IUPUI Bulletins » Schools » liberal-arts » Courses » World Languages and Cultures (WLAC, ASL, CLAS, EALC, FREN, GER, NELC, SPAN)

Courses

World Languages and Cultures (WLAC, ASL, CLAS, EALC, FREN, GER, NELC, SPAN)
Arabic (NELC)
  • NELC-A 131 Basic Arabic I (4 cr.) Introductory language course in modern standard Arabic as in contemporary literature, newspapers, and radio. Focus on grammar, reading, script, conversation, elementary composition, and culture.
  • NELC-A 132 Basic Arabic II (4 cr.) Introductory language course in modern standard Arabic as in contemporary literature, newspapers, and radio. Focus on grammar, reading, script, conversation, elementary composition, and culture. 
  • NELC-A 200 Intermediate Arabic I (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 131-A132, or consent of instructor. This course will focus on the mastery of grammar, including more complex structures, acquisition and expansion of vocabulary, and the development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. These objectives are achieved through intensive oral/aural practice using audio and video materials. 
  • NELC-A 250 Intermediate Arabic II (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 200, or consent of instructor. This course will focus on the mastery of grammar, including more complex structures, acquisition and expansion of vocabulary, and the development of reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. These objectives are achieved through intensive oral/aural practice using audio and video materials. 
  • NELC-A 300 Advanced Arabic I (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 200-A250, or consent of instructor. Modern standard/classical Arabic syntax and morphology. Development of advanced language skills in reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Translation and active vocabulary development. Readings in a variety of genres and periods. 
  • NELC-A 350 Advanced Arabic II (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 300, or consent of instructor. Modern standard/classical Arabic syntax and morphology. Development of advanced language skills in reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Translation and active vocabulary development. Readings in a variety of genres and periods. 
  • NELC-N 397 Peoples/Cultrs of Middle East (3 cr.) General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, and gender.  
  • NELC-A 308 Arab Histories (3 cr.) Explores how Arab people have commemorated, debated, and interpreted their shared past. Topics may include role of Arab identity in early Islamicate societies; Arab nationalism; and the modern Arab diaspora.
Chinese (EALC)
  • EALC-C 131 Beginning Chinese I (4 cr.) Introductory language course in Chinese with emphasis on comprehension and oral expression, grammar, reading, script, elementary composition, and culture. 
  • EALC-C 132 Beginning Chinese II (4 cr.) P: EALC-C 131 or equivalent. Continuation of introductory language course in Chinese with emphasis on comprehension and oral expression, grammar, reading, script, elementary composition, and culture. 
  • EALC-C 201 Second-Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 132 or equivalent. Both spoken and written aspects stressed, completing major grammatical patterns. 
  • EALC-C 202 Second-Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201 or equivalent. Both spoken and written aspects stressed, completing major grammatical patterns. 
  • EALC-C 301 Third-Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201-EALC-C 202 or equivalent. Emphasis on practice in understanding the difference between oral and written expression, building up discourse-level narration skills, and developing reading strategies for coping with authentic texts.
  • EALC-C 302 Third-Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201-EALC-C 202 or equivalent. A further expansion on vocabulary and grammatical patterns focusing on reading and oral communication. 
  • EALC-C 320 Business Chinese (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201-EALC-C 202 or equivalent. For student who want to acquire skills for business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. Classroom activities such as mock negotiation in international trade, business letter writing, and oral presentation, help students acquire skills for business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. 
  • EALC-C 401 Fourth Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 301-EALC-C 302 or equivalent. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating Chinese literary genres and prose. 
  • EALC-C 402 Fourth Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 301-EALC-C 302 or equivalent. A further improvement of language proficiency. 
  • EALC-C 495 Improve Chinese Proficiency through Chinese Linguistics and Translation (1-3 cr.) P: EALC-C 301 Improve Chinese Proficiency through Chinese Linguistics and Translation explores Chinese grammar, Chinese pronunciation, and Chinese characters on the framework of Chinese thinking patterns. In addition, this course introduces common discourse patterns for students to practice. Furthermore, this course introduces basic principles of translation between Chinese and English. Specifically, translation is used both as a way for students to grasp the unique features of the Chinese language and as a subject to study. After taking this course, students will be able to consciously apply Chinese thinking patterns to guide the learning of the Chinese language.
  • EALC-E 232 China Past and Present: Culture in Continuing Evolution (3 cr.) Chinese culture and its modern transformations. Intellectual, artistic, and literary legacies of the Chinese people. 
  • EALC-E 301 Chinese Language and Culture (3 cr.) The relationship of Chinese language to its culture and society. Four topics emphasized: (1) unique characteristics of Chinese; (2) influence of language structure on thought patterns and social behavior; (3) traditional conception of life as it affects verbal behavior; and (4) interaction between linguistic and other factors in social life. 
  • EALC-E 331 Traditional Chinese Literature (3 cr.) An introduction to Chinese historical and religious writing, narrative prose, and lyrical poetry from roughly 1300 BCE to 1300 CE. 
  • EALC-E 333 Studies in Chinese Cinema (3 cr.) Critical and historical perspectives on Chinese cinema from the 1930s to the 1990s, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. 
  • EALC-E 334 Contemporary Chinese Cinema (3 cr.) This course introduces representative films from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan since the 80s.  Students analyze film form, meaning and style in social and cultural contexts, get acquainted with Chinese literary and aesthetic standards, and observe the changes in value and belief systems and China moves into modernity. 
  • EALC-E 335 Chinese Martial Arts Culture (3 cr.) This course surveys the history and style of Chinese martial arts and explores their theoretical bases of Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, Chinese medicine, and health preservation practices.  Students also study the literary tradition and aesthetic conventions of martial arts fiction and analyze cinematic expression of martial arts skills, chivalry, and love. 
  • EALC-E 351 Studies in East Asian Culture (3-6 cr.) Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian culture, taught within one of the humanistic disciplines.  May be repeated once for credit.
  • EALC-E 396 Studies in East Asian Culture: The I Ching (3 cr.) The objective of the course is to help students gain an understanding of Chinese culture and civilization from its roots. This course studies the I Ching (i.e., Book of Changes), and its influence on Chinese culture and civilization. The I Ching is the most influential ancient Chinese classic. No other book can match its influence in shaping Chinese thought, traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese written language, and popular Chinese cultural behaviors. 
Classical Studies (CLAS)
Courses in Classical Archaeology
  • CLAS-A 301 Classical Archaeology (3 cr.) The past is a puzzle with no instructions and mostly missing pieces. Come find out how archaeologists put together what pieces we do have to reconstruct the cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome. Learn how to raw connections using a variety of evidence, including excavation, coins, and sculpture. Explore numerous issues for the study of ancient and modern societies, such as environmental practices and the expression of personal identity. Most importantly, learn to think critically about how societies work, change, and interact over time.
  • CLAS-A 418 Myth and Reality in Classical Art (3 cr.) Introduction to Classical iconography (the study of images) that explores approaches to narration and representation in Ancient Greece and Rome. The course examines the illustration of myth, history, and everyday life in Classical art in relation to ancient society. Why and how did ancient societies represent stories in art? What can pottery and sculpture tell us about the role of storytelling in ancient life? How did visual art serve as a means of powerful communication across cultures and centuries?
  • CLAS-C 413 The Art and Archaeology of Greece (3 cr.) Art and archaeology of Greece from about 1000 B.C. through the Hellenistic period. Special attention given to the development of Greek architecture, sculpture, and vase painting. (Equivalent to Herron H413; students may not receive credit for both courses.) 
