Courses

Applied Health Science
Behavioral, Social, and Community Health - SPH-B
  • SPH-B 150 Introduction to Public Health (3 cr.) Focuses on rationale, history and development of public health in the U.S. and globally. Emphasis on underlying theories, scientific, and social basis for public health practice plus the impact of critical public health concerns on society. Professional disciplines, organizations, and methods that interact to improve the public’s health are addressed.
  • SPH-B 310 Health Care in Diverse Communities (3 cr.) Provides knowledge of health risk factors, health care, and prevention challenges promoting a disparate impact of disease on certain American populations. Students examine health policy, program and educational interventions addressing these groups with special needs.
  • SPH-B 315 Health in the Later Years (3 cr.) As aging becomes a public health priority, an interdisciplinary consideration of the health issues of older adults is critical. This course reviews the biology of aging, health care, new research in aging, applications of integrative medicine for older adults, and physical activity and aging.
  • SPH-B 325 Health, Informatics, and Aging (3 cr.) Reviews how health in later life can be supported by technology. Concepts include: pervasive and ubiquitous computing; human-centered design; virtual worlds; fitness; chronic illness; and models, prototypes, and applications of technologies. Students develop entrepreneurial business plans for potential funding. Guest presentations from Informatics, Nursing, and Kinesiology.
  • SPH-B 335 Aging, Health, and Diverse Populations (3 cr.) This online course examines contemporary issues in the rapidly aging population. Topics include aging issues among diverse populations, women's aging experience, and the aging baby boomer cohort. Students develop plans to address the health needs of selected aging populations.
  • SPH-B 350 Topical Seminar in Public Health Education (1–3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of public health education. Possible topics for this seminar are aging, environmental health, teenage health problems, health problems of ethnic groups, public health administration, and group dynamics. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-B 354 Multidisciplinary Perspectives in Gerontology (3 cr.) This course is an overview of the areas involved in the study of aging. We will consider the major theoretical approaches and current research in aging in the following areas: biology and health, psychology, sociology, and social policy.
  • SPH-B 366 Community Health (3 cr.) Introduction to community health within the public health context. Students will develop an understanding of historical and theoretical foundations of community health and major societal health concerns, explore community health models and programs used to address these concerns, and examine racial/ethnic, cultural, socioeconomical, and related determinants of community health.
  • SPH-B 403 Public Health Program Planning (3 cr.) P: HPER-C 366 and junior/senior status. Skill building in public health and health promotion program planning, including proposal presentations. Topics include program planning models, needs assessment methods, behavior change theories, types of community organization, social marketing principles, program implementation fundamentals, and evaluation techniques.
  • SPH-B 416 Introduction to Health Counseling (3 cr.) Reviews recent developments in mental health; implications for public health and school health programs; and roles of health educators in supportive listening, crisis intervention, and appropriate counseling and referral strategies for contemporary health issues.
  • SPH-B 491 Readings in Public Health Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Planned readings in public health education under the direction of a member of the faculty. Enrollment is limited to seniors or advanced juniors who are majors in the department. Readings proposal must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 492 Research in Public Health Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Field experience through on-the-job and related opportunities in public health. Students will be assigned to official, primary care, voluntary and related health agencies offering opportunities for professional development, practical application of skills, and participatory experience for the health educator. Regular critique will be held with supervisors and written progress reports are required. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 496 Field Experience in Public Health Education (1–10 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Field experience through on-the-job and related opportunities in public health. Students will be assigned to official, primary care, voluntary and related health agencies offering opportunities for professional development, practical application of skills, and participatory experience for the health educator. Regular critique will be held with supervisors and written progress reports are required. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 501 Assessment and Planning in Public Health (3 cr.) Principles of community health assessment and program planning in public health, including: social and epidemiological assessment; identification and prioritization of health issues, behaviors, and behavioral determinants; administrative and policy assessment; and planning for program implementation and evaluation; and evaluation including personnel management and resource acquisition.
  • SPH-B 514 Health Education in Occupational Settings (3 cr.) Approaches to developing comprehensive employee health education and health promotion programs in occupational settings. Topics include health risk appraisal; program design, implementation, and evaluation; employee health networks; and special instructional methods appropriate for the workplace. Reviews model employee health education programs from business and industry.
  • SPH-B 515 Health Education in Clinical Settings (3 cr.) An extensive study of health education programs in clinical settings, including historical background, recent legislation, health care delivery systems, roles and responsibilities of the educator, patient representation, program planning, and evaluation strategies. Examines instructional techniques and materials and reviews model programs. Field visitations may be required.
  • SPH-B 516 Introduction to Health Counseling (3 cr.) Reviews recent developments in mental health; implications for public health and school health programs; roles of health educators in supportive listening, crisis intervention, and appropriate counseling and referral strategies for contemporary health issues; and the development of health counseling as an evolving component of public health and medical care systems.
  • SPH-B 517 Workshop in Public Health (1–3 cr.) Interesting topics of relevance to individuals in public health are conducted in workshop fashion under the direction of faculty members. Emphasis on practical application, group involvement, and the use of resource personnel. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 518 The Nature of Addictive Disorders (3 cr.) Focus on understanding contemporary theories of addiction including behavioral, psychological, biological, physiological, social/cultural, and other approaches. Topics covered include addictions found in youth/adults (e.g., drugs, sex, eating, Internet, gambling, work). Upon completion, students will demonstrate knowledge of addiction theories and the factors underlying addictive behaviors.
  • SPH-B 529 Health and Disease Disparities in Diverse Communities (3 cr.) Cultural and socioeconomic factors, gender, age, and regional factors all affect disparities in the health status of certain U.S. populations. Students evaluate research in social, behavioral, and health care use predictors of community health and develop strategies for public health, health service, policy, and other interventions for specific groups.
