Undergraduate Programs

Courses

Informatics

  • INFO-I 101 Introduction to Informatics (4 cr.) Problem solving with information technology; introductions to information representation, relational databases, system design, propositional logic, cutting-edge technologies: CPU, operation systems, networks; laboratory emphasizing information technology including Web page design, word processing, databases, using tools available on campus. Credit not given for both INFO-I 101 and H 101.
  • INFO-H 101 Introduction to Informatics, Honors (4 cr.) Honors version of
 INFO-I 101. Problem solving with information technology; introductions to information representation, relational databases, system design, propositional logic, cutting-edge technologies: CPU, operation systems, networks; laboratory emphasizing information technology including Web page design, word processing, databases, using tools available on campus. Credit not given for both INFO-H 101 and I 101.
  • INFO-I 110 Basic Tools of Informatics I—Programming Concepts (1.5 cr.) CSCI-A 110, A 111, or equivalent computing experience recommended. Introduction to programming for users of computer systems. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques. An eight-week lecture and laboratory course. Cross-listed with CSCI-A 112. Credit not given for both INFO-I 110 and CSCI-A 112.
  • INFO-I 111 Basic Tools of Informatics II—Introduction to Databases (1.5 cr.) CSCI-A 110, A 111, or equivalent computing experience recommended. Introduction to database design concepts. Entering and modifying data, accessing data using visual tools and SQL, and building database applications using forms and application development tools. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques. An eight-week lecture and laboratory course. Credit not given for both INFO-I 111 and CSCI-A 114.
  • INFO-I 123 Data Fluency (3 cr.) Data is big. Data is everywhere. How can we possibly be expected to keep up in a world full of data, much of which is data about ourselves? This class provides fundmental skills for the 21st century: understanding data, extracting knowledge from data, generating predictions from data and presenting data.
  • INFO-I 130 Introduction to Cybersecurity (1 cr.) P: INFO-I 101. This course introduces students to cybersecurity. The course will primarily focus on introduction to three core areas (technical aspects of security, organizational aspects of security, and legal aspects of security). Through examples of security problems in real life, this course will illuminate fundamental ideas and concepts of information security. An eight-week course.
  • INFO-I 200 Explorations in Informatics (1-3 cr.) Variable topic. Exploration of topics in informatics. The course may cover topics from all areas of informatics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • INFO-I 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 and (MATH-M 118 or A 118 or S 118 or V 118 or (MATH-D 116 and D 117)). An introduction to methods of analytical, abstract, and critical thinking; deductive reasoning; and logical and mathematical tools used in information sciences. Topics include propositional and predicate logic, natural deduction proof system, sets, functions and relations, proof methods in mathematics, mathematical induction, and graph theory. Credit not given for both INFO-I 201 and H 201.
  • INFO-H 201 Mathematical Foundations of Informatics, Honors (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 101 and (MATH-M 118 or A 118 or S 118 or V 118 or (MATH-D 116 and D 117)). Honors version of INFO-I 201. An introduction to methods of analytical, abstract, and critical thinking; deductive reasoning; and logical and mathematical tools used in information sciences. Topics include propositional and predicate logic, natural deduction proof system, sets, functions and relations, proof methods in mathematics, mathematical induction, and graph theory. Credit not given for both INFO-H 201 and I 201.
  • INFO-I 202 Social Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101. Introduction to key social research perspectives and literatures on the use of information and communication technologies. Discusses current topics such as information ethics, relevant legal frameworks, popular and controversial uses of technology (e.g., peer-to-peer file sharing), digital divides, etc. Outlines research methodologies for social informatics. Credit not given for both INFO-I 202 and H 202.
  • INFO-H 202 Social Informatics, Honors (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101. Honors version of INFO-I 202. Introduction to key social research perspectives and literatures on the use of information and communication technologies. Discusses current topics such as information ethics, relevant legal frameworks, popular and controversial uses of technology (e.g., peer-to-peer file sharing), digital divides, etc. Outlines research methodologies for social informatics. Credit not given for both INFO-H 202 and I 202.
  • INFO-I 210 Information Infrastructure I (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 201 or CSCI-C 241. This course introduces software architectures of information systems and basic concepts and procedures of system and application development. Course topics include PHP programming syntax; procedural programming fundamentals; principles of developing dynamic, database-driven applications for the World Wide Web; relational database concepts; and basic MySQL statements. Credit not given for both INFO-I 210 and H 210.