  • CLAS-C 414 The Art and Archaeology of Rome (3 cr.) Explores the material culture of the Roman world in its cultural and socio-political contexts from the beginning through the fourth century CE. Includes the study of ancient Roman architecture, sculpture, painting as well as evidence from geoarchaeology and archaeological survey.
Courses in Classical Civilization
  • CLAS-B 311 Classical Drama (1 cr.) This class serves as an introduction to sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome. By the end of the class, students will be able to answer the following questions: How did ancient Mediterranean societies conceptualize sex and gender? How did such conceptions evolve and function within the specific context of the ancient Mediterranean world? What social roles did sex and gender play? How did societies shape ideas of sex and gender, and how did sex and gender shape societies? How are sex and gender reflected in the literature and art of both ancient societies and our modern culture?
  • CLAS-B 312 EVIL, CRIME, AND TERRORISM IN THE ANCIENT WORLD (1 cr.) B312 serves as an introduction to how the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome conceptualized, dealt with, and discussed concepts such as evil, crime, and the politicized use of terror. Topics include: How did ancient Mediterranean societies conceptualize evil, crime, and terrorism? How did such conceptions evolve and function within the specific context of the ancient Mediterranean world? How did societies shape ideas of evil, crime, and terrorism, and how did evil, crime, and terrorism shape societies? How are ancient evil, crime, and terrorism reflected in the literature and art of both ancient societies and our modern culture?
  • CLAS-C 101 Ancient Greek Culture (3 cr.) CLAS-C101 is an historical and topical introduction to ancient Greek culture. From prehistorical to Hellenistic cultures, CLAS-C101 surveys the geography, economics, politics, philosophy, religion, society, technology, and daily lives of ancient Greeks by studying representative works of art, architecture, and literature. 
  • CLAS-C 102 Roman Culture (3 cr.) CLAS-C102 explores the culture and history of ancient Rome, both as a distinct past society, and as a cultural force that continues to shape modern life. We will focus on several questions: How was Roman society organized? How did Rome's particular history shape how Roman society developed? What was daily life like for various social classes (elite and poor, free and slave, etc.)? What was the role of religion? How do we interpret different types of evidence about the past, including written and archaeological sources? How does ancient Rome continue to shape the world we inhabit today? 
  • CLAS-C 205 Classical Mythology (3 cr.) Introduction to Classical Mythology, the myths of Ancient Greece and Rome. Learn about these important societies through the lens of the stories they told about themselves. Discover the influences that resonatethroughout literature (Dante, Shakespeare, Elliott), art (Michelangelo, Picasso), film (Disney, Coen Brothers), government (Hamilton, Jefferson) and more to shape modern society.
  • CLAS-C 210 Medical Terminology from Latin and Greek Roots (2-3 cr.) Provides students with (a) basic vocabulary of some 1,000 words and (b) understanding of formation of compounds, to enable students to build working vocabulary of several thousand words. Designed for students intending to specialize in medicine, nursing, dentistry, health sciences, microbiology, or related fields. 
  • CLAS-C 213 Sport and Competition in the Ancient World (3 cr.) An introduction to athletics in Greek and Roman societies and the Classical World. With historical and comparative analysis of ancient literature, art, architecture, and other material artifacts, C213 studies the origins and developments of classical competitions of strength, speed, stamina, and skill within the contexts of ancient Mediterranean cultures, and draws connection to modern competition. 
  • CLAS-C 310 Classical Drama (3 cr.) Masterpieces of ancient Greek and Roman theater studied in relation to literary, archaeological, and artistic evidence for their production and interpretation. 
  • CLAS-C 321 Classical Myth and Culture in Film (3 cr.) Examines depictions of ancient Greece and Rome in modern cinema and television.  Questions to be asked:  How historically accurate are these onscreen versions of antiquity?  What conventions and stereotypes appear?  How has classical mythology been treated?  How do these films reflect the period in which they were made? 
  • CLAS-C 350 Greek Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Survey of Greek literature through selected literary works of such authors as Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Plato. 
  • CLAS-C 351 Change and Innovation in Ancient Greece (3 cr.)

    Ancient Greece experienced watershed moments that sparked dramatic socio-political change and artistic achievements, such as the invention of democracy in fifth-century Athens and the military campaigns of Alexander the Great. This course explores one of these moments within its cultural and historical contexts through the study of ancient literary and material evidence.

     

  • CLAS-C 360 Roman Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Survey of Latin literature from its beginnings to the middle of the second century after Christ. Among authors read are Plautus, Terence, Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Vergil, Ovid, Petronius, Juvenal, Tacitus, and Apuleius. 
  • CLAS-C 361 Ancient Roman Revolutions (3 cr.)

    The Roman world experienced revolutionary eras that generated socio-political change and artistic achievements, such as the crisis of the Republic, the Empire under Augustus, and the Rome of Nero. This course explores one of these eras within its cultural and historical contexts through study of ancient literary and material evidence.

  • CLAS-C 386 Greek History (3 cr.) C386 explores the history of Ancient Greece from the time of the Mycenaean Kings (1600 BC) to the final conquest by Rome (30 BC). This critical period of history covers (a) the Bronze Age collapse (b) the rise and fall of Troy, Athens, Sparta, and Thebes; (c) the birth of democracy, theater, and the jury system; (d) the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age. Reading a selection of primary sources allows students to hear the ancient Greeks in their own words, and encourages critical analysis of historical sources.
  • CLAS-C 387 Roman History (3 cr.) C387 explores the history of Ancient Rome from the time of the Etruscan Kings (750 BC) to the last days of the Empire (350 AD). This critical period of history covers (a) the rise of Rome from village to empire; (b) the Civil Wars of Pompey, Julius Caesar, Marc Antony and Cleopatra, and the first emperor Augustus; (c) the reigns of 'bad' emperors (Caligula, Nero, Commodus) and 'good' (Titus, Trajan, Marcus Aurelius); (d) the establishment of Christianity under Constantine. Reading a selection of primary sources allows students to hear the ancient Romans in their own words, and encourages critical analysis of historical sources.
  • CLAS-C 396 Classical Studies Abroad (1-9 cr.) P: Acceptance into an approved Indiana University overseas study program. Credit for foreign study in classical languages, civilization, and archaeology when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Credit in CLAS-C 396 may be counted toward a minor in classical studies or classical civilization with approval of undergraduate advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  • CLAS-C 414 Art and Archaeology of Roman World (3 cr.)

    Explores the material culture of the Roman world in its cultural and socio-political contexts from the beginning through the fourth century CE. Includes the study of ancient Roman architecture, sculpture, painting as well as evidence from geoarchaeology and archaeological survey.

  • CLAS-C 419 Art and Archaeology of Pompeii (3 cr.) Survey of archaeological evidence of the best-preserved ancient city, buried under the ashes of Mt. Vesuvius in AD 79. Learn about everyday life in a Roman seaside town. Topics including urban development, gladiators, theater, the lives of women and slaves, commerce, religion, art history, the ethics of preserving disaster sites, and more.
  • CLAS-C 491 Topics in Classical Studies (3 cr.) A detailed examination of a particular aspect of classical civilization using a variety of literary and archaeological evidence. 
  • CLAS-C 495 Individual Reading in Classics (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • CLAS-C 491 Classics in Focus Euripides' Medea (3 cr.) D470 serves as an in-depth examination of Euripides' tragedy Medea, a rightfully legendary work that explores concepts such as the nature of heroism and justice, the struggle for personal agency, the destruction of the family, and the role of women in society. Topic include: How does Euripides' Medea interact with and help shape the larger Graeco-Roman mythological tradition? What does Medea tell us about women, both real and fictive, in ancient societies? What does the Medea tell us about heroic virtues? How does the Medea reflect ancient social tensions, and how are those connected to modern cultures?