  • SPH-B 535 Contemporary Issues in Aging and Health (3 cr.) This online course examines aging issues and health inequalities among diverse populations, women's aging and health experiences, and the prospects for the aging baby boomer cohort. Graduate students evaluate the effectiveness of current public health programs and policies in meeting the needs of the rapidly growing diverse older adult population.
  • SPH-B 589 Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health (3 cr.) Role of social and behavioral factors in health will be examined. Selected theories, concepts, and models from individual, interpersonal, organizational, and social levels will be discussed with applications to health promotion and behavior change programs for diverse public health problems, populations, and settings.
  • SPH-B 602 Intervention Design in Public Health (3 cr.) P: SPH-B 589 and SPH-B 501, or equivalents. Designing and selecting public health promotion interventions and programs which are grounded in theory, based on data, and appropriate to the setting and community. Emphasis on social and behavioral interventions.
  • SPH-B 615 Health, Longevity and Integrative Therapies for the Later Years (3 cr.) This interdisciplinary online course reviews health care, the biology of aging, new research in aging, and applications of integrative medicine for older adults. Students evaluate comparative effectiveness of integrative therapies and allopathic medicine for common chronic illnesses in the rapidly growing older adult population and critically analyze the "anti-aging" industry.
  • SPH-B 625 Health Information Systems, Technology, and Aging (3 cr.) Develops leadership in technologies and information systems that support and promote health and independence in later life.  Students evaluate and apply theoretical constructs including person-environment fit, human-centered design, privacy, ethics, and usability in developing a business plan for presentation to venture capitalists.  Builds competencies in communication, informatics, technology, and design.
  • SPH-B 630 Sexual and Reproductive Health Surveillance (3 cr.) In-depth orientation to the major methods and systems used for purposes of sexual and reproductive health surveillance, with a focus on the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data essential to planning, implementing, and evaluating efforts to promote sexual and reproductive health.
  • SPH-B 632 Sexual Health: Contemporary Discoveries and Controversies (3 cr.) This course involves in-depth explorations of research and conceptual frameworks in the field of sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on recent scientific discoveries, contemporary controversies, new technologies relevant to sexual and reproductive health, and relevant ethical issues in society.
  • SPH-B 634 Sexual Health Research and Evaluation: Methods and Approaches (3 cr.) Sexual health scientists ask a range of unique questions which require tailored methods and approaches to answer. Through a combination of independent readings and interactive discussions, lectures and guest speakers, and student-led presentations, we will gain an understanding of the major elements of sexual health research, interventions, and practice.
  • SPH-B 642 Operational Research and Management Science in Public Health (3 cr.) Focuses on improving the operations of health services organizations, reducing resources utilization and decision making tools (statistical/math tools) for managing healthcare organizations (hospitals and senior houses). Introduces a variety of tools to increase throughput, optimize response time, and create considerable value in healthcare sectors.
  • SPH-B 650 Seminar in Public Health (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Contemporary topics in the area of public health are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-B 675 Practicum in Public Health (1-5 cr.) P: Permission of academic advisor. Students pursuing a graduate certificate in public health develop and apply knowledge and skills in appropriate professional settings. Practicum experiences must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit
  • SPH-B 691 Readings in Public Health (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students, and reading proposals must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 692 Research in Public Health (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students, and project proposals must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Behavioral, Social, and Community Health (1–7 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Behavioral, Social, and Community Health (1–3 cr.) P: Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the Fall SPH-B 698 course. Enrollment in the Spring SPH-B 698 course requires successful completion (passing grade) of the Fall SPH-B 698 course. C: SPH-B 696 and permission of academic advisor. This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Behavioral, Social, and Community Health. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 701 Advanced Health Behavior Theory for Research (3 cr.) P: SPH-B 589 or other graduate course in health-behavior theory; restricted to doctoral students. An analysis of the role of health behavior theory in research. Emphasis on exploring the conceptual and methodological issues associated with theory-based research and developing a proposal for a theory-based research project.
  • SPH-B 702 Advanced Evaluation Research in Public Health (3 cr.) P: Restricted to doctoral students. Permission of instructor is required. This course provides students with advanced knowledge of and skills in evaluation research in public health program, policies and interventions. Topics include logic models, research designs, measurement, data collection, and advanced statistical and economic evaluation methods.
  • SPH-B 703 Acquiring External Funds for Research (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required for enrollment. This course provides doctoral students with a basic understanding of how to apply for external funding for research. The final product is a grant proposal that students could use to apply for funding to support their work. This course is restricted to doctoral students.
  • SPH-B 784 Advanced Seminar in Public Health (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0 and advanced graduate student status. Advanced topics in the area of public health are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-B 794 Doctoral Seminar in Public Health (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0 and doctoral student status. Research techniques in public health are reviewed, and examples of current and completed research projects and other professional literature are critiqued. Particular attention is given to dissertations being planned or in progress.
Health Education - SPH-H
  • SPH-H 150 Children's Health up to Age 5 (3 cr.) The course focuses on recent research on infant feeding and sleeping needs. Causes, prevention and management of the health and safety problems of pre-school aged children are presented. Emphasis is on health and social service agencies.
  • SPH-H 160 First Aid and Emergency Care (3 cr.) Course addresses cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rescue breathing, choking, wounds, bleeding, burns, sudden illnesses, musculoskeletal injuries, and defibrillation/ the use of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs). Skills are practiced in small lab settings. Students may obtain American Red Cross certifications, including CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer.
  • SPH-H 161 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for P-12 Teachers (1 cr.) Through online learning and in-person skills-testing students are eligible to obtain American Red Cross CPR certification needed to meet state teaching license requirements. For those students who have not taken or are currently enrolled in H160.
