Previous IU South Bend Campus Bulletins

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English | ENG

Eva MonhautPictured | Eva Monhaut | B.A. in English | Bremen, Indiana (hometown)
Club Affiliations | English Club (president), Preface (staff writer), French Club, Sustainability Club, Honors Program
Volunteer Activity | Pub Hub (writer)


English | ENG

P Prerequisite | C Co-requisite | R Recommended
I Fall Semester | II Spring Semester | S Summer Session/s


  • ENG-A 190 Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.) Explores artistic disciplines and associated forms, materials, and practices. Develops students' making, looking, and listening skills. Through the creative process students will explore relationships to other individuals and cultures, and will review the implications of their learning for their personal, academic, and professional pursuits.
  • ENG-A 399 Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Explores relation between creative writing and other art forms. Interdisciplinary arts projects. Emphasis on independent work, ethical issues of art and society, and the nature of the creative process. Discussion-based, writing-intensive.
  • ENG-D 600 History of the English Language (3-4 cr.) Survey of the evolution of the English language from its earliest stages to the present, with reference to its external history and to its phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary.
  • ENG-E 110 Diversity in United States Literature (3 cr.) This lecture course offers a broad introduction to the cultural diversity of the United States through a range of interdisciplinary material, including literature, theater, cinema, photography, music, oral history, and critical theory.  Topics covered may include race, national identity, gender, the Civil Rights movement, globalization, and immigration.
  • ENG-E 301 Literatures in English to 1600 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. The historical study of literature in English for the period 450 to 1600. I
  • ENG-E 302 Literatures in English 1600-1800 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Representative study of British and American literature of the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries in the context of transatlantic cultural developments. II
  • ENG-E 303 Literatures in English 1800-1900 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Representative study of nineteenth-century British and American literature in the context of transatlantic cultural developments.
  • ENG-E 304 Literatures in English 1900-Present (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Representative study of twentieth-century literatures in English. In addition to Britain and North America, cultural locations may include the Indian subcontinent, Australasia, Anglophone Africa, the Caribbean, etc. Focus on themes associated with modernity and cross-cultural contacts. I
  • ENG-G  13 Academic Writing for Graduate Students (3 cr.) P:  Must earn grade of C or higher in ENG-W 130 or a score of 55 on the SBENG exam to enroll. Designed to meet the academic writing needs of ESL graduate students from multiple disciplines, this course focuses on a variety of academic writing styles and disciplinary approaches to producing research papers and professional documents.  Students practice paraphrasing, summarizing, and critiquing discipline-related articles; writing successful proposals and a comprehensive research paper.
  • ENG-G 20 Communication Skills for Graduate Students and International Teaching Assistants (4 cr.) This course for graduate International Teaching Assistants provides instruction on basic teaching strategies and helps students develop the oral language skills necessary to present academic materials in English to a student audience. Pronunciation, listening comprehension, and classroom interaction skills are practiced. Regular conferences focus on individual pronunciation needs.
  • ENG-G 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Acquaints the student with contemporary studies of the nature of language in general and of the English language in particular.
  • ENG-G 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Historical and structural analysis of English language in stages of its development. Political and social events affecting development of language: interrelationship of language and literature, evolution of modern English phonology, syntax, orthography, and lexicon. II (alternate years)
  • ENG-G 302 Structure of Modern English (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Linguistic analysis of present-day spoken and written English, with attention to its phonemic, morphemic, and syntactical systems and its system of expressive features.
  • ENG-G 660 Stylistics (3-4 cr.) Survey of traditional and linguistic approaches to the study of prose and poetic style. Attention to the verbal characteristics of texts, what they reflect about the author, and how they affect the reader.
  • ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. AHLA development of critical skills essential to participation in the interpretive process. Through class discussion and focused writing assignments, introduces the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods associated with historical, generic, and/or cultural concerns. I, II
  • ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Issues and approaches to critical study of women writers and treatment in British and American literature.
  • ENG-L 220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.) Shakespeare's best-known plays and poems.
