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Education | EDUC

Chendarin NholPictured | Chandarin Nhol | Secondary Education, Earth and Space Science  | Goshen, Indiana (hometown)
Club Affiliation | Physics Club (secretary)


Education | EDUC

P Prerequisite | C Co-requisite | R Recommended
I Fall Semester | II Spring Semester | S Summer Session/s


  • EDUC-A 190 Teaching About the Arts (3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 190, EDUC-A 325, EDUC-K 305. Introduction to the importance of the arts in elementary school curriculum.  Students are given a foundation of methods and materials in art, music, and drama that enables the student to integrate the arts into the general curriculum, supplement the resource specialists in the arts in schools, and encourage student discussion and understanding of the arts in the world today. I, II.
  • EDUC-A 500 Introduction to Educational Leadership (3 cr.) This course entails an introduction to the history, philosophy, and social aspects of educational leadership. It reviews relevant theories of administration; the historical role of administration in schools; and the political, social, economic, and philosophical frameworks that have informed administration. S
  • EDUC-A 502 Communication and Interpersonal Relationships (3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500 and admission to the principals’ certification program. This course is designed to develop expertise in four types of communication faced by school administrators: interpersonal, group, organizational, and public. Practice involves participation in actual school situations to understand role communication plays in problem identification and resolution. Skills of writing and speaking in a range of experiences, both in person and through media are emphasized.
  • EDUC-A 504 Knowledge of Teaching and Learning (6 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500 and admission to the principal’s certification program. The course involves interpreting and communicating curriculum standards; discussion and application of teaching and learning theory as they relate to the practice of teaching; analyzing student achievement data; supervising/evaluating personnel; commitment to meaningful change and an understanding of its dynamics; coordinating and facilitating on-going staff development; and a commitment to one's own professional development. II
  • EDUC-A 506 Portfolio Assessment (0 cr.) P: All coursework for principals’ certification program and program director approval. A portfolio is required for completion of the School Administration Certification Program. Items to be included in the portfolio will be selected by the students throughout the course of their study in school administration. The portfolio will be organized to highlight experiences from the Orientation and Domain courses.
  • EDUC-A 510 School Community Relations (2-3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500 and admission to the principal’s certification program. This course investigates characteristics of the community school, including the multicultural quality of the community. It also explores adapting the educational program to community needs, using community resources in instruction, and planning school-community relations programs. II May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-A 515 Educational Leadership: Teacher Development and Evaluation (3 cr.) The primary outcome is to develop the knowledge, interpersonal and leadership skills that can be applied in leadership for the improvement of instruction. Models of supervision and evaluation will be examined, but the major focus will be to examine the context for change in today's schools and apply leadership knowledge to the task of direct assistance, group development, professional development, curriculum development, and action research. II
  • EDUC-A 560 Political Perspectives of Education (3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500. This course focuses on theoretical and conceptual approaches useful in describing, explaining, and predicting political behavior related to schools. Forces for continuity and change at local, state, and federal levels are explored.
  • EDUC-A 590 Independent Study in Educational Leadership (1-3 cr.) P: Successful completion of all program course requirements. Individual research or study with School Administration faculty member, arranged in advance of registration. A one or two page written proposal should be submitted to the instructor during the first week of the term, specifying the scope of the project, project activities, meeting times, completion date, and student products. II
  • EDUC-A 608 Legal Perspectives on Education (3 cr.) P: Consent of the instructor. This course entails an overview of the legal framework affecting the organization and administration of public schools, including church-state issues, pupil rights, staff-student relationships, conditions of employment, teacher organizations, tort liability, school finance, and desegregation.. I
  • EDUC-A 625 Administration of Elementary Schools (3-6 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500 and program director approval. This course provides an overview of leadership at the elementary school level, including topics such as instructional leadership, personnel issues, managing support services and budgets, and building parent and community relationships. I
  • EDUC-A 627 Secondary School Administration (3-6 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500 and program director approval. This course provides an overview of leadership at the secondary school level, including topics such as planning for instruction, personnel issues, managing support services and record keeping practices, coordinating extracurricular activities, and building parent and community relationships. I
  • EDUC-A 629 Data-Informed Decision Making for School Leaders (3 cr.) This on-line course prepares educational leaders to critically collect, analyze, evaluate, and use various forms of data to inform instructional and organizational decision making in schools. The focus of the course is on decision making to further student learning and school improvement. II
  • EDUC-A 630 Economic Dimensions of Education (3 cr.) P: EDUC-A 500 and admission to the principal’s certification program. This course provides an introduction to economic thinking concerning K-12 education as well as the theory and practice of funding K-12 schools. Topics include economics and educational leadership, efficiency, equity, liberty, sources and characteristics of school revenue, and school funding distribution systems. I
  • EDUC-C 511 Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) Summative seminars on each student's capstone project. The detailed analysis, synthesis, and summative evaluation of the expert, master teacher model. The summative evaluation of the effectiveness of the MaPP program.
  • EDUC-E 201 Multicultural Education and Global Awareness (1-3 cr.) This course examines educators' and students' responsibility(ies) in a complex and interdependent world. Students will be guided to develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to live effectively in a world of limited resources, ethnic diversity, cultural pluralism and increasing interdependencies and confidence with which to face the future. II
  • EDUC-E 317 Practicum in Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) Methods and materials used in the education of children from three to six years of age. Observation and participation. I, II, S
  • EDUC-E 325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (1-4 cr.) C: EDUC-A 190, EDUC-E 372, EDUC-K 305 and EDUC-M 401. Emphasizes the development of objectives, teaching strategies and evaluation procedures that facilitate the social learnings of young children. Special attention given to concept learning, inquiry, decision-making and value analysis. I, II
  • EDUC-E 327 Social Studies Methods and the Family: Focus on Young Children (3 cr.) C: EDUC-E 327 and EDUC-M 101, and be admitted to TEP. Students must also enroll in all Block 1 courses. The course has a dual focus: One goal of the course is to explore issues related to children, families, and communities including legal and ethical issues, and public policies affecting young children from a deeper understanding of families and communities; the course will then focus on goals of a social studies curriculum for young children, including appropriate methods and strategies of instruction. I, II
  • EDUC-E 328 Science in the Elementary Schools (1-3 cr.) C: EDUC-E 327 and EDUC-M 301. Students must also enroll in all Block 3 courses. The focus of this course will be on developing teacher competencies in writing performance objectives, question asking, evaluating, and sequencing. These competencies will reveal themselves in the preparation and development of science activities and the teaching strategies involved in presenting those activities to elementary school children.. I, II
  • EDUC-E 330 Infant Learning Environments (3 cr.) Students will broaden their knowledge base of appropriate instructional strategies to enhance infant-toddler development, caregiving skills, and knowledge of appropriate learning environments, and will apply strategies and knowledge in providing care and educational experiences. Open to students from allied health, psychology, pediatric nursing, and social work. I
  • EDUC-E 333 Inquiry in Mathematics and Science (3 cr.) P: Students must be admitted to TEP. Students must also enroll in all Block 3 courses. Focuses on planning and managing appropriate science and math experiences with children of three to eight years of age. Opportunity for exploring, developing, experimenting and evaluating instructional materials. Planning appropriate inquiry-oriented experiences will be stressed. I, II
  • EDUC-E 335 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) This course has a dual focus. First, is an overview of the field including an historic perspective, program models, goals of early childhood education and professional organizations. The second focus emphasizes learning observation skills, understanding the characteristics of young children, teacher-child interaction and classroom management skills. Students must also enroll in all Block 1 courses. I, II
  • EDUC-E 343 Mathematics in the Elementary Schools (1-3 cr.) P: Currently cluster/co-requisite of EDUC-E 328, EDUC-E 371 and EDUC-M 301. Currently not using block scheduling. Students must also enroll in all Block 3 courses. Emphasizes the developmental nature of the arithmetic process and its place as an effective tool in the experiences of the elementary school child.
  • EDUC-E 370 Language Arts and Reading I (1-4 cr.) C: EDUC-E 327 and EDUC-M 101. Students must also enroll in all Block 1 courses. The student will broaden their knowledge of the theoretical base as well as instructional strategies to enhance literacy practices throughout the preprimary and primary childhood years. This course will cover emergent literacy by emphasizing literacy practices which engage children in integrated, meaningful and functional activities. I, II
  • EDUC-E 371 Language Arts and Reading II (3 cr.) C: EDUC-E 328, EDUC-E 343 and EDUC-M 301. Students must also enroll in all Block 2 courses. This course focuses on the theory, instructional methods, materials, technology, and assessment strategies related to listening, speaking, reading, and writing for students in grades 3-6.