  • SPH-H 170 Health and Surviving the College Years (3 cr.) This course covers the health and wellness issues related to a student's transition from high school to college. It focuses on education and prevention issues and includes the following topics: stress, sexuality, safety, substance use and abuse, fitness, nutrition, budgeting, and emotional health.
  • SPH-H 172 International Health and Social Issues (3 cr.) Covers world health problems and efforts being made to achieve optimal health for all. Exposes students to health concerns of non-Western and nondominant cultures. Population dynamics, vital statistics, global disease patterns, and analysis of variations among nations will be considered in analyzing health status of people and communities around the world.
  • SPH-H 174 Prevention of Violence in American Society (3 cr.) Provides a managerial understanding of ecological concepts, resource management practices, and resource policies related to natural resource/land management. Focus on allocation of resources, carrying capacity, resource protection, and environmental impacts of uses on natural resources.
  • SPH-H 180 Stress Prevention and Management (3 cr.) This course is designed to help students learn about the body's reaction to perceived stress, mental and physical factors related to stress, and effective coping techniques to help mitigate causes of stress. Students may acquire several stress management techniques that include diaphragmatic breathing, visualization, meditation, and progressive muscular relaxation.
  • SPH-H 205 Introduction to Health Education (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the profession of health education. Topics addressed in the course include historical perspectives, practice settings, career opportunities, professional ethics, trends, and current issues. Emphasis will also be placed on the relationship between community and school health.
  • SPH-H 220 Death and Dying (3 cr.) Introductory analysis of the dying and death experience with emphasis on the development of a healthy personal death awareness. Topics include processes of dying, needs and care of the dying person, grief, legal and consumer aspects, and children and death.
  • SPH-H 235 Obesity and Health (3 cr.) An introduction to the physiological, social, cultural, and behavioral aspects of health weight management and obesity prevention. Topics will also include the impact of obesity on individual, family, and community health.
  • SPH-H 263 Personal Health (3 cr.) This survey course provides a theoretical and practical treatment of the concepts of disease prevention and health promotion. Covers such topics as emotional health; aging and death; alcohol, tobacco, and drug abuse; physical fitness; nutrition and dieting; consumer health; chronic and communicable diseases; safety; and environmental health.
  • SPH-H 304 Healthy Children: Breastfeeding Promotion in Global Communities (3 cr.) Course focuses on breastfeeding promotion in global communities. Includes social, cultural and behavioral influences on women's breastfeeding practices, support of mothers to maintain human milk production, and their influence on women and children's health.
  • SPH-H 305 Women’s Health (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to examine the relationship of women to health and health care. Five dimensions of health:  physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual provide a framework for comparison and contrast of health concerns unique to women and common to both sexes at all ages.
  • SPH-H 306 Men’s Health (3 cr.) This course provides an overview of male health issues. Course topics include gender as a factor in men's health behavior and risks, the way men perceive and use their bodies, and men's psychological experience of health, wellness, and illness.
  • SPH-H 315 Consumer Health (3 cr.) This course provides students with (1) a model for making informed consumer health related decisions; (2) current information involving consumer related topics, emphasizing necessity of current information for making informed decisions; (3) mechanisms for continued consumer awareness and protection, i.e., sources of accurate consumer information and lists of consumer information and protection agencies.
  • SPH-H 318 Drug Use in American Society (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary approach to the study of drug use in American society. The course will examine the effects of alcohol, tobacco, and the "illicit'' drugs on the physical, mental, and social health of the individuals.
  • SPH-H 319 Global Health Promotion (3 cr.) This course examines the combination of behavioral, social, economic, and environmental factors that influence health and enables students to develop knowledge and skills they can use throughout their lives to protect and improve their own health, the health of their families, and health of communities in which they will live.
  • SPH-H 320 The Nature of Cancer (3 cr.) This course deals mainly with primary and secondary prevention of cancer.  Various topics include lifestyle and cancer, causes of cancer, types of cancer, methods of detecting cancer, methods of treating cancer, and public attitudes. Discusses economic and psychological problems involved with cancer.
  • SPH-H 326 AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (3 cr.) An introductory, nontechnical examination of the biological, medical, social, psychological, and ethical aspects of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), HIV infection, and other sexually transmitted diseases.
  • SPH-H 330 Human Sexuality Education in Diverse Settings (3 cr.) P: Minimum grade of B in SPH-F 255 Human Sexuality or equivalent. To prepare students to plan, implement, and evaluate human sexuality education in a variety of settings. Topics include exploring issues which impact human sexuality education in academic and community-based settings.
  • SPH-H 334 Heart Health and Diabetes (3 cr.) Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. Examined are preventive individual lifestyle and public health intervention resources addressing knowledge and skills related to risk factors of tobacco use, diet/obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension and diabetes.
  • SPH-H 345 Introduction to Causes and Prevention of Developmental Disabilities (3 cr.) Introductory evaluation of genetic (chromosomal, monogenic and polygenic) and acquired (environmental: drugs, alcohol, tobacco, infections, nutrition, obesity, fertility, teenage parents) causes of low birth weight and disabilities present at birth; special emphasis on early identification of high risk families and means available for prevention via education and intervention and correction.
  • SPH-H 350 Topical Seminar in Health Education (1–3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of health education. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-H 351 Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Health (3 cr.) This course discusses traditional health practices used as primary health care by 65 to 85 percent of the world's population. Discussion and activities will center on enhancing awareness of complementary and alternative practices such as acupressure, acupuncture, aromatherapy, biomagnetic applications, chiropractics, herbology/botanicals, homeopathy, meditation, and naturopathy.
  • SPH-H 352 Secondary School Health Curriculum and Strategies (3 cr.) P: Admission to the School of Education Teacher Education Program and SPH-H 205 with grade of S. C: Must take concurrently with SPH-H 353. Professional competencies for planning and implementing secondary school curricula based on assessed needs. Effective curriculum characteristics, content standards, instructional strategies, curriculum analysis, lesson and unit structures. Preparation of lesson and unit plans.