  • INFO-H 210 Information Infrastructure I, Honors (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 201 or CSCI-C 241. Honors version of INFO-I 210. This course introduces software architectures of information systems and basic concepts and procedures of system and application development. Course topics include PHP programming syntax; procedural programming fundamentals; principles of developing dynamic, database-driven applications for the World Wide Web; relational database concepts; and basic MySQL statements. Credit not given for both INFO-H 210 and I 210.
  • INFO-I 211 Information Infrastructure II (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 200 or C 211. The systems architecture of distributed applications. Advanced programming, including an introduction to the programming of graphical systems. Credit not given for both INFO-I 211 and H 211.
  • INFO-H 211 Information Infrastructure II, Honors (4 cr.) P: INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 200 or C 211. Honors version of 
INFO-I 211. The systems architecture of distributed applications. Advanced programming, including an introduction to the programming of graphical systems. Credit not given for both INFO-H 211 and I 211.
  • INFO-I 216 Humans, Animals, and Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.) What are the origins and computational foundations of intelligence? How close are we to building machines that think like humans and animals? We will explore how cognitive abilities are distributed across the animal kingdom, investigate which abilities are uniquely human, and discuss progress building artificial intelligence that mimics biological intelligence.
  • INFO-I 222 The Information Society (3 cr.) In this course, students will learn to think critically about what it means to live in an "Information Society." From printing press to telephone to computer to the Internet, they will explore the history and social implications of the various information revolutions that shaped contemporary commercial, scientific, organizational, political life.
  • INFO-I 230 Analytical Foundations of Security (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101. This course will enable students to re-evaluate and conceptualize material learned in discrete courses to consider the topics from their perspective of security. For example, computer system basics such as hardware (CPUs, memory, ...) and software are reconsidered from the perspective of how their interactions create vulnerabilities. Vulnerabilities that combine standard hardware and software configurations will be examined as these illuminate both security and computer networks. Operating systems and file systems are examined from the perspective of access control, permissions, and availability of system services, etc.
  • INFO-I 231 Introduction to the Mathematics of Cybersecurity (3 cr.) INFO-I 101 and I 201 recommended. Introduces the basic mathematical tools used in modern cybersecurity. Covers mathematical material from a number of disparate fields, including probability theory, analysis of algorithms, complexity theory, number theory, and group theory. Credit not given for both INFO-I 231 and CSCI-C 231.
  • INFO-I 245 Interaction Design Thinking (3 cr.) This hands-on, project driven course offers a creative approach to the process of designing interactive systems. Activities include researching user behaviors, preferences, and needs and then producing sketches, models, and prototypes to explore possible solutions. Resulting designs are desirable to users, technically feasible, and economically viable.
  • INFO-I 246 Use and Usability (3 cr.) Students will learn the foundations of user experience (UX). These include basics of human psychology and storytelling as well as paradigms of human-computer interaction (e.g., desktop, mobile, voice). Students will practice translating user and system research into actionable design insights to envision and test diverse design solutions.
  • INFO-I 300 HCI/Interaction Design (3 cr.) P: INFO- I 202 or I 222. An intermediate course that teaches students how to assess the usability of software through quantitative and qualitative methods, including conducting task analysis, usability studies, heuristic inspections, interviews, surveys, and focus groups.  The course also introduces students to the tools and techniques for designing and testing user interfaces based on a human-centered methodology. Credit not given for both INFO-I 300 and H 300.
  • INFO-H 300 HCI/Interaction Design, Honors (3 cr.) P: INFO- I 202 or I 222. Honors version of INFO-I 300. An intermediate course that teaches students how to assess the usability of software through quantitative and qualitative methods, including conducting task analysis, usability studies, heuristic inspections, interviews, surveys, and focus groups.  The course also introduces students to the tools and techniques for designing and testing user interfaces based on a human-centered methodology. Credit not given for both INFO-H 300 and I 300.
  • INFO-I 301 Presentations for IT Professionals (3 cr.) Must be a LUDDY major. Students present several different types of presentations and engage in developing these "21st Century skills" for their future. The course utilizes an open studio format that allows students to explore public speaking to better prepare for future educational and professional presentations.