  • CLAS-B 311 Classical Drama (3 cr.) This class serves as an introduction to sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome. By the end of the class, students will be able to answer the following questions: How did ancient Mediterranean societies conceptualize sex and gender? How did such conceptions evolve and function within the specific context of the ancient Mediterranean world? What social roles did sex and gender play? How did societies shape ideas of sex and gender, and how did sex and gender shape societies? How are sex and gender reflected in the literature and art of both ancient societies and our modern culture?
Courses in Latin
  • CLAS-L 131 Beginning Latin I (4 cr.) L131 provides an introduction to the basics of Latin vocabulary and grammar with an eye to developing  direct reading comprehension. Students also will learn about Ancient Roman society, literature, religion, and culture.
  • CLAS-L 132 Beginning Latin II (4 cr.) P: CLAS-L 131 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). L132 provides further experience in Latin vocabulary and grammar. Students also continue their study of Ancient Roman society, literature, religion, and culture. Previous experience (equivalent to one semester) in Latin is necessary for this course; see current prerequisites for information.
  • CLAS-L 200 Second-Year Latin I (3 cr.) P: CLAS-L 132 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). L200 provides further understanding of Latin vocabulary and grammar, with emphasis placed on reading the original texts of Latin authors. Students also continue their study of Ancient Roman society, literature, religion, and culture. Previous experience (equivalent to two semesters) in Latin is necessary for this  course; see current prerequisites for information.
  • CLAS-L 250 Second-Year Latin II (3 cr.) P: CLAS-L 200 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). L250 provides further understanding of Latin vocabulary and grammar, with emphasis placed on reading the original texts of Latin authors. Students also continue their study of Ancient Roman society, literature, religion, and culture. Previous experience (equivalent to three semesters) in Latin is necessary for this course; see current prerequisites for information.
  • CLAS-L 495 Individual Reading in Latin (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. May be repeated once for credit.
Courses in Latin
  • CLAS-G 131 Elementary Ancient Greek I (4 cr.) The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, vocabulary, and syntax that will allow students to begin study of classical and Biblical texts.
  • CLAS-G 132 Elementary Ancient Greek II (4 cr.) P: CLAS-L 131 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, vocabulary, and syntax that will allow students to begin study of classical and Biblical texts.
  • CLAS-L 200 Second-Year Latin I (3 cr.) P: CLAS-L 132 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). L200 provides further understanding of Latin vocabulary and grammar, with emphasis placed on reading the original texts of Latin authors. Students also continue their study of Ancient Roman society, literature, religion, and culture. Previous experience (equivalent to two semesters) in Latin is necessary for this  course; see current prerequisites for information.
  • CLAS-L 250 Second-Year Latin II (3 cr.) P: CLAS-L 200 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). L250 provides further understanding of Latin vocabulary and grammar, with emphasis placed on reading the original texts of Latin authors. Students also continue their study of Ancient Roman society, literature, religion, and culture. Previous experience (equivalent to three semesters) in Latin is necessary for this course; see current prerequisites for information.
  • CLAS-L 495 Individual Reading in Latin (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. May be repeated once for credit.
French (FREN)
Undergraduate Courses
  • FREN-F 131 First-Year French I (4 cr.) Introductory French language course. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening and reading skills as well as awareness of Francophone cultures. 
  • FREN-F 132 First-Year French II (4 cr.) P: FREN-F 131, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. This is the second course for beginning students of French and follows FREN-F 131 with emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills, as well as awareness of French and Francophone cultures. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students/. Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses at a greatly reduce fee. 
  • FREN-F 203 Second-Year Composition, Conversation, and Reading I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 132, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. This is the third course in the French-language sequence and follows F132. Composition, conversation, and grammar coordinated with the study of expository and literary texts. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students. Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses at a greatly reduce fee. This course is offered every fall only in the classroom and every spring only as an online course.
  • FREN-F 204 Second-Year Composition, Conversation, and Reading II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 203, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. This is the fourth course in the French-language sequence and follows F203. Composition, conversation, and grammar coordinated with the study of expository and literary texts. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students. Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses at a greatly reduce fee. FREN-F 204 is offered every spring only in the classroom and every fall only as an online course.
  • FREN-F 271 Topics in Francophone Cultures (1-3 cr.) P: FREN-F 203, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. Culture matters. This variable topics course will address particular aspects of Francophone cultures throughout the world and how identities and cultural formations occur.
  • FREN-F 296 Study of French Abroad (1-6 cr.) P: acceptance in an overseas study program in France. Credit for foreign study in French language and/or literature done at second-year level when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Does not count towards the major.
  • FREN-F 300 Lectures et analyses littéraires (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Preparation for more advanced work in French literature. Readings and discussion of one play, one novel, short stories, and poems, as well as the principles of literary criticism and "explication de texte." 
  • FREN-F 307 Masterpieces of French Literature (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Includes material from both classical and modern periods. 
  • FREN-F 315 FRENCH CONVERSATN & DICTION 1 (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Combined lectures on problems of pronunciation and phonetic transcription, and oral practice sessions. 
  • FREN-F 326 French in the Business World (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Introduction to the language and customs of the French-speaking business world. Designed to help prepare students to take the examination for the "Certificat pratique de francais commercial et conomique" offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. 
  • FREN-F 328 Advanced French Grammar and Composition (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent or by authorization of the program Study and practice of French thinking and writing patterns. 
  • FREN-F 330 Introduction to Translating French and English (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. A comparative study of the style and grammar of both languages, with focus on the difficulties involved in translating. Introduction to the various tools of the art of translation. 
  • FREN-F 331 French Pronunciation and Diction (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Thorough study of French phonetics and intonation patterns. Corrective drill. Includes intensive class and laboratory work. Oral interpretation of texts. 
  • FREN-F 334 French for the Medical and Technical World (3 cr.) This course addresses the French language and francophone cultural specifics for communicating in medical and technical settings. The objectives of this class are to provide vocabulary in the domain of the health-related fields in contextualized situations while reviewing the basics of French grammar. Students are to achieve an advanced level of proficiency in the target language in both production and receptive skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) as well as to gain awareness of the range of health care and technology issues as related to the francophone patient. Class taught in French. 
  • FREN-F 336 Structure of French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. This course will introduce major themes in linguistics, the scientific study of language. Topics to be covered include the development and spread of human language and the acquisition of native languages during childhood as well as a brief overview of each branch of linguistics: phonetics (sounds), morphology (words), syntax (phrases), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (interpretation), with a focus on the French language. This course is taught in French. 
  • FREN-F 350 Structure of French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. Emphasis in this class is on a topic, author or genre within francophone studies. Class is taught in French.
  • FREN-F 352 Structure of French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. This course invites post-intermediate students of French to improve their language skills while exploring the complex history and culture of Quebec. Drawing on cultural products from the earliest days of exploration to the present day, this course introduces students to an array of texts that sample Quebecois literature, popular culture, art, music, and politics. The interdisciplinary approach will challenge students to improve their French language skills while learning about one of our closest French-speaking neighbors: Quebec. Readings for the course are thematically organized to delve into issues central to understanding the many facets of contemporary Quebecois identity, while prompting students to search for a range of materials online. Class taught in French. 
  • FREN-F 360 Introduction socio-culturelle à la France (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. A study of France and its people through an examination of France's political and cultural development. 
