. Part two of the required two-semester seminar sequence for Tier One students.
  • HON-H 306 Multidisciplinary Seminar in the Humanities and Social Sciences (3-6 cr.) P: Admission to the Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Director. Topic varies with the instructor and semester. Possible topics include Art as Literature; Death and Dying; Utopias through History. May be repeated for up to 18 credit hours.
  • HON-H 307 Multidisciplinary Seminar (3-6 cr.) P: Admission to the Honors Program or permission of the Honors Program Director. Topic varies with the instructor and semester. Topics will include those outside the humanities and social sciences. May be repeated for up to 18 credit hours.
  • HON-H 400 Honors Research Minor Seminar (1-3 cr.) Required seminar for Tier Two students undertaking the research minor. Honors seminars will encompass discussion of each student's research along with larger issues such as research strategies, publication, and ethics. May be repeated for up to 4 credit hours.
  • HON-H 495 Honors Project (1-3 cr.) Designed to meet the needs of Honors students who have chosen to pursue individualized honors, this course permits students flexibility and the opportunity to work with a faculty mentor. May be repeated for up to 4 credit hours.
  • HPER-A 361 Coaching of Football (1.5 cr.) Fundamentals of offensive and defensive line and backfield play, outstanding rules, offensive plays, and most frequently used defenses. Includes principles, theories, techniques, and problems of football coaching and coaching psychology.
  • HPER-A 362 Coaching of Basketball (1.5 cr.) Fundamentals of basketball shooting, passing, ball handling, and footwork; patterns against man to man, zone, and zone pressure defense. Includes principles, theories, techniques, and problems of basketball coaching and coaching psychology.
  • HPER-A 368 Coaching of Tennis (1.5 cr.) Theory and methods of coaching tennis, covering technical, administrative, and organizational aspects involved in the process. Emphasis placed upon principles, fundamentals, tactics, conditioning, psychology, conduct of practice sessions, and problems.
  • HPER-C 366 Community Health (3 cr.) Human ecology as it relates to interaction of social and physical phenomena in solving community health problems. Considers the promotion of community health, programs of prevention, environmental health, and health services.
  • HPER-E 181 Tennis (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the fundamental skills of forehand and backhand strokes and serves. Competitive play in women's, men's, and mixed doubles.
  • HPER-E 185 Volleyball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental skills of power volleyball. Emphasis on overhand serve, bump, set, dig, and spike. Team offensive and defensive strategies included.
  • HPER-H 160 First Aid and Emergency Care (2-3 cr.) Lecture and demonstration on first aid measures for wounds, hemorrhage, burns, exposure, sprains, dislocations, fractures, unconscious conditions, suffocation, drowning, and poisons, with skill training in all procedures.
  • HPER-H 305 Women's Health (3 cr.) Examines the relationship of women to health and health care. Five dimensions of health: physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual, provide a framework for comparison and contrast of health concerns unique to women and common to both sexes at all ages.
  • HPER-H 317 Topical Seminar in Health Education (1-3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of health education. May be repeated for credit if topic differs.
  • HPER-H 363 Personal Health (3 cr.) Acquaints prospective teachers with basic personal health information; provides motivation for intelligent self-direction of health behavior; study of physiological and psychological bases for health, drugs, and other critical issues; and family health.
  • HPER-R 160 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure (3 cr.) An introduction to the field of recreation and leisure from the viewpoint of the individual as a consumer and of societal agencies as providers of leisure services. Includes philosophy, history, theory, and survey of public and private leisure-service organizations.
  • HPER-R 271 Dynamics of Outdoor Recreation (3 cr.) Philosophical orientation to the field of outdoor recreation; camping, outdoor education, and natural resource management; with emphasis on programs, trends, resources, and values.
  • HPER-R 272 Recreation Activities and Leadership Methods (3 cr.) P: HPER-R 160. Analysis of recreation program activities, objectives, determinants, and group dynamics involved in the leadership process. Identification and evaluation of equipment, supplies, and leadership techniques are included.
  • HPER-R 317 Seminar in Recreation and Parks (1-3 cr.) Park and recreation current issues seminar.  Topic varies with the instructor and year. May be repeated for credit if topic differs.
  • HPER-R 324 Recreational Sports Programming (3 cr.) Overview of programmatic elements and techniques in recreational sports. Topics include informal, intramural, club, and extramural programming; values of recreational sports, programming techniques, publicity and promotion; faculty utilization, equipment, safety, liability, and program observation.
  • HPER-R 398 Practicum in Recreation, Park and Tourism Studies (1-6 cr.) Students earn practical field experience under faculty supervision and with seminar discussions with professionals in the field of recreation. Course is designed for future recreation and sports specialists. Repetable for credit.
  • HPER-R 399 Readings in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of Intructor/Department Coordinaotor Selected readings in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism studies. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for Credit
  • HUMA-U 101 Introduction to the Humanities (3 cr.) A survey of the development of the humanities to the Renaissance, with an emphasis on the relationship between ideas and the arts.
  • HUMA-U 102 Introduction to Modern Humanities (3 cr.) A survey of the development of the humanities from the Renaissance to the present, with an emphasis on the relationship of ideas and the arts.
  • HUMA-U 333 Greeks in Ancient Italy (3 cr.) P: HUMA-U 101 or PHIL-P 100 or PHIL-P 410 This course will involve a firsthand exploration of these traces of the Ancient Greeks in Italy. In particular, this course will offer students an opportunity to witness in person the dynamic relationship between ideas, politics, religion, and the arts that the Greeks provoked in Magna Grecia.
  • IDIS-D 500 Graduate Project (3-6 cr.) Independent project to be undertaken in consultation with graduate advisor. This project requires students to demonstrate mastery of some specific topic or medium of expression. Course is repeatable
  • IDIS-D 501 Humanities Seminar (1-4 cr.) An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the humanities. Topics vary from semester to semester. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 502 Social Science Seminar (1-4 cr.) An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the social sciences. Topics vary from semester to semester. Course is repeatable
  • IDIS-D 503 Natural Science Seminar (1-4 cr.) An interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the natural sciences. Topics vary from semester to semester. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 510 Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies (3-4 cr.) The course provides a comprehensive introduction to graduate liberal studies, as well as preparing students to participate successfully in all facets of the MLS program. The course examines principles of intellectual inquiry in the three fields represented in the MLS program: Arts & Letters, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences.
  • IDIS-D 511 MLS Humanities Elective (1-4 cr.) An elective taken for graduate credit in a humanities field. Requires Application for Graduate Credit signed by student and instructor, submitted to MLS director. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 512 MLS Social Sciences Elective (1-4 cr.) An elective taken for graduate credit in a social sciences field. Requires Application for Graduate Credit signed by student and instructor, submitted to MLS director Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 513 MLS Natural Sciences Elective (1-4 cr.) An elective taken for graduate credit in a natural sciences field. Requires Application for Graduate Credit signed by student and instructor, submitted to MLS director. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 550 Teaching Assistantship (3 cr.) This graduate course takes the form of a teaching assistantship. This course is a requirement for the academic teaching track. It will consist of assisting a faculty member in planning, teaching, grading, and assessing a course in the area of the student's concentration. May be repeated once.
  • IDIS-D 551 Research Assistantship (1-6 cr.) P: LBST-D/IDIS-D 510 and prior consent of director and instructor. This course will enable students to assist resident faculty in their research. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 591 Graduate Seminar in Teaching and Learning (3 cr.) This workshop focuses on best practices literature about pedagogy in higher education. The course will include: philosophy of teaching and learning, course planning and design, selecting textbooks and readings, syllabus construction and course policies, the literature on lecturing and discussion, faculty and student conduct, assessment of student learning.
  • IDIS-D 594 Liberal Studies Directed Readings (1-3 cr.) Readings in interdisciplinary topic under the supervision of a faculty member. Requires application for D 594 signed by student and instructor, submitted to MIS director. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 599 Internship (0-6 cr.) An internship is an educational experience related to a student's degree program and career plan which applies what the student has learned to work situations. It involves a student, employer, and university sponsor. See Career Services for more information and to register. Course is repeatable to maximum of 6 credits.
  • IDIS-D 601 Graduate Project Proposal Seminar (3 cr.) During the course, students progress from a thesis idea to a full Graduate Project Proposal; a process which involves extensive literature review and development of appropriate methodology. At course end, students will have developed the first two chapters of their thesis. In addition students will identify their thesis committee.
  • IDIS-D 602 Graduate Project (1-6 cr.) Independent project to be undertaken in consultation with the student’s graduate advisor. This project requires students to demonstrate mastery of some specific topic or medium of expression. Prerequisite: Approved Graduate Project Proposal. Course is repeatable.
  • IDIS-D 700 TOPICS IN LIBERAL STUDIES (3 cr.) Intensive study of a major issue in the Humanities, Social Sciences, or Sciences. Interdisciplinary approach, seminar format. Individual project required. Specific topic announced in Schedule of Classes.
  • INFO-C 100 Informatics Foundations (3 cr.) Introduction to informatics, basic problems solving and elementary programming skills. It also provides a survey of computing tools in the context of selected disciplines (cognates).
  • INFO-C 112 Tools For Informatics: Programming and Databases (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to programming and databases, two basic means of creating, changing, and storing information on a computer. Computational thinking, basic programming, and basic debugging methods will be covered in a high-level language.  Data modeling, schemas, SQL queries, and data-entry forms will also be emphasized.
  • INFO-C 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (3 cr.) An introduction to methods of analytical, abstract, and critical thinking; deductive reasoning; and logical and mathematical tools used in information sciences. The topics include propositional and predicate logic, natural deduction proof system, sets, functions and relations, elementary statistics, proof methods in mathematics, and mathematical induction.
  • INFO-C 203 Social Informatics (3 cr.) Introduction to key ethical, privacy and legal issues as related to informatics, and social research perspectives and literatures on the use of information and communication technologies. Topics include: intellectual property, legal issues, societal laws, ethical use of information, information privacy laws, personal code of ethics, principles for resolving ethical conflicts, and popular and controversial uses of technology. This course also outlines research methodologies for social informatics.
  • INFO-C 210 Problem Solving and Programming I (3 cr.) First in a two-course sequence of intensive computer programming. In this course, students will design, develop, test, and debug software solutions using a given programming language.
  • INFO-C 211 Problem Solving and Programming 2 (3 cr.) Second course in the two-course sequence of intensive computer programming. In this course, students will learn and apply object oriented computer programming concepts and techniques. The course will also provide a brief introduction to data structures and files.
  • INFO-C 300 human Copmputer Interaction (3 cr.) This course introduces core topics and approaches in human-computer interaction including the process of designing and evaluating interactive technologies. Topics include interaction design, evaluation, usability, user psychology, prototyping, requirements and analysis, and related issues. Students working in teams identify stakeholders, build user-centered interfaces, and apply statistics to analyze user data.
  • INFO-C 307 Data Representation and Organization (3 cr.) This course will provide an introduction to ways in which data can be organized, represented and processed from low-level to high level. Topics include construction of memory based structures and algorithms using arrays (single, multidimensional), lists (single, double, circular), stacks, queues, binary trees, and hash tables, and basic file manipulation.
  • INFO-C 399 Database Systems (3 cr.) This course will provide an in-depth discussion of database systems fundamentals. The course emphasizes the concepts underlying various functionalities provided by a database management system, and its usage from an end-user perspective. Topics include: overview and architecture of database systems, the relational database modeling and querying, and basic XML database modeling and querying.
  • INFO-C 450 System Design (3 cr.) This course introduces the concepts of large scale system design and development. Topics include: the software development life cycle, specification, analysis, design, modeling, use cases, user interface design, planning, estimating, reusability, portability, working in teams, introductory project management and CASE tools. Student teams will present their final project design.
  • INFO-C 451 System Implementation (3 cr.) This course introduces the concepts of large scale system implementation. Topics include: implementation of data models, user interfaces, and software systems, working in teams, software testing, planning, estimating, and post-delivery maintenance. The students will work in teams and will utilize project management tools and revision control and source code management systems. Student teams will present their final project design.
  • INFO-C 452 Project Management (3 cr.) This course provides an in-depth discussion of project management in an Informatics setting. Students will become conversant in the tools and techniques of project management, such as project selection methods, work breakdown structures, network diagrams, critical path analysis, critical chain scheduling, cost estimates, earned value management, motivation theory and team building.
  • INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.) Emphasis on topics in human-computer interaction and human factors, collaborative technologies, group problem solving, ethics, privacy, and ownership of information and information sources, information representation and the information life cycle, the transformation of data to information, futuristic thinking.
  • INFO-I 110 Basic Tools of Informatics I - Programming (1.5 cr.) C: INFO-I 101. Introduction to programming for users of computers systems. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques. An eight-week lecture and laboratory course.
  • INFO-I 111 Basic Tools of Informatics II - Introduction to Databases (1.5 cr.) C: INFO-I 101 and INFO-I 110. Introduction to database design concepts. Entering and modifying data, accessing data using visual tools and SQL, and building database applications using forms and application development tools. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques. An eight-week lecture and laboratory course.
  • INFO-I 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 201 and MATH-M 118 or higher with C or better. An introduction to the suite of mathematical and logical tools used in information sciences, including finite mathematics, automata and computability theory, elementary probability and statistics, and basics of classical information theory. Credit given for either INFO-I 201 or CSCI-C 251 (if taken at IU Southeast).
  • INFO-I 202 Social Informatics (3 cr.) C: INFO-I 101. Introduces the social and behavioral foundations of informatics. Theoretical approaches to how technology is used from psychological and sociotechnical perspectives. Examples of how current and emerging technologies such as games, e-mail, and electronic commerce are affecting daily lives, social relations, work, and leisure time.
  • INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 101, INFO-I 110, and INFO-I 111, with grades of C or better. Two years of high school mathematics or equivalent is recommended. The software architecture of information systems. Basic concepts of systems and applications programming. Credit given for only one of the following: INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 201 (IU Southeast).
  • INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 201 with a C or better. The systems architecture of distributed applications. Advanced programming, including an introduction to the programming of graphical systems. Cross-listed with CSCI-C 202. Credit given for only one of the following: INFO-I 211, CSCI-C 202 (IU Southeast).
  • INFO-I 300 Human-Computer Interaction (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 or CSCI-C 202 with a C or better. The analysis of human factors and the design of computer application interfaces. A survey of current HCI designs with an eye toward what future technologies will allow. The course will emphasize learning HCI based on implementation and testing interfaces.
  • INFO-I 303 Organizational Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 with a C or better. Examines the various needs, uses, and consequences of information in organizational contexts. Topics include organizational types and characteristics, functional areas and business processes, information-based products and services, the use of and redefining the role of information technology, the changing character of work life and organizational practices, sociotechnical structures, and the rise and transformation of information-based industries.
  • INFO-I 308 Information Representation (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 201 or CSCI-C 251 and INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 201 with grades of C or better. The basic structure of information representation in digital information systems. Begins with low-level computer representations such as common character and numeric encodings. Introduces formal design and query languages through Entity Relationship Modeling, the Relational Model, XML, and XHTML. Laboratory topics include SQL and XPath querying.
  • INFO-I 320 Distributed Systems and Collaborative Computing (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 or CSCI-C 202 with a C or better. An introductory treatment of distributed systems and programming. Topics range from the distributed and object models of computation to advanced concepts, such as remote method invocations, object brokers, object services, open systems, and future trends for distributed information systems.
  • INFO-I 330 Legal and Social Informatics of Security (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 with a C or better. This course examines that set of ethical and legal problems most tightly bound to the issues of information control. The interaction and technology changes, but the core issues have remained: privacy, intellectual property, Internet law, concepts of jurisdiction, speech anonymity versus accountability, and ethical decision making in the network environment.
  • INFO-I 356 Globalization, Where We Fit IN (3 cr.) Globalization changes how we work, what we buy, and who we know. Globalization involves people working eighty hour weeks in China and receiving free state-of-the-art drugs in Africa. Learn about the past, present, and future of globalization, and what it means for you, your job, and your community.
  • INFO-I 368 Intro to Network Science (3 cr.) Friends, computers, the Web, and our brain are examples of networks that pervade our lives. Network science helps us understand complex patterns of connection, interaction, and relationships in many complex systems. Students learn essential concepts and core ideas of network literacy, and basic tools to handle social and information networks.
  • INFO-I 421 Applications of Data Mining (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 308 with a C or better. The course explores the use of data mining techniques in different settings, including business and scientific domains. The emphasis will be on using techniques instead of developing new techniques or algorithms. Students will select, prepare, visualize, analyze, and present data that leads to the discovery of novel and actionable information.
  • INFO-I 427 Search Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 308 with a C or better. Techniques and tools to automatically crawl, parse, index, store and search Web information, organizing knowledge that can help meet the needs of organizations, communities and individual users. Social and business impact of search engine technology. As a project, students will build a real search engine and compare it with Google.
  • INFO-I 441 Interaction Design Practice (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 300 with a C or better. Human-computer interaction design (HCID) describes the way a person or group accomplishes tasks with a computer: what the individual or group does and how the computer responds, and what the computer does and how the individual or group responds. This course is organized around a collection of readings and three design projects applying human-computer interaction principles to the design, selection, and evaluation of interactive systems.
  • INFO-I 491 Capstone Project Internship (3-6 cr.) P: Coordinator Approval Required. Students put their informatics education to practice through the development of a substantial project while working in a professional information technology environment. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • INFO-I 494 Design and Development of an Information System (3 cr.) P: Senior standing and department consent required. System design and development present both technical and managerial problems with which students will be familiar from their undergraduate course work. This course puts these lessons into practice as students work in teams to develop an information system. Examples of course projects include design and development of a database for a business or academic application, preparation and presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality).
  • INFO-I 495 Design and Development of Information System (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 494, senior standing and department consent required. System design and development present both technical and managerial problems with which students will be familiar from their undergraduate course work. This course puts these lessons into practice as students work in teams to develop an information system. Examples of course projects include design and development of a database for a business or academic application, preparation and presentation of an interactive media performance or exhibit, or design and implementation of a simulated environment (virtual reality).
  • INFO-I 499 Readings and Research in Informatics (1-3 cr.) P: Pre-Approval of Informatics Department Coordinator and completion of 100- and 200-level Informatics requirements. Independent readings and research related to a topic of special interest to the student. Written report required. Can be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • INFO-Y 395 Career Development for Informatics Majors (1 cr.) P: INFO-I 101, INFO-I 110, and INFO-I 111 with a C or better. Helps students develop skills and knowledge to successfully pursue a career search, both at the time of graduation and as they progress through their careers. The course covers techniques and strategies to make the job search more efficient and effective. An eight-week course.
  • INTL-I 100 Intro to International Studies (3 cr.) This course is intended to give majors or potential majors in International Studies an introduction to the field of study. As an interdisciplinary major, students in International Studies take courses from a variety of disciplines from various social sciences and humantinites. This course is intended to help students place these discipline-based concepts within a framework to see better how they interrelate and collectively make up a cohesive area of study.