  • ENG-L 222 Introduction to Criticism (3 cr.) Established critical approaches (such as formalist, biographical, historical), with practice in applying these approaches to a small number of texts.
  • ENG-L 290 Children's Literature (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Historical and modern children’s books and selections from books; designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best in children’s literature.
  • ENG-L 305 Chaucer (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Examination of The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, Troilus and Criseyede, and selected Canterbury Tales, to acquaint students with the language, conventions, and background of Chaucer's poetry.
  • ENG-L 306 Middle English Literature (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. A survey of Middle English lyrics, drama, and romance, with special attention to Langland, The Pearl-poet, and Gover, designed to acquaint the student with the language and literary development of England from 1066 to 1500.
  • ENG-L 313 Early Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. The course concentrates on Shakespeare’s history plays, and it addresses the following problems: (1) history or chronicle as dramatic genre, (2) Shakespeare as historian, (3) the rhetoric of history, and (4) fact, truth, and art.
  • ENG-L 314 Late Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Close reading of at least seven later plays of Shakespeare.
  • ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare's major plays. Credit not given for both ENG-L 220 and ENG-L 315. II (every other year)
  • ENG-L 327 Later Eighteenth Century Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Representative literary works from the mid-eighteenth century to 1800, studied within their social context.
  • ENG-L 329 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Major Romantic writers, with emphasis on two or more of the following: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.
  • ENG-L 332 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. British literature and culture in the age of Romanticism and the revolutionary era (ca. 1780-1830). Poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction writings from major and minor authors, such as Austen, Blake, Byron, Coleridge, Scott, the Shelleys, Keats, Wollstonecraft, and the Wordsworths.
  • ENG-L 335 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. A survey of English poetry and prose from approximately 1832 to 1900. Attention to figures like Tennyson, Browning, and Carlyle.
  • ENG-L 347 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. ENG-L 347 covers the development of British fiction, including the novels of John Bunyan, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, L. Frances Burney. It is intended for English majors and/or those with some literature and writing experience.
  • ENG-L 348 Nineteenth Century British Fiction (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
  • ENG-L 350 Early American Writing and Culture to 1800 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Examination of a range of literary and cultural communications from the period of exploration and colonization of the Americas through the Revolutionary era. Special attention paid to the interactions between rhetoric and history, and to religious, scientific, political, racial, and literary discourses.
  • ENG-L 351 American Literature 1800-1865 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Study of a range of texts from the formative period of the republic to the end of the Civil War. Special attention paid to the shifting definitions and constructions of U.S. American national and cultural identity, as affected by issues of race, environment, transatlantic exchanges, scientific discourse, and the emergence of women writers.
  • ENG-L 352 American Literature 1865-1914 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Surveys American literature through the development of realism, regionalism, naturalism, and the beginnings of modernism. Considers literature's relation to social and cultural phenomena of this era, such as urbanization, industrialization, immigration, racial tensions, labor strife, changing gender roles, and the spread of mass media and consumer culture.
  • ENG-L 354 American Literature Since 1914 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Study of modernist and contemporary American writers in various genres, 1914 to the present, including Frost, Stein, Faulkner, O'Connor, Baldwin, Morrison, and others.
  • ENG-L 355 American Fiction to 1900 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Survey of a range of literary fiction in nineteenth-century America, examining a variety of forms including the novel, sketch, short story, as well as modes (Gothic, romance, sentimental, adventure). Attention will be paid to the historical, cultural, and political contexts in which canonical and lesser-known authors wrote.
  • ENG-L 358 American Literature, 1914-1960 (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Survey of literary expressions centered mainly in the first half of the twentieth century. Attention may be given to such literary movements as modernism and the Beats, as well as literature written by women and various ethnic populations.
  • ENG-L 365 Modern Drama Continental (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. Special attention to Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett, and the theater of the absurd.