  • EDUC-E 372 Language Arts and Reading III (3 cr.) P: EDUC-E 370. Students must also enroll in all Block 3 courses. This course focuses on methods, materials, and techniques employed in the assessment and instruction of elementary students experiencing or at risk for literacy difficulties. This is the last course in the three-course sequence in Language Arts and Reading. I, II
  • EDUC-E 449 Trade Books and the Teacher (3 cr.) Emphasis on the use of trade books for teaching language arts and reading K-8. Historical and contemporary folk literature will be used to examine objectives and techniques of instruction. S
  • EDUC-E 495 Workshop in Elementary Education (1-6 cr.) For elementary school teachers. Gives one credit hour for each week of full-time work. S/F graded.
  • EDUC-E 502 Elementary Reading and Language Arts Curriculum I (3 cr.) Introduction to the developmental reading and language arts program in the elementary school, use of reading and language arts in various curriculum areas, appraisal of reading and language arts abilities, and techniques and materials for instruction. This course is intended for initial certification graduate students.
  • EDUC-E 505 Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3 cr.) The study of different organizational plans for Early Childhood programs from infancy through age 8. Includes discussion of school philosophy, goals, curriculum, housing, staffing, budget, policies for admission, grouping, health, licensing requirements, and school-community relations. S
  • EDUC-E 506 Curriculum in Early Childhood (2-6 cr.) Planning the curriculum and selecting and evaluating learning experiences for children ages three through eight years with reference to relevant research. Organizing the classroom to provide maximum integration among experiences in different academic areas. II
  • EDUC-E 507 Evaluation of Classroom Behavior (3 cr.) The child as a learner; goals for early childhood programs; organizing the instructional setting including teacher roles and methods of assessing behaviors, Use of this knowledge in organizing and evaluating self and a child in a program. S
  • EDUC-E 508 Seminar in Early Childhood (1-3 cr.) Seminar will be based on current interests of students and will serve as a means of synthesizing their experiences. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken to exploring current issues and problems in early childhood education, current happenings as they relate to the issues, and major research efforts to support programs. S May be repeated 5 times for up to 15 credits.
  • EDUC-E 509 Internship in Early Childhood (1-6 cr.) P: EDUC-E 505, EDUC-E 506, EDUC-E 507, and EDUC-E 508. This is the final class in the early childhood sequence. The nature of the internship would be determined by the students' personal goals and previous educational and teaching background. In this individualized program, it would be possible to elect one of many work/study-type experiences. I, II, S May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-E 518 Workshop in General Elementary Education (1-6 cr.) Individual and group study of problems within the field of elementary education. One credit hour is offered for each week of full-time work. S/F graded unless otherwise noted in the Schedule of Classes. I, II, S May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-E 521 Topics in Environmental Science Education (3 cr.) Course goals: (1) help elementary teachers develop basic scientific literacy regarding environmental issues and principles and (2) translate this basic literacy into elementary classrooms through hands-on activities. Course content: natural systems and cycles and how various kinds of pollution affect natural systems. Field trip required. For elementary majors only and for re-certification.
  • EDUC-E 524 Workshop in Early Childhood Education (1-6 cr.) Individual and group study of problems in nursery school and kindergarten education. Emphasis on broadening understandings of curricular problems and their application to teaching in nursery schools and kindergartens. S/F graded. S May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-E 536 Supervision of Elementary School Instructor (3 cr.) Modern concepts of supervision and the evolutionary processes through which they have emerged. Supervisory work of the principal, general supervisor, and supervisor or consultant. Study of group processes in a democratic school system.
  • EDUC-E 543 Advanced Study of the Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) Designed to help the experienced teacher improve the teaching of mathematics. Opportunities are provided for individual and group study of content, methodology, and instructional materials for modern mathematics programs. S (T-to-T I)
  • EDUC-E 544 Mathematic Methodology, Research, and Teaching in the Elementary School (3 cr.) This course in mathematics methodology is designed for candidates working on initial certification in elementary education at the graduate level. Opportunities will be provided for individual and group study of content, methodology and instructional materials for modern mathematics programs.
  • EDUC-E 545 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Reading in Elementary Schools (1-3 cr.) Review of developmental reading program in the elementary school, use of reading in various curriculum areas, appraisal of reading abilities, and techniques and materials for individualized instruction.
  • EDUC-E 547 Elementary Social Studies Curriculum (3 cr.) Explores the purposes, substantive issues, essential pedagogies, and content of elementary social studies curriculum. Also examines innovative approaches to designing and implementing social studies curriculum for elementary classrooms. May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-E 548 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Science in the Elementary School (3 cr.) Designed for experienced teachers to gain greater proficiency in the teaching of science in the elementary school. Individualized learning experiences will be provided for persons interested in middle school teaching.
  • EDUC-E 549 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Language Arts in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) Helps experienced teachers gain further insight into the development of the English language and how best to teach language arts. Emphasizes the basic communication skills and significant trends and materials.
  • EDUC-E 555 Human Diversity in Education (3 cr.) Interim approval. Explores issues related to teaching in a complex and diverse culture. Through this class students will become familiar with a range of diversity issues that teachers confront in our increasingly pluralistic society, including cognitive abilities, learning styles, and cultural, racial, ethnic, and socio-economic backgrounds of children.
  • EDUC-E 572 Elementary School Social Studies Curriculum (3 cr.) This course is designed for candidates working on initial certification in elementary education at the graduate. The intention of the course is to explore the sociological backgrounds of education and surveys subject matter, materials, and methods in social studies.
  • EDUC-E 575 Teaching of Science in the Elementary School (3 cr.) Candidates will assess their roles as science teachers in elementary classrooms and acquire strategies that actively engage students in their own learning. This course emphasizes the basic and integrated science process skills that engage students in the same thinking processes as scientists who are seeking to expand human knowledge. A guided inquiry approach to teaching science is stressed and modeled.
  • EDUC-E 576 Elementary Reading and Language Arts Curriculum II (3 cr.) Continuation and extension of development reading and language arts programs in the elementary school use of reading and language arts across curriculum areas, and methods and materials for assessment and instruction of reading and language arts abilities. This course is intended for initial certification graduate students.
  • EDUC-E 590 Independent Study or Research in Elementary Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research or study with an Elementary Education faculty member, arranged in advance of registration. A one or two page written proposal should be submitted to the instructor during the first week of the term specifying the scope of the project, project activities, meeting times, completion date, and student product(s). Ordinarily, E590 should not be used for study of material taught in a regularly scheduled course. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-E 591 Research Project in Elementary Education (3 cr.) P: All other requirements for the master’s degree prior to this culminating project. Designed to permit students to demonstrate their ability to identify, analyze, and propose solutions to problems in their educational area. Solutions may include research or comprehensive review of the literature, together with recommendations. An oral examination and defense of the project is required. I, II
  • EDUC-F 100 Introduction to Teaching (1-2 cr.) A first year (freshman) level course that provides a general introduction to the teaching profession and to various styles of learning. Students will explore educational careers, teaching preparation, and professional expectations as well as requirements for certification. This will enable students to make informed decisions regarding their college program as well as their future professional needs. I, II. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-F 200 Examining Self as Teacher (3 cr.) Designed to help a student make a career decision, better conceptualize the kind of teacher the student wishes to become, and reconcile any preliminary concerns that may be hampering a personal examination of self as teacher. Students design a major portion of their work.
  • EDUC-F 201 Exploring the Personal Demands of Teaching: Laboratory Experience (2 cr.) P: Must have completed EDUC-P 250 and EDUC-W 200. Students no longer take PRAXIS I. First course in a two semester sequence examining the personal demands of teaching in an Interpersonal Process Laboratory. Particular emphasis is put on interpersonal communication skills (self-disclosure, active listening, questioning, observation). I, II
  • EDUC-F 202 Exploring the Personal Demands of Teaching: Field Experience (1 cr.) C: Must have completed EDUC-P 250 and EDUC-W 200. Students no longer take PRAXIS I. Additional fee required; S/F graded. Expands the skills gained in F201 into a field experience (school classroom). Designed to assist students in career decision-making through a self-examination and discussions of the pre-service teacher's interactions, understanding, and communication with students in the classroom. I, II.