  • INTL-I 400 International Studies Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) P: INTL-I 100 and most of INTL cousework completed, as well as senior standing and permission of instructor or program coordinator. A seminar course in which advanced students will work with a professor and other students, each doing original research and exchanging ideas and findings through reports and discussions.
  • JOUR-C 200 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 cr.) Survey of the functions, responsibilities, and influences of the various media of mass communication. Directed toward the consumer and critic of mass media.
  • JOUR-C 327 Writing for Mass Media - The Horizon (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200; may be waived with instructor approval. Work as a staff member on the campus student news organization. Reporting and writing, headline writing, desktop publishing, photography, online journalism, and advertising sales. Repeatable up to 6 credit hours.
  • JOUR-J 170 Wordsmithing (2 cr.) Workshop on the mechanics of journalistic writing and editing. The course builds on the basics, focuses on the practical and strengthens confidence as a practitioner.
  • JOUR-J 200 Reporting, Writing, and Editing I (3 cr.) Working seminar stressing the creation of journalistic stories for diverse audiences. Students will learn to develop story ideas, gather information, combine visual and verbal messages, and write and edit news.
  • JOUR-J 210 Visual Communication (3 cr.) Theories of visual communication including human perception and principles of design. Application of those theories to photography, computer graphics, photo editing, and page design in news communication.
  • JOUR-J 261 Studies in Journalism (1-4 cr.) Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material. Topics may change from term to term.
  • JOUR-J 280 Seminar in Journalism Ethics (3 cr.) Examines the ethical dilemmas that confront today's journalists and provides a framework for decision making.
  • JOUR-J 300 Communications Law (3 cr.) History and philosophy of laws pertaining to free press and free speech. Topics include trademark and copyright law, libel, censorship, obscenity, right of privacy, government regulations, and business law affecting media operations.
  • JOUR-J 301 Social Media Strategies (3 cr.) Examines theories and current trends in social media's effect on modern society. Topics also include focus on personal and professional communication strategies using social media.
  • JOUR-J 303 Online Journalism (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200; may be waived with instructor approval. Explore nonlinear methods of storytelling and how web-based tools can enhance journalism written and online work. In addition to building existing skills, students use photography and embedded audio to create story packages.
  • JOUR-J 307 Media Career Planning (1 cr.) Prepare for job or internship searches. Polish your resume or portfolio. Learn how to write cover letters and practice interviewing skills. Understand how to articulate your abilities and experiences to market yourself to potential employers. Prepare a career action plan.
  • JOUR-J 320 Principles of Creative Advertising (3 cr.) Analysis of strategy employed in developing creative advertising, with emphasis on the role of the copywriter. Research, media, legal aspects, ethical standards as they apply to the copywriting functions. Place of the creative function within the advertising agency and the retail business.
  • JOUR-J 321 Principles of Public Relations (3 cr.) Survey course about the theory and practice of public relations. Examines public relations' function within organizations, its impact on publics and its role in society. Topics include the evolution of the field, the range of roles and responsibilities that public relations practitioners assume in a variety of settings, ethics, and significant issues and trends that have shaped the practice. Course provides a foundation for more advanced study in the field. Also useful for those planning another professional or managerial career that requires an understanding of public relations concepts and management practices.
  • JOUR-J 340 Public Relations Tactics and Techniques (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 321. Covers a wide variety of knowledge and skills needed by entry-level public relations practitioners. Topics include media relations, community relations and internal communications.
  • JOUR-J 344 Photojournalism Reporting (3 cr.) The course will survey photographic techniques, including subject selection, composition and framing, lens and filter use, and use of the digital darkroom and editing techniques.
  • JOUR-J 349 Public Relations Writing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200; may be waived with instructor approval. Develop the professional writing skills expected of beginning public relations practitioners, including different approaches required for a variety of audiences and media. Focus on the basics of good writing as well as the art of writing. Brush up on AP style. Learn how to work effectively with clients.
  • JOUR-J 354 Photo Journalism Editing (3 cr.) Workshop in the principles of combining visual and verbal material with emphasis on news judgment, fairness, accuracy, editorial balance, and language usage. Practice in cropping, layout, design, writing headlines and captions, and computer editing technology.
  • JOUR-J 360 Journalism Specialties (1-4 cr.) Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material from term to term. Repeatable up to 12 units.
  • JOUR-J 362 Journalism Multimedia Storytelling (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200; may be waived with instructor approval. Hands-on experiences in reporting, editing and presenting stories in images, sound and spoken word. Goes beyond basic skills with advanced cameras and software. Create projects including Podcast, Audio slideshow, web video, and Portfolio website to display projects.
  • JOUR-J 384 Videojournalism (3 cr.) Students will learn shooting, editing, producing, and distributing high-quality videojournalism.
  • JOUR-J 385 Television News (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200; may be waived with instructor approval. Work as a staff member on the campus student news organization. Preparation and presentation of news for television. Practice in writing, reporting and editing news for TV.
  • JOUR-J 425 Supervision of School Media (3 cr.) Lectures and discussion on designing, producing, and financing school newspapers and yearbooks. Practical exercises in journalistic writing, editing, layout, and photography
  • JOUR-J 429 Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 321; may be waived with instructor approval. How to develop a campaign proposal to meet a client's business objectives and how to pitch it. Part of the course focuses on media relations and crisis communications training.
  • JOUR-J 485 Senior Seminar in Journalism (3 cr.) P: Senior standing. Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material on relevant issues in journalism and mass communications; research paper usually required.
  • JOUR-J 499 Honors Research in Journalism (1-4 cr.) P: Authorization required. To be taken in conjunction with advanced courses to meet requirements for the Journalism Honors Program. Course is repeatable up to 4 credit hours.
  • MATH-A 118 Finite Mathematics for the Social and Biological Sciences (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 101. Quantitative reasoning, probability, elementary combinations, reading and interpreting graphs and tables, measuring central tendency and variation, scatter plots, correlation, and regression. Intended to meet the finite math requirement for students who will be taking MATH-K 300. Course uses applied examples from psychology, sociology, biology, and political science. Credit given for only one of MATH-A 118 or MATH-M 118.
  • MATH-K 300 Statistical Techniques for Health Professionals (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 101. Recommended: MATH-M 118 or MATH-A 118. An introduction to statistics. Nature of statistical data. Ordering and manipulation of data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion. Elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference decision; estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics may include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. Credit not given for both ECON-E 280–E 281 and MATH-K 300.
  • MATH-M 101 Topics in Algebra 4 (2 cr.) Topic: Linear Models and Graphs. Linear equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, systems, problem solving. Prepares students for MATH-M 102; MATH-M 110; MATH-M 112; MATH-M 114; MATH-A 118; MATH-M 118; MATH-T 101. Credit by examination not given.
  • MATH-M 102 Topics in Algebra 5 (2 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 101 with a C or better. Topic: Non-Linear Models and Graphs. Polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radicals, quadratic equations and functions, problem solving. Prepares students for MATH-M 122; MATH-M 125; and MATH-M 126.
  • MATH-M 110 Excursions into Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 101 with a C or better. Topics may include: Problem Solving, Logic, Set Theory, Numerations Systems (Historic and Other Bases Systems), Mathematics of Finance, Management Science, Apportionment and Voting Theory. This course does not count toward a major in mathematics.
  • MATH-M 114 Quantitative Literacy II (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 101 with a C or better. Introduction to statistics. Quantitative reasoning, probability, reading and interpreting graphs and tables, exploring shapes of distributions, measures or central tendency and variation.
  • MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 101 with a C or better. Set theory, linear systems, matrices, Markov Chains, probability and statistics. Applications to problems from the social sciences. Credit given for only one of MATH-A118 or MATH-M118.
  • MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus I (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 122 with a C or better. Introduction to calculus. Graphing and modeling with functions, compute and utilize derivatives in graphing and optimization problems, graph and model with exponential and logarithmic functions, basic integration computation and graphing. Primarily for students in business and the social sciences. Credit not given for both MATH-M 119 and MATH-M 215. For additional restrictions, refer to MATH-M 215-MATH-M216.
  • MATH-M 120 Brief Survey of Calculus II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 119 with a C or better. A continuation of MATH-M 119 covering topics in elementary differential equations, calculus of functions of several variables, and infinite series. Intended for nonphysical science students. Credit not given for both MATH-M 120 and MATH-M 216. For additional restrictions, refer to MATH-M 215-MATH-M 216.
  • MATH-M 122 College Algebra (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 102 with a C or better. Designed to prepare students for MATH-M 119 (Calculus). Includes solving and graphing linear, nonlinear, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Real life modeling and applications from business and economics. Credit not given for both MATH-M 122 and MATH-M 125.
  • MATH-M 125 Precalculus Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam or MATH-M 102 with a C or better. Designed to prepare students for MATH-M 215 (Calculus). Algebraic operations, polynomials, functions and their graphs, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphing calculators are not permitted in this course. Credit not given for both MATH-M 122 and MATH-M 125.
  • MATH-M 126 Trigonometric Functions (3 cr.) C: MATH-M 125 or equivalent. Designed to develop the properties of the trigonometric functions and equation solving to prepare for courses in calculus (MATH-M 215; MATH-M 216).
  • MATH-M 215 Calculus I (5 cr.) Completion of MATH-M 125 and MATH-M 126 (or placement) are recommended prior to enrollment. Coordinates, functions, straight line, limits, continuity, derivative and definite integral, applications, circles, conics, techniques of integration, infinite series. Credit not given for both MATH-M 215 and MATH-M 119.
  • MATH-M 216 Calculus II (5 cr.) P: MATH-M 215 with a C or better. Coordinates, functions, straight line, limits, continuity, derivative and definite integral, applications, circles, conics, techniques of integration, infinite series. Credit not given for both MATH-M 216 and MATH-M 120.
  • MATH-M 295 Readings and Research (1-3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Supervised problem solving. Admission only with permission of a member of the mathematics faculty who will act as supervisor.
  • MATH-M 303 Linear Algebra for Undergraduates (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Introduction to theory of real and complex vector spaces. Coordinate systems, linear dependence, bases. Linear transformations and matrix calculus. Determinants and rank.
  • MATH-M 311 Calculus III (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, minimum and maximum problems, and multiple integration.
  • MATH-M 312 Calculus IV (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311 with C or better. Intended for students majoring in the physical sciences and applied mathematics. Vector integral calculus (line integrals, Green's theorem, surface integrals, Stokes' theorem and applications). Topics in series expansions, including Fourier series and some applications. Introduction to functions of a complex variable (Cauchy-Riemann equations, Cauchy integral theorem, Laurent expansions and applications).
  • MATH-M 313 Elementary Differential Equations with Applications (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Ordinary differential equations of first order and linear equations of higher order with applications, series solutions, operational methods, Laplace transforms, and numerical techniques.
  • MATH-M 320 Theory of Interest (3 cr.) Measurement of interest; accumulation and discount; equations of value; annuities; perpetuities; amortization and sinking funds; yield rates; bonds and other securities; installment loans; depreciation, depletion, and capitalized cost.
  • MATH-M 360 Elements of Probability (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Introduction to mathematical theory of probability. Probability models, combinatoric problems, conditional probability and independence, random variables, distributions, densities, expectation, moments, Chebyshev inequality, generating functions of random variables, binomial, hypergeometric Poisson, uniform, gamma, normal and related distributions, joint distributions, laws of large numbers, normal approximation applications.
  • MATH-M 363 Sample Survey Techniques (3 cr.) P: Two years of high school mathematics including algebra, MATH-K 300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Techniques; simple random, stratified, systematic, cluster, proportions, ratios, percentages; sample size, and sources of error in surveys.
  • MATH-M 366 Elements of Statistical Inference (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 360 with a C or better. Sampling distributions (Chi square, t and F distributions), order, statistical decisions, and inference. Hypothesis-testing concepts, Neyman/Pearson lemma, likelihood ratio tests, power of tests. Point estimation, methods of moments, maximum likelihood, Cramer-Rao bound, and properties of estimators. Interval estimation, applications. Regression, correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods.
  • MATH-M 371 Elementary Computational Methods (3 cr.) Interpolation and approximation of functions, solution of equations, numerical integration and differentiation. Errors convergence, and stability of the procedures. Students write and use programs applying numerical methods.
  • MATH-M 380 History of Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Brief study of development of algebra and trigonometry; practical, demonstrative, and analytic geometry; calculus, famous problems, calculating devices; famous people in these fields and chronological outlines in comparison with outlines in the sciences, history, philosophy, and astronomy.
  • MATH-M 391 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Sets, functions and relations groups, real and complex numbers. Bridges the gap between elementary and advanced courses. Recommended for students with insufficient background for 400-level courses, for M.A.T. candidates, and for students in education.
  • MATH-M 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 303 and MATH-M 391 with a C or better or consent of instructor. Study of groups, rings, fields (usually including Galois theory), with applications to linear transformations.
  • MATH-M 404 Introduction to Modern Algebra II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 403 with a C or better. Study of groups, rings, fields (usually including Galois theory), with applications to linear transformations.
  • MATH-M 405 Number Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Numbers and their representation, divisibility and factorization, primes and their distribution, number theoretic functions, congruences, primitive roots, diophantine equations, quadratic residues, sums of squares, number theory and analysis, algebraic numbers, irrational and transcendental numbers.
  • MATH-M 406 Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Selected topics in various areas of mathematics not covered by the standard courses. May be repeated for credit.
  • MATH-M 413 Introduction to Analysis I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 311 and MATH-M 391 with a C or better. Modern theory of real number system, limits, functions, sequences and series, Riemann-Stieljes integral, and special topics.
  • MATH-M 414 Introduction to Analysis II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 413 with a C or better. Modern theory of real number system, limits, functions, sequences and series, Riemann-Stieljes integral, and special topics.
  • MATH-M 421 Introduction to Topology I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 303 and MATH-M 311 with a C or better. Introduction to point set topology with emphasis on metric spaces. Continuity, Cortesian products, connectedness, compactness, completeness. Elements of homotopy theory, fundamental group and covering spaces, elementary homology theory, applications to simplicial complexes and manifolds.
  • MATH-M 425 Graph (Network) Theory and Combinatorial Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 with a C or better. Graph theory: basic concepts, connectivity, planarity, coloring theorems, matroid theory, network programming, and selected topics. Combinatorial theory: generating functions, incidence matrices, block designs, perfect difference sets, selection theorems, enumeration, and other selected topics.
  • MATH-M 436 Introduction to Geometries (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 391 with a C or better or consent of instructor. Non-Euclidean geometry, axiom system. Plane projective geometry, Desarguesian planes, perspectives, coordinates in the real projective plane. The group of projective transformations and subgeometries corresponding to subgroups. Models for geometries. Circular transformations.
  • MATH-M 447 Mathematical Models and Applications I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 303, MATH-M 311, and MATH-M 360 or consent of instructor. C: MATH-M 303, MATH-M and MATH-M 360. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological,social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth. Suitable for secondary school teachers.
  • MATH-M 471 Numerical Analysis I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 303 and MATH-M 313, or consent of instructor. Solution of linear systems, eigenvalue problems, solutions of nonlinear equations by iterative methods, functional approximation and interpolation, numerical integration, initial-value and boundary-value problems.
  • MATH-M 490 Problem Seminar (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 303, MATH-M 403, or MATH-M 413 and consent of instructor. C: MATH-M 403 or MATH-M 413 Introduction to research techniques for advanced undergraduates, based on problems from parts of the regular curriculum, such as linear algebra, topology, probability, and analysis. Emphasis will be on problems of both current and historical interest but usually not in the standard literature.
  • MATH-M 493 Senior Thesis in Mathematics (1 cr.) P: MATH-M 403 or MATH-M 413 and permission of instructor. The student must write and present a paper (senior thesis) on a topic agreed upon by the student and the department chairperson or advisor delegated by the chairperson.
  • MATH-T 101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3 cr.) P: Placement by exam. To enroll, the student must first pass a Skills Test given at the Student Development Center. Problem solving with and operations on whole numbers, and integers. Prime numbers and elementary number theory. Other bases and exponents. Elements of set theory and functions. Equations and inequalities over the real number system. Open only to elementary-education students.
  • MATH-T 102 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3 cr.) P: MATH-T 101 with a C or better. Problem solving with rational numbers, decimals, percents, math of finance, elementary combinatorics, probability, and statistics. Open only to elementary-education students.
  • MATH-T 103 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers III (3 cr.) P: MATH-T 101 with a C or better. Basic introduction to geometric concepts, including definitions, properties, congruence and similarity of plane and three-dimensional figures. Geometric constructions and transformations. Problem solving with geometric measurements of perimeter, area, surface area, and volume. Open only to elementary-education students.
  • MICR-J 200 Microbiology and Immunology (3 cr.) P: ANAT-A 215 and CHEM-C 101, CHEM-C 102, or CHEM-C 105 with a C or better. C: MICR-J 201. Consideration of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites in human disease; immunology and host-defense mechanisms.
  • MICR-J 201 Microbiology Laboratory (1 cr.) C: MICR-J 200. Bacteriological techniques: microscopy, asepsis, pure culture, identification. Biology of microorganisms; action of antimicrobial agents. Representative immunological reactions. Recognition of pathogenic fungi and animal parasites.
  • MICR-M 310 Microbiology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with grade of C or better. C: MICR-M 315. Introduction to microorganisms and viruses as model systems for comparative studies of cytology, metabolism, nutrition, genetics, and intracellular regulatory mechanisms, with emphasis on medical microbiology.
  • MICR-M 315 Microbiology: Laboratory (2 cr.) P: MICR-M 310 with grade of C or better. C: MICR-M 310. Exercises and demonstrations to yield proficiency in principles and techniques of cultivation and utilization of microorganisms under aseptic conditions.
  • MICR-M 350 Microbial Physiology and Biochemistry (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 and MICR-M 315. C: MICR-M 360. Intended for biology and chemistry majors. Introduction to microbial biochemistry and physiology; nutrition, growth, and metabolism of selected bacteria.
  • MICR-M 420 Environmental Microbiology (5 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with grade of C or better. Role of microorganisms in various ecosystems. Detection and enumeration of microorganisms and their products from various environments.
  • MUS-A 101 Introduction of Audio Technology (2 cr.) Introduction to the equipment and techniques employed in audio recording and reinforcement, including basic audio theory, analog and digital recording, microphone placement, mixing, and editing.
  • MUS-A 270 Multi-track Studio Technology 1 (2 cr.) P: MUS-A 101. This course presents basic multi-track recording techniques, microphone placement and equipment settings. Emphasis is given to development of creative problem solving as relates to audio recording situations.
  • MUS-A 301 Electronic Studio Resources I (2 cr.) P: MUS-T 113 or instructor permission. An introduction to techniques and equipment used in the electronic music lab. Past musical study and experience required. MUS-A 301 required for all music majors.
  • MUS-A 302 Electronic Studio Resources II (2 cr.) P: MUS-E 241 and MUS-T 109 or higher (MUS-T 113-114). An introduction to techniques and equipment used in the electronic music lab. Past musical study and experience required.
  • MUS-A 321 Sound for Picture Production (3 cr.) P: MUS-A 301. Introduction to techniques and equipment used for integrating audio and video for musical applications. Required for Composition-Film and the Media trach majors.