  • SPH-H 353 Field Observation (1 cr.) C: Must take concurrently with SPH-H 352. Observation and limited participation in a secondary school with a designated health teacher for a minimum of 20 clock hours. Students compile logs and summaries of their experiences.
  • SPH-H 385 Practicum in College Death Education (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Examination of death education strategies and leading group discussions for SPH-H 220 Death and Dying.
  • SPH-H 395 Practicum in College Sex Education (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Examination of sexuality education strategies and leading group discussions for SPH-F 255 Human Sexuality.
  • SPH-H 401 Emergency Medical Technician (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 160 C: Must take concurrently with SPH-H 404 EMT Lab. This class prepares the students to care for patients in a variety of emergency settings. In order to take the Indiana State EMT Certification exam, students must complete this course and SPH-H 404 and be at least 18 years of age.
  • SPH-H 403 Emergency Medical Technician Teaching Assistant (1–2 cr.) P: SPH-H 401 or equivalent training. This course is directed toward the instruction of emergency medical technician skills. The student comes to class with EMT training and provides skills assistance to EMT students. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 404 Emergency Medical Technician Lab (1 cr.) C: SPH-H 401 The EMT Lab teaches skills necessary to care for patients in the prehospital setting. It includes automated defibrillation, airway adjuncts, oxygen delivery, managing wounds, and other procedures. Students complete evaluations under the instruction of certified EMTs. Meets the Department of Transportation and Public Safety Institute standards.
  • SPH-H 414 Health Education in Pre-K Grade 6 (3 cr.) Practical guidelines for developing health and safety education programs in Pre-K-Grade 6, including current child health problems, health content standards, critical topics in health instruction, curriculum development, lesson and unit planning, innovative approaches to health teaching, and evaluation.
  • SPH-H 418 The Nature of Addiction (3 cr.) Addresses contemporary theories of addiction including behavioral, psychological, biological, physiological, social/cultural, and other approaches. Examines addictions found among youth and adults including tobacco, alcohol, other drugs, sex, eating, Internet, gambling, and work. Upon completion, students will demonstrate knowledge of addiction theories and the factors underlying addictive behaviors.
  • SPH-H 445 Travel Study (1–10 cr.) P: Permission of sponsor. Planned study tours of school and public health programs throughout the United States and selected foreign countries are conducted under the direction of a faculty sponsor. Specific tours vary.
  • SPH-H 452 Secondary School Health Instruction and Assessment (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 352 with grade of C or better. C: SPH-H 453 Professional competencies related to classroom management, managing controversy, assessment and course planning. Analysis and demonstration of proven curricula. Skill development in assessment tool development and curriculum planning.
  • SPH-H 453 Microteaching Lab for Health Education (1 cr.) C: SPH-P 452 Application of professional competencies through presentation of secondary-level lesson segments and complete lessons. Emphasis on use of active-learner teaching strategies. Student presentations are recorded and critiqued.
  • SPH-H 460 Practicum in First Aid Instruction (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 160 or equivalent. Students will learn instructional techniques for first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and automated external defibrillation (AED). Students assist with SPH-H 160 labs and other teaching experiences. Completion of the course makes students eligible for American Red Cross Instructor authorization.
  • SPH-H 464 Coordinated School Health Programs (3 cr.) Focuses on the coordinated school health program (CSHP) model components, and coordination. Includes the relationship of CSHP to health and education policy. Emphasis on practical application of organizational principles and school health strategies for addressing current student and staff health issues.
  • SPH-H 481 Readings in Health and Safety (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor Permission; Readings proposal must be approved in advance. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interest to be conducted under the direction of a member of the faculty. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 482 Research in Health and Safety Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Undergraduate research done in the field of health and safety under a faculty advisor in the department. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 494 Research and Evaluation Methods in Health and Safety (3 cr.) This course deals with general concepts and foundations of measurement, evaluation, and research.  Additionally the course covers major methods and techniques of research and evaluation. Special emphasis is given to writing small research and grant proposals.
  • SPH-H 500 Philosophy and Principles of Health Education (3 cr.) The philosophy and principles that provide the foundation for health and safety education as academic disciplines, including history of the professions, theories of health behavior, principles of learning applied to health communications, diffusion and adoption in health promotion, professional preparation, and areas of professional specialization.
  • SPH-H 502 Instructional Strategies for School and College Health (3 cr.) Application of innovative strategies for the teaching of health education. Attention is given to conceptualizing instruction, specifying instructional objectives, planning units and lessons, utilizing various instructional methods, selecting and using instructional materials, and evaluating teaching effectiveness.
  • SPH-H 504 Breastfeeding: Practice and Policy (3 cr.) This course focuses on breastfeeding practice and policy.  Strategies for planning program design to improve breastfeeding practices along with different interventions for supporting breastfeeding in the community are discussed. World Health Organization (WHO) policies and recommendations on breastfeeding practice are also highlighted.
  • SPH-H 510 Organization of School Health Programs (3 cr.) Consideration of the coordinated school health program (CSHP) as a health promotion model that contributes to both health and education outcomes. Addresses the role and function of CSHP at the national, state, and local levels. Includes strategies for addressing child and adolescent health across multiple program components.
  • SPH-H 511 Advanced Emergency Care (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 160 or equivalent. This graduate course includes research in emergency care, teaching techniques for first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); and automated external defibrillators (AEDs); and assisting with SPH-H 160 labs. Students who complete the course become eligible for American Red Cross Instructor authorization.