  • FREN-F 371 Topics in French (3 cr.) Topics in French literature and culture will be explored from a variety of perspectives. The course will be given in English. Does not count towards the major.  May be taken twice for credit if topic differs.
  • FREN-F 380 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. For non-native speakers of French. Designed to develop conversational skills through reports, debates, and group discussions with an emphasis on vocabulary building, mastery of syntax, and general oral expression.  
  • FREN-F 391 Studies in French Cinema (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Analysis of major French art form, introduction to modern French culture seen through medium of film art, and study of relationship of cinema and literature in France. 
  • FREN-F 396 Study of French Abroad (1-6 cr.) P: Acceptance in an overseas study program in France. Credit for foreign study in French language or literature when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings.  May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • FREN-F 402 Introduction to French Linguistics (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Introduction to the structure of the French language: phonology, morphology, and syntax. 
  • FREN-F 421 Fourth-Year French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Advanced work in language with a focus on syntax. 
  • FREN-F 423 Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Advanced course in translation. The problems and techniques of translating French/ English and English/French using a variety of texts and concentrating on the use of various stylistic devices. 
  • FREN-F 430 Modern Short Narratives (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Structural and interdisciplinary approaches to short French narratives of the modern period, eighteenth-century fiction (short stories, tales, etc.), and nonfiction (essays, commentaries, etc.). 
  • FREN-F 434 Advanced French for the Medical and Technical World (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. This course addresses the French language and francophone cultural specifics for communicating in medical and technical settings. The objectives of this class are to provide vocabulary in the domain of the health-related fields in contextualized situations while reviewing the basics of French grammar. Students are to achieve an advanced level of proficiency in the target language in both production and receptive skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) as well as to gain awareness of the range of health care and technology issues as related to the francophone patient. Course taught in French. 
  • FREN-F 450 Colloquium in French Studies (2-3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Emphasis is on topic, author, or genre. 
  • FREN-F 451 Le francais des affaires (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Investigates in depth some of the topics touched on in FREN-F 326. Designed to help prepare students to take the examination for the Diplome francais profesionnel by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. 
  • FREN-F 452 La civilisation et littérature québécoises (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. The study of the history of French Canadian literature and civilization from its origins down to the present, leading to the "Quiet Revolution" as seen through the contemporary poetry, novels, and drama of Quebec. 
  • FREN-F 453 Littérature contemporaine I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Twentieth-century French literature. 
  • FREN-F 454 Littérature contemporaine II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Twentieth-century French literature. 
  • FREN-F 460 French Fiction in Film (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Involves reading works of French fiction and studying them as works of literature, followed by the viewing of a film version of each work and the preparation of a comparative analysis of the two versions. 
  • FREN-F 461 La France Contemporaine (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. France since 1945: political, social, economic, and cultural aspects. 
  • FREN-F 480 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Designed to develop conversational skills through intensive controlled conversation with an emphasis on the use of linguistic devices and the mastery of oral expression. Both FREN-F 380 and FREN-F 480 may be taken for credit. 
  • FREN-F 493 Internship in French (3 cr.) P: Senior standing or consent of internship director. A field experience in the applied use of French in a professional workplace environment. Previous course work and experience are integrated in a practical application locally or in a French-speaking country. Directed readings, journal, reports, final project. 
  • FREN-F 495 Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. For majors only.
  • FREN-F 497 Capstone in French (1-3 cr.) P: Authorization of the Program. A senior level summative experience for French majors that integrates students' undergraduate study in the discipline. Students showcase academic progress through a capstone portfolio, a reflective journal, discussions with a faculty capstone director, and by a final presentation to students and faculty. 
Graduate Courses
  • FREN-F 528 Comparative Stylistics and Translation (3 cr.) This is an introductory course to the practice and evaluation of translation. Students will get hands-on experience with many different text types from a variety of areas and professions and develop skills to translate them into both English and French. At the same time, students will have the opportunity to discuss some of the theoretical and professional issues involved in translation as a profession.
  • FREN-F 529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • FREN-F 530 Specialized Translation II (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and resources for the translation of technical, scientific and medical documents, as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • FREN-F 575 Introduction to French Linguistics (3 cr.) An introduction to phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of French, and to recent linguistic developments.
German (GER)
Undergraduate Courses
  • GER-G 131 First-Year German I (4 cr.) Introductory German language course. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening and reading skills as well as awareness of German-speaking countries and cultures.
  • GER-G 132 First-Year German II (4 cr.) Continuation of introductory German language course. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening and reading skills as well as awareness of German-speaking countries and cultures. 
  • GER-G 203 Second-Year German I (3 cr.) P: GER-G 132, or equivalent or placement by testing. Intensive review of grammar. Further development of oral and written use of the language. Selections from contemporary German readings and media. 
  • GER-G 204 Second-Year German II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 203 or equivalent or placement by testing. Review of grammar. Readings of modern German with stress on discussion in German. Writing of descriptive and expository prose. 
  • GER-G 265 German Culture in English Translation (3 cr.) A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, as well as of contemporary civilization, with an emphasis on individual aspects of culture traced through several epochs. 
  • GER-G 300 Fifth Semester German (3 cr.) P: GER-G 204 or placment. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in G100 through G250. Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignment of short literary texts and one novel or play. Conducted in German. 
  • GER-G 331 Business German I (3 cr.) P: Third-year language proficiency or consent of instructor. Emphasis on acquisition and use of business vocabulary, idiom, and style. Translating, reading, and writing skills are developed using constructions common to business German, as well as current materials (reports, journals) in the field.
  • GER-G 333 German Translation Practice (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Introduction to the theory and practice of translation. Discussion of techniques and stylistic approaches. Emphasis on German/English translation using a variety of texts, including technical texts, business communication, and texts on current topics. 
  • GER-G 340 German Language and Society Past and Present (3 cr.) P: GER-G 203 or equivalent or consent of instructor This course is an introduction to German sociolinguistics.  We examine the differences between Standard German and German dialects, dialects vs. colloquial speech, urban and rural colloquial speech, colloquial speech in East and West Germany, and the manners in which German dialects differ from one another.
  • GER-G 355 Theater Spielen (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. This combined reading, discussion, pronunciation, and performance course provides an applied introduction to contemporary German theater and drama, along with intensive practice of oral language skills. 
  • GER-G 365 Deutsche Kultur Heute (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. A critical investigation of contemporary culture in the German-speaking countries, including institutions and major personalities, customs, traditions, changing mentalities, and lifestyles as they compare with contemporary U.S. culture. Taught in German. 
  • GER-G 370 German Cinema (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production. Offered in English concurrently with GER-G 371. No credit given towards German major. 
  • GER-G 371 Der deutsche Film (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or equivalent. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production. 
  • GER-G 391 German Colloquium in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. May be taken as an elective by other students. Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre in German literature, or other aspect of German culture. No credit given toward German major. 
  • GER-G 401 Deutsche Kultur in Amerika (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Advanced undergraduate course. Provides an overview of the cultural heritage of German-Americans and assists students in researching German heritage with a view toward developing research skills with original materials. The course is in a seminar format with students actively participating in discussions and presentations. Taught in German. 
  • GER-G 407 Knights, God, and the Devil (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the development of early German cultural life by reading and analyzing texts of the periods covered. Lecture materials cover historical and cultural background. Period texts are placed in contexts of other cultural phenomena, including art and music. As much reference as possible is made to the European context of the emerging German literacy language. Taught in German. 
  • GER-G 408 Love, Nature, and the Age of Romanticism (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the cultural capital of courtly Germany, Weimar, and its relationship to German Romanticism, including readings and discussions of works by Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Tieck, and the Grimm brothers. Literary examples are accompanied by pictorial, filmic, and musical illustrations. Taught in German. 