  • MUS-A 370 Multi-track Studio Technology 2 (2 cr.) P: MUS-A 270. This course presents intermediate multi-track recording techniques, microphone placement and equipment settings. Emphasis is given to understanding signal flow, and development of critical listening skills as relates to audio engineering decisions.
  • MUS-A 423 Project in Sound Engineering (1 cr.) P: MUS-A 470, Gateway and departmental permission. Capstone Project for sound engineering students. Includes presentation that demonstrates advanced audio production skills.
  • MUS-A 470 Individual Projects in Sound Engineering (2 cr.) P: MUS-A 370, Gateway. This course requires the student to create and complete audio recording projects. In addition to audio productions and critical listening skills, emphasis is given to project management as relates to sound engineering situations.
  • MUS-B 110 Horn Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-B 120 Trumpet Undergraduate Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in trumpet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-B 130 Trombone Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in trombone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-B 150 Tuba Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in tuba. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level. C
  • MUS-B 260 Horn (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission through audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-B 270 Trumpet (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission through audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in trumpet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-B 280 Trombone/Euphonium (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission through audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-B 290 Tuba (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission through audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in tuba. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-B 310 French Horn (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 325 Trumpet and Cornet (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 270. For majors. Private studio instruction. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 330 Trombone (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 280. For majors. Private studio instruction in trombone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 350 Tuba (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 290. For majors. Private studio instruction in tuba. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 402 Brass Senior Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. For majors. Should be taken simultaneously with applied music study. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-B 415 French Horn (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 310. For majors. Private studio instruction in horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 420 Trumpet Undergraduate Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 325. For majors. Private studio instruction in trumpet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 425 Trumpet and Cornet (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 325. For majors. Private studio instruction in trumpet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 430 Trombone Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 333. For majors. Private studio instruction in trombone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-B 450 Tuba Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-B 350. For majors. Private studio instruction in tuba. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-D 100 Percussion Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in percussion. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-D 200 Percussion Instruments (1-2 cr.) Private percussion lessons at the secondary level. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • MUS-D 260 Percussion (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in percussion. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-D 300 Percussion Instruments (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-D 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in percussion. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-D 305 Percussion (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-D 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in percussion. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-D 400 Percussion Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-D 300. For majors. Private studio instruction in percussion. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-D 402 Senior BM Percussion Recital (2 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors. Repeatable for credit.
  • MUS-D 405 Percussion (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-D 305. For majors. Private studio instruction in percussion. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-E 241 Introduction to Music Fundamentals (3 cr.) Basic music theory and beginning piano with an interdisciplinary focus. Fulfills arts requirement for special education and elementary education. Also for the nonmajor who wishes to learn the basics of music notation, scales, chords, and rhythms.
  • MUS-E 493 Piano Pedagogy (3 cr.) P: Permission of the instructor. Techniques and methods for teaching piano. Includes observation of private lessons.
  • MUS-G 261 String Class Techniques (1-2 cr.) Class instruction and teaching methods for violin, viola, violoncello and double bass.
  • MUS-G 281 Bass Instrument Techniques (1-2 cr.) Class instruction for developing proficiency on trumpet, French horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba. Study of methods and materials for teaching brass instruments in class or private lessons. Repeatable up to 2 units.
  • MUS-G 338 Percussion Techniques (1-2 cr.) Class instruction to learn the rudiments of snare drum, tympani, and mallet instruments. Study of methods and materials for teaching percussion instruments in class or private lessons. Repeatable up to 2 units.
  • MUS-G 370 Techniques for Conducting (2 cr.) Principles and practice of basic conducting techniques in music of various periods and styles.
  • MUS-G 371 Choral Conducting I (2 cr.) Further development of basic conducting technique with a concentration on choral concepts. Emphasis on period style elements, analytical listening, aspects of choral tone, text analysis, score preparation, rehearsal planning, vocal techniques, and other advanced problems in choral conducting. Conduct representative works from varying style periods.
  • MUS-H 100 Harp Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in harp. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-H 260 Harp (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission through audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in harp. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-H 305 Harp (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-H 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in harp. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-H 402 Harp BM Senior Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors. Repeatable for credit.
  • MUS-H 405 Harp (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-H 305. For majors. Private studio instruction in harp. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-K 200 Secondary Composition (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Writing and analysis under professional guidance in private consultations and class discussions.
  • MUS-K 300 Composition Concentration (3 cr.) P: MUS-T 113 or permission of instructor. For majors. Writing and analysis under professional guidance in private consultations and class discussions. May be repeated for credit.
  • MUS-K 312 Arranging for Instrumental and Vocal Groups (2 cr.) P: MUS-T 113. Fundamental techniques of scoring music for vocal and instrumental ensembles. Required for composition concentration, for which it must be taken prior to senior year.
  • MUS-K 400 Composition Major (3 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-K 300. For majors. Writing and analysis under professional guidance in private consultations and class discussions. May be repeated for credit.
  • MUS-K 402 Senior Recital in Composition (0-1 cr.) P: Completion of sophomore gateway. For majors. Course should be taken simultaneously with MUS-K 400. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-K 403 Electronic Studio Resources I (2 cr.) P: MUS-A 301 and MUS-A 302. Continued study in electronic music laboratory emphasizing the creative application of resources introduced in MUS-A 301 and MUS-A 302.
  • MUS-K 406 Projects in Electronic Music (1-3 cr.) P: Completion of sophomore gateway. Final senior project for music technology majors.
  • MUS-L 100 Guitar Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in guitar. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-L 101 Beginning Class Guitar (2 cr.) Class guitar instructions for beginning students. Course may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester).
  • MUS-L 102 Intermediate Guitar Class (2 cr.) Class guitar instruction for beginning students.
  • MUS-L 200 Guitar (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in guitar. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-L 260 Guitar (Applied Music) (2 cr.) For majors. Private studio instruction in guitar. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-L 300 Concentration Guitar (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-L 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in guitar. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required.
  • MUS-L 400 Guitar Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-L 300. For majors. Private studio instruction in guitar. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-L 402 Senior BM Guitar Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. For majors. Should be taken simultaneously with applied study. Course may be repeated.
  • MUS-M 110 Special Topics in Music (1-3 cr.) An introduction to the history of various styles of rock and popular music and to the music of significant composers and performers in these genres. For the nonmajor.
  • MUS-M 174 Music for the Listener (3 cr.) An introduction to the art of music and its materials; to symphonic music, opera, and other types of classical music; and to the works of the great composers. For the nonmajor.
  • MUS-M 201 Literature of Music I (3 cr.) Recommended: one year of music theory. Music history from the Baroque/Classical Period (1660-1800). Designed to develop a perspective of the evolution of music in its social-cultural milieu, to familiarize students with a repertoire of representative compositions, and to develop critical and analytical listening skills. Nonmusic majors with some musical background (ability to read music) may enroll with consent of the instructor.
  • MUS-M 202 Literature of Music II (3 cr.) Recommended: one year of music theory. Music history from the Romantic Period (19th Century). Designed to develop a perspective of the evolution of music in its social-cultural milieu, to familiarize students with a repertoire of representative compositions, and to develop critical and analytical listening skills. Nonmusic majors with some musical background (ability to ready music) may enroll with consent of the instructor.
  • MUS-M 338 Methods and Materials for Teaching Choral Music (2 cr.) Development and organization of administration of choral music programs in the middle and secondary school. Emphasis on auditioning and placement, vocal productions, rehearsal techniques, and appropriate choral literature.
  • MUS-M 375 Survey of Ethnic and Popular Music of the World (3 cr.) A study of music of other nations and cultures and including Native American, Asian, Middle Eastern, and African American music. For the nonmajor.
  • MUS-M 403 History of Music I (3 cr.) P: Must have passed Gateway exams. Recommended: one year of music theory. A survey and analysis of music from the beginning of Western civilization to 1600. Style analysis of representative compositions; relationship of music to social-cultural background of each epoch. Introduces students to basic research methods and techniques in music history.
  • MUS-M 404 History of Music II (3 cr.) P: Must have passed Gateway exams. Recommended: one year of music theory. A survey and analysis of music from 1900 to the present. Introduces students to basic research methods and techniques in music history
  • MUS-M 414 Choral Repertoire (2 cr.) This course presents an overview of choral repertoire from the early Renaissance to the present. Students will explore a variety of genres and composers throughout history.
  • MUS-M 540 Appreciation of Music (3 cr.) A study of the place of music and the other performing arts in society; philosophy and aesthetic theory in the arts; development of critical standards; listening to music; concert and opera attendance. For graduate students outside the department of music.
  • MUS-M 543 Keyboard Literature from 1700 to 1850 (3 cr.) A survey of literature for stringed keyboard instruments (piano and harpsichord) from the age of Bach to the twentieth century. Historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features.
  • MUS-M 566 Ethnic Music Survey (3 cr.) A study of the music of other nations and cultures including Native American, Asian, Middle Eastern, and African American music. For the nonmajor.
  • MUS-P 100 Piano Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in piano. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-P 101 Piano Class I (1 cr.) Class piano instruction for beginning students. Course may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester).
  • MUS-P 105 Keyboard Proficiency (0-1 cr.) P: Permission of Instructor of department. All students majoring in music must pass a piano proficiency examination.  Students will register in P105 no later than fourth semester of study, and will receive the grade of S when they have successfully passed the examination. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • MUS-P 200 Piano (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in piano. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-P 260 Piano (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in piano. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-P 300 Piano (1-4 cr.) Individual piano lessons for music majors. Additional applied fee. Time scheduled with instructor. Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • MUS-P 305 Piano (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-P 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in piano. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-P 400 Piano (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-P 305. For majors. Private studio instruction in piano. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-P 402 Senior BM Piano recital (0-1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors.  Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-Q 100 Organ Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in organ. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-Q 260 Organ (Applied Music) (2 cr.) For majors. Private studio instruction in organ. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-Q 305 Organ (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-Q 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in organ. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-Q 400 Organ Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-Q 305. For majors. Private studio instruction in organ. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-Q 402 Senior BM Organ Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors. Repeatable for credit.
  • MUS-R 251 Workshop in Opera Acting 1 (1 cr.) P: Permission of conductor or audition. Course is repeatable up to four credit hours.
  • MUS-S 110 Violin Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in violin. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-S 120 Viola Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in viola. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-S 130 Cello Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in cello. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-S 140 Double Bass Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-S 260 Violin (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in violin. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-S 270 Viola (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in viola. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-S 280 Cello (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in cello. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-S 290 Bass (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission of department. For majors. Private studio instruction in bass. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-S 315 Violin (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in violin. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 315 Violin (2-6 cr.) Repeatable up to 99 units.
  • MUS-S 320 Viola (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 270. For majors. Private studio instruction in viola. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 330 Cello (2 cr.) P: Two semester of MUS-S 280. For majors. Private studio instruction in cello. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 345 Double Bass (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 290. For majors. Private studio instruction. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 402 Senior BM String Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors.  Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-S 415 Violin (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 315. For majors. Private studio instruction in violin. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 420 Viola Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 320. For majors. Private studio instruction in viola. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 430 Cello Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 330. For majors. Private studio instruction in cello. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-S 440 Double Bass Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-S 345. For majors. Private studio instruction. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-T 109 Rudiments of Music 1 (3 cr.) A music elective that covers learning to read music notation, scales, chords, rhythms and some keyboard. For the general student and for music majors needing a preparatory course before taking music theory (MUS-T 113).
  • MUS-T 113 Music Theory I (3 cr.) P: MUS-T 109 or by passing a theory placement exam. Study of the principles of eighteenth and nineteenth century common practice music. Includes analysis and composition of melody, harmony, counterpoint, and simple forms.
  • MUS-T 114 Music Theory II (3 cr.) P: MUS-T 113. Study of the principles of eighteenth and nineteenth century common practice music. Includes analysis and composition of melody, harmony, counterpoint, and simple forms.
  • MUS-T 115 Sightsinging & Aural Perception I (1 cr.) P: MUS-T 109 or by passing a theory placement exam or permission of instructor. Designed to develop basic performing and listening skills of the student. Includes drills in ear-training, dictation, and sight-singing.
  • MUS-T 116 Sightsinging & Aural Perception II (1 cr.) P: MUS-T 115. Designed to develop basic performing and listening skills of the student. Includes drills in ear-training, dictation, and sight-singing.
  • MUS-T 215 Sightsinging/Aural Perception III (1 cr.) P: MUS-T 116. Designed to develop basic performing and listening skills of the student. Includes drills in ear-training, dictation, and sight-singing.
  • MUS-T 216 Sightsinging & Aural Perception IV (1 cr.) P: MUS-T 215. Designed to develop basic performing and listening skills of the student. Includes drills in ear-training, dictation, and sight-singing.
  • MUS-T 400 Undergraduate Readings in Theory (1-6 cr.) Independent study on a topic approved by the music theory department prior to enrollment in the course. Repeatable up to 25 units.
  • MUS-T 418 Music and Ideas (3 cr.) An introduction to the philosophy of music and the history and problems of musical aesthetics.
  • MUS-T  317 Analysis of Tonal Music (3 cr.) P: MUS-T 114. Builds on the foundation of first-year theory. Development of contrapuntal skills through appropriate exercises and analysis of polyphonic styles from selected periods. Also systematically incorporates chromatic harmony with an intensive study of music styles; integrates chordal vocabulary with larger formal processes.
  • MUS-T  318 Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3 cr.) P: MUS-T 317. Introduction to and analysis of works from Impressionism to music of today.
  • MUS-U 230 Foreign Language for Singers (3 cr.) Study of language techniques, diction, international phonetic alphabet, and pronunciation fundamentals. May be repeated for credit.
  • MUS-U 411 Performing Arts Center Management (3 cr.) On national and local level. Mechanics of management, booking of concert artists and attractions, organized-audience plan, local concert series, symphony management.
  • MUS-U 413 Legal Aspects of the Music Industry (3 cr.) Introduction to the legal environment affecting music such as copyright, artist contracts, royalties, rights associated with intellectual property, and publishing.
  • MUS-U 440 Practicum (2 cr.) Internships for music business and music technology students. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-V 100 Voice Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in voice. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-V 101 Voice Class (2 cr.) Class voice instruction for beginning students. Course may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester).
  • MUS-V 200 Voice (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in voice. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-V 260 Voice (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in voice. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-V 305 Voice (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-V 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in voice. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-V 400 Voice (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-V 305. For majors. Private studio instruction in voice. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-V 402 Senior BM Voice Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-W 110 Flute/Piccolo Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in flute/piccolo. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-W 120 Oboe/English Horn Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in oboe/English horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-W 130 Clarinet Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in clarinet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-W 140 Bassoon Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in bassoon. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-W 150 Saxophone Elective/Secondary (2 cr.) Private studio instruction in saxophone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Students who complete two semesters of private study should consult with the music program coordinator for registration in a higher course level.
  • MUS-W 240 Bassoon (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in bassoon. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-W 250 Saxophone (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in saxophone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-W 260 Flute/Piccolo (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in flute/piccolo. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-W 270 Oboe (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in oboe. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-W 280 Clarinet (Applied Music) (2 cr.) P: Admission by audition as a music major or permission by department. For majors. Private studio instruction in clarinet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. Take two semesters at this number before proceeding to the next level.
  • MUS-W 315 Flute and Piccolo (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 260. For majors. Private studio instruction in flute/piccolo. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-W 320 Oboe and English Horn (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 270. For majors. Private studio instruction in oboe/English horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-W 330 Clarinet (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 280. For majors. Private studio instruction in clarinet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-W 345 Bassoon (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 240. For majors. Private studio instruction in bassoon. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.
  • MUS-W 355 Saxophone (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 250. For majors. Private studio instruction in saxophone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.  Course may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester).
  • MUS-W 402 Senior BM Woodwind Recital (1 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. C: Must be taken concurrently with applied study. For majors. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-W 410 Flute/Piccolo Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 315. For majors. Private studio instruction in flute/piccolo. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-W 420 Oboe/Eng Horn Undergrad Major (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 320. For majors. Private studio instruction in oboe/English horn. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee required. 
  • MUS-W 430 Clarinet (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 330. For majors. Private studio instruction in clarinet. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-W 445 Bassoon (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 345. For majors. Private studio instruction in bassoon. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students. 
  • MUS-W 455 Applied Saxophone (2 cr.) P: Two semesters of MUS-W 355. For majors. Private studio instruction in saxophone. Levels may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester). Applied music fee is required for all students.  Course may be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester).
  • MUS-X 1 All-Campus Ensemble (0 cr.) P: All ensembles require permission of condudctor or audition. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-X 2 Piano Accompanying (2 cr.) P: Permission of the instructor. Techniques of vocal and instrumental accompanying. Students will be assigned to studio or choral accompanying. May be repeated for credit (2 credit hours each semester).
  • MUS-X 40 University Instrumental Ensembles (1 cr.) P: All ensembles require permission of conductor or audition. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-X 70 University Choral Ensembles (1 cr.) P: All ensembles require permission of conductor or audition. Choral ensemble dedicated to performing a variety of repertoire including great choral masterpieces of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. Open to all students. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-X 95 Performance Class (0 cr.) For Majors. Attendance at four scheduled master classes and attendance at six concerts of collegiate or professional level. Performance majors must perform at least once a semester. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-X 341 Guitar Ensemble (1 cr.) P: All ensembles require permission of conductor or audition. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-X 350 Jazz Ensemble (1 cr.) P: All ensembles require permission of conductor or audition. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-X 421 Chamber Music with Piano (1 cr.) This course consists of coaching a chamber ensemble while covering a wide range of topics and music foundational to ensemble performance. Repertoire is assigned by the instructor and will cover the major stylistic periods from the classical period up to the music of today. May be repeated for credit.
  • MUS-X 423 Chamber Music (1 cr.) P: All ensembles require permission of conductor or audition. Choral ensemble dedicated to performing a variety of repertoire including great choral masterpieces of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. Open to all students. Course is repeatable.
  • MUS-Z 201 History of Rolck and Roll Music (3 cr.) A survey of the major trends, styles, and genres of rock music from the earliest recordings to the present day, focusing on the work of the artist and groups who have proven to be of the most enduring significance.
  • MUS-Z 340 Intro to Music Business (3 cr.) An introduction to the business aspects of the music industry. Recording companies, artists, and contracts; music production; copyright, licensing, and publishing; booking agents, promotions, and performing rights organizations.
  • NATS-R 300 Research in the Sciences (1-3 cr.) P: Department consent. This course allows students who want to participate in research to do so; and allows students who received research fellowships to finish their work when the fellowship runs out. May be repeated twice for credit up to 3 credit hours.
  • NATS-S  100 Introduction to Pre-Professional Science Studies (1 cr.) This course is designed for students planning to pursue admission into professional science programs (medical, dental, pharmacy, veterinary, etc.).
  • NATS-S  200 Career Advising: Science Careers (1 cr.) P: For Natural Science Majors only. This course is designed for students pursuing a Science degree at Indiana University Southeast who are not currently working in a professional position.
  • NATS-S  350 Seminar in Pre-Professional Science Studies (1 cr.) P: NAT-S 100 Standardized test strategies and the science based professional school application process.