  • SPH-H 512 Understanding the Medicated Student/Client (3 cr.) A nonmedical introduction for teachers, administrators, agency personnel, and others who work with children or adults on sustaining prescription medications. Examines how such medications affect the performance of students or clients. Additional topics include drug actions, interactions, indications, contraindications, and side effects.
  • SPH-H 514 Health Education Pedagogy in Pre-K and Elementary Years (3 cr.) Designed to assure that pre-service and in-service teachers acquire the knowledge and essential skills to implement effective health education curricula. Topics include: current child health problems, health content standards, effective teaching strategies, developmentally appropriate content, curriculum development, lesson and unit planning, evaluation, and integration of health topics into traditional subjects.
  • SPH-H 515 Human Sexuality Education in Schools (3 cr.) Competencies in human sexuality education are identified for teachers, administrators, nurses, and other school personnel. Specific activities include developing a comprehensive vocabulary in human sexuality education, establishing effective communication skills, and reviewing various educational techniques and materials relevant to the teaching of human sexuality.
  • SPH-H 518 Alcohol and Drug Education (3 cr.) Alcohol and drug abuse in American society are probed in a comprehensive yet practical manner. Physiological, psychological, sociological, theological, and legal dimensions of the issue are explored through lectures, group discussions, guest speakers, and audio-visual presentations. Discusses principles of teaching and counseling in drug education programs.
  • SPH-H 519 Contemporary Issues in Health Promotion (3 cr.) Surveys a variety of contemporary issues related to lifestyle and health behavior, including Centers for Disease Control and prevention priority health risks. Social, economic, and environmental factors that influence health promotion, such as poverty, social capital, and mass communication, etc., will also be discussed.
  • SPH-H 520 Death Education (3 cr.) Helps prepare educators and health-related personnel dealing with death education and/or dying and death in the work setting. Educational methodology and materials, helping/supportive strategies, and background content about death and dying.
  • SPH-H 521 Consumer Health (3 cr.) Consumer decision-making models, interpretation and assessment of available information related to consumer issues, and identification of consumer awareness and protection resources. Emphasis on the health educator's role in a consumer-based society.
  • SPH-H 522 Promoting Women’s Health (3 cr.) Examines the relationships of women to health and health care, with attention to health concerns unique to women and common to both sexes throughout the life span. Emphasizes current information related to women's health issues and the health educator's role in women's health.
  • SPH-H 524 Gerontology: Multidisciplinary Perspectives (3 cr.) An overview of areas in the study of aging, focusing on health, psychological aspects, and policy issues. Includes theoretical approaches to aging and current research in these areas. In-depth literature reviews provide focus and enhanced knowledge of chosen areas.
  • SPH-H 526 AIDS and Other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (3 cr.) In-depth examination of the health and social impact of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases in the United States and worldwide, with particular attention to theoretical models of individual prevention behavior.
  • SPH-H 528 Issues in Substance Abuse (3 cr.) Various drugs including alcohol, sedative-hypnotics; narcotic-analgesics; cocaine; xanthines; cannabis; hallucinogens; and over-the-counter, prescription, and other substances causing health problems in our culture are identified and discussed. Emphasis on history, symptoms of use and abuse, and the role of the health educator in prevention and referral.
  • SPH-H 530 International Health (3 cr.) Major trends and issues related to international health, including health care systems, nutrition, family planning, distribution and nature of communicable and chronic diseases, and preventive measures in selected countries. Special emphasis on problems that can be prevented through health education programs.
  • SPH-H 550 Workshop in Health Education (1–3 cr.) Interesting topics of relevance to individuals in school and public health and related disciplines are conducted in workshop fashion under the direction of faculty members. Emphasizes practical application, group involvement, and the use of resource personnel. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-H 552 Instructional Planning for Public Health Settings (3 cr.) Planning for implementation of innovative approaches to health instruction in diverse public heath settings.  Learners acquire skills for conceptualizing and targeting instruction; specifying instructional objectives; planning lessons and units; utilizing effective instructional methods; selecting instructional materials; and evaluating teaching effectiveness.
  • SPH-H 555 Issues in Human Sexuality and Health (3 cr.) Issues, problems, and scientific concepts of human sexual expression in contemporary society, with particular attention to their relationships to individual health and the development of a healthy sexuality.
  • SPH-H 562 Health Program Evaluation (3 cr.) P: Previous program planning course/ experience; Permission of advisor. Identifies relevant evaluation concepts, measures, models, and techniques. Presents utilization-focused strategies for communicating program theory, involving relevant stakeholders, analyzing data, and reporting results.
  • SPH-H 585 Practicum in College Death Education (3 cr.) Includes the study of death education methodology, preparation of learning activities dealing with death and dying, evaluation of student papers, and leading discussion sections of SPH-H 220 Death and Dying.
  • SPH-H 595 Practicum in College Sex Education (3 cr.) Includes the study of sexuality education methodology, preparation of learning activities dealing with human sexuality, evaluation of student papers, and leading discussion sections of SPH-F 255 Human Sexuality.
  • SPH-H 599 Master's Thesis (1–5 cr.) P: School approval of the student's master's thesis committee membershiip. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 601 Curriculum Development for School and College Health (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 502 with B– or higher. The theory and practice of curriculum development in health education, including philosophy and principles of curriculum development; scheduling and sequence of health instruction; yearly, unit, and lesson planning; course of study preparation; evaluation strategies; and practical procedures for organizing a curriculum development project.
  • SPH-H 610 Professional Applications in Health Education (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 552 Learners acquire or enhance the skills and knowledge needed to implement public health education programs in diverse settings. Students will build skills for applied settings needed to fund, conceptualize, design, deliver, and evaluate programs consistent with health education concepts.
  • SPH-H 623 School Health Program Management (3 cr.) P: SPH-H 510 or equivalent with a B– or better. Focuses on knowledge and skills to manage a local school health program, with emphasis on systems change theory, needs assessment, program planning, program management, coalition development, team building, social marketing and advocacy, policy development and implementation, and long-term sustainability.