  • GER-G 409 German Myths, Fairy Tales and Social Transformation (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Survey of literary representations of nineteenth-century German life at a time of change from rural to urban transformation. Text selection includes a variety of shorter forms: fairy tales, short stories, novella, satire and drama. Taught in German. 
  • GER-G 410 LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY IN MODERN GERMAN LITERATURE (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural and intellectual life of the German-speaking countries of the 20th century, through the reading of exemplary literary works. Discussion of literary movements from the turn of the century until the present. Texts will be analyzed within the context of other cultural phenomena, including film and music. Conducted in German.
  • GER-G 423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in German-English translation providing intensive translation practice in many text categories: commercial and economic translations, scientific, technical, political, and legal texts. Applied work combined with study of theory and methodology of translation, comparative structural and stylistical analysis, and evaluation of sample translations. Use of computer-assisted translation management. 
  • GER-G 431 Advanced Business German (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Focus is on the contemporary business idiom and current economic issues facing Germany. Active practice of specialized business language, both for oral and written communication. 
  • GER-G 445 Oberstufe: Grammatik (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Survey and practice of complex grammatical structures; systematic expansion of vocabulary. Discussion and writing based on current materials, such as newspapers, films, and radio programs. 
  • GER-G 465 Structure of German (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. The course introduces students to the core disciplines of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, and semantics. While the approach is generally a cross-linguistic one, special emphasis is placed on examples from German. 
  • GER-G 490 Das deutsche Kolloquium (3 cr.) P: Fourth-year German language proficiency or consent of instructor. Concentration on a specific topic, genre, or author in German literature, film, or other aspect of culture. 
  • GER-G 493 Internship in German (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of program director. A field experience in the applied use of German in a professional work place environment. Previous course work and language knowledge are integrated in professional application locally and/or in a German-speaking country. Directed journal, report, final investigative project. Minimal length of internship linked to weekly work schedule. 
  • GER-G 498 Individual Studies in German (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of program director. 1-6 credit hours toward the major in German may be earned through individual study or international work internship abroad or locally. There is a 3 credit limit for one individual study or work project. 
Graduate Courses
  • GER-G 507 Foreign Language Institute (1-6 cr.) Intensive interdepartmental course involving language laboratory and other audiovisual equipment and techniques, lecture, assignments in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), and discussions of classroom use of applied linguistics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G 528 Comparative Stylistics and Translation (3 cr.) This is an introductory course to the practice and evaluation of translation. Students will get experience with many different text types from a variety of areas and professions and develop skills to translate them into both English and German. Discussion of the theoretical and professional issues involved in translation as a profession.
  • GER-G 529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • GER-G 530 Specialized Translation II (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and resources for the translation of technical, scientific, and medical documents, as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • GER-G 551 Structure of Modern German (3 cr.) Taught concurrently with GER G465.  Systematic development of writing and speaking skills, proceeding from exercises to specific forms, such as Brief, Aufsatz, Referat, Vortrag. Focus on usage and style.
  • GER-G 563 German Culture Studies I (3 cr.) The formation of cultural traditions in the German-speaking countries prior to the twentieth century.
  • GER-G 564 German Culture Studies II (3 cr.) Culture of the German-speaking countries in the twentieth century.
  • GER-V 605 Selected Topics in German Studies (1-3; 9 max. cr.) Selected Topics in German Studies.
Japanese Studies (EALC-J)
  • EALC-J 131 Beginning Japanese I (4 cr.) Introductory language courses designed for students who have not had any prior training in Japanese. Drills for basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. 
  • EALC-J 132 Beginning Japanese II (4 cr.) P: EALC-J 131 or equivalent. Introductory language courses designed for students who have not had any prior training in Japanese. Drills for basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. 
  • EALC-J 201 Second-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 132 or equivalent. Continuation of emphasis on communicative skills. Increased attention to reading and writing skills. 
  • EALC-J 202 Second-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 201 or equivalent. Continuation of emphasis on communicative skills. Increased attention to reading and writing skills. 
  • EALC-J 301 Third-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second years of Japanese. More advanced level of speaking, reading, writing, and listening proficiency. 
  • EALC-J 302 Third-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 201-EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second years of Japanese. More advanced level of speaking, reading, writing, and listening proficiency. 
  • EALC-J 310 Japanese Conversation (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Designed to develop conversational skills through controlled linguistic patterns, reports, and group discussion. More advanced level of oral communication. 
  • EALC-J 330 Business Japanese (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Emphasis on acquisition and use of business vocabulary, idiom, and style. Oral practice is emphasized. 
  • EALC-J 394 Japanese Literature in Translation II (3 cr.) Survey of the classical genres of Japanese literature. I: Ancient period to end of Momoyama. II: Tokugawa and modern periods. 
  • EALC-J 401 Fourth-Year Japanese (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 302 or equivalent. Advanced level of communications skills in speaking and writing. Study of advanced grammar and reading of newspaper articles. 
  • EALC-J 402 Fourth-Year Japanese (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 401 or equivalent. Advanced level of communications skills in speaking and writing. Study of advanced grammar and reading of newspaper articles. 
  • EALC-J 498 Individual Studies in Japanese (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of the program director. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • EALC-E 231 Japan: The Living Tradition (3 cr.) An introduction to the patterns of Japanese culture: society, history, visual arts, literary masterpieces, performing arts, and living religious traditions. 
  • EALC-E 351 Studies in East Asian Culture (3-6 cr.) Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian culture, taught within one of the humanistic disciplines.  May be repeated once for credit.
  • EALC-E 472 Modern Japanese Fiction (3 cr.) The novels, short stories, and theories of fiction of prominent Japanese writers of the modern period. 
Spanish (SPAN)
Undergraduate Courses
  • SPAN-S 131 First-Year Spanish I (4 cr.) Introductory language sequence of courses. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills as well as awareness of Hispanic cultures. 
  • SPAN-S 132 First-Year Spanish II (4 cr.) P: SPAN-S 131, or transfer equivalent, or placement by testing. Continuation introductory language sequence of courses. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills as well as awareness of Hispanic cultures. 
  • SPAN-S 142 Beginning Spanish for Law Enforcement I (3 or 4 cr.) Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of law enforcement personnel. Service-learning component available. 
  • SPAN-S 143 Beginning Spanish for Law Enforcement II (3 or 4 cr.) P: SPAN-S 142. Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of law enforcement personnel. Service-learning component available. 
  • SPAN-S 160 Beginning Spanish for Health Care Personnel I (3 cr.) Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of health care personnel. Service-learning component available. 
  • SPAN-S 161 Beginning Spanish for Health Care Personnel II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 160. Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of health care personnel. Service-learning component available. 
  • SPAN-S 203 Second-Year Spanish I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 132, or 8-10 credit hours of college-level Spanish or placement by testing. Intensive drill reviewing important structural and vocabulary problems, coordinated with literary readings. Attendance in language laboratory required. Practice in composition. 
  • SPAN-S 204 Second-Year Spanish II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 203 or 10-14 credit hours of college-level Spanish or placement by testing. Intensive drill reviewing important structural and vocabulary problems, coordinated with literary readings. Attendance in language laboratory required. Practice in composition.
  • SPAN-S 311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. This course is designed to integrate the four basic language skills into a review of the major points of Spanish grammar. Course work will combine grammar exercises with brief controlled compositions based on reading assignments and class discussion in Spanish. Sentence exercises will be corrected and discussed in class. 
  • SPAN-S 313 Writing Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Not open to heritage or native speakers of Spanish. Grammar review, composition, and themes in Spanish. 