  • EDUC-F 203 Topical Exploration in Education (1-3 cr.) Identification and assessment of goals for a university degree. Development of a written academic and strategic plan to complete the degree. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-F 400 Honors Seminar (1-3 cr.) Foundations of Education content varies but always involves the investigation in-depth of significant topics in education. An interdisciplinary approach is taken. May be repeated for up to 20 credits.
  • EDUC-F 401 Topical Exploration in Education (0-3 cr.) This course will explore various topics of relevance to education, both in the United States and abroad. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-F 500 Topical Exploration in Education (1-3 cr.) The goal of this course is to bridge the gap between beginning computer users and beginning multimedia developers. The focus of the assignments will be on personal development of strategies and skills to be used in solving problems that arise during multimedia construction. A variety of multimedia software and hardware solutions will be presented including virtual reality, audio and video applications. Student will work on multimedia projects. Some will be undertaken individually while more complex media may involve the formation of teams and/or class projects.
  • EDUC-G 203 Communication for Youth-Serving Professionals (3 cr.) Students study counseling theories and techniques for application to teaching and working with youth.  They learn methods of building community and ways to encourage student participation and respect for others.  Students learn techniques and attitudes of group dynamics and leadership.  Other topics of communication: conlict resolution, active listening, parent-teacher communication.
  • EDUC-G 206 Introduction to Couneling Psychology (3 cr.) This course provides an introduction to the fields of counseling and counseling psychology. We will focus mainly on a survey of 11 major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. This course will be useful for students who are interested in the helping professions (e.g., teaching, social work, psychology, counseling, nursing, etc.).
  • EDUC-G 208 Prevention of Adolescent Risk Behavior: Counseling Perspectives (3 cr.) This course will provide an overview of the principles of prevention interventions with a focus on the role of counselors and other helping professionals in the development and dissemination of prevention.  Prevention of the following adolescent risk/problems that will be covered in the course:  alcohol and drug use, risky sexual behaviors, suicide and self-harm, delinquency, obesity, and bullying.  Further, the course will address the settings in which prevention of adolescent risk behaviors occurs including, but not limited to, schools and community agencies.
  • EDUC-G 302 Resources for Counseling with Youth (3 cr.) This course will provide an orientation to the psychological needs of children and adolescents, including but not limited to developing an understanding of potential risk factors as well as the key roles all youth workers and teachers have in helping young people begin to conceptualize their future personal and career goals. Special attention will be given to counseling interventions and the resources available in schools and other community youth-serving agencies. A service-learning component working directly with youth in either a school or local agency is a requirement of this course.
  • EDUC-G 375 Multicultural Counseling-Related Skills and Communication (3 cr.) The course serves as an introduction to multicultural counseling, skills, and communication. We will explore how culture influences behavior and how that knowledge can be applied in counseling-related skills. You will be asked to examine your own culture and how that has shaped your identity and world view as well as how that will impact you as a helping professional. We will also explore other cultures, understand the complexities related to intersectionality, and how this information can be utilized to best meet the needs of different groups.
  • EDUC-G 500 Orientation to Counseling (3 cr.) Focus is on the student, his/her self-concept, interpersonal relationship skills, consultation skills, and commitment to the helping field. Provides philosophic basis of the helping relationship. I, S. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-G 501 Counseling Group Laboratory (3 cr.) P: Admission to Master of Science in Education, Counseling and Human Services program. The course serves as a laboratory where students can put theory into practice in a safe environment and where they can practice group process skills under the supervision of a qualified faculty member. Students learn through readings, discussions, demonstrations, and modeling. I May be repeated for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-G 503 Counseling Theories and Techniques I: Humanistic and Existential (3 cr.) Analysis of major humanistic and existential counseling theories emphasizing didactic and experiential activities designed to model application of processes, procedures, and techniques of theories being studied.
  • EDUC-G 504 Counseling Theories and Techniques II: Behavior and Family Systems (3 cr.)

    Analysis of major behavior and family counseling theories emphasizing didactic and experiential activities designed to model application of processes, procedures, and techniques of behavior, and family approaches to professional practice.

  • EDUC-G 505 Individual Appraisal: Principles and Procedures (3 cr.) P: Admission to Master of Science in Education, Counseling and Human Services program. An analysis of statistical, psychometric, socio-metric, and clinical principles crucial to professional interpretation of standardized and informal data regarding individual clients. Current issues/controversies about ethnic, sex, cultural, and individual differences will be examined. S
  • EDUC-G 506 Personal Development: Growth of Normal and Deviant Styles (3 cr.) P: Admission to Master of Science in Education, Counseling and Human Services program. An examination of the nature, needs, competencies, and environmental factors which contribute to personality development and growth at principal life stages. Emphasis is placed on normal and deviant styles of behavior. I
  • EDUC-G 507 Lifestyle and Career Development (3 cr.) P: Admission to Master of Science in Education, Counseling and Human Services program. Lifestyle and career development includes such areas as vocational choice theory, relationship between career choice and lifestyle, sources of occupational and educational information, approaches to career decision-making processes, and career development exploration techniques. S
  • EDUC-G 510 Introduction to Alcohol and Drug Counseling (3 cr.) Course is an introduction to social and behavioral theories concerning the causation and maintenance of alcohol and drug addiction. The study and application of research-based theories of counseling will be emphasized. The history of alcohol and drug counseling and recent developments and issues in the field will also be discussed. I
  • EDUC-G 511 Screening and Assessment of Alcohol and Drug Problems (3 cr.) This course deals with the physical, social, psychological, vocational, economic, and legal symptoms of alcohol and drug abuse. Instrumentation for screening and assessment in clinical situations is presented as well as medical and non-medical diagnostic criteria. This course includes both instructional and experiential learning opportunities. I
  • EDUC-G 512 Counseling Approaches with Addictions (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to the major theories of alcohol and drug treatment. Special attention will be given to recent developments in the field as well as research-based theories of treatment. Students will be expected to engage in active learning projects both within and outside of the classroom. II
  • EDUC-G 513 Legal and Illegal Drugs of Abuse (3 cr.) This course deals with the physiological, behavioral, and pharmacological aspects of legal and illegal psychoactive substance use. Special emphasis is placed on observable signs and symptoms resulting from use of psychoactive substances. Attention will also be given to recent trends in psychoactive substance use. II
  • EDUC-G 514 Practicum in Alcohol and Drug Counseling (3 cr.) P: EDUC-G 510, EDUC-G 511, EDUC-G 512, EDUC-G 513. This course is a field experience in an alcohol or drug counseling agency. The field experience involves direct supervision by faculty and approved clinical supervisors in the field. S.
  • EDUC-G 515 Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Mental Health Disorders (3 cr.) Provides an overview of abnormal behavior, effects of maladaptive behavior on individuals, families, and communities, and methods of treatment. Students will be introduced to the latest version of the DSM classification system of mental disorders. Lastly, students will gain an understanding of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications.
  • EDUC-G 516 Understanding Child and Adolescent Behavior (3 cr.) Students will actively explore the various models of child and adolescent development, psychopathology, and treatment within the scope of school counseling. Students will be introduced to the concepts of classification, assessment, and intervention of maladaptive behaviors in children and adolescents.
  • EDUC-G 517 Crisis and Trauma Counseling (3 cr.) Course content includes an overview of the impact of crises, disasters, and trauma-causing events on people, the impact of working with traumatized clients on practitioners, and interventions and strategies for working with individuals, families, and groups of people who have experienced crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events.
  • EDUC-G 522 Counseling Theories (3 cr.) Introduction to counseling theories and psychological processes involved in individual counseling. II
  • EDUC-G 523 Laboratory Counseling and Guidance (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. C: Concurrent: G522. Laboratory experience, counseling, analysis of counseling interviews, role playing and closely supervised counseling in the laboratory setting. S
  • EDUC-G 524 Practicum in Counseling (1-3 cr.) P: EDUC-G 503, EDUC-G 504, EDUC-G 505, and EDUC-G 532. Closely supervised counseling practice with clients in the department¿s counseling laboratories or in approved field sites in schools or agencies. Intensive supervision. Special application required. May be repeated up to 12 times for 12 credits. II.