  • NURS-B 231 Comm Skill for Hlth Profsnl (3 cr.) Students in this course will focus on basic communication skills essential for working with clients of various ages and health care professionals. Content includes interpersonal communications and group dynamics. Students will practice communication skills with individuals, within groups, and through electronic media.
  • NURS-B 232 Introduction to the Discipline (3 cr.) This course focuses on core theoretical concepts of nursing practice: health, wellness, illness, wholism, caring environment, self-care, uniqueness of persons, interpersonal relationships, and decision making. This course helps the student understand nursing's unique contributions to meeting societal needs through integrating theory, research, and practice.
  • NURS-B 233 Health and Wellness (4 cr.) P: All 200 level Nursing Courses This course focuses on the use of concepts from nursing, nutrition, pharmacology, and biopsychosocial sciences to critically examine the determinates of health, wellness, and illness across the life span. Environmental, sociocultural, and economic factors that influence health care practices are emphasized. Theories of health, wellness, and illness are related to health promotion, disease prevention, illness prevention, and nursing interventions.
  • NURS-B 236 Developmental Issues in Nursing (3 cr.) P: NURS-B 231, NURS-B 232, NURS-B 244, and NURS-B 245 The course focuses on theories of individual development and family adaptation across the lifespan and health promotion/risk reduction topics for specific age groups. Students will perform assessments on individuals in various age groups.
  • NURS-B 244 Comprehensive Health Assessment (2 cr.) This course focuses on helping students acquire skills to conduct a comprehensive health assessment, including the physical, psychological, social, functional, and environmental aspects of health. The process of data collection, interpretation, documentation, and dissemination of assessment data will be addressed.
  • NURS-B 245 Comprehensive Health Assessment: Practicum (2 cr.) Students will have the opportunity to use interview, observation, percussion, palpation, inspection, and auscultation in assessing clients across the life span in simulated and actual environments.
  • NURS-B 248 Science and Technology of Nursing (2 cr.) This course focuses on the fundamentals of nursing from a theoretical research base. It provides an opportunity for basic care nursing skills development. Students will be challenged to use critical thinking and problem solving in developing the ability to apply an integrated nursing therapeutics approach for clients experiencing health alterations across the life span.
  • NURS-B 249 Science and Technology of Nursing: Practicum (2 cr.) Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate fundamental nursing skills in the application of nursing care for clients across the life span.
  • NURS-B 304 Health Policy (3 cr.) This course focuses on core theoretical concepts of professional nursing practice, including health, wellness, illness, self-care and caring, disease prevention, and health promotion. Students will be expected to explore theoretical premises and research related to the unique wellness perspectives and health beliefs of people across the life span in developing care outcomes consistent with maximizing individual potentials for wellness.
  • NURS-B 331 Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing Practice (3 cr.) This course addresses professional communication, inter-intra professional collaboration and professional engagement to foster growth and development in nursing. This course also focuses on issues related to professional practice, theory, development and use, professional organization participation, service, continuing education, autonomy and accountability.
  • NURS-B 344 Comprehensive Nursing Health Assessment (3-3 cr.) This course focuses on the complete health assessment, the nursing process, and its relationship to the prevention and early detection of disease across the life span. Students learn the skills of interview, inspection/observation, palpation, percussion, and auscultation in assessing clients across the life span and comparing normal from abnormal findings.
  • NURS-B 404 Informatics (3 cr.) This course addresses nursing informatics: state of the science and issues for research, development and practice. It clarifies concepts of nursing, technology, and information management; and comprises theory, practice, and the social and ethical issues in nursing and health care informatics.
  • NURS-H 351 Alterations in Neuropsychological Health (3 cr.) P: sophomore-level courses. C: NURS-H 352, NURS-H 353, and NURS-H 354. This course focuses on individuals and small groups experiencing acute and chronic neuropsychological disorders. Content includes the effect of the brain-body disturbances on health functioning. Other content areas are growth and development, stress, mental status, nurse-client relationships, psychopharmacology, and nursing approaches for clients experiencing DSM-IV neuropsychological disorders.
  • NURS-H 352 Alterations in Neuropsychological Health: The Practicum (2 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses C: NURS-H 351, NURS-H 353, and NURS-H 354. Students will provide nursing care to individuals and small groups who are experiencing acute and chronic neuropsychological disturbances related to psychiatric disorders. Student experiences will be with individuals and small groups in supervised settings such as acute care, community based, transitional, and/or the home.
  • NURS-H 353 Alterations in Health I (3 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses. C: NURS-H 351, NURS-H 352, and NURS-H 354. This course focuses on the pathophysiology and holistic nursing care management of clients experiencing acute and chronic problems. Students will use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to plan intervention appropriate to health care needs.
  • NURS-H 354 Alterations in Health I: The Practicum (2 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses. C: NURS-H 351, NURS-H 352, NURS-H 353. Students will apply the science and technology of nursing to perform all independent, dependent, and interdependent care functions. Students will engage clients in a variety of settings to address alterations in health functioning, identify health care needs, and determine the effectiveness of interventions given expected outcomes.
  • NURS-H 355 Data Analysis/Pract & Research (3 cr.) This course will introduce students to tools and techniques for presenting and analyzing quantitative data relevant to the health care situation for practice and research. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be addressed, with a focus on commonly reported statistics in the nursing literature.
  • NURS-H 361 Alterations in Health II (3 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses: NURS-H 351, H 352, H 353, and H 354. C: NURS-H 262, H 363, H 364, H 365. This course builds on Alterations in Health I and continues to focus on pathophysiology and holistic nursing care management of clients experiencing acute and chronic health problems and their associated needs.
  • NURS-H 362 Alterations in Health II: The Practicum (2 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses; NURS-H 351, H 352, H353, and H354. C: NURS-H 361, H 363, H 364, and H 365. Students will continue to apply the science and technology of nursing to perform all independent, dependent, and interdependent care functions. Students will engage clients in a variety of settings to address alterations in health functioning.
  • NURS-H 363 The Developing Family and Child (3 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses; NURS-H 351, H 352, H 353, and H 354. C: NURS-H 361, H 362, H 363, and H 365. This course focuses on the needs of individuals and their families who are facing the phenomena of growth and development during the childbearing and child-rearing phases of family development. Factors dealing with preserving, promoting, and restoring healthy status of family members will be emphasized.
  • NURS-H 364 The Developing Family and Child: The Practicum (3 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses; NURS-H 351, H 352, H 353, and H 354. C: NURS-H 361, H 362, H 363, and H 365. Students will have the opportunity to work with childbearing and child-rearing families, including those experiencing alterations in health.
  • NURS-H 365 Nursing Research (3 cr.) P: All sophomore-level courses; NURS-H 351, H 352, H 353, and H 354. C: NURS-H 361, H 363, and H 364. This course focuses on development of the student's skills in using the research process to define clinical research problems and to determine the usefulness of research in clinical decisions related to practice. The critique of nursing and nursing-related research studies will be emphasized in identifying applicability to nursing practice.
  • NURS-K 301 Complementary Health Therapies (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce the student to non-mainstream health care therapies. The course will serve as an introduction to a variety of therapies, including healing touch, guided imagery, hypnosis, acupuncture, aromatherapy, reflexology and massage, to name a few.
  • NURS-K 490 Life Span Practicum (1 cr.) P: PSY-P 101. C: NURS-B 310. Students will make assessments and observations of individuals in various stages of growth and development.
  • NURS-K 492 Nursing Elective (1-6 cr.) P: Successful completion of junior-level courses or permission of instructor. Opportunity for the nursing student to pursue independent study of topics in nursing under the guidance of a selected faculty member.
  • NURS-P 345 Pharmacology for Professional Nursing Practice (3 cr.) P: Admission to the RN-BSN program. This course focuses on principles of pharmacology for professional nursing practice.  It includes the pharmacologic properties of major drug classes and individual drugs, with an emphasis on the clinical application of drug therapy through the nursing process.
  • NURS-R 375 Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3 cr.) This course focuses on nursing research and evidence-based practice. Students develop skills in retrieving and appraising literature relevant to clinical problems, understanding the research process, and critiquing evidence from research publications and other sources to inform evidence-based nursing practice.
  • NURS-R 470 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone (3 cr.) This course must be taken in the final term for RN BSN students. This course allows students to synthesize knowledge and skills learned in the baccalaureate program and to demonstrate competencies consistent with program outcomes and to refine their nursing practice skills. Students will plan and organize learning experiences, design a project, and practice professional nursing in a safe and effective manner.
  • NURS-S 470 Restorative Health Related to Multisystem Failures (3 cr.) P: All junior-level courses. C: NURS-S 471, S 472, and S 473. This course focuses on the pathophysiology and nursing care management of clients experiencing multisystem alterations in health status. Correlations among complex system alterations and nursing interventions to maximize health potential are emphasized.
  • NURS-S 471 Restorative Health Related to Multisystem Failures: The Practicum (2 cr.) P: All junior-level courses. C: NURS-S 470, S 472, and S 473. Students will apply the nursing process to the care of clients experiencing acute multisystem alterations in health.
  • NURS-S 472 A Multisystem Approach to the Health of the Community (3 cr.) P: All junior-level courses. C: NURS-S 470, S 471, and S 473. This course focuses on the complexity and diversity of groups or aggregates within communities and their corresponding health care needs. Through a community assessment of health trends, demographics, epidemiological data, and social/political/economics issues in local and global communities, the student will be able to determine effective interventions for community-centered care.
  • NURS-S 473 A Multisystem Approach to the Health of the Community: Practicum (2 cr.) P: All junior-level courses. C: NURS-S 470, S 471, and S 472. Students will have the opportunity to apply the concepts of community assessment, program planning, prevention, and epidemiology to implement and evaluate interventions for community-centered care to groups or aggregates. Professional nursing will be practiced in collaboration with diverse groups within a community.
  • NURS-S 481 Nursing Management (2 cr.) P: All junior-level courses; NURS-S 470, S 471, S 472, and S 473. C: NURS-S 482, S 483, S 484, and S 485. This course focuses on the development of management skills assumed by professional nurses, including delegation of responsibilities, networking, facilitation of groups, conflict resolution, leadership, case management, and collaboration. Concepts addressed include organizational structure, change, managing quality and performance, workplace diversity, budgeting and resource allocation, and delivery systems.
  • NURS-S 482 Nursing Management: The Practicum (3 cr.) P: All junior-level courses: NURS-S 470, S 471, S 472, and S 473. C: NURS-S 481, S 483, S 484, and S 485. Students will have the opportunity to apply professional management skills in a variety of nursing leadership roles.
  • NURS-S 483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone (3 cr.) P: All junior-level courses; NURS-S 470, S 471, S 472, and S 473. C: NURS-S 481, S 482, S 484, and S 485. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate competencies consistent with program outcomes and to refine their nursing care practice skills. Students will collaborate with faculty and a preceptor in choosing a care setting, planning and organizing a learning experience, and practicing professional nursing in a safe and effective manner.
  • NURS-S 484 Evidence-Based Practice (1 cr.) P: All junior-level courses; NURS-S 470, S 471, S 472, and S 473. C: NURS-S 481, S 482, S 483 and S 485. This course focuses on students' abilities to refine their critical/analytical skills in evaluating clinical research for applicability to nursing practice. Students will examine the role of evaluation, action research, and research findings in assuring quality of nursing care and in solving relevant problems arising from clinical practices.
  • NURS-S 485 Professional Growth and Empowerment (3 cr.) P: All junior-level courses; NURS-S 470, S 471, S 472, and S 473. C: NURS-S 481, S 482, S 483, and S 484. This course focuses on issues related to professional practice, career planning, personal goal setting, and empowerment of self and others. Students will discuss factors related to job performance, performance expectations and evaluation, reality orientation, and commitment to lifelong learning.
  • NURS-Z 480 B.S.N. Portfolio Review for Course Substitution (1-6 cr.) The portfolio review process is available to all undergraduate students who believe that they can meet the learning objectives/competencies required of a specific nursing course within their program of study. The portfolio is a mechanism used to validate the acquisition of knowledge and skills congruent with course expectations and student learning outcomes. The portfolio provides objective evidence that students have acquired the content and skills through prior learning and/or practice experiences.
  • NURS-Z 490 Clinical Experience in Nursing (1-6 cr.) Opportunity for independent study of clinical experience related to nursing practice. Includes elective credit awarded to registered nurses holding valid specialty certification from a professional nursing organization in an appropriate area of nursing. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be awarded.
  • NURS-Z 492 Individual Study in Nursing (1-6 cr.) Opportunity for registered nurses to participate in independent study of topics related to nursing practice under the guidance of a selected faculty member.
  • PHIL-P 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.) Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, and in philosophy of religion. Readings in selected writings of philosophers from Plato to the present.
  • PHIL-P 140 Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.) The study of classical ethics texts by Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and many others. Examination of some contemporary moral issues.
  • PHIL-P 145 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) Fundamental problems of social and political philosophy: the nature of the state, political obligation, freedom and liberty, equality, justice, rights, social change, revolution, and community. Readings from classical and contemporary sources.
  • PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.) Development of critical tools for the analysis and evaluation of arguments.
  • PHIL-P 170 Intro to Asian Philosophy (3 cr.) Survey of select philosophical traditions of India, China, and Japan, including Vedanta, Mahayana Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Topics include the nature of reality, ethical responsibility, and the role of the "self" in creating ignorance and attaining enlightenment.
  • PHIL-P 200 Problems of Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Selected writings of modern philosophers concerning some important philosophical problems.
  • PHIL-P 237 Environmental Ethics (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. An introductory consideration of philosophical views regarding the extent of human responsibility for the natural environment.
  • PHIL-P 240 Business and Morality (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Fundamental issues of moral philosophy in a business context. Application of moral theory to issues such as the ethics of investment, moral assessment of corporations, and duties of vocation.
  • PHIL-P 250 Symbolic Logic I (3 cr.) Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic.
  • PHIL-P 251 Intermediate Symbolic Logic (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Identity, definite descriptions, properties of formal theories, elementary set theory.
  • PHIL-P 302 Medieval Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. A survey including Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, Ockham, and Nicholas of Cusa.
  • PHIL-P 304 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Selected survey of post-Kantian philosophy, including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Mill.
  • PHIL-P 306 Business Ethics (3 cr.) A philosophical examination of ethical issues which arise in the context of business. Moral theory will be applied to such problems as the ethical evaluation of corporations, what constitutes fair profit, and truth in advertising.
  • PHIL-P 310 Topics in Metaphysics (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours of philosophy. Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, causality, determinism, space, time, events and change, relation of mental and physical.
  • PHIL-P 313 Theories of Knowledge (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Topics such as the nature of knowledge; the relation of knowledge and belief, of knowledge and evidence, of knowledge and certainty; and the problem of skepticism.
  • PHIL-P 314 Modern Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. A study of Western philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, dealing with such philosophers as Bacon, Descartes, Berkeley, Hume, Leibniz, and Kant.
  • PHIL-P 316 Twentieth Century Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Study of select problems in twentieth century philosophy.
  • PHIL-P 319 American Pragmatism (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credits of philosophy. Examination of the central doctrines of Peirce, James, Dewey, Mead.
  • PHIL-P 320 Philosophy and Language (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. A study of selected philosophical problems concerning language and their bearing on traditional problems in philosophy.
  • PHIL-P 330 Marxist Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. An examination of major philosophical issues in Marxist theory. Historical materialism and the critique of idealism in metaphysics, the theory of knowledge, ethics, and social science. Discussion of both classical and contemporary sources.
  • PHIL-P 333 Philosophy Seminar (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 270 or ENG-W 290; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Careful collaborative study of selected texts from the history of philosophy in a seminar format. Course may be repeated for credit.
  • PHIL-P 334 Buddhist Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours of philosophy. An examination of the basic philosophical concepts of early Buddhism and their subsequent development in India, Japan, and Tibet. Implications of the Buddhist view of reality for knowledge, the self, and ethical responsibility will be explored.
  • PHIL-P 335 Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Selected readings from Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, and Sartre.
  • PHIL-P 336 Analytic Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Selected readings from Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Ryle, and others. Topics include realism, logical atomism, logical positivism, and ordinary language philosophy.
  • PHIL-P 338 Philosophy, Technology, and Human Values (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. A philosophical study of the role of technology in modern society, including consideration of the relationships between technology and human values.
  • PHIL-P 340 Classics in Ethics (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131: 3 credit hours of philosophy. Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche. Topics include virtue and human nature, pleasure and the good, the role of reason in ethics, the objectivity of moral principles, and the relation of religion to ethics.
  • PHIL-P 342 Problems of Ethics (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours of philosophy. Concentration on a single problem or on several problems. Examples are bioethics, reason in ethics, and objectivity in ethics.
  • PHIL-P 343 Classics in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Hobbes, Locke, Hegel, and Marx. Topics include the ideal state, the nature and proper ends of the state, natural law and natural right, social contract theory, and the notion of community.
  • PHIL-P 345 Problems in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Intensive study of one or more problems such as civil disobedience, participatory democracy, conscience and authority, law and morality.
  • PHIL-P 360 Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.) P: 6 credits in Philosophy, or permission of the instructor. Selected topics from among the following: the nature of mental phenomena (e.g. thinking, volition, perception, emotion); the mind-body problem (e.g. dualism, behaviorism, functionalism); connections to cognitive science issues in psychology; linguistics and artificial intelligence; computational theories of mind.
  • PHIL-P 371 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours of Philosophy. Topics such as the nature of religion, religious experience, the status of claims of religious knowledge, the nature and existence of God.
  • PHIL-P 374 Early Chinese Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credits of philosophy. Origins of Chinese philosophical traditions in the classical schools of Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, and Legalism. Explores contrasting agendas of early Chinese and Western traditions.
  • PHIL-P 394 Feminist Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credits of philosophy. A study of gender from the perspective of feminist philosophy. Topics include sexism, oppression, body, sex and sexuality, knowledge and value, race and class, as well as various gender-focused themes in popular culture.
  • PHIL-P 401 History of Philosophy: Special Topics (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. Special topics, such as developing views on one or more of the following subjects: substance, nature, essence, dialectics. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • PHIL-P 410 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credit hours in philosophy. A study of the earliest period of Western philosophy, dealing with such figures as the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle.
  • PHIL-P 435 Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credits of philosophy. Study of the work of philosophers in contemporary continental philosophy, including figures such as Foucault, Derrida, Eco, and Habermas.
  • PHIL-P 490 Readings in Philosophy (1-3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credits of philosophy; and consent of instructor. Intensive study of selected authors, topics, and problems.
  • PHIL-P 495 Senior Proseminar in Philosophy (1-4 cr.) P: ENG-W 270 or ENG-W 290; 9 credit hours in Philosophy; and senior status. For philosophy majors in their senior year of study. The proseminar will concentrate of issue(s) and figure(s) selected by the student and faculty involved. The emphasis will be on the preparation, formal presentation and discussion of papers.
  • PHIL-X 303 Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; 3 credits in Philosophy. Scientific explanation, discovery, and theory testing. Do logic and mathematics have empirical content? Philosophical issues in the sciences: causality, space-time, free will, and science of human behavior.