  • SPAN-S 315 Spanish in the Business World (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Introduction to the technical language of the business world with emphasis on problems of style, composition, and translation in the context of Hispanic mores. 
  • SPAN-S 317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Not open to heritage or native speakers of Spanish. Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions.  May be repeated once for credit.
  • SPAN-S 318 Writing Spanish for Heritage Speakers (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 (passed with a C or better) or transfer equivalent, or placement by testing. Focus on developing the literacy and writing skills of students who need additional practice and accuracy with standard written Spanish. Designed for native speakers and/or heritage speakers of Spanish. "Native" speakers are students who graduated from a high school in a Spanish-speaking country. "Heritage" speakers are students whose fominant language is English but who have had significant expsure to Spanish at home or in a Spanish-speaking country. This course is specifically required for native speakers who wish to earn special credit (SPAN-S 298) in Spanish. 
  • SPAN-S 319 Spanish for Health Care Personnel (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. A course designed specifically for those interested in learning Spanish in the context of material related to health care systems. Emphasis placed on vocabulary necessary for communicative competence in the medical fields. 
  • SPAN-S 323 Introduction to Translating Spanish and English (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. A comparative study of the style and grammar of both languages with a focus on the difficulties involved in translating. Introduction to the techniques and process of translation through intensive practice.
  • SPAN-S 326 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent. Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles.  The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax.  Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. 
  • SPAN-S 330 Studies in Hispanic Cultures (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, advanced level reading and writing skills in English Introduction to the varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking peoples to English-speaking students, with a main focus on the belief and knowledge systems, the customs and other socio-cultural behaviors, and the artistic and cultural products of the Spanish-speaking peoples of the world. Taught in English. Credit not applicable to the Spanish major or minor. 
  • SPAN-S 360 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent. Using fiction, drama, and poetry from both Spain and Latin America, this course introduces strategies to increase reading comprehension and presents terms and concepts useful in developing the critical skills of literary analysis. 
  • SPAN-S 363 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent. Introduction to the cultural history of Spanish-speaking countries with emphasis on its literary, artistic, social, economic, and political aspects. 
  • SPAN-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. A historical survey that covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from the Spanish Middle Ages through the Baroque period of the seventeenth century. Readings include prose works, poetry, and drama. 
  • SPAN-S 408 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. A historical survey of Spanish literature that covers the main current of Spain's literary history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Readings in prose, poetry, and drama by Larra, Perez Galdes, Unamuno, Garcia Lorca, and other representative writers. 
  • SPAN-S 411 Spain: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 363, or consent of instructor. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spain. 
  • SPAN-S 412 Spanish America: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 363, or consent of instructor. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spanish America. 
  • SPAN-S 419 Spanish for Law Enforcement (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Specialized vocabulary necessary for law enforcement professionals in the course of their daily work. Sight and written translation of legal documents, court records, and the language of the courtroom and courtroom procedures. Intensive classroom practice and language laboratory exercises focus on use of specialized vocabulary to help prepare students for communicative competence in this terminology. Information on becoming certified court interpreters and review of federal standards for interpreters. 
  • SPAN-S 421 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 311 and SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Selected grammar review and intensive practice in effective use of the written language. 
  • SPAN-S 423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 323, or consent of instructor. Basic introductory course in translation. The problems and techniques of Spanish/English and English/Spanish translation using a variety of texts and concentrating on such critical areas as stylistics, tone, rhythms, imagery, nuance, allusion, etc. 
  • SPAN-S 425 Spanish Phonetics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 or equivalent. Intensive patterned pronunciation drills and exercises in sound discrimination and transcription, based on detailed articulatory description of standard Spanish of Spain and Latin America. Attendance in language laboratory required. 
  • SPAN-S 427 The Structure of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 326 or consent of instructor. This course analyzes the structure of the Spanish language, including word and sentence formation, and how the language is used employed to produce specific meanings.  This course will help students recognize the patterns underlying the Spanish language, and improve their grammatical accuracy. 
  • SPAN-S 428 Applied Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326, or consent of instructor. General aspects of Spanish phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as they bear on teaching. 
  • SPAN-S 429 Medical Interpreting (3 cr.) P: 300-level Spanish and SPAN-S 319, or consent of instructor. This is a course for advanced students who are considering a career in medical interpreting in the various health care fields. Students get in-depth oral and comprehension practice in the primary areas of sight translation and consecutive interpreting and focus on medical terminology to reduce errors in interpreting 
  • SPAN-S 430 Legal Spanish (3 cr.) P: 300-level Spanish or consent of instructor. Advanced course for native speakers of Spanish or advanced students in Spanish who are considering careers in the legal professions. Course begins with general knowledge of legal Spanish and focuses on reading, communicative activities, interpreting, and translation. 
  • SPAN-S 440 Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 or equivalent. Examines current topics in Hispanic sociolinguistic/pragmatics.  Topics include sociolinguistic and phonological and syntactic variation, field methods, discourse analysis, language and power, language ideology language attitudes, languages in contact, language and gender, language and the law, bilingualism, linguistic politeness, and speech act theory. 
  • SPAN-S 441 The Acquisition of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Examines current topics in the acquisition of Spanish. Provides an introduction to research on the first and/or second language acquisition of Spanish and to the pedagogical applications of these findings. Students develop a background in these fields and have opportunities to link theory and practice. 
  • SPAN-S 445 Major Dramatists of the Golden Age I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Lectures outlining the development of the theater during the Golden Age. Readings selected from the works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Juan Ruiz de Alarcon, Calderan. 
  • SPAN-S 450 Cervantes’ Don Quixote I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Intensive reading of Don Quixote, with account of the author's life and thought and discussions of the development of the novel to Cervantes' time. 
  • SPAN-S 468 Varieties of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics. This course is an advanced descriptive analysis of the varieties of Spanish spoken around the globe. A detailed analysis of the phonetic, lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of such varieties is provided with an aim to define its different macrodialectal areas, including Spanish in the US and Creole languages. 
  • SPAN-S 470 Women and Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. The Hispanic woman within her cultural context through literary texts. Topics such as women authors, characters, themes, and feminist criticism. 
  • SPAN-S 471 Spanish-American Literature I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Introduction to Spanish-American literature. 
  • SPAN-S 472 Spanish-American Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Introduction to Spanish-American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.
  • SPAN-S 477 Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Prose Fiction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Close readings of representative novelists and short story writers, including established authors (Borges, Asturias, Arreola, Carpentier) and promising young writers. 
  • SPAN-S 487 Capstone Internship in Spanish (3 cr.) P: Senior standing in Spanish, with authorization. Senior-level option for Spanish majors who must complete a capstone course for the B.A. in Spanish. Students demonstrate academic progress through a portfolio, discussions with the faculty capstone directory, and an internship report. The report is presented in Spanish in writing and orally.
  • SPAN-S 493 Internship Program in Spanish (3 cr.) P: Junior standing with authorization. Open to IUPUI students only. Students work in businesses, organizations, or institutions applying their skills in Spanish in order to gain awareness of the uses of Spanish in the workplace. They record and analyze their experiences through logs and meetings with the internship director and write a research paper. 
  • SPAN-S 494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, with authorization. May not be taken for graduate credit. Open to IUPUI majors in Spanish only or students in the Certificate in Translation Studies and Interpreting program. Topic to be selected by the student with the consent of the Director. Topic may not duplicate the content of an already existing course. 
  • SPAN-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Topic to be selected by the faculty member offering the course.  May be taken twice for credit as long as the topic is different.