  • SPH-H 633 Advanced Instructional Methods in Sexual and Reproductive Health Education (3 cr.) P: SPH-H350 Teaching Methods in Human Sexuality Education or equivalent. Students develop pedagogical competencies aligned with professional standards, and encompassing emerging technologies and applications, required to deliver sexual and reproductive health education to diverse populations. Intended for prospective and practicing educators and health care workers for, and in, public health settings, including primary and secondary schools.
  • SPH-H 635 Health Promotion in the 21st Century (3 cr.) Health promotion has evolved as a major strategy to improve population health. WHO defined it as enabling people to increase control over, and improve their health. The course provides health professionals with theoretical, technical, organizational, economic, political, and systems skills to establish and evaluate health promotion programs domestically and internationally.
  • SPH-H 645 Travel Study (3 cr.) P: Permission of sponsor. Planned study tours of school and public health programs throughout the United States and selected foreign countries are conducted under the direction of a faculty sponsor. Specific tours vary. Only S/F grades given.
  • SPH-H 650 Seminar in Health Education (1–3 cr.) Contemporary topics in the area of health education are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-H 653 Practicum in School Health Management (3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3. Permission of Instructor. Practicum experiences must be approved in advance. Culminating practical management experiences are completed in appropriate school settings under direction of a faculty member. Seminars are held periodically throughout the practicum. Evaluation is on an S/F basis only.
  • SPH-H 661 Legal Issues in Public Health (3 cr.)

    Role of constitution, legislatures, agencies, courts, and public in shaping public health policy. Includes Constitutional authority, limits on governmental intervention, tensions between protecting society's interests and preserving individual rights, reading legal documents, recognizing legal issues, communicating with attorneys, and strategies to increase public understanding and influence on laws affecting health.

  • SPH-H 662 Acquiring & Managing External Funds for Health and Human Services (3 cr.) Develop skills to acquire and manage external funds for health and human services research and development in academic, public-, not-for-profit, and private-sector agencies, including establishing a research or development career trajectory; identifying sources of funds in areas of interest; preparing a proposal and budget for funding; and managing funded projects.
  • SPH-H 681 Readings in Health Education (1–5 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Permision of instructor. Reading proposals must be approved in advance. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students, Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 682 Research in Health Education (1–5 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 685 Practicum in Health (1–10 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Practicum experiences must be approved in advance. Practical learning experiences are completed in appropriate professional settings under the direction of a faculty member. Seminars are held periodically throughout the practicum. Evaluation is on an S/F basis only. Repeatable for up to 10 credits.
  • SPH-H 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Professional Health Education (1–7 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Internship experiences must be approved in advance. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in public health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only.
  • SPH-H 697 Internships in Health Promotion (3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Internship experiences must be approved in advance. Professional internships in school or agency settings are completed under the direction of a faculty member. Internship experiences are available only upon completion of course work for a master's degree. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Professional Health Education (1–3 cr.) P: Permission of academic advisor; Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall SPH-H 698 course. Enrollment in the spring SPH-H 698 course requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall SPH-H 698 course. C: SPH-H 696 This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Professional Health Education. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-H 710 Pedagogy in Health Behavior (3 cr.) Provides doctoral students with knowledge required to think critically about teaching practice and enhance pedagogical skills. Rooted in the scholarship of teaching and learning, will help students prepare for teaching, feel more comfortable in the classroom, and utilize pedagogical best practices in a supportive environment.
  • SPH-H 750 Advanced Seminar in Health Behavior (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0 and advanced graduate student status. Advanced topics in the area of health behavior are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-H 764 Doctoral Seminar in Health Education (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Reviews research techniques in health education and critiques examples of current and completed research projects and other professional literature. Particular attention is given to dissertations being planned or in progress. Only S/F grades given.
  • SPH-H 791 Readings in Health Behavior (1–10 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Reading proposals must be approved in advance. Planned readings in the area of health behavior are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced doctoral students. Repeatable up to 10 credits.
  • SPH-H 792 Research in Health Behavior (1–10 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Project proposals must be approved in advance. Research projects in the area of health behavior are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced doctoral students. Repeatable for up to 10 credits.
  • SPH-H 799 Ph.D. Dissertation (1–30 cr.) Repeatable for credit.
Human Development and Family Studies - SPH-F
  • SPH-F 150 Introduction to Life Span Human Development (3 cr.) How individuals interact with family units and society and how family and society influence the development of the individual across the life span.
  • SPH-F 180 Survey and Practice with Youth and Families (3 cr.) This course prepares students for the professional practice of serving youth and families in public, health, education, recreation and social settings. Course concepts include youth and family services delivery settings, theoretical frameworks related to youth services, and professional ethics, organizations, and credentialing. This course includes a service learning component.
  • SPH-F 255 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) Survey of the dynamics of human sexuality; identification and examination of basic issues in human sexuality as relating to the larger society.
  • SPH-F 258 Marriage and Family Interaction (3 cr.) Basic personal and social factors influencing the achievement of satisfying marriage and family experiences.
  • SPH-F 330 Leadership Theory and Practice in Youth Development (3 cr.) Youth professionals work in a wide variety of public, private, and non-profit agencies. Students will engage in an examination of organizational leadership theory and research. This knowledge will then be utilized as students engage in case projects that are initiated from real-world leadership challenges occurring in community youth-serving agencies.
  • SPH-F 341 Effects of Divorce on Children (3 cr.) Examination of how divorce affects children. The class focuses on how to minimize these effects. The class includes both in- and out-of-class experiential exercises.
  • SPH-F 345 Parent-Child Relations (3 cr.) Explores issues associated with parenting and addresses the reciprocal processes and interdependencies among parents, children, and their multiple environments.