  • INFO-I 303 Organizational Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101. Examines the various needs, uses, and consequences of information in organizational contexts. Topics include organizational types and characteristics, functional areas and business processes, information-based products and services, the use of and redefining the role of information technology, the changing character of work life and organizational practices, sociotechnical structures, and the rise and transformation of information-based industries.
  • INFO-I 304 Introduction to Virtual Reality (3 cr.) Virtual Reality has applications in fields as diverse as medicine, education, military training, trauma recovery, and artificial intelligence.  In this course, students will learn the foundational skills needed to build virtual reality applications. We will focus on software programs for building virtual assets and realistic virtual environments.
  • INFO-I 308 Information Representation (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 201 and (INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 200 or C 211). The basic structure of information representation in digital information systems. Begins with low-level computer representations such as common character and numeric encodings. Introduces formal design and query languages through Entity Relationship Modeling, the Relational Model, XML, and XHTML. Laboratory topics include SQL and XPath querying. Credit not given for both INFO-I 308 and H 308.
  • INFO-H 308 Information Representation, Honors (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 201 and (INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 211 or C 200). Honors version of 
INFO-I 308. The basic structure of information representation in digital information systems. Begins with low-level computer representations such as common character and numeric encodings. Introduces formal design and query languages through Entity Relationship Modeling, the Relational Model, XML, and XHTML. Laboratory topics include SQL and XPath querying. Credit not given for both INFO-H 308 and I 308.
  • INFO-I 310 Multimedia Arts and Technology (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 300. The study of the evolution of media arts and underlying principles of communication. Application development paradigms in current practice.
  • INFO-I 311 Application Development (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 210 or CSCI-C 200 or C 211. This undergraduate course uses a professional development environment to teach advanced programming skills using an object oriented programming language. Topics include primitive data types, mathematical functions, string manipulation, arrays, logical statements, loops, methods, classes, inheritance, debugging, exception handling, graphical user interfaces (GUIs), and version control software.
  • INFO-I 320 Distributed Systems and Collaborative Computing (3 cr.) INFO-I 211 recommended. An introductory treatment of distributed systems and programming. Topics range from the distributed and object models of computation to advanced concepts such as remote method invocations, object brokers, object services, open systems, and future trends for distributed information systems.
  • INFO-I 330 Legal and Social Informatics of Security (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 and I 230. This course will examine that set of ethical and legal problems most tightly bound to the issues of information control. The interaction and technology changes, but the core issues have remained: privacy, intellectual property, Internet law, concepts of jurisdiction, speech anonymity versus accountability, and ethical decision making in the network environment.
  • INFO-I 341 Prototyping with Arduino Tools (3 cr.) The course covers material culture and literature of the hobby and professional electronics design communities with the goal of creating a physical prototype that communicates the students' creative and social vision. These student prototypes are model systems that embody the computational and organizational thinking of working effectively within engineering firms.  
  • INFO-I 342 Mobile Programming I (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 311. This undergraduate course uses a professional development environment to teach skills to program applications for mobile devices. Topics include graphical user interfaces (GUIs), data management, recording and playing back audio and video, location, maps, and using text messaging within an application.  
  • INFO-I 345 Interaction Design Research (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 245 and I 246. Students will learn the basics of user experience (UX), including theories of experience, UX data collection, and data analysis methods. It also covers fundamental research topics, including research ethics, sampling, and documentation. Students will translate research results into design: experience journey maps, personas, scenarios, and design concepts.  
  • INFO-I 346 Prototyping and Evaluation (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 245 and I 246. This course emphasizes the iterative development of interaction design problems and possible solutions. It incorporates visual thinking, including sketching, storyboarding, map-making, and wireframing; and also paper, visual behavioral, minimum viable prototyping; and evaluation, including usability testing.  
  • INFO-I 356 Globalization, Where We Fit In (3 cr.) Globalization, increasingly enabled by information technology, changes how we work, what we buy, and who we know. New digital technology touches people working eighty-hour weeks in China and others receiving free state-of-the-art drugs in Africa. Learn about the past, present and future of globalization from an information technology perspective, and what it means for you, your career, and your community.