  • SPAN-S 496 Foreign Study in Spanish (3-6 cr.) P: Authorization of Director. Planning of a research project during the year preceding the summer abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by the end of the semester following foreign study. 
  • SPAN-S 498 Capstone Seminar in Spanish (3 cr.) P: Senior standing in Spanish with authorization. Senior-level course for Spanish majors that integrates students’ undergraduate study. Students showcase academic progress through a portfolio, a reflective journal, discussions with the faculty capstone director, and a final presentation to students and faculty. 
Graduate Courses
  • SPAN-S 507 Foreign Language Institute (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of instructor. Intended primarily for teachers. Intensive interdepartmental course involving language laboratory and audiovisual equipment and techniques, lecture, assignments in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), and discussion of classroom use of applied linguistics. Taught only in the summer. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • SPAN-S 508 Varieties of Spanish (3 cr.) This course is an advanced descriptive analysis of the varieties of Spanish spoken around the globe. A detailed analysis of the phonetic, lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of such varieties is provided with an aim to define its different macrodialectal areas, including Spanish in the US and Creole languages.  
  • SPAN-S 511 Spanish Syntactic Analysis (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the analysis of syntactic data. Focus on developing theoretical apparatus required to account for a range of syntactic phenomena in Spanish.
  • SPAN-S 513 Introduction to Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326, or consent of instructor. Examination of the relationship between language and society in the Spanish-speaking world. Survey of a wide range of topics relevant to Spanish: language as communication, the sociology of language, and linguistic variation. The course is conducted in Spanish.
  • SPAN-S 515 The Acquisition of Spanish as a Second Language (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 and SPAN-S 428, or consent of instructor. Surveys the empirical research conducted on Spanish in order to address the question: How does a nonnative linguistic system develop? The course is organized around four topics: morpheme acquisition studies, interlanguage development, input processing, and Universal Grammar.
  • SPAN-S 517 Methods of Teaching College Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 428 or consent of instructor. Trains graduate students to teach the freshman and intermediate college courses in Spanish.
  • SPAN-S 518 Studies in Latino and Spanish American Culture (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 412 or consent of instructor. Introduction to themes and topics in the study of the cultural phenomena produced in Latin America and among Hispanics in the United States: popular culture, colonialism, the Other, etc.
  • SPAN-S 519 Practicum in the Teaching of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 517 or consent of instructor. Practical application of the teaching methodology explored in SPAN-S 517. Students will undertake teaching projects supervised by a graduate faculty member in Spanish and meet with their mentors to assess their teaching objectives, techniques, materials and outcomes.
  • SPAN-S 521 Spanish Grammar and Linguistics for Teachers I (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Themes and issues in Spanish grammar and Hispanic linguistics selected for their relevance to teaching Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 524.
  • SPAN-S 523 Spanish Literature, Art, and Culture for Teachers I (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Authors, artists, themes, and issues in Spanish literature, visual art, and cultural life selected to enrich the teaching of Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 525.
  • SPAN-S 524 Spanish Grammar and Linguistics for Teachers II (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Themes and issues in Spanish grammar and Hispanic linguistics selected for their relevance to teaching Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 521.
  • SPAN-S 525 Spanish Literature, Art, and Culture for Teachers II (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Authors, artists, themes, and issues in Spanish literature, visual art, and cultural life selected to enrich the teaching of Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 523.
  • SPAN-S 527 Graduate Internship in Spanish (3-6 cr.) P: SPAN-S 517 and consent of instructor. A supervised internship on the application of Spanish studies in educational work settings. Each intern will be assigned a project supervised by a graduate faculty member in Spanish. Interns will complete a portfolio of workplace learning and self-evaluation; they will also be visited by a faculty coordinator and evaluated in writing by their on-site supervisors.
  • SPAN-S 528 Translation Practice and Evaluation (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This is an introductory course to the practice and evaluation of translation. Students will get hands-on experience with many different text types from a variety of areas and professions and develop skills to translate them into both English and Spanish. At the same time, students will have the opportunity to discuss some of the theoretical and professional issues involved in translation as a profession.
  • SPAN-S 529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 528 or Equivalent or Consent of Program. This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • SPAN-S 530 Specialized Translation I (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 528 or Equivalent or Consent of Program. This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of technical,scientific, and medical documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • SPAN-S 627 Individual Readings in Spanish (3-6 cr.) Enables students to work on a reading project that they initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of a department faculty member in Spanish. Credit hours depend on scope of project.
  • SPAN-S 680 Topics in Contemporary Spanish American Literature (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of instructor. Topics include poetry, drama, short story, novel, and essay.
  • SPAN-S 686 M.A.T. Thesis (2-4 cr.) P: Authorization of graduate director. Students identify a research theme and develop it under the guidance of a director (IUPUI professor) and a co-director (University of Salamanca professor). The topic will be related to the teaching of Spanish language or to the teaching of an aspect of Hispanic literature or culture. Repeatable for up to 6 hours.
  • SPAN-S 650 Topics in the Teaching of Spanish (3 cr.) P: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor. Seminar in selected topics related to the teaching of Spanish, such as assessment, teaching materials development, the teaching of specific linguistic skills. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
World Langauges and Cultures (WLAC)
  • WLAC-F 100 Immersion Abroad Experience (1-6 cr.) This course designation applies to interdisciplinary immersion experiences outside of the United States, including language study in a formal academic setting, cultural exposition and immersion, guided tours, and international service learning. Credit hours (1 to 6) are awarded on the basis of duration of program and classroom contact hours but do not fulfill language requirements. 
  • WLAC-F 200 Cross-Cultural Encounters (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. This course develops intercultural awareness and understanding through comparative study of the relationship between selected texts and their specific cultural context. One theme is examined in literature and other media by a team of experts in a variety of literatures from around the world. 
  • WLAC-F 350 Introduction to Translation Studies and Interpreting (3 cr.) P: 300-level language competence. This course offers an overview in the history and theory of translation studies and interpreting, beginning practice in translation and interpreting. This course is taught in English but is designed for students who have 300-level competence in languages offered in the department. 
  • WLAC-F 360 Women and Islam (3 cr.) The course examines the status of women in the main Islamic sources and its historical evolution. It adopts a multidisciplinary approach to study women's role in different regions of the world and the main challenges they faced and still encounter in the present time. 
  • WLAC-F 450 Computers in Translation (3 cr.) P: 300-level language class. This course is designed to prepare translators in computer technology as it relates to translation: translations in electronic form, accessing electronic dictionaries, researching on the World Wide Web, terminology management, machine translation, and computer-assisted translation. Taught in English, but designed for students who have competence in languages offered in the department. 
  • WLAC-F 400 Islam, Gender, and Conflicts (3 cr.) This course investigates cultural and religious differences, as well as women's issues in the Muslim world.
  • WLAC-F 550 Introduction to Translation Studies (3 cr.) This course introduces the main issues that have dominated Western translation discourse for two millennia, as well as contemporary trends in Translation Studies that call them into;question. Students will learn to evaluate critically the complex dynamics involved in translation and, in turn, apply this theoretical base to their practice. Class is conducted in English.
  • WLAC-F 560 Computer Assisted Translation & Localization (3 cr.) Computers are an essential part of the translating activity.  This course introduces students to the uses, applications, and evaluation of technologies, such as terminology management, translation memory systems and machine translation in the translation field. Course also includes an assessment of productivity gain, current usability and quality outcomes. Taught in English, with practice translation in second language.