  • PHSL-P 130 Human Biology (3 cr.) Basic concepts in human biology. Covers reproduction and development, physiological regulations, stress biology, and behavioral biology, with emphasis on socially related problems.
  • PHSL-P 215 Basic Mammalian Physiology (5 cr.) P: ANAT-A 215 or BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102 with grades of C or better OR permission of the instructor. Lab fee required. Functional aspects of cells, tissues, organs, and systems in the mammalian organism. Designed for preprofessional students in allied health, nursing, speech and hearing, and HPER.
  • PHSL-P 416 Comparative Animal Physiology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 101 and BIOL-L 102 with grade of C or better. C: PHSL-P 418. Lecture course presenting physiological principles of the respiratory, circulatory, excretory, and related systems in a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate animals.
  • PHSL-P 418 Lab in Comparative Animal Physiology (2 cr.) C: PHSL-P 416. Laboratory experiments using a variety of animals to illustrate physiological principles.
  • PHYS-P 100 Physics in the Modern World (5 cr.) One year of high school algebra or equivalent is recommended. Ideas, language methods, impact, and cultural aspects of physics today. Four lectures and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Includes classical physics up to physical bases of radar, atomic-energy applications, etc. Beginning high school algebra used. Cannot be substituted for physics courses explicitly designated in specified curricula. Students successfully completing PHYS-P 201 or P 221 not given credit for PHYS-P 100.
  • PHYS-P 105 Basic Physics of Sound (3 cr.) One year of high school algebra or equivalent is recommended. The physical principles involved in the description, generation, and reproduction of sound. Topics discussed include physics of vibrations and waves, Fourier decomposition of complex wave forms, harmonic spectra, propagation of sound waves in air, standing waves and resonance, sound loudness and decibels, room acoustics, and sound recording and reproduction, including digital sound. Intended for students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, business, music, and education. Little or no background in science is assumed. Mathematics at the level of one year of high school algebra is used.
  • PHYS-P 120 Energy and Technology (3 cr.) One year of high school algebra or equivalent is recommended. Provides the physical basis for understanding interaction of technology and society, and for the solution of problems, such as energy use and the direction of technological change. Intended for students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, business, music and education. Little or no background in science is assumed. Mathematics at the level of one year of high school algebra is used.
  • PHYS-P 201 General Physics: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound (5 cr.) Completion of MATH-M 122 or high school equivalent is recommended prior to enrollment. Noncalculus presentation of Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, heat, thermodynamics, and properties of matter. Application of physical principles to related scientific disciplines, including engineering and life sciences. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory work per week. Credit given only for either PHYS-P 201 or PHYS-P 221 or PHYS-P 100.
  • PHYS-P 202 General Physics: Electricity, Magnetism, Light, and Nuclear Physics (5 cr.) P: PHYS-P 201 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor. Continuation of PHYS-P 201. Noncalculus presentation of electricity and magnetism; geometrical and physical optics; introduction to concepts of quantum theory, atomic, and nuclear physics, including applications to related scientific disciplines. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Credit given only for either PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222.
  • PHYS-P 218 General Physics I (4 cr.) Mechanics, conservation laws, gravitation; simple harmonic motion and waves; kinetic theory, heat, and thermodynamics for students in technology fields. Lecture and Lab.
  • PHYS-P 219 General Physics II (4 cr.) P: PHYS-P 218 or equivalent. Electricity, light, and modern physics. Lecture and Lab.
  • PHYS-P 221 Physics I (5 cr.) C: MATH-M 215. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations and waves, heat and thermodynamics, and introduction to concepts of relativity. For physical science and engineering students. Four hours of lecture and two and one-half hours of laboratory per week. Credit given only for either PHYS-P 221 or PHYS-P 201 or PHYS-P 100.
  • PHYS-P 222 Physics II (5 cr.) P: PHYS-P 221 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor. Continuation of PHYS-P 221. Electricity and magnetism; geometrical and physical optics; and brief introduction to concepts of quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Four hours of lecture and two and one-half hours of laboratory per week. Credit given only for either PHYS-P 222 or PHYS-P 202.
  • PHYS-P 301 Physics III (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 and MATH-M 215 with grade of C or better or consent of instructor or consent of instructor. Introduction to modern physics for physics majors and students in other departments. Atomic and nuclear physics, kinetic theory, relativity, and elementary particles. Laboratory experiments in modern physics.
  • PHYS-P 309 Intermediate Physics Laboratory (2 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 and MATH-M 215 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. Fundamental experiments in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and modern physics. Emphasis is placed upon developing basic laboratory skills and data analysis techniques, including computer reduction and analysis of the data.
  • PHYS-P 310 Environmental Physics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 and MATH-M 215 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. Relationships of physics to current environmental problems. Energy production, comparison of sources and byproducts; energy use, alternative sources, conservation methods; global warming, environmental effects.
  • PHYS-P 331 Theory of Electricity and Magnetism I (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 202 or PHYS-P 222 with grades of C or better or consent of instructor. Electrostatic fields and differential operators, Laplace and Poisson equations, dielectric materials, steady currents, power and energy, induction, magnetic fields, scalar and vector potentials, Maxwell's equations.
  • PHYS-P 340 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 301 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor. Intermediate course, covering three laws of thermodynamics, classical and quantum statistical mechanics, and some applications.
  • PHYS-P 441 Analytical Mechanics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 301 and MATH-M 313. Elementary mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, treated by methods of calculus and differential equations.
  • PHYS-P 453 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3 cr.) P: PHYS-P 301 and PHYS-P 331. The Schroedinger equation with the applications to problems such as barrier transmission, harmonic oscillation, and the hydrogen atom. Discussion of orbital and spin angular momentum and identical particles. Introduction to perturbation theory.
  • PHYS-S 405 Readings in Physics (1-3 cr.) C: Department consent required. Independent reading under the supervision of a faculty member. Study in depth of a topic of interest to the student, culminating in a research paper. Repeatable for credit.
  • PHYS-S 406 Research Project (1-6 cr.) P: For a theoretical research project: PHYS-P 453 or consent of instructor. For experimental research project: PHYS-P 309, or consent of intructor. Research participation under faculty supervision in project of current interest. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units,
  • PLSC-B 101 Plant Biology (5 cr.) Fundamental principles of biology as illustrated by plants: characteristics of living matter, nutrition, growth, responses to environment, reproduction, basic principles of heredity. This course will not count toward a biology major.
  • PLSC-B 364 Summer Flowering Plants (5-6 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. For those desiring a broad, practical knowledge of common wild and cultivated plants.
  • PLSC-B 368 Ethnobotany (Plants and Civilization) (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. Plants in relation to man, with primary emphasis on food plants.
  • PLSC-B 370 Plant Physiology (5 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. The physiological process of plants.
  • PLSC-B 373 Plant Growth and Development. (5 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. Examination of growth and development of seed plants from embryo to ovule, with emphasis on experimental studies of abnormal growth.
  • PLSC-B 375 Horticultural Plants: Biotechnology, Physiology, and Development (5-6 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. This course acquaints students with horticultural plants from developmental, physiological, and biotechnological perspectives, along with concrete practice in various skills used in modern horticulture, such as tissue culture, grafting, electrophoresis, and landscape design. Horticulture is the applied biological science involving the use of ornamental and/or fruiting plants in the landscape and garden.
  • pols-y 106 The Game of Politics (3 cr.) This course will introduce students to the study of politics through the use of historical role playing games.  Two to three games from the Reacting to the Past program will be played each semester.  Students in a game will be assigned roles and game objectives: they will need to think strategically, form alliances with other students, and articulate their positions persuasively in order to achieve their goals.
  • POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.) Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system, its political party base, public policy, and law.
  • POLS-Y 105 Introduction to Political Theory (3 cr.) Perennial problems of political philosophy, including relationships between rulers and ruled, nature of authority, social conflict, law and morality, economic issues, and democracy.
  • POLS-Y 107 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) Explores similarities and differences between political institutions and processes in political systems around the world. Usually covers Britain, Germany, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, and Iran.
  • POLS-Y 109 Introduction to International Relations (3 cr.) Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organizations, major international issues.
  • POLS-Y 200 Contemporary Political Problems (1-6  cr.) Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once for credit, up to maximum of 12 units.
  • POLS-Y 205 Analyzing Politics (3 cr.) Introduces the approaches and techniques used to study politics.  Includes an introduction to social science language, concepts and critical research skills.  Overview of political science research and approaches, including case study, surveys, and model-building.  Emphasizes skills such as interpreting the presentation of data in charts, graphs, and tables, and elementary analysis of qualitative and quantitative data.
  • POLS-Y 301 Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.) Examination and evaluation of the behavior of political parties, voters, and interest groups and of other institutions and procedures by which Americans try to control their government.
  • POLS-Y 302 Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society (3 cr.) Examines public bureaucracy as a political phenomenon engaging in policy making and in defining the terms of policy issues; places special emphasis on the United States. Considers the role of bureaucratic instruments in promoting social change, and in responding to it.
  • POLS-Y 303 Formation of Public Policy in the United States (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 103. Processes and institutions involved in formation of public policy in a democratic society, with emphasis on American experience.
  • POLS-Y 304 Constitutional Law (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 103. Nature and function of law and the American court system; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system.
  • POLS-Y 305 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 103. Nature and function of law and the American court system; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the American constitutional system.
  • POLS-Y 306 State Politics in the United States (3 cr.) Comparative study of politics in the American states. Special emphasis on the impact of political culture, party systems, legislatures, and bureaucracies on public policies.
  • POLS-Y 319 The United States Congress (3 cr.) Evaluation and development of the contemporary Congress. Examines such topics as electoral process, organizational structures and procedures of the Senate and House of Representatives, involvement of Congress with other policy-making centers, law-making and oversight activities of the national legislature.
  • POLS-Y 324 Women and Politics (3 cr.) Analysis of women in contemporary political systems, domestic or foreign, with emphasis on political roles, participation, and public policy. Normative and/or empirical examination of how political systems affect women and the impact women have on the system(s).
  • POLS-Y 335 West European Politics (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 107 Examines different political systems in Europe. Highlights democratic alternatives in institutions and processes of liberal democracies.
  • POLS-Y 337 Latin American Politics (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 107 and POLS-Y 109. Analysis of political change in major Latin American countries, emphasizing alternative explanations of national development; brief historical overview with examination of the impact of political culture, the military, labor, political parties, peasant movements, the Catholic Church, multinational corporations, and the United States on politics and the study of public policy processes in democratic and authoritarian regimes.
  • POLS-Y 349 Comparative Public Policy (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 107 Investigates public policies and policy making among advanced industrial democracies from a comparative perspective. Usually covers policy areas such as immigration, health care, education, and taxation.
  • POLS-Y 351 Political Simulations (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. A course tied to simulations of international organizations such as the United Nations, the League of Arab States, or the European Union. May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. Repeatable for credit up to 3 units.
  • POLS-Y 354 Nationalism in Europe (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 107 and/or POLS-Y 109. Examines the politics surrounding ethnicity, ethnic minorities, and nationalism in Europe. Covers both indigenous and immigrant groups.
  • POLS-Y 360 United States Foreign Policy (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 103 and POLS-Y 109. Study of the foreign policy decision making process in the United States. Focus on the application of decision making models to foreign policy making, international economic policy of the United States; and the role of ethics and morals in foreign policy.
  • POLS-Y 369 Introduction to East Asian Politics (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 107. This course examines the political diversity in Asia, a region of growing global importance, by exploring governing structures and processes, political culture and ideologies, and the forces shaping them. Case studies may include China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and India.
  • POLS-Y 376 International Political Economy (3 cr.) R: ECON-E 200 and POLS-Y 107 or POLS-Y 109. Study of how the international political system determines the nature of international economic relations. Focus is on the following: (1) trade and monetary regimes, (2) the role of multinational corporations; (3) global action, (4) relations between wealthy countries, and (5) relations between wealthy and poor countries.
  • POLS-Y 379 Ethics and Public Policy (3 cr.) This course examines the ethical responsibilities of public officials in democratic societies. It explores such topics as the meaning of moral leadership, the appeal to personal conscience in public decision making, the management of conflicts of values, and the ethics of loyalty and dissent in administrative agencies. A special concern is the way institutional arrangements promote or inhibit moral choices.
  • POLS-Y 384 Developments in American Political Thought (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 105. Study of the development of American political thought from colonial times to the contemporary period. This course will explore such topics as the nature and evolution of American liberalism, capitalism, and egalitarianism.
  • POLS-Y 387 Research Methods in Political Science (3 cr.) This course focuses on basic concepts of social science research. Students will become familiar with research techniques necessary for systematic analysis of social service systems, trends in social issues, and program effectiveness. This course must be taken from an IU Southeast faculty member.
  • POLS-Y 388 Marxist Theory (3 cr.) Origin, content, and development of Marxist system of thought, with particular reference to philosophical and political aspects of Russian Marxism.
  • POLS-Y 392 Problems of Contemporary Political Philosophy (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 105. An extensive study of one or more great philosophical thinkers, movements, or problems. Subject will vary with instructor and year. Current information may be obtained from the Department of Political Science. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • POLS-Y 401 Studies in Political Science (2-3 cr.) Topic varies with the instructor and year. Consult the Schedule of Classes for current information. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • POLS-Y 402 Politics of the Budgetary Process (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 302. Examines the interactions among the legislative, executive, and administrative aspects of the budgetary process in national, state, and local governments. Emphasis placed on the politics of the budgetary process.
  • POLS-Y 403 Legal Issues in Public Bureaucracy (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 302. Examines the legal framework of public bureaucracies, their powers, functions and roles. Analysis of relevant cases in which basic principles are identified and synthesized along with other elements of public law.
  • POLS-Y 404 Political Issues in Public Personnel Administration (3 cr.) R: POLS-Y 302. Examines the political framework in which public agencies hire, train, motivate, promote, and discipline their employees. Also examines the historical legal development of public personnel management.
  • POLS-Y 471 Terrorism (3 cr.) This course will focus on the problems in defining terrorism; the causes of terrorism; the nature of terrorist organizations (resources, structure, methods, goals); the media and terrorism; and policies and policy responses to terrorism. The course will focus on both domestic (within the United States) and international case studies of terrorism.
  • POLS-Y 480 Undergraduate Readings in Political Science (1-6 cr.) P: Written consent of Instructor. Individual readings and research. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • POLS-Y 481 Field Experience in Political Science (1-6 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing, 15 credit hours of political science, and project approved by instructor. Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based on field experience. Directed readings, field research, and research papers. Certain internship experiences may require research skills. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • POLS-Y 490 Senior Seminar in Political Science (3 cr.) P: Senior standing, POLS-Y 103, and POLS-Y 389. Readings and discussion of selected problems; research paper required. Seminar topics vary by instructor.  Course must be taken on Southeast campus and not as an independent study. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • POLS-Y 498 Honors Readings in Political Science (1-6 cr.) P: Authorization of Instructor. To be taken in conjunction with advanced political science courses to meet the requirement of Political Science Honors Program. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • POLS-Y 499 Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.) P: Approval of instructor. Individual readings and research for students admitted to the Political Science Honors Program. Repeatable for credit up to 12 units.
  • PSY-B 310 Life-Span Development (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours in psychology. This course emphasizes a lifespan perspective of physical, motor, intellectual, cognitive, language, social, and personality development. Commonalities across the life span as well as differences among various segments of the life span are examined. Theory and research are equally stressed.
  • PSY-B 354 Adult Development and Aging (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. The course content examines changes that occur with age in the following areas: intelligence, memory, personality, sexuality, health, living environments, economics, developmental disorders, and treatment for developmental disorders.
  • PSY-B 366 Concepts and Applications of Organizational Psychology (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours in psychology or consent of instructor. The study and application of psychological principles to understand human behavior in the work setting. Emphasis on the role of psychological theory and research methodology in solving human behavior problems in the workplace. Specific areas of coverage include work motivation, job satisfaction, employee involvement, communication, leadership, team effectiveness, work and well-being, organizational structure and culture.
  • PSY-B 378 Introduction to Industrial Psychology (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours in psychology or consent of instructor. The design and application of psychological analysis and research methods to address personnel issues including recruitment, selection, placement, training and development, compensation, evaluation, and safety. Emphasis on interviewing skills, research methods, performance analysis and improvement, ergonomic solutions, and legal issues.
  • PSY-B 386 Introduction to Counseling (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 324 The course is a general overview of the challenges therapists experience in the psychotherapeutic process from first session to termination. Students should gain an understanding of the therapeutic skills clinicians need, understand potential issues and pitfalls, and develop a cohesive understanding of the content of therapy.
  • PSY-B 388 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. This course presents a biopsychosocial model of sexual function and dysfunction. Factors influencing sexual functioning such as chronic illness, substance abuse, and fear of AIDS are explored. Sexual paraphilias will also be discussed.
  • PSY-B 452 Senior Seminar in Psychology (3 cr.) P: Senior status, completion of PSY-P250/P251 or PSY-P341/P342, and consent of instructor. A capstone course requiring readings, discussion, and typically, a research project. Repeatable for credit up to 12 units, provided different topics are studied.
  • PSY-P 101 Introduction to Psychology 1 (3 cr.) Introduction to research methods, data, and theoretical interpretation of psychology in the areas of learning, sensation and perception, and behavioral neuroscience.
  • PSY-P 102 Introduction to Psychology 2 (3 cr.) Introduction to individual differences; personality; and developmental, abnormal, and social psychology.
  • PSY-P 199 Planning Your Psychology Career (1 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. Intended for Psychology majors only. Where do you want to be 10 years from now? How can you get there? Information for undergraduate majors to help them intelligently organize their undergraduate studies. Information about what psychologists do, professional and practical issues in career choice, course selection, intern/research experience, and planning a course of study.
  • PSY-P 220 Introduction to Drugs and Behavior (3 cr.) Introductory discussion of basic human neuroanatomy and the influence of drugs on the brain and behavior. The study of social and clinical aspects of drug use is covered.
  • PSY-P 234 Principles of Mental Health (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of psychology. Development and maintenance of mental health by application of psychological and psychiatric principles of normal human behavior.
  • PSY-P 301 Psychology and Human Problems (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Contemporary human problems considered from a psychological perspective. Representative topics include stress, creativity, environmental impact, behavior control, volunteerism, and drug usage.
  • PSY-P 303 Health Psychology (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Introductory course outlining contributions of psychology to the promotion and maintenance of health and prevention and treatment of illness. Special emphasis on clinical techniques used by psychologists to confront heart disease, cancer, and AIDS.
  • PSY-P 305 Psychology and Cultures (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology; or consent of instructor. Methods and findings of cross-cultural psychology. Sensitization to cross-cultural and sub-cultural variations and the impact of culture in understanding human behavior. Cultural competence development.
  • PSY-P 316 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of Psychology. Development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth; factors that influence behavior.
  • PSY-P 319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. R: PSY-P 102. Methods and results of scientific study of personality. Basic concepts of personality traits and their measurement; developmental influences; problems of integration.