  • ENG-L 369 Studies in British and American Authors (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Studies in single authors (such as Wordsworth and Melville), groups of authors (such as minority writers), and periods (such as American writers of the 1920s). Topics will vary from semester to semester.
  • ENG-L 370 Recent Black American Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. A study of the major African American writers, with special emphasis on recent writing.
  • ENG-L 371 Critical Practices (3 cr.) P: Must have completed ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or better and ENG-L 202. Study of and practice in critical methodologies; can be focused on specific topics. I, II.
  • ENG-L 376 Literature for Adolescents (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. A survey of the challenging, sometimes controversial, literature written about and for young adult readers. A wide range of readings, with discussion topics that include "problem" fiction, fantasy and escapism, and censorship. This course is for future teachers and for others interested in the complex phenomenon of coming of age.
  • ENG-L 379 American Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. A survey of representative authors and works of American ethnic and minority literature with primary focus on Black, Hispanic, and Native Americans.
  • ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements (such as Black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, Para journalists and other experiments in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets and critics; or any combination of groups.
  • ENG-L 382 Fiction of Non-Western World (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. An in-depth study of selected narratives from the fiction of the non-Western world. Focus and selections vary from year to year. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 388 Studies in Irish Literature and Culture (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. This course is an intensive classroom and on-site study of Irish culture and the literature it has produced.
  • ENG-L 450 Seminar: British and American Authors (3 cr.) P: ENG-L 371 or ENG-L 222. Open only to seniors, except by consent of instructor. Should not be taken until all, or almost all, other major courses are completed. Intensive study. Intensive study of a major author or a school of closely-related authors. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 460 Seminar: Literature Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.) P: ENG-L 371 or ENG-L 222. Open only to seniors, except by consent of instructor. Should not be taken until all, or almost all, other major courses are completed. Study of texts written in several historical periods united by a common mode or form (narrative, romanticism, lyric, etc.), or by a common theme (Bildungsroman, the city and the country, the two cultures question, the uses of literacy, etc.). May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 495 Individual Readings in English (1-3 cr.)
  • ENG-L 501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (4 cr.) Instruction in the materials, tools, and methods of research. The course is especially designed to familiarize beginning graduate students with the research expectations associated with graduate study in literature.
  • ENG-L 502 Contexts for Study of Writing (4 cr.) Historical and cognitive effects of writing, reading, and language use, and the implication of these effects for the teaching and study of literature and writing. Special emphasis will be placed on the history and psychology of literacy.
  • ENG-L 590 Internship in English (4 cr.) A supervised internship in the uses of language in the workplace. Each intern will be assigned a problem or task and will develop the methods for solving or completing it. Each intern will complete a portfolio of workplace writing and self-evaluation.
  • ENG-L 612 Chaucer (4 cr.) Critical analysis of The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected shorter poems.
  • ENG-L 623 English Drama from the 1590s to 1800, Exclusive of Shakespeare (4 cr.) P: Familiarity with half a dozen plays of Shakespeare.
  • ENG-L 625 Readings in Shakespeare (4 cr.) Critical analysis of selected texts.
  • ENG-L 631 English Literature 1660-1790 (4 cr.) Extensive reading in poetry and nonfictional prose.
  • ENG-L 639 English Fiction to 1800 (4 cr.)
  • ENG-L 642 Studies in Romantic Literature (4 cr.) An advanced survey of the literature and thought of the major writers of the British Romantic movement, including Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.
  • ENG-L 647 Studies in Victorian Literature (4 cr.) Study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period.
  • ENG-L 650 Studies in American Literature to 1900 (4 cr.) Intensive study of writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period.
  • ENG-L 653 American Literature 1800-1900 (4 cr.) Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from Washington Irving through Frank Norris.
  • ENG-L 660 Studies in British and American Literature 1900-Present (4 cr.) Intensive study of one writer, a group of writers, or a theme or form significant to the period. Course may be repeated once for credit with a different topic.
  • ENG-L 674 Studies in International English Literature (4 cr.) Literatures from Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific islands, the Indian subcontinent, or Canada.
  • ENG-L 680 Special Topics-Literature Study and Theory (4 cr.) Readings in sociological, political, psychological, and other approaches to literature. May be repeated once for up to 8 credits.
  • ENG-L 681 Genre Studies (4 cr.)