  • EDUC-G 525 Advanced Counseling Practicum (3 cr.) P: EDUC-G 503, EDUC-G 504, EDUC-G 505, EDUC-G 524. Additional fee required. Supervised use of individual, couples, and/or group counseling techniques with emphasis upon more complex and difficult client situations. May be repeated for credit with the advice of counselor education program faculty. S May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits with consent of the academic program.
  • EDUC-G 532 Introduction to Group Counseling (3 cr.) P: Admission to Master of Science in Education, Counseling and Human Services program. Psychological and theoretical foundations of group counseling. Analysis of the dynamics of groups. II
  • EDUC-G 542 Organization and Development of Counseling Programs (3 cr.) Environmental and population needs assessment for program planning. Procedures for counseling program development and accountability/evaluation. Case studies. May be repeated for credit.
  • EDUC-G 550 Internship in Counseling (1-6 cr.) P: Basic courses in counseling and guidance and consent of instructor; Counseling experience in actual school or agency situations. Counseling experience in school or agency situations. Under supervision, students get practice in counseling, interviewing, in-service training, orientation procedures, and data collection. Special application required. May be repeated for up to 12 credits.
  • EDUC-G 560 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling (3 cr.) Includes studies of cultural changes, ethnic groups, subcultures, changing roles of women, sexism, urban and rural societies, population patterns, cultural mores, use of leisure time, and differing life patterns. Such disciplines as the behavioral sciences, economics, and political sciences are involved in enhancing the counselor/client relationship. II
  • EDUC-G 562 School Counseling (3 cr.) Foundations and contextual dimension of school counseling.  Knowledge and skills for the practice of school counseling, Developmental Counseling, Program development, implementation and evaluation.  Consultation, Principles, practices and applications of needs assessment.  Provides an overall understanding of the organization of schools and the functions of the counselor and counseling program. I.
  • EDUC-G 563 Mental Health Counseling (3 cr.) P: EDUC-G 500 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Foundations and contextual dimensions of mental health counseling. Program development, implementation, and evaluation. Principles, practices, and applications of community needs assessment. Ethics, examination of professional issues, administration, finance and management of mental health counseling services. May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits. I.
  • EDUC-G 567 Marriage and Family Counseling (3 cr.) Analysis of historical context, theoretical formulations, counseling techniques/strategies, research findings, treatment issues, and ethical/social concerns in marriage and family counseling. II.
  • EDUC-G 570 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) This is an introductory graduate-level course dealing with all areas of human sexuality which a person might encounter in day-to-day living. Topics include: sexual terminology, the human body, expressing our sexuality, heterosexuality, homosexuality, pornography, sex education, sex offenses, sexual dysfunction, and sex therapy.
  • EDUC-G 575 Multicultural Counseling (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide both a cognitive and guided training opportunity. It examines the influence of cultural and ethnic differences of counselor and client in counseling. Attention is given to theory, research, and practice. General cross-cultural dynamics as well as specific target populations are studied. I
  • EDUC-G 580 Topical Seminar in Counseling and Guidance (3 cr.) P: EDUC-G 500 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. An intensive study of theory and research of selected topics. I, II, S
  • EDUC-G 585 Contemporary Issues in Counseling (3 cr.) Focuses on the goals and objectives of professional organizations, codes of ethics, legal considerations, standards of preparation, certification, licensing, and role identity of counselors and other personnel services specialists. Students will conduct research on emerging developments reported in the counseling literature.
  • EDUC-G 590 Research in Counseling and Guidance (1-3 cr.) Individual research. May be repeated for credit. I, II, S.
  • EDUC-G 592 Seminar in Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention (3 cr.) Introduction to etiology and symptomology of drug/alcohol abuse and methods of prevention or remediation. Includes dynamics of Adult Children of Alcoholics/Abusers and families of abusers. S
  • EDUC-G 595 Workshop-Counseling and Guidance (1-3 cr.) Individual and group study of selected topics and issues in Counseling and Guidance. I, II, S May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-G 596 Counseling Supervision (3 cr.) Introduction to counseling supervision theory, methods, and techniques. Special attention to ethical and legal obligations. Closely directed experience in supervising beginning graduate students. II.
  • EDUC-H 340 Education and American Culture (3 cr.) P: EDUC-P 250, EDUC-W 200. The present educational system, its social and future implications, viewed in historical, sociological, and philosophical perspectives. Special attention is given to ethnic, minority, cultural, pluralistic, and legal dimensions of the educational system. I, II, S May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-H 520 Education and Social Issues (3 cr.) Identification and analysis of major problems set for education by the pluralistic culture of American society.
  • EDUC-H 590 Independent Study: Research in Historical, Philosophical, and Comparative Education (1-3 cr.) Individual study arranged in advance of registration. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-J 511 Methods of Individual Instruction (3 cr.) Student will critically examine several approaches to individualizing instruction.
  • EDUC-K 205 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) An overview of the charateristics and the identification of exceptional children. The course presents the issues in serving exceptional children as they participate in the educational, recreational, and social aspects of their lives. I, II, S
  • EDUC-K 300 Developmental Characteristics of Exceptional Individuals (3 cr.) Theoretical concepts and models of intellectual, emotional-social, and sensory-motor characteristics of the exceptional individual. Effect of these characteristics on cognitive, affective, and psychomotor development. S.
  • EDUC-K 305 Teaching the Exceptional Learner in the Elementary School (3 cr.) P: EDUC-E 372. Knowledge, attitudes, and skills basic to the education of exceptional learners (students who are handicapped as well as gifted and talented) in the regular elementary classroom. Topics include historical and international perspectives, the law and public policy, profiling the exceptional learner, a responsive curriculum, teaching and management strategies, teachers as persons and professionals. I, II.
  • EDUC-K 306 Teaching Students with Special Needs in Secondary Classrooms (3 cr.) This course includes an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for effective instruction of students with disabilities in inclusive secondary programs. II
  • EDUC-K 343 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed (3 cr.) A basic survey of the field of emotional disturbance and social maladjustment. Definitions, classifications, characteristics, and diagnostic and treatment procedures are discussed from a psycho-educational point of view.
  • EDUC-K 345 Academic and Behavioral Assessment of the Mildly Handicapped Child (3 cr.) C: EDUC-K 345 and EDUC-K 402 must be taken together. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the application of formal and informal assessment information in making decisions regarding classification and placement of educable mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed children. This information is considered within the context of Public Law 94-142. I
  • EDUC-K 351 Vocational Assessment and Instruction for Special Needs Secondary Students (3 cr.) P: TEP, EDUC-K 360, EDUC-K 370. Emphasizes an awareness of issues and available options related to programming for the special needs adolescent adult. The concept of career education including preparation in daily-living, personal, social, and occupational skills is used as the basic framework for the course.
  • EDUC-K 362 Team Approaches to the Education of Students with Disabilities (3 cr.) Students will learn techniques related to effective collaboration and interactive teaming in educational settings. Focus will be the development of skills necessary to serve as consultant or co-teacher in school environments. I
  • EDUC-K 370 Introduction to Language and Learning Disorders (3 cr.) Survey of historical development and current status of definitions, classifications, assessment, and treatment procedures for students with language and learning disorders; including students with communication disorders, learning disabilities, autism, and mental retardation. II
  • EDUC-K 400 Computers for Students with Disabilities (3 cr.) P: TEP, EDUC-W 200 or equivalent, EDUC-K 360, EDUC-K 370. Additional fee required. Provides knowledge and experience for the student to integrate special-education computer technology into the educational process of the self-contained classroom and mainstream environments: Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI), data management, and telecommunications software; adaptive devices for communication, learning, and environmental control; and other related experiences.
  • EDUC-K 402 Internship in Instructional Techniques for the Mildly Disabled (1-3 cr.) C: EDUC-K 345 and EDUC-K 402 must be taken together. Provides for internship experiences and application of instructional techniques, materials, and media for all levels of mild disabilities. Additional fee required; S/F graded. I
  • EDUC-K 452 Classroom Management (3 cr.) P: TEP. This course will show students how to plan and implement interventions that improve the motivation and self-management skills of students in the classroom. It will focus on procedures for teaching students how to regulate their behavior, and will address the array of skills they need to learn in order to take responsibility for their actions. I
  • EDUC-K 480 Student Teaching in Special Education (3-15 cr.) Provides experience for each student in his or her respective area of exceptionality, under the direction of a supervising teacher, in an educational school setting. Additional fee required; S/F graded. II May be repeated for up to 15 credits.