  • INFO-I 360 Web Design (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 101. Hands-on introduction to the core standards required for professional front-end web design and development (HTML/CSS/Bootstrap). You will create websites, plus learn how web content and style work together, how to make professional choices about web graphics and layout, and how to analyze and critique a website's design and structure.
  • INFO-I 368 Introduction to Network Science (3 cr.) P: COGS-Q 260 or CSCI-A 201 or CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211 or INFO-I 210. Friends, computers, the Web, and our brain are examples of networks that pervade our lives. Network science helps us understand complex patterns of connection, interaction, and relationships in many complex systems. Students learn essential concepts and core ideas of network literacy, and basic tools to handle social and information networks.
  • INFO-I 369 Performance Analytics (3 cr.) P: COGS-Q 260 or CSCI-A 201 or CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211 or INFO-I 210. INFO-I 368 recommended. This course will review quantitative studies aimed at measuring, predicting and understanding performance in social competitive arenas, ranging from social media to financial markets, from professional sports to scientific and technological innovation.
  • INFO-I 370 Methods for HCC (3 cr.) At least junior standing or permission of instructor. UX/UI Design uses a variety of approaches for obtaining human-centered information and requirements for the design and development of systems and applications. The course surveys key methods, current and emergent, in the field of Human Computer Interaction and Interaction Design to prepare students for a career in IT.
  • INFO-I 371 Chemical Informatics I (1 cr.) Basic concepts of information representation, storage, and retrieval as they pertain to chemistry.  An overview of the techniques that make modern chemical informatics systems work, including the coding techniques that form the basis for chemical information retrieval by structures, nomenclature, and molecular formulas, various methods of coding for visualization of chemical structures and chemical data, and algorithms and techniques used in the modern pharmaceutical industry to enhance reseach efforts.
  • INFO-I 372 Molecular Modeling (1 cr.) CHEM-C 341 recommended. Molecular modeling and computational chemistry; application of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics to drive structural and energetic information about molecules; conformational analysis; quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and related methods for drug design.
  • INFO-I 390 Undergraduate Independent Study (1-3 cr.) Department approval. Independent research based on existing literature or original work. A report, in the style of a departmental technical report, is required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • INFO-I 391 Internship in Informatics Professional Practice (1-3 cr.) Department approval. Students gain professional work experience in an industry or research organization setting, using skills and knowledge acquired in informatics course work. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.
  • INFO-I 399 Current Topics in Informatics (1-3 cr.) Variable topic course. Emphasis is on new developments and research in informatics. May be repeated once with different topic.
  • INFO-I 400 Topics in Informatics (1-3 cr.) Variable topic. Emphasis is on new developments and research in informatics. May be repeated when topic varies.
  • INFO-H 400 Topics in Informatics, Honors (1-3 cr.) Honors version of INFO-I 400. Variable topic. Emphasis is on development and research in informatics. May be repeated when topic varies.
  • INFO-I 407 Introduction to Health Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 300. This is a combined advanced undergraduate and graduate course that provides an introduction to health informatics. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe and apply informatics methods that improve health and well being. Credit not given for both INFO-I 407 and H 407.
  • INFO-H 407 Introduction to Health Informatics, Honors (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 300. Honors version of 
INFO-I 407. This is a combined advanced undergraduate and graduate course that provides an introduction to health informatics. By the end of the course, student will be able to describe and apply informatics methods that improve health and well being. Credit not given for both INFO-H 407 and I 407.
  • INFO-I 411 Animal-Computer Interaction Methods (3 cr.) This courses introduces cutting-edge Animal-Computer Interaction methods with a focus on how they are used to enhance animal welfare, enrichment, husbandry, and cognitive research opportunities. It will also take a critical approach and consider key challenges relating to access, ethics, implementation, scale, and evaluation of ACI methods.
  • INFO-I 413 Usable Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.) Proficient in basic programming (Python, C, C++, Java, or equivalent) recommended. Building foundational skills in machine learning, natural language processing, and artificial intelligence for data collection, data analysis, and data visualization, and decision-making.
  • INFO-I 414 Seminar in Animal-Computer Interaction (3 cr.) This exploratory seminar is an introduction to ACI. We will draw on faculty and student selected readings, multimedia materials, and guest lectures from current ACI practitioners to see what we think about the ethics, history, state-of-the art, and possible futures for this broad field of practice.