    A variable title course, genre studies examines the specific characteristics of individual genres.

    May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 695 Invidual Readings in English (1-4 cr.) Independent study. May be repeated once for up to 8 credits.
  • ENG-L 699 M.A. Thesis (1-4 cr.)
  • ENG-T 190 Literary and Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.) P: Open only Freshmen students (29 or fewer credit hours). Explores, in an interdisciplinary way, one of the great humanistic traditions of inquiry regarding one of the following themes: ideas of self, truth, beauty, community, nature, or conflict. Writing intensive, discussion-focused.
  • ENG-T 191 World Literary and Intellectual Traditions I (3 cr.) P: For Education (EDUC1) students only. A thematic interdisciplinary exploration of a major humanistic tradition of inquiry in the context of world culture before 1600.  Themes may include:  self, truth, beauty, community, nature, and conflict.  Designed to allow Education majors to meet campus general education and state licensing requirements.  Writing-intensive, discussion focused.
  • ENG-T 192 World Literary and Intellectual Traditions II (3 cr.) P: For Education (EDUC1) students only. A thematic, interdisciplinary exploration of a major humanistic tradition of inquiry, in the context of world culture after 1600.  Themes may include:  self, truth, beauty, community, nature, and conflict.  Designed to allow Education majors to meet campus general education and state licensing requirements.  Writing-intensive, discussion-focused.
  • ENG-T 390 Literary and Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Interdisciplinary exploration of a humanistic tradition of inquiry regarding one of the following themes:  ideas of self, truth, beauty, community, nature, or conflict.  Writing intensive, discussion-focused.  Attention to primary texts and research materials.
  • ENG-W 31 Pre-Composition (3-4 cr.) For ESL students only. Providing practice in writing skills necessary for success in ENG-W 131, this course concentrates on brief essays with work on sentence and paragraph writing and details of standard English as needed. Credit hours, though counting toward full-time student status, do not accrue toward the total number required for a degree.
  • ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 130 is for students who score a 1, 2, or 3 on the English Placement Exam. Students scoring 1 or 2 should take the 4-credit version of ENG-W 130. For students who need a semester of writing instruction before taking ENG-W 131. Practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences. Attention to sentence and paragraph structure.

    ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (4 cr.) P. Level II on English placement exam or Level I and enrollment in Write Well program. This 4-credit course is an enhanced version of ENG-W 130, with additional laboratory time. In this course, students should become more confident as interpreters of college-level reading and better prepared for developing their ideas in relation to those texts. The course focuses on using summary, analysis, and synthesis to produce thoughtful, organized, theory-driven essays. Students edit their writing with a view to improving their ability to organize ideas and present them in effective language.

    ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition- ESL (3 cr.) P: Score of 25 on ESL placement exam or successful completion of ENG-W 31. In this course, ESL students focus on interpreting college-level readings and developing their ideas in relation to those texts in order to become well-prepared for ENG-W 131. The course focuses on using summary, analysis, and synthesis to produce thoughtful, organized, theory-driven essays. Specific ESL writing issues are addressed.

  • ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, and Inquiry I (2-4 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 130 or score a 4 on the English Placement Exam to enroll. ENG-W 131 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students' abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students' own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.
  • ENG-W 140 Reading, Writing, and Inquiry I-Honors (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 130 or score a 4 on the English Placement Exam to enroll. Offers an introductory writing course for advanced first-year writers. Like W131, W140 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students' abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students' own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.
  • ENG-W 206 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 cr.) Does not satisfy English composition requirements. Provides students with the opportunity to develop their creative writing skills and gives them a working knowledge of the basic principles of fiction, poetry and drama.
  • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. To develop research and writing skills requisite for most academic and professional activities.  Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and writing techniques useful in preparing reviews, critical bibliographies, research and technical reports, proposals and papers.
  • ENG-W 232 Introduction to Business Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Designed for students pursuing business careers. Practice in clarity, correctness, organization, and audience adaptation in business letters, interoffice memos, and informal and formal reports. Some emphasis on business research methods, research design, collaborative writing, and oral communication.
  • ENG-W 233 Intermediate Expository Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Instruction and practice in producing researched and documented texts appropriate for public and academic audiences. Emphasis on appropriate primary and secondary research methods, organization, writing style, and documentation.
  • ENG-W 234 Technical Report Writing (3 cr.) Instruction in preparing engineering and other technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics.
  • ENG-W 250 Writing in Context (1-3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. An intermediate-level expository writing course. During each five-week segment students will read on a contemporary issue and write a seven-to-ten page paper on that issue. Topics will vary from year to year. May be taken twice for credit.
  • ENG-W 260 Film Criticism (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 with a grade of C or higher. This course surveys the major schools of film criticism and applies these theories to contemporary films. Students may write in the manner of the different critical approaches studied. Schools of film criticism considered may include formalism, auteur theory, genre studies, and feminist film theory.
  • ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Offers instruction and practice in writing argumentative essays about complicated and controversial issues. The course focuses on strategies for identifying issues, assessing claims, locating evidence, deciding on a position, and writing papers with clear assertions and convincing arguments.
  • ENG-W 280 Literary Editing and Publishing (3 cr.) This class is designed to educate students by exposing them to contemporary writing as it goes through the process—from mailbox to published book—of being judged and selected for publication. Students will read and critique manuscripts submitted to Wolfson Press for possible publication. We will focus on the mechanics and ethics inherent in any editorial endeavor that includes selection as part of its process.
  • ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: Must have passed ENG-W 203 or ENG-W 206 to enroll. Further exploration in the art of fiction writing. May be taken twice for credit.
  • ENG-W 302 Screenwriting (3 cr.) Students may not receive credit for both ENG-W 302 and TEL-T 331. A practical course in basic techniques of writing for film. Examine film screenplay structure and analyze the dramatic strategies of films. Learn to use the correct script format, and to creatively engage in the various stages of original dramatic script writing. Covers the essentials of dramatic structure, story development, characterization and theme, scene construction, and dialogue. May be taken twice for credit.
  • ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) P: Must have passed ENG-W 203 or ENG-W 206 to enroll. Further exploration in the art of poetry writing. May be repeated twice for credit.
  • ENG-W 311 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3 cr.) P: Must have passed ENG-W 203 or ENG-W 206 to enroll. Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, or documentary. Course focuses on understanding and practicing the rhetorical and stylistic choices available to writers of creative nonfiction: options for structure, pacing, language, style, tone, detail, description, authorial presence and voice, etc. (Offered every other year)
  • ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers - hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing - and explores what impact these new forms have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.
  • ENG-W 319 Grant Writing (3 cr.) P: Grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140; also, enrolled students must be at least sophomore status (30 or more credit hours earned). This course is an introduction to grant writing. Students will participate in regular discussion and team-based writing activities and write practice grants and reflection journals. The course culminates in a collaborative grant-writing project for a non-profit agency and counts as both a Community-Engaged course and a Second-Level Writing course.
  • ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.) Close examination of the assumptions and choices that govern content and style, and practice in the techniques of producing a variety of researched papers incorporating primary and secondary research, appropriate to audience and purpose.
  • ENG-W 367 Writing for Multiple Media (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C or better in ENG-W 131 to enroll. Introduces principles and practices of multimedia design and implementation, with emphasis on writing in multimedia contexts. Students will consider ways that new media affect the production and reception of writing and its relationship to other forms of communication (e.g., oral and visual).
  • ENG-W 395 Individual Study of Writing (1-3 cr.)
  • ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (1-3 cr.) Combines study of writing with practical experience of working with professionals in journalism, business communication, or technical writing. Researched reports are required. Evaluations made by both supervisor and instructor. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.
  • ENG-W 401 Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have passed ENG-W 203 or ENG-W 206 to enroll. Focused work in the art and profession of fiction writing. May be repeated twice for credit.
  • ENG-W 403 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.) P: Must have passed ENG-W 203 or ENG-W 206 to enroll. Focused work in the art and profession of poetry writing. May be repeated twice for credit.
  • ENG-W 413 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing (3 cr.) P: C or better in ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140; and either ENG-W 203 or ENG-W 206. Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, and documentary.
  • ENG-W 511 Writing Fiction (4 cr.) Either ENG-W 511 or ENG-W 513 may be taken twice for the M.A.
  • ENG-W 513 Writing Poetry (4 cr.) Poetry writing workshop on the study of prosody and form (including formal elements of free verse) in the context of writing by class members. Course may be taken twice for M.A. credit.
  • ENG-W 600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (4 cr.) C: Graduate Level Status. Covers selected issues in current composition and rhetorical theory.
  • ENG-W 609 Directed Writing Projects (1-4 cr.) Individual creative or critical projects negotiated with the professor who agrees to offer tutorial assistance. Credit hours will vary according to scope of project. Course may be taken twice for M.A. credit.
  • ENG-W 615 Writing Creative Nonfiction (4 cr.) Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, and documentary.
  • ENG-W 616 Prose Style Workshop (4 cr.) A writing course in prose style using a workshop and revision model, with a focus on types of English sentences, on stylistic and rhetorical choices and effects, and on models drawn from notable essayists both past and present.

Academic Bulletins

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2020-2021 Campus Bulletin
2019-2020 Campus Bulletin
2018-2019 Campus Bulletin
2017-2018 Campus Bulletin
2016-2017 Campus Bulletin
2015-2016 Campus Bulletin
2014-2015 Campus Bulletin

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