  • PSY-P 320 Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. Principles of scientific psychology applied to the individual in a social situation.
  • PSY-P 321 Group Dynamics (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Exposes the student to interpersonal processes inherent in group settings. Topics may include group psychotherapy, social factors in groups, group decision making or group violence. Particular focus of course may vary with instructor.
  • PSY-P 322 Psychology in the Courtroom (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. This course considers the psychological aspects of roles and interactions in the courtroom. Topics include definitions of "sanity" and "competency," eyewitness testimony, jury selection, psychological autopsies, and the psychologist as "expert witness."
  • PSY-P 324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. R: PSY-P 102. A first course in adult abnormal psychology; including forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretations, and final manifestations.
  • PSY-P 325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Facts and principles of human and animal learning, especially as treated in theories that provide a general framework for understanding what learning is and how it takes place.
  • PSY-P 326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. R:BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 105, or AHLT-M 330. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors.
  • PSY-P 329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. R: BIOL-L 100, BIOL-L 105, or AHLT-M 330. This course focuses on the study of vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, temperature, and pain; as well as topics fundamental to an understanding of sensory and perceptual processes.
  • PSY-P 335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking.
  • PSY-P 336 Psychological Tests and Individual Differences (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 250 or PSY-P 341. Principles of psychological testing. Representative tests and their uses for evaluation and prediction. Emphasis on concepts of reliability, validity, standardization, norms, and item analysis.
  • PSY-P 340 Sleep and Dreams (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101. This course is designed to provide you with an essential understanding of sleep and dreams, and their importance in our daily lives. Course content includes theories of sleep and dreams, the biological basis of sleep and dreams, biological rhythms, the relationship between sleep and daytime alertness and performance, sleep requirements, sleep deprivation, sleep disorders, the role of sleep and dreams in mental/physical health, the relationship between sleep and both cognitive and emotional functioning, dream content and meaning, dreaming and creativity, lucid dreaming, and the impact of sleep deprivation and sleep disorders on academic and social life.
  • PSY-P 341 Research and Quantitative Methods in Psychology I (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology; and MATH-M 118 or MATH-A 118 or above. Course is designed to enable students to become both a user and an informed consumer of basic statistical techniques used in psychological research. Students will also learn to design and critique the methodology of psychological research. Preparation of research proposals/reports using statistical analysis and knowledge of research methods is required. This course is the first semester of a two-semester course and must be taken the semester before taking P 342. Should be taken prior to enrolling in other 300- and 400-level psychology courses.
  • PSY-P 342 Research and Quantitative Methods in Psychology II (3 cr.) P: PSY-P341. Course is a continuation of P 341 that includes statistical analysis, research methods, and proposal/report writing used in psychological research. This course is the second half of a two-semester course and must be taken the semester after P 341. Should be taken before enrolling in other 300- and 400-level psychology courses.
  • PSY-P 346 Neuroscience (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours of Psychology. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience.
  • PSY-P 351 Psychobiology, Self, and Society (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours in Psychology. The physiological and neural bases of selected behavioral processes (for example, hunger, thirst, sleep, addiction, aggression, sex) will be examined as a means of understanding individual behavior and then in relation to larger, related issues of ethics, law, and societal organization.
  • PSY-P 354 Statistical Analysis in Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY-P101, PSY-P102, or 6 credit hours in Psychology, and either MATH-K300, PSY-P250/P251, or PSY-P341/P342. Use of statistics in psychological work, including multivariate statistical methods. Understanding of statistics as they are presented in the psychological literature. Use of computer statistical software package to analyze psychological data.
  • PSY-P 363 Psychology in the Schools (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. This course is an introduction to the field of School Psychology. It focuses on the history of the profession and examines the role and function of school psychologists. Introduced early in the semester, theory (behavior theory and social learning theory) and multicultural diversity permeate all course activities and discussion. The course also provides an overview of the organization and operations of schools, and topics include the role of special education, ethical and legal issues, and school psychologists as data-based problem-solvers.
  • PSY-P 380 Ethical Issues in Psychology (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. This course introduces students to methods of ethical reasoning, as well as ethical principles and laws that arise in the practice of psychology in academic, research, and clinical settings.
  • PSY-P 407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 326. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function.
  • PSY-P 408 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 326. Discussion of the brain systems involved in cognition and perception. Emphasis upon understanding the anatomy and function of cerebral cortex. Consideration of neural models of brain function.
  • PSY-P 411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 326. This course will survey the major work in the field of the neurobiology of memory, approaching the subject from anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical perspectives. Topics covered will include animal models of memory that have proven useful in this research, as well as what has been learned from humans with brain damage and from brain-imaging studies. The facts and fiction of memory-enhancing drugs will also be discussed.
  • PSY-P 417 Animal Behavior (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. Methods, findings, and interpretations of recent investigations of animal behavior, including ethological studies.
  • PSY-P 425 Behavioral Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 324. A survey of major behavior disorders, with emphasis on empirical research and clinical description relative to etiology, assessment, prognosis, and treatment.
  • PSY-P 430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions.
  • PSY-P 438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 335. This course surveys the major themes that characterize psycholinguistics. Emphasizes the mental processes that underlie ordinary language use, the tacit knowledge that native English speakers have of their language, and the processes by which children acquire language.
  • PSY-P 440 Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 335. Seminar courses in current areas of research in cognitive psychology. Specific topic determined by instructor offering the course.
  • PSY-P 442 Infant Development (3 cr.) P: 6 hours in Psychology. Surveys cognitive, socioemotional, and perceptual-motor development during the first two years of life. Emphasis is on theory and research addressing fundamental questions about the developmental process, especially the biological bases for developmental change.
  • PSY-P 454 Field Experience in International Psychology (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. Examines clinical psychology from a multi-national perspective using applied research methodology. In addition to attending lectures and contributing to a research lab, students will be required to participate in a travel abroad component for this course.
  • PSY-P 457 Topics in Psychology (1-3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. Studies in special topics not usually covered in other department courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units, if topics differ.
  • PSY-P 459 History and Systems of Psychology (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102, or 6 credit hours in Psychology; and 6 additional credit hours in psychology. Historical background and critical evaluation of major theoretical systems of modern psychology: structuralism, functionalism, associationism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, and psychoanalysis. Methodological problems of theory construction and system making. Emphasizes integration of recent trends.
  • PSY-P 460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Basic data and theories about the development and maintenance of sex differences in behavior and personality.
  • PSY-P 477 Applied Research in Psychology (1-6 cr.) P: PSY-P 250 or P341 or consent of instructor. This course will provide an in depth investigation of research methods and their associated statistical procedures. Special emphasis is placed upon the translation of research findings to applied settings. The topic to be investigated will vary. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.
  • PSY-P 488 Environmental Psychology and Sustainable Living (3 cr.) Environmental psychology is an interdisciplinary field concerned with how the physical environment and human behavior interrelate. Most of the course focuses on how our environments in both urban and natural settings affect human health and well-being. Students also examine how human attitudes and behaviors affect environmental quality and our larger global ecosystem.
  • PSY-P 493 Supervised Research I (0-3 cr.) P: PSY-P 250/P251 or PSY-P 341/342 or consent of the instructor. Active participation in research. An independent experiment of modest magnitude, or participation in ongoing research in a single laboratory. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • PSY-P 494 Supervised Research II (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 493. A continuation of PSY-P 493. Course will include a journal report of the two semesters of work. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.
  • PSY-P 495 Readings and Research in Psychology (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. S/F grading. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units.
  • REL-R 152 Jews, Christians, Muslims (3 cr.) Patterns of religious life and thought in the West; continuities, changes, and contemporary issues.
  • REL-R 153 Religions of Asia (3 cr.) Modes of thinking; views of the world and the sacred; the human predicament and paths to freedom; human ideals and value systems in the religions of India, China, and Japan.
  • REL-R 160 Religion and American Culture (3 cr.) Traditional patterns of encounter with the sacred. Secularization of Western culture. Religious elements in contemporary American culture.
  • REL-R 170 Religion, Ethics, and Public Life (3 cr.) Western religious convictions and their consequences for judgments about personal and social morality, including such issues as sexual morality, medical ethics, questions of socioeconomic organization, and moral judgments about warfare.
  • REL-R 180 Introduction to Christianity (3 cr.) Survey of beliefs, rituals, and practices of the Christian community with a focus on the varieties of scriptural interpretation, historical experience, doctrine, and behavior.
  • REL-R 200 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) Select intermediate studies in religion. Interdisciplinary studies emphasized. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units, if topics differ.
  • REL-R 210 Introduction to Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (3 cr.) Development of its beliefs, practices, and institutions from the Patriarchs to the Maccabean period. Introduction to the Biblical literature and other ancient Near East documents.
  • REL-R 220 Introduction to New Testament (3 cr.) Origins of the Christian movement and development of its beliefs, practices, and institutions in the first century. Primary source is the New Testament, with due attention to non-Christian sources from the same environment.
  • REL-R 245 Introduction to Judaism (3 cr.) The development of post-Biblical Judaism: major themes, movements, practices, and values.
  • REL-R 257 Introduction to Islam (3 cr.) Introduction to the "religious world" of Islam: the Arabian milieu before Muhammad's prophetic call, the career of the Prophet. Quran and hadith, ritual and the "pillars" of Muslim praxis, legal and theological traditions, mysticism and devotional piety, reform and revivalist movements.
  • REL-R 280 Speaking of God (3 cr.) Theology, as the study of the first principle, ground of being, the good, the One, etc., as appearing in various traditions.
  • REL-R 327 Christianity 50-450 (3 cr.) The emergence of Christianity as a distinct religion in the Roman empire through the fifth century: development of offices and rituals; persecution and martyrdom; Constantine and Catholic orthodoxy; monasticism; major thinkers and theological controversies; the transition to the Middle Ages.
  • REL-R 331 Christianity, 1500-2000 (3 cr.) Major figures and movements in the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and modern periods.
  • REL-R 335 Religion in the United States, 1600-1850 (3 cr.) Development of religious life and thought in early America, from the beginnings to 1850.
  • REL-R 336 Religion in the United States, 1850-Present. (3 cr.) Development of religious life and thought in modern America, from 1850 to the present.
  • REL-R 345 Religious Issues in Contemporary Judaism (3 cr.) Religious problems confronting Jews and Judaism in our own time: women and Judaism, the impact of the Holocaust on Judaism, contemporary views of Zionism, religious trends in American Judaism. Repeatable for credit up to 12 units, if topics differ.
  • REL-R 354 Buddhism (3 cr.) Historical survey of Buddhism from its origins in India through its diffusion throughout Asia in subsequent centuries. Emphasis on practice (ritual, meditation, and ethics) and social grounding (including individual roles and institutional structures) as well as on doctrinal debates.
  • REL-R 358 Introduction to Hinduism (3 cr.) Beliefs, rites, and institutions of Hinduism from the Vedic (c. 1200 B.C.) to modern times: religion of the Vedas and the Upanishads; epics and the rise of devotional religion; philosophical systems (Yoga and Vedanta); sectarian theism; monasticism; socioreligious institutions; popular religion (temples and pilgrimages); modern Hindu syncretism.
  • REL-R 362 Religion in Literature (3 cr.) Theological issues raised in literature. Function of religious myth and central religious themes, such as damnation, alienation, pilgrimage, quest, conversion, enlightenment. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.
  • REL-R 364 Topics in Gender and Western Religion. (3 cr.) Basis for and substance of the feminist critique of Western religions. Examines feminist arguments with religious texts, traditions, patterns of worship, expressions of religious language, and modes of organization. Examination of alternatives.
  • REL-R 371 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment (3 cr.) Exploration of relationships between religious world views and environmental ethics. Considers environmental critiques/defenses of monotheistic traditions; selected non-Western traditions, the impact of secular "mythologies," philosophical questions, and lifestyle issues.
  • SOC-R 100 Introduction to Sociology (3 cr.) Consideration of basic sociological concepts, including some of the substantive concerns and findings of sociology, source data, and the nature of the sociological perspective.
  • SOC-R 121 Social Problems (3 cr.) Selected current problems of American society are analyzed through the use of basic sociological data and the application of major sociological frameworks. Policy implications are discussed in the light of value choices involved in various solutions.
  • SOC-R 220 The Family (3 cr.) The family as a major social institution and how it relates to the wider society. Formation of families through courtship, marriage, and sexual behavior; maintenance of families through childbearing and family interaction; and dissolution of families by divorce or death. Social change and the emergence of new familial patterns. Recommended for nonmajors.
  • SOC-R 318 The Self and Social Interaction (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The course will examine the reciprocal link between the individual and society; more specifically, how individuals are affected by group behavior, and how the group is affected by the individual. Topics include: Socialization, the development of the self, social interaction, group dynamics, collective behavior and social movements.
  • SOC-R 319 Sport & Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Explores the institution of sport from a sociological point of view, including sports as an agent of socialization, sports in everyday life, race, class, and gender and sports, and sports as an institution.
  • SOC-R 320 Sexuality and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Provides a basic conceptual scheme for dealing with human sexuality in a sociological manner.
  • SOC-R 322 Art & Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Explores the creation of art from a sociological point of view, including how artists and artworks are shaped by their societies, the art world as a social institution, and other key cultural institutions that shape artistic creation and reception.
  • SOC-R 326 Masculinity & Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of the meanings of masculinity. The major focus of the course is to examine how male gender roles impact the lives of men including: influences on men's behavior, identities and interactions with other men and women. Variations by social class, race/ethnicity, age and sexual orientation will be examined.
  • SOC-R 327 Sociology of Death & Dying (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. This course examines inevitable and salient features of the human condition. Historical evaluation of images and attitudes toward death, the medicalization of death, the human consequences of high-tech dying, the role of the family in caring for dying loved ones. The emergence and role of hospices, the social roles of funerals, grief and bereavement, euthanasia and suicide, the worlds of dying children and grieving parents, and genocide are major issues that may be addressed. Two of the major themes of the course revolve around the idea that the way we die is a reflection of the way we live; and that the study of dying and death is an important way of studying and affirming the value of life.
  • SOC-R 463 Inequality and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Presentation of conservative, liberal, and radical theories of class formation, class consciousness, social mobility, and consequences of class membership. Emphasis on the American class system, with some attention given to class systems in other societies.
  • SOC-S 101 Social Problems and Policies (3 cr.) Introduces sociology through in-depth study of a major social problem; and explores alternative policies.  Problems treated vary by section.  Examples include the environment; women, men, and work; medicine in America; the sociology of sport; alcohol and drug use.
  • SOC-S 161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.) Nature of interpersonal relationships, societies, groups, communities, and institutional areas such as the family, politics, education, the economy, and religion. Includes social process operating within these areas; significance for problems of social organization, social change, and social stratification.
  • SOC-S 162 Principles of Sociology II (3 cr.)
  • SOC-S 163 Social Problems (3 cr.) Major social problems in areas such as the family, religion, economic order; crime, mental disorders, civil rights; racial, ethnic, and international tensions. Relation to structure and values of larger society.
  • SOC-S 199 Careers in Sociology (1 cr.) This course provides information on what students can do with a sociology undergraduate major. The course will help students see their undergraduate coursework as part of their path to graduate school, professional school, and careers of interest (with or without additional schooling). We will address professional and practical issues in career choice, course selection, internship and research experiences, and will help students plan a course of study, internships and activities to reach their goals.
  • SOC-S 203 Sociological Concepts and Perspectives (3 cr.) This course is designed to be a survey of important sociological concepts. Topics covered will include: the development of sociology and major theoretical perspectives; the scientific methods and sociological research; cultural, society and the social structure; the process of socialization and everyday interaction; groups dynamics and formal organizations; deviance and social control; an overview of several selected social institutions; collective behavior, social movements and the process of social change.
  • SOC-S 215 Social Change (3 cr.) Introduction to theoretical and empirical studies of social change. Explores issues such as modernization; rationalization; demographic, economic and religious causes of change; reform and revolution.
  • SOC-S 216 American Ethnic Diversity (3 cr.) Themes discussed include Old World origins, current conditions, family, work, power, gender, and art. The approach is interdisciplinary. Readings are largely original accounts and include autobiographies, novels, and essays.
  • SOC-S 230 Society and the Individual (3 cr.) Personality and its development; relationship to culture and communication and to social settings; deviant types.
  • SOC-S 250 Methods and Statistics 1 (3 cr.)
  • SOC-S 258 Elementary Social Research Techniques (3 cr.) An introduction to major field and laboratory research methods. This includes techniques applicable to applied fields of sociology including social work, advertising, criminology, city planning, and police, military and industrial intelligence.
  • SOC-S 260 Intermediate Sociological Writing (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163. C: SOC-S 381. The focus on the seminar will be thinking, questioning, and writing from sociological perspectives. Students will frame sociological questions,match data to questions, develop sociological arguments, learn effective methods for doing library searches and organizing information, and then write and polish their papers. Required for sociology majors.
  • SOC-S 301 Topics in Gender (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Specific topics announced each semester; examples include gender in the media, religion and gender, gender and work, gender and health, gender and politics. May be repeated three times for credit with a different topic, up to 9 credits.
  • SOC-S 304 Global Issues in Gender (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. This course will provide a general introduction to social issues from around the world with a focus on gender.
  • SOC-S 305 Population and Human Ecology (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Population composition, fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration; history, growth, and change of populations; population theories and policies; techniques of manipulation and use of population data; the spatial organization of populations.
  • SOC-S 308 Global Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Introduction to methods of cross-cultural analysis; study of key theories derived from comparative analysis, with emphasis on determinants and consequences of industrialization.
  • SOC-S 309 The Community (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Urban, suburban, and rural communities, especially in America; community and neighborhood structure and organization; housing and land utilization; human behavior; patterns of community growth; community planning.
  • SOC-S 312 Education and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology or consent of instructor. The role of educational institutions in modern industrialized societies, with emphasis on the functions of such institutions for the selection, socialization, and certification of individuals for adult social roles. Also covers recent educational reform movements and the implications of current social policies on education.
  • SOC-S 313 Religion and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The nature, consequences, and theoretical origins of religion; the social origins and problems of religious organizations; and the relationships between religion and morality, science, magic, social class, minority status, economic development, and politics.
  • SOC-S 314 Social Aspects of Health and Medicine (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The effects of group characteristics in causing, treating, and preventing mental and physical illness; social influences in medical education, medical practice, and hospital administration.
  • SOC-S 315 Work and Occupations (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of the professions and occupations; range, history, social origins, and typical career patterns of selected occupations; social characteristics of occupational and professional groups; influence of sex, education, and minority group membership upon selection of a profession or occupation.
  • SOC-S 319 Science and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology or consent of instructor. Issues such as development and structure of the scientific community; normative structure of science; cooperation, competition, and communication among scientists; scientists' productivity, careers, and rewards; development of scientific specialties; and relationship between science and society.
  • SOC-S 320 Deviant Behavior and Social Control (3 cr.) Analysis of deviance in relation to formal and informal social processes. Emphasis on deviance and conformity as functions of social reactions, rules, and power and conflict.
  • SOC-S 325 Criminology (3 cr.) A study of the patterns of crime, strategies for control, and theories of crime causation.