  • EDUC-K 490 Research in Special Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-K 500 Topical Workshop in Special Education (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Intensive study of such selected topics as language development for exceptional children, the disadvantaged child, and behavior modification for exceptional children. S/F graded. I, S May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-K 501 Adapting Computers for Special Education (3 cr.) P: EDUC-W 200 or equivalent. Provides background information and experiences necessary to plan for and integrate special education technology into the curriculum of the special education classroom and for individuals with handicaps in the mainstreamed situation: software/uses, integration/implementation planning, IEP/data management, adaptive devices, and funding. Additional fee required.
  • EDUC-K 502 Communication and Children with Exceptional Needs (3 cr.) This course focuses on language and communication development, language disorders, and intervention of language of public school children. The relationship of language acquisition, developmental disabilities, and assessment will be emphasized through lecture and literature review.
  • EDUC-K 503 Advanced Classroom Management Techniques for Special Educators (3 cr.) This course focuses on in-depth application of behavioral and instructional interventions for exceptional learners from diverse backgrounds. Included are techniques in positive behavioral support, problem solving, crisis intervention, social skills development, self-advocacy, classroom management and group and individual behavior management. Integration in general education environments is emphasized.
  • EDUC-K 505 Introduction to Special Education for Graduate Students (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both EDUC-K 205 and EDUC-K 505. Basic special education principles for graduate students with no previous coursework in special education. I, II, S
  • EDUC-K 507 Professional Teaching Standards Project (3 cr.) This course addresses the needs of candidates as they create a portfolio that provides evidence that they meet the highest standards of the teaching profession. The course focuses on standards and certification cumulating in a professional teaching portfolio.
  • EDUC-K 508 Mathematics and Science Methods for Special Education (3 cr.) This course examines the various approaches to teaching and adapting mathematics and science for students with special needs. Special attention will be given to writing instructional objectives and accommodations for classrooms and individualized Education Programs.
  • EDUC-K 511 Language Arts Methods for Special Education (3 cr.) This course examines the various approaches to teaching and adapting reading and writing for students with special needs. Special attention will be given to writing instructional objectives and accommodations for classrooms and individualized Education Programs.
  • EDUC-K 512 Advanced Computer Technology for Special Education (3 cr.) Advanced study of general and specialized applications of microcomputers and related technologies to exceptional learners. Topics include microcomputers and classroom management, microcomputers and video-assisted instruction, and special applications of current technologies with exceptional groups. An overview of traditional AT assessments and a working knowledge of best practice in assisting technology arenas is emphasized.
  • EDUC-K 520 Survey of Behavior Disorders (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505. An advanced survey of the literature related to behaviorally disordered/emotionally disturbed children, including historical information, theoretical approaches, characteristics, and issues.
  • EDUC-K 521 Survey of Learning Disabilities (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505. Advanced survey of the literature related to learning disabled children, including historical information, theoretical approaches, characteristics, and issues.
  • EDUC-K 523 Inclusive Strategies for Exceptional Students in the Elementary Classroom (3 cr.) An introduction to inclusive strategies to ensure the success of students with exceptionality in the elementary setting. Knowledge, attitudes, and skills basic to the educational of exceptional learners (students with disabilities as well as gifted and talented) in the general elementary classroom. Topics include assessing exceptional learners, differentiating instruction, inclusive strategies, adaptations and accommodating, and specialized methods and materials. I, II
  • EDUC-K 524 Integration of Students with Exceptional Learning Needs (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide general and special educators who teach middle and secondary education settings with basic information and methods for integrating students with exceptionalities into general education classrooms, including those who are at-risk for having or who have disabilities, students with limited English proficiency, and those who are gifted and talented. Strategies for working with students in general education settings, for identifying and referring students when they cannot succeed in the general education classroom, and for teaching students self-advocacy skills are included. I, II
  • EDUC-K 525 Survey of Mild Handicaps (3 cr.) An advanced survey of the literature relating to mild handicaps, including historical foundations, definitions, and current issues facing workers in the field. II
  • EDUC-K 530 Medical and Physical Management of Persons with Severe Disabilities (3 cr.) This course addresses medical and physical aspects of severe disabilities, and focuses on educational implications of various conditions/disorders. The course incorporates information from various disciplines into classroom programming. The goal is to develop the knowledge of basic vocabulary to communicate effectively with all related service personnel.
  • EDUC-K 531 Teaching the Severely Handicapped I (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505, EDUC-K 550, EDUC-P 519. This is the first course in teaching severely handicapped individuals. Its content focuses on the analysis of instructional content, the analysis of instructional methodology, the use of physical aids, and methods for providing physical assistance. I
  • EDUC-K 532 Teaching the Severely Handicapped II (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 531. This course focuses on the analysis of curriculum for severely handicapped individuals, from birth through adulthood. II.
  • EDUC-K 534 Behavior Management of the Severely Handicapped (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505, EDUC-K 532, EDUC-K 550, EDUC-P 519. This course focuses on planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions that are designed to change incentive for performing a task. Consideration of the physical, environmental, and instructional aspects of performance are made, with respect to both the acquisition and maintenance of responses. S
  • EDUC-K 538 Advanced Instructional Methodology for Special Educators (3 cr.) The course provides candidates with an advanced repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individual instruction for individuals with exceptional learning needs. Special educators will learn to plan, select, adapt, and use instructional strategies to promote positive learning results for individuals with exceptional learning needs across environments, settings, and life spans.
  • EDUC-K 543 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed 1 (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505, EDUC-P 519. An advanced survey of the literature related to behaviorally disordered/emotionally disturbed children including historical information, theoretical approaches, characteristics, and issues. II, S
  • EDUC-K 544 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed 2 (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 543.  A basic survey of educational curricula, procedures, and materials for socially and emotionally disturbed children; stresses development of individual teaching skills, emphasizes classroom experiences with disturbed children.
  • EDUC-K 545 Management of the Severely Emotionally Disturbed (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 544. Theoretical and practical issues in the education management of the severely emotionally disturbed. Emphasis is placed on case analysis. II
  • EDUC-K 550 Introduction to Mental Retardation (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505. Definitions, classifications, and diagnostic treatment procedures discussed from medical, psychological, sociological, and educational points of view.
  • EDUC-K 553 Classroom Management and Behavior Support (3 cr.) P: EDUC-K 505, EDUC-P 519, EDUC-K 525, EDUC-K 543. Surveys principles of behavior management as they pertain to educational environments. Students will learn how to define, observe, measure, record, and change academic and social behavior. I, II
  • EDUC-K 555 Seminar: Occupational Planning for the Handicapped (3 cr.) P: Minimum of an undergraduate degree in special education or equivalent. Introduction to theories of vocational development. Analysis of the vocational career expectations for the handicapped. Implications for instructional planning.
  • EDUC-K 565 Collaboration and Service Delivery (3 cr.) Reviews methods of implementing service delivery systems; consulting with professionals and parents; designing in-service training programs; and developing referral systems, curricular and personnel resources, and evaluation techniques used in special education programs. I, II
  • EDUC-K 588 Supervised Teaching in Special Education (3-12 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Provides students an opportunity to teach exceptional children under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher and a University special education supervisor. I, II May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-K 590 Independent Study or Research in Special Education (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Individual research or study with a Special Education faculty member, arranged in advance of registration. A one or two page written proposal should be submitted to the instructor during the first week of the term specifying the scope of the project, project activities, meeting times, completion date, and student product(s). Ordinarily, EDUC-K 590 should not be used for teh study of material taught in a regularly scheduled course. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-K 595 Practicum in Special Education (1-6 cr.) C: Consent of instructor. Provides for closely supervised field experience in various areas of special education. Additional fee required; S/F graded. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-L 436 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language (3 cr.) Emphasizes practices, strategies, and materials needed by teachers in English as a second language setting. Whole language approaches, including developing comprehension, speaking, writing and reading will be utilized via hands on experiences with a variety of materials. S
  • EDUC-L 441 BILINGUAL EDUCATION: INTRODUCTION (3 cr.) Introduction to the development of bilingual/bicultural education in the United States—its antecedents, the rationale, theories, and comparison of existing bilingual/bicultural programs.