  • INFO-I 421 Applications of Data Mining (3 cr.) INFO-I 308 recommended. The course explores the use of data mining techniques in different settings, including business and scientific domains. The emphasis will be on using techniques instead of developing new techniques or algorithms. Students will select, prepare, visualize, analyze, and present data that leads to the discovery of novel and actionable information.
  • INFO-I 422 Data Visualization (3 cr.) From dashboards in a car to cutting-edge scientific papers, we extensively use visual representation of data.  As our world becomes increasingly connected and digitized and as more decisions are being driven by data, data visualization is becoming a critical skill for every knowledge worker. In this course we will learn fundamentals of data visualization and create visualizations that can provide insights into complex datasets.
  • INFO-I 423 Big Data Applications and Analytics (3 cr.) The Big Data Applications & Analytics course is an overview course in Data Science and covers the applications and technologies (data analytics and clouds) needed to process the application data. It is organized around rallying cry: Use Clouds running Data Analytics Collaboratively processing Big Data to solve problems in X-Informatics.  Credit given for only one of INFO-I 423, I 523, or ENGR-E 534.
  • INFO-I 424 Big Data Software and Projects (3 cr.) This course studies software HPC-ABDS used in either High Performance Computing or the open source commercial Big Data cloud computing. The student builds analysis systems using this software on clouds and then to use it on a project either chosen by student or selected from list given by instructor. Credit not given for both INFO-I 424 and I 524.
  • INFO-I 426 Informatics in Disasters and Emergency Response (3 cr.) This course teaches students the skills needed to design and deploy informatics technologies in emergency response and disaster situations, including practical applications. Specific areas include technology design, situational awareness, threat modeling, and data science.   Credit not given for both INFO-I 426 and I 516.
  • INFO-I 427 Search Informatics (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211. Techniques and tools to automatically crawl, parse, index, store, and search web information, organizing knowledge that can help meet the needs of organizations, communities and individual users. Social and business impact of search engine technology. As a project, students will build a real search engine and compare it with Google.
  • INFO-I 430 Security for Networked Systems (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 231 or CSCI-C 231. An extensive survey of network security. Covers threats to information confidentiality, integrity, and availability in different internet layers, and defense mechanisms that control these threats. Also provides a necessary foundation on network security, such as cryptographic, primitives/protocols, authentication, authorization and access control technologies. Hands-on experiences through programming assignments and course projects. Credit given for only one of INFO-I 430, I 520, or CSCI-B 430.
  • INFO-I 433 Systems & Protocol Security & Information Assurance (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 291 and (INFO-I 231 or CSCI-C 231). Covers the fundamentals of computer security by looking at how things can go wrong, how people can abuse the system, and ways to make the system secure.  Students will gain a basic overview of existing security problems, and be introduced to methods for addressing such problems.  Should be taken by anyone designing, selecting, or using applications in which security or privacy plays a role. Credit given for only one of INFO-I 433, I 533, or CSCI-B 433.
  • INFO-I 435 Management, Access, and Use of Big and Complex Data (3 cr.) Innovation today is emerging from a preponderance of data from sensors, social media, and the Internet. This course covers knowledge representation, data process, and data management for big and complex data. Specific topics include data integration, semantics, and provenance; workflows and pipelines; and distributed noSQL stores.  Credit not given for both INFO-I 435 and I 535.
  • INFO-I 436 Technology Innovation (3 cr.) This course teaches students the process of innovation, specifically in respect to technological innovation. Students are required to ideate technological concepts given a set of constraints and an opportunity space. The focus of the course is on students inventing and implementing without considering the commercial potential of their innovations. Credit not given for both INFO-I 436 and I 566.
  • INFO-I 437 Design Strategy (3 cr.) Permission of instructor. The course requires students to apply "the" design process to better understand the factors affecting the success or failure of a design beyond the target audience and problem space in order to iterate on the design to propose solutions to avoid its failure, a process known as strategic design.
  • INFO-I 438 Technology Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) This course will teach students the importance of systems and design thinking as they relate to building and managing a startup holistically. Students will be required to take a business concept from inception to implementation, at least to the degree required to have a minimum viable product (MVP). Credit not given for both INFO-I 438 and I 568.