  • SOC-S 328 Juvenile Delinquency (3 cr.) A study of the patterns of juvenile delinquency, strategies for control, and theories of juvenile delinquency causation.
  • SOC-S 331 Sociology of Aging (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Examination of theoretical issues and practical problems associated with aging. Emphasis on social and social-psychological dimensions, with some treatment of the demographic, political, economic, and familial aspects of old age. Topics include consequences of research methods and findings, how experiences of younger people affect their subsequent adaptations to old age, American cultural values and norms with respect to older people, and predictions concerning the quality of life for elderly persons in the twenty-first century.
  • SOC-S 335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Relations between racial and ethnic minority and majority groups; psychological, cultural, and structural theories of prejudice and discrimination; comparative analysis of diverse systems of intergroup relations.
  • SOC-S 338 Sociology of Gender Roles (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Exploration of the properties, correlates, and consequences of sex-gender systems in contemporary societies. Emphasis on defining sex-gender systems; tracing their historical development; considering their implications for work, marriage, and fertility, with cross-cultural comparisons.
  • SOC-S 344 Sociology of Childhood (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Defining Sociology of Childhood; Sociological Approaches to the Study of Children & Childhood; Ethical & Practical Concerns Regarding Research with Children; Historical Overview of Childhood in U.S.; Meaning(s) and Dimensions of Children's Consumption; Changing Demographics of Childhood; Children and Immigration & Globalization; Social Policy Implications for Children & Childhood.
  • SOC-S 345 Food & Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. This course introduces students to recent literature, thoughts, and research on the role of food in human societies. We use historical and critical analyses to examine selected issues about food and society.
  • SOC-S 360 Topics in Social Policy (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Specific topics announced each semester; examples include environmental affairs, urban problems, poverty, and population problems. May be repeated three times for credit with a different topic.
  • SOC-S 361 Cities and Suburbs (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Introduction to theory and research on the changing scale and complexity of social organization (urbanization), the quality of life in urban areas, demographic and ecological city growth patterns, and public policy concerns in contemporary urban society.
  • SOC-S 380 Introduction to Methods and Social Research I (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 and MATH-M 118 or MATH-A 118. This course introduces students to the various methods of research used in Sociology. Includes the logic of scientific inference, ethics, theory construction, and research design. 
  • SOC-S 381 Introduction to Methods and Social Research II (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 and MATH-M 118 or MATH-A 118. This course integrates methods of research and statistical analysis.
  • SOC-S 398 Internship in Sociology (1-6 cr.) Students are placed in an organization or agency to receive experience in an applied sociology setting. Work is supervised by a sociology faculty member and the organization/agency. Research and written reports are required. Evaluations by the organization/agency and sociology faculty member. Repeatable up to 12 units.
  • SOC-S 403 Industry, Labor, and Community (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Organizations studied from a sociological perspective. Theories and typologies of organizations as well as research that tests them. Attention to social structures (formal and informal) of organizations, the participants (management, labor, and clients), organizational goals, effects of technology and the environment.
  • SOC-S 405 Selected Social Institutions (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. An examination of one or more institutional areas, e.g., religion, education, the military. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units with permission of instructor.
  • SOC-S 413 Gender and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Explores several theories of sex inequality in order to understand the bases of female-male inequality in American society; examines the extent of sex inequality in several institutional sectors; and considers personal and institutional barriers women face, including those resulting from socialization, discrimination, and other structural arrangements.
  • SOC-S 416 The Family (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The family as a social institution, changing family folkways, the family in relation to development of personality of its members, disorganization of the family, and predicting success and failure in marriage.
  • SOC-S 419 Social Movements and Collective Action (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Change-oriented social and political collective action and consequences for groups and societies. Resource mobilization, historical and comparative analysis of contemporary movements and collective action.
  • SOC-S 420 Advanced Topics in Deviance (3 cr.) An advanced course in deviance, allowing for a more thorough coverage of selected topics, e.g. crime, juvenile delinquency, law enforcement, corrections, mental illness, sexual deviance, drug use, and violence.
  • SOC-S 431 Topics in Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology and SOC-S 203. Specific topics announced each semester, e.g., socialization, personality development, small group structures and processes, interpersonal relations, language and human behavior, attitude formation and change, violence and aggression. May be repeated three times for credit.
  • SOC-S 432 Small Group Processes (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Behavioral, cultural, and emotional processes which take place as small groups form, develop, change, and dissolve. Introduction to the literature on the small group, including studies derived from group dynamics, psycho-analysis, and interactionism. 
  • SOC-S 435 Social Psychology of the Self (3 cr.) The nature of the self and its development and consequences from various perspectives. Topics include identity dissolution, shame, guilt, anxiety and alienation. Techniques of measurement and analysis of the self-concept are also covered.
  • SOC-S 440 History of Social Thought (3 cr.) Social theories from the Greeks to the close of 19th century, with emphasis on relation of social thought to social forces. Approved by Arts and Sciences for the Cultural Studies (Western Tradition) requirement.
  • SOC-S 441 Topics in Social Theory (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163 and SOC-S 203. Topics include development of American sociology; classical sociological theory; contemporary sociological theory.
  • SOC-S 443 Development of American Social Thought (3 cr.)
  • SOC-S 461 Urban Sociology (3 cr.) Introduction to theory and research on the changing scale and complexity of social organization (urbanization), the quality of life in urban areas, demographic and ecological city growth patterns, and public policy concerns in contemporary urban society.
  • SOC-S 470 Senior Seminar (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163, SOC-S 250, SOC-S 251. Topics in sociology and sociological applications.
  • SOC-S 495 Individual Readings/Research in Sociology (1-6 cr.) P: 6 credit hours in sociology and written consent of instructor. To be taken in conjunction with advanced sociology courses to meet requirements of the Sociology Honors Program. May be repeated when topics vary for up to a maximum of 6 total hours.
  • SOC-S 498 Honors Thesis Seminar I (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of the instructor for SOC-S 470 required. C: SOC-S 470. To be taken in conjunction with SOC-S 470 to meet the requirements of the Sociology Honors Program. Repeatable for credit up to 12 units.
  • SOC-W 100 Gender Studies (3 cr.) Interdisciplinary approach to core discipline areas and to methodological and biographical tools required for research in women.
  • SPAN-S 100 Elementary Spanish I (4 cr.) P: Placement Testing required for students who have studied Spanish in High School. Intensive introduction to present-day Spanish and Hispanic culture with emphasis on structure and grammatical forms, vocabulary building and meaning. Development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Attendance in the language lab or some online work may be required.
  • SPAN-S 150 Elementary Spanish II (4 cr.) P: Placement Testing or SPAN-S 100. Continuation of SPAN-S 100. Part II of introduction to present-day Spanish and Hispanic culture with emphasis on structure and grammatical forms, vocabulary building and meaning. Development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Attendance in the language lab or some online work may be required.
  • SPAN-S 200 Intermediate Spanish I (3 cr.) P: Placement testing or SPAN-S 100 and SPAN-S 150. Further development and review of structure and grammatical forms; vocabulary building coordinated with literary and non-literary readings. Continued development of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Attendance in the language lab or some online work may be required.
  • SPAN-S 250 Intermediate Spanish II (3 cr.) P: Placement testing or SPAN-S 200. Review of slelected grammar items. Further development of intermediate listening comprehension and speaking skills. Readings and discussions in Spanish of literary and non-literary readings. Practice in composition and presentation in Spanish. Attendance in the language lab or some online work may be required.
  • SPAN-S 275 Hispanic Culture and Conversation (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Conducted in Spanish. Practice of language skills through reading and discussion of Hispanic culture. Treats facets of popular culture, diversity of the Spanish-speaking world, and themes of social and political importance. Native speakers of Spanish, as well as students who have taken a 300 or 400-level Spanish course, may not take SPAN-S 275.
  • SPAN-S 291 Hispanic Literature and Civilization (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Conducted in Spanish. Continuing practice of language skills through reading and discussion of Hispanic culture. Treats facets of popular culture, diversity of the Spanish-speaking world, and themes of social and political importance. Native speakers of Spanish, as well as students who have taken a 300 or 400-level Spanish course, may not take SPAN-S 275 or SPAN-S 291.
  • SPAN-S 301 The Hispanic World I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Introduction to Hispanic culture through literature. Study of representative literary works in both Spain and Spanish America, in the context of Hispanic history, art, philosophy, folklore, etc.
  • SPAN-S 302 The Hispanic World II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Continuing exploration of Hispanic culture through literature. Study of representative literary works in both Spain and Spanish America, in the context of Hispanic history, art, philosophy, folklore, etc.
  • SPAN-S 303 The Hispanic World III (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Continuing exploration of Hispanic culture through literature. Study of representative literary works in both Spain and Spanish America, in the context of Hispanic history, art, philosophy, folklore, etc.
  • SPAN-S 311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Review of the major points of Spanish grammar. Continued development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.
  • SPAN-S 312 Written Composition in Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Course integrates the four basic language skills into a structured approach to composition. Some review of selected points of Spanish grammar included. Emphasis on correct usage, vocabulary building, and stylistic control. Required for major.
  • SPAN-S 317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 250. Intensive, controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions. Required for major. May be repeated once for credit overseas. Native speakers of Spanish may not take S 317; native speakers majoring or minoring in Spanish will replace S 317 with another 300- or 400-level course.
  • SPAN-S 363 Introduccion a la Cultura Hispanica (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317. A specialized study of cultural phenomena of the Spanish-speaking world. Topics include Hispanic Film, Latino Studies, Hispanic theater, etc. May be repeated once for credit.
  • SPAN-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3 cr.) P: One 300-level literature/culture course. An historical survey that covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from the Spanish Middle Ages through the Baroque period of the seventeenth century. Readings include prose works, poetry, and drama.
  • SPAN-S 408 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317. An historical survey of Spanish literature that covers the main current of Spain's literary history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries.
  • SPAN-S 411 Spain: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: One 300-level literature/culture course. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spain.
  • SPAN-S 412 Spanish America: the Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: One 300-level literature/culture course. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spanish America.
  • SPAN-S 420 Modern Spanish American Prose Fiction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317. Spanish American prose fiction from late-nineteenth-century modernism to the present.
  • SPAN-S 450 Don Quixote (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317. Detailed analysis of Cervantes's novel. Life and times of the author. Importance of the work to the development of the novel as an art form.
  • SPAN-S 471 Survey of Spanish American Literature I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317. An historical survey of Spanish American literature. This course covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from pre- Columbian times, through the Conquest and the Spanish colonies, to the beginning of the nineteenth century when the Spanish American republics were born.
  • SPAN-S 472 Survey of Spanish American Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 312, SPAN-S 317. An historical survey of Spanish American literature. This course covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements. This literary survey course begins in the nineteenth century, when Spanish colonial rule ended and most Spanish American countries became republics, and follows the growth of Spanish American literature up to the present day.
  • SPAN-S 494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of the department. Intensive study of selected authors and topics. Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • SPCH-C 110 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3 cr.) Theory and practice of public speaking; training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content for informative and persuasive situations; application of language and delivery skills to specific audiences. Lectures and recitations. A minimum of six speaking situations.
  • SPCH-C 205 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing and SPCH-S 121 or THTR-T 120; or consent of instructor. Basic principles and practice in analysis and reading of selections from prose, poetry, and drama. Lecture and recitation.
  • SPCH-C 300 Practicum in Speech (1-8 cr.) Practical experience in the various departmental areas as selected by the student prior to registration, outlined in consultation with the instructor and approved by department. Must represent a minimum of 45 clock hours practical experience. Repeatable up to 8 units.
  • SPCH-C 325 Interviewing Principles and Practices (3 cr.) P:  Sophomore standing; or consent of the instructor. Study and practice of methods in selected interview settings; emphasis on the logical and psychological bases for the exchange of information and attitudes.
  • SPCH-C 391 Seminar (1-3 cr.) This course is designed to provide experience in the design, development, presentation, and evaluation of instructional communication training programs. While everything in this class will be grounded in theoretical principles of training and adult learning, this course functions as an applied hands-on experience for learning about and practicing training programs. Repeatable up to 12 units.
  • SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking (3 cr.) Theory and practice of public speaking, training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content, analysis of components of effective delivery and language.
  • SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) Practical consideration of spontaneous human interaction in face-to-face situations. Special attention is given to perception, language, and attitudes in dyads and small groups.
  • SPCH-S 160 Speech Correction Classroom Teaching (3 cr.)
  • SPCH-S 200 Training The Speaking Voice (3 cr.) Exercises for production of good speaking voice and adequate speech sounds.
  • SPCH-S 205 Introduction to Speech Communication (3 cr.) Overview of fundamental theoretical and methodological issues involved in the social scientific and critical study of human communication. Analyzes influences on and impact of communication in dyadic, group, public, and mediated contexts.
  • SPCH-S 210 Survey of Communication Studies (1 cr.) This course surveys the foundational principles, theories, and practice of the major areas of the communication studies discipline.
  • SPCH-S 221 Speech and Human Behavior (3 cr.) Development of speech and theories or oral discourse; the communication process and human behavior and culture; speech in conflict situations.
  • SPCH-S 222 Social Influence of Speech (3 cr.) Influence of public address; historical and current problems of freedom of speech, ethics, propaganda, and demagoguery.
  • SPCH-S 223 Business and Professional Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 and sophomore standing; or consent of instructor. Preparation and presentation of types of speeches and oral reports appropriate to business and professional occupations; group discussion and parliamentary procedure.
  • SPCH-S 228 Argumentation and Debate (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 and sophomore standing; or consent of instructor. Reasoning, evidence, and argument in public discourse. Study of forms of argument. Practice in argumentative speaking.
  • SPCH-S 229 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 with grade of C or better and sophomore standing. Leadership and participation in group, committee, conference, and public discussion; logical and psychological aspects of group process.
  • SPCH-S 246 Rhetorical Skills (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121, SPCH-S 122, ENG-W 131 completed with a letter grade of C or better; a minimum GPA of 2.3 with 30 credit hours earned; or consent of the instructor. This course provides instruction and practice in intermediate skills of written communication.
  • SPCH-S 306 Leadership (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 and Junior Standing. An upper-level survey course designed to familiarize students with the role of effective leadership within a business environment; students will explore and distinguish among various styles of leadership and their demand in today's global market.
  • SPCH-S 307 Crisis Management (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 with a C or higher and Junior Standing; or consent of instructor. An upper-level survey course designed to introduce students to the various concepts, theories, and principles of effecive crisis management. The course explores both national and international corporate crises in regards to crisis prevention, crisis readiness, and crisis resolution.
  • SPCH-S 321 Rhetoric and Modern Discourse (3 cr.) Topical analysis of the constituents of traditional rhetorical theory; application of rhetorical principles to the study of selected modern discourse.
  • SPCH-S 322 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 122 and junior standing. Advanced consideration of communication in human relationships. Emphasis given to self-concept, perception, verbal language, nonverbal interaction, listening, interpersonal conflict and communication skills in family, social, and work situations.
  • SPCH-S 323 Speech Composition (3 cr.) Advanced speech writing, focusing upon the content of speeches. The theory and practice of informative, persuasive, and ceremonial speaking. Topics include the principles of organization, exposition and argumentation, and language and style.
  • SPCH-S 324 Persuasion (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 246 with grade of C or better, and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Motivational appeals in influencing behavior; psychological factors in speaker-audience relationship; contemporary examples of persuasion. Practice in persuasive speaking.
  • SPCH-S 325 Voice and Diction (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 or THTR-T 120. R: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Anatomy and functions of vocal mechanism; background for teaching normal speech patterns.
  • SPCH-S 325 Voice and Diction (3 cr.) Anatomy and functions of vocal mechanism; introduction to phonetics; improvement of student's voice and diction through exercises and practical work in area of student's special interest.
  • SPCH-S 333 Public Relations (3 cr.) P: TEL-R 311, or SPCH-S 246, or ENG-W 290, and Junior Standing; or consent of instructor. Communication Studies majors and minors only. Introduction to the principles of contemporary public relations, including ethics of public relations; impact on society; and uses by government, business, and social institutions for internal and external communication. Public relations as a problem-solving process utilizing theoretical and applied communication strategies.
  • SPCH-S 336 Current Topics in Communication (3 cr.) Extensive analysis of selected problems in contemporary speech communication. Topics vary each semester and are listed in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once for credit.
  • SPCH-S 339 Freedom of Speech (3 cr.) Brief survey of the historical development of the concept of freedom of speech, and a close examination of contemporary free speech issues, such as those relating to national security, public order, civil rights movement, antiwar protest, obscenity, academic freedom, and symbolic speech.
  • SPCH-S 353 Advanced Public Speaking (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121 and Sophomore standing; or consent of the instructor. Development of a marked degree of skill in preparation and delivery of various types of speeches, with emphasis upon depth of research, clarity of organization, application of proof, and appropriate style.
  • SPCH-S 380 Nonverbal Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 122 and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Exploration of communicative interaction that is not linguistic in nature. Emphasizes the communicative aspects of personal space, physical environment, body movement, touch, facial expression, eye contact, and paralanguage.
  • SPCH-S 398 Independent Study in Speech Communication (1-3 cr.) P: Junior standing and approval of instructor. Independent study or practicum experience. Projects must be approved by faculty member before enrolling. May be repeated for up to a total of 6 credits.
  • SPCH-S 400 Senior Seminar (2 cr.) P: SPCH-S 210, SPCH-S 246 and Senior standing; or consent of the instructor. Permission required. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and skills as communications majors, and prepare them for a career in communications.
  • SPCH-S 405 Human Communication Theory (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 210,SPCH-S 246, and Senior standing; or consent of the instructor. Survey of contemporary theories of human communication with emphasis on the nature of theory construction; contributions of allied disciplines to communication theory.
  • SPCH-S 407 Historical Development of Rhetorical Theory. (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 246 and Junior standing. Survey of ancient through contemporary thought on the art of rhetoric; identification of leading trends in the history of rhetoric and the assessment of those trends in light of surrounding context.
  • SPCH-S 421 Rhetorical Criticism (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 246 and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Rhetorical criticism exemplified by selected studies, ancient and modern; development of contemporary standards and methods of appraisal.
  • SPCH-S 424 Empirical Research Methods in Speech Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 246, MATH-A 118 or MATH-M 118 or higher, completed with grade of C or higher; and Junior standing . Permission required. Focuses on the objective appraisal of behavioral data in the study of speech communication. Introduces the theoretical foundation of empirical social science and offers guidelines for conducting descriptive and experimental studies.
  • SPCH-S 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. A survey study of national, cultural, and cross-cultural persuasion in theory and practice.
  • SPCH-S 440 Organizational Communication (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or consent of the instructor. Examination of internal and external communication in business and other professional organizations, with emphasis upon theory, techniques, practices, goals, and the social environment in which such communication exists.
  • SPCH-S 450 Gender and Communication (3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 121, or ENG-W 290, or SPCH-S 246; and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Exploration of the communication between males and females from psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. Emphasizes interpersonal interaction between males and females in friendship and romantic contexts as well as educational, organizational, and mediated contexts.