  • SPH-F 346 Human Development I—Conception through Early Childhood (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258, or equivalent. Examination of prenatal, infant, preschool development; physical, cognitive, and social-emotional characteristics of development.
  • SPH-F 347 Human Development II—Middle Childhood through Adolescence (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258, or equivalent. Examines human development during the school years, or middle childhood, through adolescence. Addresses major concepts and issues concerning development, in the physical, cognitive, psychological, and social domains.
  • SPH-F 348 Human Development III—Early, Mid, and Late Adulthood (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258, or equivalent. Examination of the development of adults as a dynamic process that continues throughout life, in the biological, cognitive, psychological, and social realms. Emphasizes developmental reciprocity between adults and their multiple environments.
  • SPH-F 350 Topical Seminar in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of human development and family studies. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-F 355 Leading Family Process Discussion Groups (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 258 with B or higher and interview with professor. This course is intended to give students an opportunity, under supervision, to lead a discussion group in family process. Students will guide small group discussion on a variety of family-related topics and assist with various administrative tasks related to that discussion. Repeatable once for credit.
  • SPH-F 370 Family Health and the Media (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 258 or equivalent. Course explores the relationship between media and family mental, social, and cultural health dynamics. A diversity of family depictions will be addressed. Media explored will include, but not be limited to, film, television, Internet, video games, and popular music.
  • SPH-F 410 The Science of Positive Youth DevelopmentTitle (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, Positive Youth Development (PYD) focuses on improving competence, confidence, character, connection, and caring among youth. Students will learn the origins of PYD, how its principles are applied in the development of youth focused programs, and review research on how PYD impacts youth.
  • SPH-F 417 African American and Latino Families (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258. Enacts a strength-based approach in the examination of African American and Latino family structure in a socio-historical context with emphasis on cultural resiliency. Current statistics, scholarly literature, and American media segments will be used to illustrate aspects of cultural perception.
  • SPH-F 430 Professional Preparation in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) P: Major in human development and family studies; junior/senior standing; P or concurrent: 18 hours of SPH-F courses. Exploration of professional roles and career opportunities in HDFS. Addresses necessary skills and information related to the search for employment and/or graduate school.
  • SPH-F 453 Family Life Education (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258, or equivalent; Permission of instructor. History of family life education; philosophy and rationale for curriculum development, including methods and source materials. Current methods and theory provide the basis for program planning relevant to contemporary developmental and family issues.
  • SPH-F 457 Stress and Resilience in the Family (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258, or equivalent; junior or senior standing. Research and theory on family stress and resilience. Addresses important aspects of the family's experience of stress, (e.g., as social support and coping in a family context) as well as resilience factors that reduce the effects of stress on families.
  • SPH-F 458 Family Law and Policy (3 cr.) Overview of family law and policy issues in the United States. Class is organized around the four major disciplines that shape political science, economics, sociology, and family science. Class includes lectures, case studies, and films. Final section explores current family law/policy issues.
  • SPH-F 490 Current Issues in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258. An in-depth investigation of a contemporary topic in the field of human development and family studies. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-F 491 Readings in Human Development and Family Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Readings in human development and family studies to be conducted under the direction of a member of the faculty. Readings proposal must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 492 Research in Human Development and Family Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Undergraduate research done in the field of human development and family studies under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 493 Independent Study in Human Development and Family Studies (1–3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150, SPH-F 258, or equivalent; Permission of instructor. An in-depth investigation of some area within human development and family studies. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 496 Fieldwork Experience in Human Development and Family Studies (1–10 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Field experience through on-the-job and related opportunities in human development and family studies. Course requirements will be established by field experience supervisor. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 497 Internship in Human Development and Family Studies (6 cr.) P: Application due by tenth week of previous semester; SPH-F 430; 2.0 overall minimum GPA; junior or senior standing; consent of HDFS or Youth Development faculty sponsor; open only to HDFS and Youth Development majors. Human Development and Family Studies development course that corresponds to age group with which student will work. Involves active participation in community programs. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 510 African American and Latino Families (3 cr.) Relevant issues related to the socio-culture context of African American and Latino Families will be explored. Specific focus will be on understanding how these issues influence the home environmental life for these ethnic families.
  • SPH-F 531 Human Development I: Preconception through Age 6 (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of Social/Behavioral Sciences or equivalent or consent of instructor. An in-depth look at children from preconception to age 6; balancing theory, application and research, presenting a picture of the whole child situated in realistic, everyday cultural contexts.
  • SPH-F 532 Human Development II: Ages 6-19 (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of Social/Behavioral Sciences or equivalent or consent of instructor. This course incorporates scientific and personal experience in examining middle youth to adolescence developments. We will discuss theories of development and view our beliefs through the lenses of such theories, paying attention to ways research supports, questions, or contradicts perspectives in society about development.
  • SPH-F 533 Human Development III: Adulthood (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of Social/Behavioral Sciences or equivalent or consent of instructor. Emphasizes developmental reciprocity between adults and their multiple social, psychological, cultural, and biological environments. Promotes the student's examination of in-depth and specified focus in several salient areas for the purpose of deepening their foundational understanding of adult development.
  • SPH-F 541 Effects of Divorce on Children (3 cr.) In-depth examination of how a parental divorce affects children both in the short term and years later. Particular focus is on how to minimize these effects and on how social attitudes and beliefs influence social policy.
  • SPH-F 543 Family Life Education (3 cr.) Philosophy, principles, assumptions, and history of family life education, with emphasis on theoretically based curriculum development. Strategies, methods, and resources for developing curricula to address contemporary family life.
  • SPH-F 544 Parent Child Relationships: Theoretical, Research, and Practical Aspects (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of social and behavioral sciences or equivalent. A thorough and comprehensive review and discussion of the theory, research and practical aspects of the parent child relations within their culture and historic context.