  • INFO-I 440 Human Robot Interaction (3 cr.) This course surveys the field of human-robot interaction (HRI), which involves understanding how people perceive and respond to robots and creating robots that interact naturally with people. We will discuss the design, evaluation and societal significance of interactive robots from a human-centered perspective through readings, discussion and developing HRI prototypes. Credit given for only one of INFO-I 440, H 440 or I 540.
  • INFO-H 440 Human Robot Interaction, Honors (3 cr.) This course surveys the field of human-robot interaction (HRI), which involves understanding how people perceive and respond to robots and creating robots that interact naturally with people. We will discuss the design, evaluation and societal significance of interactive robots from a human-centered perspective through readings, discussion and developing HRI prototypes. Credit given for only one of INFO-I 440, H 440 or I 540.
  • INFO-I 441 Interaction Design Practice (3 cr.) INFO-I 300 recommended. Human-computer interaction design (HCID) describes the way a person or group accomplishes tasks with a computer—what the individual or group does and how the computer responds; what the computer does and how the individual or group responds. This course is organized around a collection of readings and three design projects applying human-computer interaction principles to the design, selection, and evaluation of interactive systems.
  • INFO-I 442 Creating Virtual Assets (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 304. This course will explore advanced techniques for creating virtual assets for virtual reality applications.  Topics include 3D modeling, animation, motion capture, sound capture and editing, materials, textures, shaders, and scripting.  Students will learn how to export assets to virtual reality, augmented reality, video, still images, and 3D printed objects.
  • INFO-I 443 Building Virtual Worlds (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 304. This course will explore advanced techniques for designing and building virtual reality worlds. Topics include rigged animation, spatial sound, keyframe and procedural animation, interactivity, intelligent cameras, advanced shaders, and particle systems.  Students will develop proficiency with a variety of software tools, development methods, and creation techniques.
  • INFO-I 444 Artificial Life in Virtual Reality (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 304. This course will explore one powerful application of virtual reality: the study of life, evolution, and artificial intelligence.  Students will learn the basic building blocks of biological intelligence, how to build virtual worlds for assessing artificial intelligence, and how to populate virtual worlds with intelligent and autonomous artificial agents.
  • INFO-I 453 Computer and Information Ethics (3 cr.) Ethical and professionalization issues that arise in the context of designing and using networked information technologies and information resources. Examines frameworks for making ethical decisions, emergent technologies and their ethical implications, information/computer professionalism. Topics include privacy, intellectual property, cybercrime, games, social justice, and codes of professional ethics.
  • INFO-I 468 Network Science Applications (3 cr.) P: COGS-Q 260 or CSCI-A 201 or CSCI-C 200 or CSCI-C 211 or INFO-I 210. Friends, computers, the Web, and our brain are examples of networks that pervade our lives. Network science helps us understand complex patterns of connection, interaction, and relationships in many complex systems. Students strengthen their understanding of essential concepts, learn networks analytic tools, use models and data from social, infrastructure, and information networks.
  • INFO-I 469 Collective Intelligence (3 cr.) This course examines the phenomenon of Collective Intelligence from a computational perspective, with theory and applications in the biological, cultural, and economic domains. We will, in particular, focus on the role of social media which is enabling collective intelligence applications at previously unimagined scales.  
  • INFO-I 485 Bioinspired Computing (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 or CSCI-C 212. Biological organisms cope with the demands of their environments using solutions quite unlike the traditional human-engineered approaches to problem solving. Biological systems tend to be adaptive, reactive, and distributed. Bio-inspired computing is a field devoted to tackling complex problems using computational methods modeled after design principles encountered in nature. Credit not given for both INFO-I 485 and I 585.
  • INFO-I 486 Artificial Life (3 cr.) Artificial Life is a broad discipline encompassing the origins, modeling, and synthesis of natural and artificial living entities and systems. Artificial Intelligence, as a discipline, tries to model and understand intelligent systems and behavior, typically at the human level. Credit not given for both INFO-I 486 and I 586.
  • INFO-I 487 Introduction to Virtual Heritage (3 cr.) This course focuses on how digital technology can represent, restore, disseminate, and help with analysis of artifacts such as vases, furniture, sculpture, monuments, and buildings. Other topics covered include the history and methodologies of Virtual Heritage. Each semester a different case study will provide the focus for the course. Credit not given for both INFO-I 487 and I 587.