  • EDUC-L 482 Student Teaching-English as a Second Language (1-16 cr.) Full-time supervised student teaching in Enlish as a second language at the elementary, junior high/middle school, and/or high school in an accredited school within the state of Indiana or an approved or accredited out-of-state site. This will be done under teh supervision of a university supervisor and a school cooperating teacher. This will include a minimum of six continuous weeks of full-time experience. Additional fee required; S/F graded. I, II
  • EDUC-L 511 Teaching Writing in Elementary Schools (3 cr.) The study of trends, issues, theories, research, and practice in the teaching and evaluation of written composition in elementary schools. The emphasis is on alternative methods for the teaching of writing and for the evaluation of progress (growth) in writing. S May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-L 512 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Writing in Secondary Schools (3 cr.) Study of current trends, issues, theories, and research in literacy, emphasizing the teaching and learning of writing in secondary schools. Addresses linguistic and cultural diversity issues in composition as it explores the complex and varied nature of "good" writing and "effective" communication, tracing the implications for composition pedagogy. S
  • EDUC-L 524 Language Issues in Bilingual and Multicultural Education (3 cr.) A survey of language education issues related to the linguistic abilities and educational needs of students requiring bilingual or bidialectal instruction.  Topics discussed include language acquisition, language pedagogy, program models, cultural influences, teacher training, and research directions.
  • EDUC-L 530 Topical Workshop in Literacy, Culture, and Language Education (1-6 cr.) Individual and group study of special topics in the field of language education. Updating and improving the teaching of English, English as a second or foreign language, foreign languages, and reading. S May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-L 532 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.) A survey of the major theories of first and second language learning and their potential applications to language development strategies.
  • EDUC-L 536 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language (3 cr.) Study and analysis of current methods and materials in English as a Second Language. Development and evaluation of practical exercises, visual aids, and demonstration materials for use by teachers in English as Second Language programs at the elementary, junior and senior high levels.
  • EDUC-L 559 Trade Books in Elementary Classrooms (3 cr.) Emphasizes the use of trade books in language and reading in elementary classrooms.
  • EDUC-M 101 Laboratory-Field Experience (0-3 cr.) C: EDUC-E 370 and EDUC-E 327. Laboratory or field experience for freshman. I, II May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-M 130 Introduction to Art Education (3 cr.) Historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of art education, and the general processes and techniques of teaching as they apply to teaching visual art.
  • EDUC-M 301 Laboratory-Field Experience (0-3 cr.) Additional fee required; S/F graded C: EDUC-E 371 and EDUC-E 328. Laboratory or field experience for juniors. I, II May be repeated 10 times for credit
  • EDUC-M 310 General Methods (1-3 cr.) An introduction to instructional design, media and methodology appropriate to all teaching levels. Provides an orientation to classroom management, legal rights and responsibilities of students and teachers, disability awareness, human relations skills and other general methods concerns.
  • EDUC-M 311 Methodology for Kindergarten/Elementary Teachers (1-3 cr.) C: EDUC-R 301 and EDUC-W 310. Explores individualized and interdisciplinary learning methods, measurements and evaluation, teaching process and curriculum development, and the organization of the elementary schools. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-M 314 General Methods for Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Teachers (1-3 cr.) C: EDUC-R 301 and EDUC-W 310. General methodology and organization; knowledge about teaching process, including general methods, instructional media, measurement, curriculum development and organization of the senior high-junior high/middle school; and techniques to promote individualized and interdisciplinary learning. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-M 323 Teaching of Music in the Elementary School (2 cr.) P: MUS-M 174 and admission to TEP. Not open to music majors. Fundamental procedures of teaching elementary school music, stressing music material suitable for the first six grades. Observations required. May be repeated twice for up to 4 credits.
  • EDUC-M 324 Teaching About the Arts (1-3 cr.) Introduction to the importance of the arts in elementary school curriculum. Students are given a foundation of methods and materials in art and music that will enable them to integrate the arts into the general curriculum, supplement art lessons given by school art specialists, and encourage student discussion and understanding of art and music in the world today. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-M 330 Foundations of Art Education and Methods 1 (3 cr.) An introduction to art education theory and related social issues. Supervised art teaching in public schools is an important part of this course. I
  • EDUC-M 333 Art Experience for the Elementary Teacher (2 cr.) P: Admission to TEP. Not open to Art or Art Education majors. Development of skills in viewing and discussing art, guidance in selecting and organizing visuals and media for art instruction in the elementary classroom.
  • EDUC-M 337 Methods and Materials for Teaching Instrumental Music (2-3 cr.) P: Junior standing; EDUC-P 250, EDUC-F 201, EDUC-F 202. Teaching, organization, and administration of school wind and percussion ensembles.
  • EDUC-M 338 Methods and Materials for Teaching Choral Music (2-3 cr.) P: Junior standing; EDUC-P 250, EDUC-F 201, EDUC-F 202. A study of vocal pedagogy, development of musicianship, rehearsal techniques, program management, and choral literature for elementary through high school choirs. A section of EDUC-M 401 Laboratory-Field Experience is co-requisite. I
  • EDUC-M 359 Health and Wellness for Teachers (2 cr.)
  • EDUC-M 401 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) C: EDUC-A 190, EDUC-E 325, EDUC-E 372, and EDUC-K 305. A laboratory field experience in education for undergraduate students.
  • EDUC-M 412 Teaching of Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools (3 cr.) Study of current trends, issues, theories, research in literacy, emphasizing the teaching and learning of writing in secondary schools. Addresses linguistic and cultural diversity issues in composition as it explores the complex varied nature of "good" writing and "effective" communication, tracing the implications for composition pedagogy.
  • EDUC-M 420 Student Teaching Seminar (1-3 cr.) This seminar will address several issues related to the process of becoming a teacher. I, II.
  • EDUC-M 425 Student Teaching: Elementary (1-16 cr.) Full time supervised student teaching in grades 1-6 for a minimum of ten weeks in an elementary school accredited by the State of Indiana or an equivalent approved school out-of-state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising tacher and has university provided supervision. I, II.
  • EDUC-M 430 Foundations of Art Education and Methods 2 (3 cr.) P: EDUC-M 401. Advanced study of curriculum developments in art education and methods of teaching visual art in secondary settings. II
  • EDUC-M 441 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Social Studies (2-4 cr.) P: EDUC-M 401. Develops concepts and theories from social science, humanities and education into practices of successful social studies instruction. Integrates social issues and reflective thinking skills into the social studies curriculum; emphasis on curriculum development skills and repertoire of teaching strategies appropriate for middle/secondary school learners. Includes micro-teaching laboratory. I.
  • EDUC-M 445 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages (1-4 cr.) P: EDUC-M 401. Development and practice of skills and techniques of teaching foreign languages, selection of content an materials, an evaluation of students an teacher performance. Micro-teaching laboratory included. This course should be taken during the semester immediately preceding student teaching. I.
  • EDUC-M 446 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Science (1-5 cr.) P: EDUC-M 401. Designed for students who plan to teach Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, General Science or Physics in Junior High/Middle School/Secondary School. May be repeated twice for up to ten credits. I.
  • EDUC-M 452 Methodoly of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School English (1-5 cr.) P: EDUC-M 401. Methods, techniques, content, and materials applicable to the teaching of English in secondary schools, junior high schools, and middle schools. Experiences provided to assess on-going programs in public schools and to study materials appropriate for these programs. I May be repeated twice for up to ten credits.
  • EDUC-M 457 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Mathematics (2-4 cr.) Study of methodology, heuristics of problem solving, curriculum design, instructional computing, professional affiliations and teaching of daily lessons as related to the teaching of secondary and/or junior high/middle school mathematics. May be repeated twice for up to eight credits. I.
  • EDUC-M 464 Methods of Teaching Reading (3 cr.) Focuses on middle, junior, senior high school. Curriculum, methods and materials for teaching students to read more effectively. May be repeated twice. II.
  • EDUC-M 470 Practicum (3-8 cr.) Teaching or experience under the direction of an identified supervising teacher, with university-provided supervision in the kindergarten endorsement or minor area, at the level appropriate to the area, and in an accredited school within the state of Indiana, unless the integral program includes experience in an approved and accredited out-of-state site. The practicum may be full- or part-time, but in every instance the amount of credit granted is commensurate with the amount of time spent in the instructional setting. Additional fee required; S/F graded. May be repeated for credit.
  • EDUC-M 480 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (1-16 cr.) Additional fee required; S/F graded. P: Students must meet all the eligibility requirements for student teaching listed in the current University Bulletin before they will be allowed to student teach. Full time supervised student teaching for a minimum of ten weeks in either a junior high or middle school or high school accredited by the State of Indiana or an equivalent approved school out-of-state. The experience is directed by a qulified supervising teacher and has university provided supervision. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 32 credits.