  • SPH-B 150 Introduction to Public Health (3 cr.) Focuses on rationale, history and development of public health in the U.S. and globally. Emphasis on underlying theories, scientific, and social basis for public health practice plus the impact of critical public health concerns on society. Professional disciplines, organizations, and methods that interact to improve the public's health are addressed.
  • SPH-H 174 Prevention of Violence in American Society (3 cr.) This course covers various contributors to violence in America with an emphasis on community health issues. Personal and environmental factors related to violence are considered within a context of public health. Personal and community violence prevention and reduction approaches are presented.
  • SPH-S 101 Introduction to Safety (3 cr.) Provides an overview of the variety of careers available in the safety profession. Examines the broad areas practiced by safety professionals including regulatory compliance, environmental protection, ergonomics, industrial hygiene, emergency management, recreational safety, personal safety, healthcare, training and instruction, system safety, fire protection, and hazardous materials management.
  • SPH-S 151 Legal Aspects of Safety (3 cr.) Discusses legal requirements for safety, health, and environmental compliance. Emphasis is given to OSHA standards with additional review of EPA, NFPA, NIOSH, and related agencies.
  • SPH-S 201 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene (3 cr.) The concepts, principles, and techniques in the practice of industrial hygiene are presented. The identification, evaluation, and control of occupational health hazards are discussed. An orientation to selected instrumentation used to assess the workplace is provided.
  • SPH-S 202 Fundamentals of Fire Protections (3 cr.) Reviews fire protection codes and standards, principles, and practices; fire theory, fire-safe design, fire protection systems and equipment, and fire hazards. Emphases on the life safety aspect of fire protection.
  • SPH-S 210 OSHA General Industry Standards (3 cr.) An introduction and analysis of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) general industry standards as they apply to both the private and federal sectors. Includes an inspection practicum.
  • SPH-S 214 OSHA Construction Standards (3 cr.) An introduction to and application of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Indiana OSHA (IOSHA) construction standards as they apply to both the private and public sectors. Course includes an inspection practicum.
  • SPH-S 217 Safety: A Personal Focus (3 cr.) This course surveys current topics of interest in safety. Areas explored include injury problems, safety analysis, home safety, fire safety, personal protection, responding to emergencies, firearm safety, motor vehicle safety, occupational safety, recreational safety, school safety, and related issues.
  • SPH-S 231 Safety Engineering & Technology (3 cr.) An introduction to and review of various administrative programs developed by companies at the basic, intermediate, and corporate levels to enhance the total safety program and to minimize loss.
  • SPH-S 251 Incident Investigation and Analysis (3 cr.) Introduction of questioning and interviewing techniques for incident investigation and analysis. Examines injury causation theories, evaluation, reporting, legal aspects, and using investigation findings as a prevention tool. Reviews root causes in management systems.
  • SPH-S 255 Threats, Violence, and Workplace Safety (3 cr.) Emphasis on personal safety and survival through prevention, protection, and effective countermeasures for individuals and groups in the workplace. Examines potential methods for delivery and perpetuation of violence.
  • SPH-S 302 Introduction to Homeland Security (3 cr.) Explores relationships and interactions between private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at federal, state and local levels. Examines specific roles, responsibilities and vulnerabilities of private-sector and governmental agencies in protecting critical infrastructure as well as preventing, deterring, and responding to crises.
  • SPH-S 332 Ergonomics and Human Factors (3 cr.) The application of ergonomic principles and human factors techniques to the design and evaluation of workplaces and equipment.
  • SPH-S 336 Emergency Management (3 cr.) An all-hazard multidisciplinary response and recovery. Topics include identifying critical roles, risk assessment, strategies, planning concepts and methodologies, establishing effective integrated and coordinated programs, crisis management, communication and response.
  • SPH-S 345 Safety Program Management (3 cr.) Principles, theories, and concepts of safety and health program management with comparisons of past, present, and future practices. Review of managing behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations. Focuses on managing a total safety program.
  • SPH-S 350 Topical Seminar in Safety Education (3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of safety education. Possible topics for this seminar are new requirements for controlling hazardous material, the changing legal environment of the safety professional, new techniques in accident investigation, system safety and the safety manager, human factors, and workplace design.
  • SPH-S 354 Hazardous Materials and Waste Control (3 cr.) Introduction and review of hazardous materials regulations and hazardous materials control method, including hazardous wastes. Occupational and environment requirements and exposures, with guidance and common examples of materials that are toxic, corrosive, reactive, explosive, flammable, and combustible. These classes of materials will be considered from their generation to disposal.
  • SPH-S 402 Emergency Planning and Preparation (3 cr.) Addresses multiple facets of emergency planning and preparedness as part of comprehensive emergency management. Fundamentals of planning as applied to four phases of emergency management; how these phases overlap, interrelate, and complement each other; and critical steps in preparation will be examined.
  • SPH-S 410 Advanced Industrial Hygiene (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 201 plus 12 credits of SPH-S courses; junior/senior standing. Provides definitive application of principles and concepts for the solutions of workplace health and physical hazards. Program management techniques are discussed. Research procedures and techniques are introduced through individual and group projects.
  • SPH-S 411 Indust Hygiene Sampling & Analysis (3 cr.) This course emphasizes industrial hygiene sampling and measurement techniques primarily for airborne exposures to gases, vapors, particulates and physical agents. Students are introduced to the most common type of field measurements, sampling methods and laboratory analyses, which are used in evaluating occupational health hazards. A familiarization with the instrumentation and techniques is obtained through application in a laboratory-based scenario. Methods of generating test atmospheres are used to provide concentrations for field type sampling methods. Typical samples are collected for later laboratory analysis.
  • SPH-S 415 Safety Education and Training (3 cr.) Assessing training and education needs, establishing goals and objectives, planning and methods for delivery, using resources and evaluating effectiveness. Students develop evaluation instruments and conduct mock OSHA training. Emphasis is on improving safety performance in addition to compliance.
  • SPH-S 430 Topical Senior Seminar in Safety Culture (1-3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of safety culture. Explore issues of sound business principles and management practices for the development of an effective safety culture.
  • SPH-S 436 Emergency Response and Recovery (3 cr.) Identifies various types of disasters and appropriate emergency management stakeholders. Explores theoretical frameworks, emergency and post-emergency activities typical challenges of response efforts: and, the tools and techniques of response and recovery are examined.
  • SPH-S 491 Research in Safety Education (1-3 cr.) Undergraduate research done in the field of safety education under the direction of a faculty member in the department.
  • SPH-S 492 Readings in Safety Education (1-3 cr.) Enrollment is limited to seniors or advanced juniors who are majors in the department. Planned readings in safety education to be conducted under the direction of a member of the faculty. Reading proposal must be approved in advance.
  • SPH-S 496 Field Experience in Occupational Safety (1-10 cr.) P: Safety majors only; junior/senior standing; consent of instructor. Field experience through on-the-job and related opportunities in occupational safety. Students will be assigned to industrial and occupational enterprises offering professional development for the safety specialist. Periodic critiques will be scheduled with supervisory personnel. Written progress reports will be required. S/F only.
  • SUPV-S 300 Frontline Leadership (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. This introductory supervision course explores traditional and contemporary leadership styles used in the manager-employee relationship. Concepts include improving communication, conflict resolution, planning, organizing, and strategies for performance and productivity improvements. This course is an introduction to the front-line managerial position. It offers the student an insight into one of the most demanding jobs in the country and gives those already in that role, practical advice in handling on-the-job problems within their own organizations.
  • SUPV-S 310 Resource Planning Management (3 cr.) P: SUPV-S 300 or equivalent supervision experience. Increased competitiveness in the world today has required companies to re-evaluate how they design facilities and manage their resources. During interactive class discussions, this course takes a visionary approach and proactive approach to the concepts of organizational design, process/quality management, capacity analysis, and supply chain management. This course builds on the concepts presented in Front-Line Leadership to identify business strategies for managing the delivery of goods and services.
  • SUPV-S 320 Labor Relations (3 cr.) An introduction to labor relations for supervisors. The organization of labor unions and federations, certification, contracts, collective bargaining, grievances, arbitration, and labor law will be covered.
  • SUST-S 211 Sustainability and Regeneration: The Essentials (3 cr.) This course introduces students to the essentials of the field of sustainability and regeneration.
  • SUST-S 361 Sustainability Abroad (1-6 cr.) Topics announced in Schedule of Classes.  An analysis of how sustainability is being incorporated into societies and cultures around the world.  Can be conducted in the field or on campus. Repeatable up to 12 units.
  • SUST-S 415 Research in Sustainability and Regeneration (1-6 cr.) Research course that reviews and applies research methods used in sustainability and regeneration.  Analyzed problems using principles of field.  Requires application of research methods to problems in field including collecting, analyzed and critiquing data.   Includes development of a research brief, research proposal/funding proposal, a technical report and a recommended solutions list. Repeatable up to 6 units.
  • SUST-S 491 Internship in Sustainability (3 cr.) Involves placement in a business, not-for-profit agency or governmental unit to give student hands on experience working with sustainability in a practical setting.
  • TEL-R 404 Senior Seminar in Telecommunications (1-3 cr.) P: SPCH-S 333; TEL-T 345; TEL-T 347; TEL-R 440; TEL-R 311 or ENG-W 290; and Junior standing; or consent of instructor C: TEL-R 440 or TEL-T 347 Exploration of problems and issues of telecommunications in contemporary society.
  • TEL-R  311 Broadcast Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131; TEL-T 102, and Sophomore standing; or consent of the instructor. Style, form, and preparation of written materials for broadcasting.
  • TEL-R  440 Advertising Strategies (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 102; TEL-R 311 or ENG-W 290, and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Analysis and evaluation of the planning, creative and placement components of advertising campaigns utilizing the broadcast media; development of original advertising campaigns.
  • TEL-T 102 Introduction to Advertising (3 cr.) This course focuses on the role of advertising in a free economy and its place in the media of mass communication. It will cover advertising appeals, product and marketing research, selection of advertising media, testing of advertising effectiveness, and organization of advertising profession.
  • TEL-T 345 Advertising Media Planning (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 102; TEL-R 311 or ENG-W 290. and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. This course will introduce you to the process of advertising media planning and how it fits into the marketing function for brands, products and services. This process involves the creative and strategic use of media vehicles to deliver advertising messages to the target audience at the right time, through the most appropriate communication channel, and in a cost efficient manner.
  • TEL-T 347 Promotion and Marketing in Telecommunications (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 102; TEL-R 311 or ENG-W 290, and Sophomore standing; or consent of instructor. Theory and practice of designing, implementing, and evaluating promotional materials and understanding the process of strategic brand management in traditional and emerging media.
  • TEL-T 441 Advanced Advertising Strategies (3 cr.) P: TEL-T 102, and Junior standing; or consent of the instructor. Analysis and evaluation of planning, creative, and placement components of advertising campaigns utilizing the electronic media; development of original advertising campaigns.
  • THTR-T 105 Appreciation of Theatre (3 cr.) Introduction to the art of the theatre through a study of major dramatic forms and theatrical techniques. No credit for theatre/drama major concentration.
  • THTR-T 115 Oral Interpretation I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: oral and visual presentation of literature for audiences.
  • THTR-T 120 Acting I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: body movement, voice and diction, observation, concentration, imagination. Emphasis on improvisational exercises. Lectures and laboratory.
  • THTR-T 130 Stage Makeup (1 cr.) Techniques and styles of makeup in theatre. Lecture and laboratory. Theatre majors have registration priority.
  • THTR-T 220 Acting II (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 120 and permission of instructor. Textual analysis and techniques of communicating with body and voice. Study and performance of characters in scenes from Shakespeare and modern realistic and nonrealistic dramas. Lecture and laboratory.
  • THTR-T 221 Movement for the Actor (3 cr.) Designed to develop awareness of the body as an instrument of communication in the study of acting. Technical skills will be mastered through practice of exercises for flexibility, limberness, balance, coordination, and creative exploration of body movement in space as an individual and as a group member.
  • THTR-T 222 Voice of the Actor (3 cr.) Designed to develop physiological and psychological understanding of the voice as it applies specifically to the study of acting. Provides a series of exercise/techniques to free, develop, and strengthen vocal pitch, range, resonance, breath control, and articulation. Includes an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet and stage directions.
  • THTR-T 225 Stagecraft I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: analysis of practical and aesthetic functions of stage scenery, fundamentals of scenic construction and rigging, mechanical drawing for stagecraft. Lecture and laboratory.
  • THTR-T 230 Stage Costuming I (3 cr.) Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: materials, construction techniques, pattern drafting, wardrobe work, and decorative processes. Lecture and laboratory.
  • THTR-T 236 Readers Theatre I (3 cr.) Exploration of theory and techniques. Practical experience with a variety of materials: fiction and nonfiction, poetry, prose, dramatic dialogue.
  • THTR-T 270 Introduction to History of the Theatre I (3 cr.) Significant factors in primary periods of theatre history and their effect on contemporary theatre. Review of representative plays of each period to illustrate theatrical use of dramatic literature. Credit not given for both THTR-T 470 and THTR-T 270.
  • THTR-T 271 Introduction to History of the Theatre II (3 cr.) Continuation of THTR-T 270. Significant factors in primary periods of theatre history and their effect on contemporary theatre. Review of representative plays of each period to illustrate theatrical use of dramatic literature. Credit not given for both THTR-T 471 and THTR-T 271.
  • THTR-T 275 American Theatre: The Black Experience (3 cr.) Historical survey of the black influence in the American theatre; a critical study of early and contemporary plays concerning black social problems and depicting black culture; the contributions of black actors and black playwrights to the American stage.
  • THTR-T 310 Creative Dramatics (3 cr.) Theory and technique of guiding children in spontaneous activity; specifically, creating scenes or plays and performing them with improvised dialogue and action. Although theories will be discussed, the emphasis will be on practical activities that may be useful to prospective teachers, recreation leaders, etc.
  • THTR-T 315 Oral Interpretation II (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 115. Study of the oral and visual presentation of literature, with emphasis on analysis of intellectual and emotional values.
  • THTR-T 320 Acting III (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 220 and audition. Character analysis and use of language on stage. Study and performance of characters in scenes from Shakespeare and modern realistic and nonrealistic dramas. Lecture and laboratory.
  • THTR-T 325 Voice and Speech (3 cr.) Anatomy and functions of vocal mechanism; introduction to phonetics; improvement of student's voice and diction through exercises and practical work in area of student's special interest.
  • THTR-T 326 Scene Design I (3 cr.) Introduction to the process of scene design, scene designer's responsibilities, scene problem solving, and exploration of visual materials and forms.
  • THTR-T 335 Stage Lighting (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 225. Introduction to theories, methodologies, and skills; instruments and their use; control of light; practical application. Lecture and laboratory.
  • THTR-T 340 Directing I (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 120. Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: play analysis, work with actors, basic elements of stage composition.
  • THTR-T 349 Theatre Practicum (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor/director. Practicum credit for students participating responsibly in a performance capacity is available by special arrangement with the instructor/director as casting decisions are confirmed. Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • THTR-T 363 Modern Plays for Stage Interpretation (3 cr.) Production of realistic, naturalistic, and expressionistic plays on level representative of Pulitzer Prize and Drama Critics Circle selections.
  • THTR-T 385 Theatre Laboratory (1-3 cr.) P: THTR-T 225, THTR-T 424, THTR-T 425; or consent of instructor. Practicum credit for students participating responsibly in production capacities is available by special arrangement with the instructor, with current IU Southeast theatre productions serving as the core of study. Students will engage in script analysis, comparison, detailed research, and production planning as required and then actual implementation of plans in a specific key area (e.g., set design or construction, costumes, lighting, promotion, etc.) contracted on an individual basis with the instructor.
  • THTR-T 390 Creative Work in Summer Theatre (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of director. Work in summer theatre productions. Repeatable for credit up to six credits.
  • THTR-T 400 Arts Management (3 cr.) Business theory and practice in contemporary arts organizations, both profit and not-for-profit. Emphasis on practical application. Laboratory required.
  • THTR-T 410 Movement for the Theatre (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 120. Introduction to theories, methodologies, and skills in developing a flexible, relaxed, controlled body for the theatre. Emphasis on relaxing body tensions, alignment, eye training, tumbling, and stage combat.
  • THTR-T 424 Stagecraft II (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 225; or consent of instructor. Using theatrical drafting as a vehicle, special techniques, new materials and techniques, and problems of construction are explored. Continued exploration of production duties is included.
  • THTR-T 433 Costume Design (3 cr.) P: THTR-T 230 or consent of instructor. Design and selection of costumes, with an emphasis on the relationship of costume to character and production.
  • THTR-T 446 Theatre for Children (3 cr.) Purposes, principles, and problems of staging plays for young people.
  • THTR-T 453 Playwriting I (3 cr.) P: Consent of Instructor. Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: principles of dramatic structure, practice in writing. Conferences and class evaluation.
  • THTR-T 458 Screenwriting (3 cr.) Structural analyses of cinematic models, culminating in the creation of an original full-length narrative screenplay.
  • THTR-T 483 Topics in Theatre and Drama (1-3 cr.) Studies in special topics not usually covered in other departmental courses. May be repeated once for credit if topic differs.
  • THTR-T 490 Independent Study in Theatre and Drama (1-6 cr.) P: 12 credit hours in theatre and drama, departmental grade average of B or above, consent of instructor required. Readings, reports, experiments, or projects in area of student's special interest. Repeatable for credit up to 6 credits.
  • WOST-W 200 Women in Society - Intro to Women's Studies (3 cr.) Interdisciplinary approach to core discipline areas and to methodological and bibliographical tools required for research in women's studies. Roles and images of women in contemporary American society based on historical, social, political background. Will not count toward the social science distributional requirement.
  • WOST-W 400 Selected Topics in Women's Studies (Senior Seminar) (3 cr.) Readings and discussion of selected topics, with an interdisciplinary focus; research paper included.
  • WOST-W 495 Readings and Research in Women's Studies (1-3 cr.) Individual readings and research. May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
  • ZOOL-Z 103 Animal Biology (5 cr.) Emphasis on interdependence of all living things. Type forms are used to demonstrate general biological principles. Functional aspects of biology, inheritance, development, and evolution and their application to human biology. This course will not count toward a biology major.
  • ZOOL-Z 373 Entomology (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. C: ZOOL-Z 383. Insects, with emphasis on evolution, distribution, behavior, and structure.
  • ZOOL-Z 383 Laboratory in Entomology (2 cr.) C: ZOOL-Z 373. Laboratory and field studies of methods of collecting, preserving, and studying insects, with intensive study of classification. Preparation of insect collection required.
  • ZOOL-Z 460 Ethology (Animal Behavior) (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 or ENG-W 131, and MATH-M 110 or higher with grades of C or better, OR minimum of 12 credits. Introduction to the zoological study of animal behavior. Emphasizes both internal and external factors involved in the causation of species-typical behavior of animals (protozoa-primates) in their natural environment.
  • ZOOL-Z 466 Endocrinology (3 cr.) P: BIOL-L 211 with C or better. Mechanisms of hormone action from the molecular to the organismal level in vertebrates.

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