  • INFO-I 488 Advanced Topics in Virtual Heritage (3 cr.) This course teaches students how to create simulations of complex cultural heritage environments such as a room and its furnishings, a building, or a settlement. Also covered are the principles of restorations of art, technologies to disseminate 3D models, and the use of simulations as tools of scientific discovery. Credit not given for both INFO-I 488 and I 588.
  • INFO-I 490 Professional Practicum/Internship for Undergraduates (0 cr.) Department approval. Provides for participation in professional training and internship experience.
  • INFO-I 491 Capstone Project Internship (3-6 cr.) P: INFO-I 211 and I 308. Department approval. Students put their informatics education in practice through the development of a substantial project while working in a professional information technology environment. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • INFO-I 492 Senior Thesis (3 cr.) All required core courses must be completed. Department approval. The senior student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial, typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned research or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member.
  • INFO-I 493 Senior Thesis (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 492. Department approval. The senior student prepares and presents a thesis: a substantial, typically multichapter paper based on a well-planned research or scholarly project, as determined by the student and a sponsoring faculty member.
  • INFO-I 494 Design and Development of an Information System (3 cr.) P: All required core courses must be completed. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world-style environment. Credit not given for both INFO-I 494 and H 494.
  • INFO-H 494 Design and Development of an Information System, Honors (3 cr.) P: All required core courses must be completed. All required core courses must be completed. Honors version of INFO-I 494. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world-style environment. Credit not given for both INFO-H 494 and I 494.
  • INFO-I 495 Design and Development of an Information System (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 494. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world-style environment. Credit not given for both INFO-I 495 and H 495.
  • INFO-H 495 Design and Development of an Information System, Honors (3 cr.) P: INFO-I 494. Honors version of INFO-I 495. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world-style environment. Credit not given for both INFO-H 495 and I 495.
  • INFO-H 498 Honors Seminar (1-3 cr.) Junior or senior major in INFO with GPA at least 3.3 or permission of instructor. A survey of faculty research in computer related fields with different professors discussing their research each week. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • INFO-I 499 Readings and Research in Informatics (1-3 cr.) Department approval. Independent readings and research related to a topic of special interest to the student. Written report required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of INFO-I 499 and H 499.
  • INFO-H 499 Readings and Research in Informatics, Honors (1-3 cr.) Department approval. Honors version of INFO-I 499. Independent readings and research related to a topic of special interest to the student. Written report required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours for any combination of INFO-I 499 and H 499.
  • INFO-T 100 Topics in Informatics Technology (1-3 cr.) Variable topic. The course serves as an introduction to a specific information technology in a hands-on setting. Emphasis is on problem solving techniques using technology. Credit hours may not be applied toward satisfying major requirements in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.
  • INFO-Y 100 Exploring Informatics and Computer Science (1 cr.) Technology is everywhere and how it relates to the world today is very important to the future. The objective of this course is to offer students an opportunity to explore the many tracks within the fields of Informatics, Computer Science, and Engineering while also learning about the multiple careers available to students majoring in the fields. Emphasis will be placed on the various ways technology affects the work world and how students can tailor a major to their individual interests. The course will promote a hands-on, interactive and self-reflective course environment. Offered as either a six or eight week course.
  • INFO-Y 101 Technology Leadership and Innovation (1.5 cr.) This course will focus on developing student leaders by providing resources and tools to empower them in setting goals, teamwork, communication, and decision-making skills. Students will have an opportunity to interact and develop relationships with School of Informatics and Computing faculty, staff, alumni, upper class students, and conduct research.
  • INFO-Y 102 Technology Leadership and Innovation II (1.5 cr.) P: INFO-Y 101. The focus of this course will be on developing you as a professional and a future leader. Topics addressed will include professional identity development; working in a diverse team; leadership in a global/multinational workforce; the role of social media; and the process and development of professional mentor relationships.  
  • INFO-Y 395 Career Development for Informatics Majors (1 cr.) Helps students develop skills and knowledge to successfully pursue a career search, both at the time of graduation and as they progress through their careers. The course covers techniques and strategies to make the job search more efficient and effective. An eight-week course. Credit not given for both INFO-Y 395 and CSCI-Y 395.

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