  • EDUC-M 482 Student Teaching: All Grades (1-16 cr.) P: Completion of basic and methods course requirements. C: EDUC-S 487, EDUC-R 303. Additional fee required; S/F graded. Full time supervised student teaching in the areas of Visual Arts, Music, Physical Education, Recreation, Special Education, or School Library/Media Services for a minimum of ten weeks at the elementary, junior high/middle school, and/or high school accredited by the State of Indiana or an equivalent approved school out-of-state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university provided supervision. May be repeated for credit up to 16 credits.
  • EDUC-M 500 Integrated Professional Seminar (0-6 cr.) This seminar is linked to courses and field experiences included in the Transition to Teaching (T2T) program. It will allow for collaboration among school-based mentors, university-based instructors and T2T candidates in offering academic content appropriate to the program. The seminar will provide a technology-rich and performance-based professional experience. This course has a fee attached. May be repeated six times for up to 6 credits
  • EDUC-M 501 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) Additional fee required; S/F graded. II A laboratory field experience in education for graduate students.
  • EDUC-M 525 Practicum in Junior High/Middle School Education (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Additional fee required; S/F graded. Provides for closely supervised field experience with children of junior high/middle school age.
  • EDUC-M 550 Practicum (1-16 cr.) Additional fee required; S/F graded. II Teaching or experience in an accredited school, normally in Indiana. Credit will be commensurate with time spent in the instructional setting. May be repeated for credit.
  • EDUC-P 250 General Educational Psychology (1-4 cr.) The study and application of psychological concepts and principles as related to the teaching-learning process, introduction to classroom management, measurement/evaluation, and disability awareness. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 8 credits.
  • EDUC-P 407 Psychological Measurement in the Schools (2-3 cr.) Application of measurement principles in classroom testing; construction and evaluation of classroom tests; evaluation of student performance; interpretation and use of measurement data; assessment of aptitudes, achievement, and interests via standardized tests; school testing programs. I
  • EDUC-P 475 Adolescent Development and Classroom Management (3 cr.) Focuses on discipline approaches appropriate for middle and high school through an understanding of adolescents. Analysis of cognitive and moral development, puberty, environmental and cultural issues, family and peer relationships, identity formation, and social and personal problems. Provides tools to diagnose students' behaviors and to establish learning climate.
  • EDUC-P 490 Research in Educational Psychology (1-3 cr.) S/F graded. Participation in a variety of student service experiences in general studies. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-P 503 Introduction to Research (3 cr.) Methods and procedures in educational research.
  • EDUC-P 507 Assessment in Schools (3 cr.) Introductory assessment course for teachers and school administrators. Topics include principles of assessment, formal and informal classroom assessment instruments and methods, formative and summative assessment, interpretation and use of standardized test results, social and political issues in assessment, use of student data bases in schools.
  • EDUC-P 510 Psychology in Teaching (2-3 cr.) Basic study of psychological concepts and phenomena in teaching. An analysis of representative problems of the teacher’s assumptions about human behavior and its development.
  • EDUC-P 514 Life Span Development: Birth to Death (3 cr.) A survey course of human development from infancy through old age, emphasizing the life span perspective of development. Classical stage theorists, current popular conceptions, major research findings, and educational implications from all life stages from birth to death. II.
  • EDUC-P 515 Child Development (3 cr.) Major theories and findings concerning human development from birth through the elementary years as they relate to the practice of education. Topics include: physical development, intelligence, perception, language, socio-emotional development, sex role development, moral development, early experience, research methods, and socio-developmental issues relating to education. I
  • EDUC-P 516 Adolescent Development (3 cr.) Examination of major theories and findings concerning biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development during adolescence, emphasizing educational and clinical implications. Topics may include: puberty and adolescent health, identity development, decision-making, the role of families, peers and romantic relationships, schools and achievement, and socioemotional problems in adolescence.
  • EDUC-P 519 Psycho-Educational Assessment of Exceptional Children (3-4 cr.) Instruments used to assess intellectual, educational, and social competencies of exceptional children. Additional credit for supervised practice in administering these tests to visually or acoustically handicapped, cerebral-palsied, language-impaired, or mentally retarded children.
  • EDUC-P 520 Early Adolescent Behavior and Development (3 cr.) Research theories and practices related to social, personal, intellectual, emotional and physical aspects of the middle years of childhood.
  • EDUC-P 545 Educational Motivation (3 cr.) This course examines a variety of theories of human motivation in educational settings, focusing on those theories that have practical application for teachers of kindergarten through post-secondary education. The course includes an examination of the development of achievement and intrinsic motivation and focuses specifically on the anxious, apathetic, and/or underachieving student as well as other problem students. Teachers will gain knowledge and skills in understanding how students' needs motivate them to learn or cause problems.
  • EDUC-P 570 Managing Classroom Behavior (3 cr.) An analysis of pupil and teacher behaviors as they relate to discipline. Attention is given to the development of such skills as dealing with pupils’ problems and feelings, behavior modification, reality therapy, assertiveness in establishing and maintaining rules, and group processes. Designed for teachers, administrators, and pupil personnel workers.
  • EDUC-P 590 Independent Study or Research in Educational Psychology (1-3 cr.) Individual research or study with an Educational Psychology faculty member, arranged in advance of registration. A one or two page written proposal should be submitted to the instructor during the first week of the term specifying the scope of the project, project activities, meeting times, completion date, and student product(s). Ordinarily, EDUC-P 590 should not be used for the study of material taught in a regularly scheduled course. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-Q 200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (1-3 cr.) Course provides the elementary education major with background in the science process skills needed to complete required science courses. May be repeated for credit. I, II.
  • EDUC-R 301 Audiovisual Production of Materials (0-2 cr.) C: EDUC-M 310 A study of simple hand and machine assisted materials production techniques. Basic graphics techniques and layout included for a variety of mediated formats.
  • EDUC-R 303 Audiovisual-Operation of Equipment (0-2 cr.) Training to basic skill levels in the operation of 16mm projectors, opaque, overhead, tape-recorders, television video-taping/playback, phonographs and other common classroom equipment.
  • EDUC-R 423 Utilization of Instructional Materials (2-3 cr.) For preservice teachers. Lectures and laboratory experiences in the selection, preparation, presentation, and evaluation of instructional materials culminating in a micro-teaching presentation by each student.
  • EDUC-R 503 Instructional Media Applications (3 cr.) Surveys the characteristics of widely used audiovisual media (e.g. slides, film, video) and technologies of instruction (e.g. programmed instruction, simulation/gaming, computer-assisted instruction). Provides guidelines for selecting media and techniques. Develops media presentation skills. For IST majors, does not count toward the minimum credit-hour requirement. May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-R 541 Instructional Development and Production I (3 cr.) Given a design plan for a simple interactive product, student teams are introduced to the entire multimedia production process. Emphasizes basic skills in: writing, graphic design, interface design, scripting, prototyping, editing, formative evaluation, quality assurance and complementary teamwork. Laboratory use of text, still image, authoring and presentation software.
  • EDUC-S 460 Books for Reading Instruction, 5-12 (1-3 cr.) Examines the use of children’s literature, trade books, and other non-text materials in reading instruction. Contemporary and historical selections for children and adolescents included. S
  • EDUC-S 487 Principles of Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Education (2-3 cr.) C: EDUC-M 480, EDUC-R 303. The background and objectives of our junior high/middle school and senior high schools. Contributions made by the curriculum and extracurriculum to these objectives. Contributions to the teacher of the guidance program.
  • EDUC-S 490 Research in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) Individual research. May be repeated for up to 3 credits.
  • EDUC-S 503 Secondary School Curriculum (3 cr.) Designed to provide an overview for the teacher on the basic theories underlying the secondary school curriculum as well as an examination of the subject areas, problems, trends, challenges for the future and significant areas, problems, trends, challenges for the future and significant research in the field.
  • EDUC-S 505 The Junior High and Middle School (3 cr.) Role of the junior high school and middle school in American education. Total program: philosophy, functions, curriculum, guidance, activities, personnel, and administration. Not open to students who have taken EDUC-S 486.