  • WLAC-F 693 Internship in Translation (3 cr.) P: Permission of the Program. Students apply the skills learned in the translation coursework in an intensive work program in the target language, through placement in area of specialization supervised by program faculty member. Students must complete a minimum of 60 hours of work or equivalent. Requirements include a translation portfolio based on work products. Internship will be supervised by a faculty member and an internship supervisor.
  • WLAC-F 694 Final Translation Project (3 cr.) P: Permission of the Program. Students apply the translation and writing skills acquired in the translation coursework to the completion of a larger translation project in chosen field of specialization under the supervision of a faculty project director in their language discipline. The source text of the final translation project will be selected by the student in consultation with the project director. Project evaluation will include a second faculty reviewer. The final translation project should be undertaken in the semester prior to program completion.
American Sign Language (ASL)
  • ASL-A 131 First Year ASL I (4 cr.) Intensive introductory language sequence of courses. Recommended for students with prior training in American Sign Language or for prospective majors in Interpreting. Emphasis on developing basic conversational skills as well as awareness of deaf culture. 
  • ASL-A 132 First Year ASL II II (4 cr.) P: ASL-A 131 or placement. Continuation of introductory ASL language course. Emphasis on receptive and expressive ASL skills as well as awareness of American Deaf Culture. 
  • ASL-A 211 Second Year American Sign Language I (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 132 or placement. A continuation of training in ASL conversational skills and American Deaf culture. 
  • ASL-A 212 Second Year American Sign Language II (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 211 or placement. A continuation of training in ASL conversational skills and American Deaf culture. 
  • ASL-A 215 Advanced Fingerspell & Number Use in ASL (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 212 or placement. This course is an advanced class in fingerspelling, ASL's unique number systems and other advanced grammatical features.  Emphasis is on expressive and receptive clarity and accuracy through intensive practice in comprehension and production. 
  • ASL-A 219 History and Culture of the American Deaf Community (3 cr.) This course is designed for students who have completed ASL 211 or a Sign Language Proficiency Interview Placement since this course will be taught in ASL only.   During the course, students will be introduced to American Deaf culture and components of the American Deaf community including history, norms,  rules of social interactions, values, traditions, and dynamics during the 19th and 20th centuries.  Educational, social, and political factors unique to the Deaf community will be explored, as well as community organizations, impact of technology, and emerging issues/trends. 
  • ASL-A 221 Linguistics of ASL (3 cr.) This course introduces the scientific study of American Sign Language structure, history, and use.  Topics include American Sign Language and the structure of signs, words, sentences, and meanings; language use in culture and society; language changes over time; language acquisition and process; and structural variations in language. 
  • ASL-A 311 Third Year American Sign Language I (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 212 or placement. This is first part of two courses in the advanced study of American Sign Language.  Emphasis is placed on narrative, receptive and expressive skill development. This course will encourage vocabulary review, clear articulation of the language, continued practice of grammatical structures, spontaneous dialogue, and exposure to a variety of signing styles.  Students will explore the syntactic similarities and   differences between the English and ASL and learn how to find functional equivalence between the two languages. 
  • ASL-A 312 Third Year American Sign Language II (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 311 or placement. This is second part of two courses in the advanced study of American Sign Language. Continued emphasis is placed on narrative, receptive and expressive skill development. This course will encourage vocabulary review as well as the addition of new vocabulary, clear articulation of the language, continued practice of grammatical structures, spontaneous dialogue, and exposure to a variety of signing styles. Students will explore the syntactic similarities and differences between the English and ASL and learn how to find functional equivalence between the two languages. 
  • ASL-A 321 Linguistics of American Sign Language (3 cr.) Through readings, video materials, exercises, and peer discussions, students will learn to analyze ASL linguistically.  We will explore the building blocks of American Sign Language: phonemic analysis, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics.  The application of these concepts to a visual rather than spoken language will be a focus of the course.  We will investigate how ASL grammar functions and then move into how cultural and social factors interact with the use of ASL.  Some background in general linguistics is expected.  This course will be of use to students of ASL, linguists, interpreting students, and working interpreters, among others. 
  • ASL-I 250 Introduction to Interpreting (3 cr.) This course is for ASL/EI Majors and ASL Minors. Provides an overview of the field of ASL/English interpreting. Emphasis is on exploring a progression of philosophical frames in the development of the profession; exploring models of the interpreting process and identifying requisite responsibilities, skills, and aptitudes for interpreters. 
  • ASL-I 305 Text Analysis (3 cr.) This course provides students with an introduction to cognitive processing, theory of translation, text analysis and models of interpretation. 
  • ASL-I 361 Theory and Process of Interpreting I (3 cr.) P: Director’s permission. This is the first course in the professional skills preparation for interpreting. Students begin by analyzing texts for purpose, audience, linguistic features, and discourse structure. Students are taught discourse mapping and retelling texts in the same language. As students learn to analyze, they also learn how to evaluate adequate renditions. 
  • ASL-I 363 Theory and Process of Interpreting II (3 cr.) P: Director’s permission. This is the second interpreting course that prepares students for the analytical skills needed to interpret. In this course, students continue their practice with inter-lingual mapping exercises. The greatest change is from an unlimited to a limited time for preparation and production of texts. 
  • ASL-I 365 Theory and Process of Interpreting III (3 cr.) P: Director’s permission. This is the third and final course to prepare student to do simultaneous interpreting. In this course, students continue with mapping exercises, working towards interpreting unfamiliar texts, and evaluating interpretations. The greatest challenge is eliminating pausing. 
  • ASL-I 370 Interpreting in the Healthcare Setting (3 cr.) P: ASL A212 or equivalent language skills This course will provide specific information on the interpreter's role in the Healthcare setting. Emphasis is on exploring the following: requisite responsibilities, skills, and aptitudes for interpreters in the healthcare setting, as well as cultural issues and laws pertinent to healthcare interpreting. Students will develop a working ASL medical vocabulary, procedures and tests as well as a basic understanding of body systems There is also the possibility that students will be able to experience mock situations in the healthcare setting through collaboration with the School of Nursing and/or potentially observe actual healthcare interpreting with the instructor or other qualified interpreters. 
  • ASL-I 405 Practicum (3 cr.) Students must be registered in ASL/EI Program and have program approval from director. An extensive practicum experience. Students will be placed at sites to experience several interpreting settings during the 15-week course. Students will be required to maintain a journal of their experiences and to meet with onsite practicum mentors and program faculty regularly throughout the course. 
  • ASL-I 409 Topics in Interpreting (3 cr.) Focuses on a particular setting or genre, certification preparation, specialized area or discourse in interpreting. Topics may include interpreting medical texts, preparing deaf interpreters, deaf blind interpreting and others. Topics may vary from year to year.  May be repeated up to 4 times (12 credit hours) under different topics.
  • ASL-I 425 Independent Study (1-6 cr.) Students must be registered in ASL/EI Program and have program approval from director. Individual projects determined in consultation with instructor. Credit varies with scope of project.   
  • ASL-L 340 Interpreting Discourse: ASL to English (3 cr.) This course focuses on the analysis of language use in different genres of spoken English so that interpreting students become explicitly aware of everyday language. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze features of conversations, lectures, explanations, interviews, descriptions, and other types of speech genres while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use in English. 
  • ASL-L 342 Interpreting Discourse: English to ASL (3 cr.) This course continues the introduction to discourse analysis, focusing on discourse in American Sign Language (ASL). Topics will include general discourse issues such as approaches to analysis, natural data analysis, technology for research in signed languages, and topics specific to ASL, including transcription in ASL, use of space and spatial mapping, involvement strategies, discourse structures and genres, cohesion and coherence, framing, and interaction strategies. One ongoing issue throughout the course will be the relevance to interpreting.