  • EDUC-S 506 Student Activity Programs (2-3 cr.) For elementary, junior high/middle, and secondary school teachers and administrators. Comprehensive consideration of the student activity program. S
  • EDUC-S 508 Problems in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) C: Taken with student teaching. Group analysis of a common problem in the field of secondary education. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-S 512 Workshop in Secondary Education (1-6 cr.) S/F graded unless otherwise noted in the Schedule of Classes. Individual and group study of issues or concerns relating to the field of secondary education in workshop format. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-S 514 Advanced Study in the Teaching and Reading in the Junior High and Secondary School (1-3 cr.) For secondary teachers. The developmental rading program in secondary schools; use of reading in various curriculum areas, appraisal of reading abilities, and techniques and materials for helping reluctant and retarded readers. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 6 credits.
  • EDUC-S 516 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School English Language Arts (3 cr.) P: Completion of an undergraduate methods course and teaching experience, or consent of instructor. For secondary teachers. The developmental reading program in secondary schools; use of reading in various curriculum areas, appraisal of reading abilities, and techniques and materials for helping reluctant and retarded readers. I
  • EDUC-S 517 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Completion of an undergraduate methods course and teaching experience, or consent of instructor. Methods, materials, literature; laboratory practice with mathematics equipment; evaluation techniques; standards; and determination of essentials of content. Developing mathematics programs for specific school situations. I
  • EDUC-S 518 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Science (3 cr.) P: Completion of an undergraduate methods course and teaching experience, or consent of instructor. Improved techniques, current literature, textbooks, and free and low-cost materials. Solution of specific practical problems confronting science teachers in the classroom and laboratory. I
  • EDUC-S 519 Advanced Study in the Teaching of Secondary School Social Studies (3 cr.) P: Completion of an undergraduate methods course and teaching experience, or consent of instructor. Restudying the purposes of high school social studies, evaluating recent developments in content and instructional procedures, and developing social studies programs for specific school situations. I
  • EDUC-S 520 Advanced Study in Foreign Language Teaching (3 cr.) P: Completion of an undergraduate methods course and teaching experience, or consent of instructor. Principles, practices, problems, and current research pertaining to the teaching of a particular modern language in the secondary school. Emphasis on teaching the advanced levels. Separate sections as needed for teachers of French, German, Russian, and Spanish. I
  • EDUC-S 530 Junior High and Middle School Curriculum (3 cr.) P: EDUC-S 505, junior high or middle school experience, or consent of instructor. The educational program especially designed for pre- and early-adolescents, with emphasis on analysis, planning, organization, and evaluation of junior high/middle school curriculum and special attention to specific subject areas.
  • EDUC-S 590 Independent Study or Research in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) S/F graded. Individual research or study with a Secondary Education faculty member, arranged in advance of registration. A one or two page written proposal should be submitted to the instructor during the first week of the term specifying the scope of the project, project activities, meeting times, completion date, and student product(s). Ordinarily, EDUC-S 590 should not be used for the study of material taught in a regularly scheduled course.
  • EDUC-S 591 Research Project in Secondary Education (3 cr.) Designed to permit students to demonstrate their ability to identify, analyze, and propose solutions to problems in their educational area. Solutions may include research or comprehensive review of the literature, together with recommendations. An oral examination and defense of the project is required.
  • EDUC-U 100 Threshold Seminar: Craft/Culture of Higher Education (1-3 cr.) Opportunities for students to better understand their personal development, to learn and utilize human relations skills, to assess humanistic issues in both personal and societal terms, and to establish goals for the future. Class emphasis will vary, depending upon student needs and specific topics to be addressed. I, II, S
  • EDUC-U 450 Undergraduate Student Personnel Assistant (1-2 cr.) To prepare undergraduate students to serve as student assistants in the functional areas of Student Personnel Administration; i.e. orientation student assistant, undergraduate resident assistants. S/F graded May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-U 570 Workshop: College Student Personnel (1-3 cr.) The course provides an opportunity for persons with experience to study current trends and issues as related to functional areas of student personnel administration.
  • EDUC-W 100 Computer Awareness-Literacy (3 cr.) A general orientation to the computer - what it is, what it can and cannot do, and how it operates. Insight into the broad societal impact of computers. Introduction to the computer programming language BASIC. Hands-on experience in programming and using a computer. Orientation to the use of microcomputers.
  • EDUC-W 200 Using Computers in Education (1-3 cr.) P: CSCI-A 106 or CLEP score of 50. Required of all students pursuing teacher education. Introduction to instructional computing and educational computing literature. Hands-on experience with educational software, utility packages, and commonly used microcomputer hardware.
  • EDUC-W 310 Integrating Technology K-12 (3 cr.) C: EDUC-M 301, EDUC-M 311, and EDUC-R 301. Explores various pedagogical approaches, design and implement technology-based lessons or K-12 classrooms, participate in professional development activities, and reflect on the integration of technology in the classroom. Learning will be documented and assessed through written assignments, and a teaching portfolio.
  • EDUC-X 401 Critical Reading in Content Areas (1-3 cr.) P: EDUC-M 464 or EDUC-E 339 and EDUC-E 340, or consent of instructor. Aids elementary and secondary teachers in the development of instructional strategies which assist students in the comprehension critical analysis, and integration of ideas presented in literature of various subject matter areas. I, S
  • EDUC-X 425 Practicum in Reading (1-8 cr.) P: For MATH-M 425, students must meet all eligibility requirements for Student Teaching listed in the current University for Student Teaching listed in the current University Bulletin before they will be allowed to student teach. Co-requisite MATH-M 425. Additional fee required; S/F graded. Additional fee required; S/F graded. Students will work in selected elementary and secondary classrooms diagnosing and developing reading competency. I, II May be repeated twice for up to 12 credits
  • EDUC-X 470 Psycholinguistics for Teachers of Reading (1-3 cr.) P: Students enrolling in EDUC-X 470 must have completed Elementary Block II (EDUC-E 370 and E 371, ) or Secondary EDUC-M 464 to register for this class. If these classes have not been completed, students should get consent of instructor to register. Explores the linguistic and cognitive dimensions of language. Discusses relationships among the systems of language and among the various expressions of language. Always includes topics on semantics, grammar, and dialect. S
  • EDUC-X 490 Research in Reading (1-6 cr.) Diagnosis of reading difficulties and solution of problems through research, conference, and practice in the use of materials and equipment. May be repeated for credit
  • EDUC-X 501 Critical Reading in Content Areas (3 cr.) P: EDUC-E 545 or EDUC-S 514, or consent of instructor. Analyzes and applies to reading various theories and models of thinking; presents teaching/learning strategies for developing critical reading; evaluates instructional materials and methodologies designed to foster critical reading. I
  • EDUC-X 502 Sociological, Psychological, and Linguistic Perspectives on Reading and Language (3 cr.) P: EDUC-E 545 or EDUC-S 514, or consent of instructor. Explores the linguistic and cognitive dimensions of language as they relate to the teaching of reading. Discusses relationships among the systems of language and between the various expressions of language. Always includes topics on pragmatics, semantics, grammar and dialect. S
  • EDUC-X 504 Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties in the Classroom (3 cr.) P: EDUC-E 545 or EDUC-S 514 and EDUC-P 507. Treats the theory, correlates instruments, and techniques of diagnosing reading difficulties in the classroom. II
  • EDUC-X 525 Practicum in Reading (1-4 cr.) P: EDUC-E 545 or EDUC-S 514, EDUC-X 504 and three years of teaching experience, or consent of instructor. Observation and participation in Reading Clinic, diagnostic testing, remedial classroom teaching, compiling clinical records, and reporting to academic counselors. I
  • EDUC-X 530 Topical Workshop in Reading (1-6 cr.) P: Instructor’s permission. S/F graded. Individual and group study of special topics in the field of reading. Means for improving the teaching of reading. One credit hour is offered for each week of full-time work. S
  • EDUC-X 590 Research in Reading (1-6 cr.) S/F graded. Individual research. May be repeated twice for up to 12 credits
  • EDUC-Y 510 Action Research I (3 cr.) An introduction to the basic philosophy and methods of action research. Students will design an action research project and write a proposal. In this class, you will learn how to conduct action research. You will learn how to select an area of focus; collect data; organize, analyze and interpret data; and take action based on your findings. You will plan an action research study and write a formal proposal for that study.
  • EDUC-Y 511 Action Research II: Independent Study (1-3 cr.) Independent study course to carry out projects proposed in EDUC-Y 510. I, II

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