  • SPH-F 546 Issues in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor; other prerequisites, depending on topic. Interrelatedness of different aspects of growth and development; review, discussion, and evaluation of current issues in human development and family studies. Topic may vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-F 550 Seminar in Human Development and Family Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Prerequisites vary depending on topic. Analysis and interpretation of various aspects of family study; stresses theoretical and/or empirical formulations with emphasis on critical discussion and evaluation. Topics may vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-F 553 Teaching Sex Education (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 255 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Philosophy, content, methods, resources, and evaluation that relate specifically to the teaching of sex education.
  • SPH-F 555 Leading Family Process Discussion Groups (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of social science course work and interview with professor. Students will lead psycho-educational discussion groups in family process including family influences, communication, intimacy, parent-child relationships, loss, and divorce. Students will also be required to assist with various administrative tasks related to that discussion.
  • SPH-F 557 Stress and Resilience in the Family and Community (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of Social/Behavioral Sciences or equivalent or consent of instructor. Addresses normative and non-normative family and community stress, social support, meaning construction and coping in family and community. Includes resilience factors that ameliorate effects of stress on families and communities.
  • SPH-F 558 Workshop in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) P: SPH-F 150 or SPH-F 258 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Topics of relevance to individuals in HDFS and related disciplines are discussed in workshop fashion under direction of faculty. Emphasis on practical application, group involvement, and use of resource personnel. Topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-F 559 Special Problems: Human Development and Family Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Permission of department. Independent work on problems of special interest to student. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 597 Internship in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission. Professional internships in appropriate settings completed under the direction of a faculty member. Internship experiences must be approved in advance. Evaluation is on an S/F basis only.
  • SPH-F 598 Non-thesis Project in Human Development and Family StudiesTitle (3 cr.) P: A detailed proposal must be submitted to supervising professor before work can begin. Individual application of student's area of study to the solution of a problem, under supervision of an advisor.
  • SPH-F 650 Seminar in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) Contemporary topics in the area of Human Development and Family Studies studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-F 654 Conceptual Frameworks in Human Development and Family Studies (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of Social/Behavioral Sciences or equivalent or consent of instructor. Critical examination and survey of major HDFS theories and conceptual frameworks. Integrative analysis of the way contemporary research and practices are informed by theoretical bases. Addresses interplay between basic tenets of theories/ conceptual frameworks and socio-historical context in which they developed.
  • SPH-F 656 Families and Health (3 cr.) The interface between the family and health systems. Explores relationship between family functions and various aspects of health and health care of family members. Emphasis on students' understanding of ways of using the strengths and overcoming the weaknesses of family systems in influencing health behavior.
  • SPH-F 691 Readings in Human Development and Family Studies (1–5 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Reading proposal must be approved in advance; Instructor permission. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 692 Research in Human Development and Family Studies (1–5 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Project proposals must be approved in advance; Instructor permission required. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 696 Field Experience in Family Health (1-7 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in public health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-F 697 Internships in Human Development and Family Studies (1–10 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.; Instructor permission required. Professional internships are completed under the direction of a faculty member. Evaluation is on an S/F basis only.
  • SPH-F 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Family Health (1–3 cr.) P: Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall semester SPH-F 698 course. Enrollment in the spring semester SPH-F 698 course requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall semester SPH-F 698 course. C: SPH-F 696 and permission of academic advisor. This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Family Health. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
Leadership - SPH-L
  • SPH-L 101 Recreation Leadership Skills (1–2 cr.) Short courses designed to provide students with skills and teaching techniques necessary to function as leaders in recreation and parks. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-L 102 Participant Leadership Development (1 cr.) An interactive online course blended with four one hour structured classroom meetings. Provides students with opportunities to learn and apply leadership skills gained through participation in organizations, athletic teams, or clubs. Will develop own personal leadership plan to initiate intentional leadership involvement. Topics include fellowship, time management, and teamwork.
  • SPH-L 103 Organizational Leadership Development (1 cr.) An interactive online course blended with four, one-hour structured classroom meetings. For advanced or organizational leaders, offers students the opportunity to develop their skills as an organizational or advanced leader. Topics include motivating others, teamwork, and integrity and students will develop their own personal leadership plan.
Nutrition and Dietetics - SPH-N
  • SPH-N 120 Introduction to Foods (3 cr.) Chemical and physical properties of food that influence food selection, handling, preservation, and preparation; menu planning, meal management. Laboratory weekly.
  • SPH-N 220 Nutrition for Health (3 cr.) Introduction to nutrients, their uses, and food sources. Application of nutrition principles to personal eating habits for general health; overview of current issues in nutrition. Not for students in dietetics or nutrition science.
  • SPH-N 231 Human Nutrition (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 101 or equivalent; a course in Biology Basic principles of nutrition with emphasis on identification, functions, and food sources of nutrients required for optimal health.
  • SPH-N 305 Nutrition to Support Performance and Prevent Chronic Disease (3 cr.) P: MSCI-M 115 or PHSL-P 215 Basic knowledge of nutrition, physiology and fitness to improve health, support performance, and reduce risks for chronic disease. Uses case studies/group activities. Credit for only one of SPH-N 305 or SPH-N 431.
  • SPH-N 320 Food Chemistry (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 120; CHEM-C 117 or CHEM-C 118 or CHEM-S 118 or CHEM-N 330 or equivalents. Recommended; A course in organic chemistry. Advanced study of the chemical and physical properties of food as related to use, quality, and preparation. New food products, composition, and technologies.
  • SPH-N 321 Quantity Food Purchasing and Production (4 cr.) Principles of menu planning and pricing, equipment selection, food product flow, and cost control in foodservice operations. Class includes service-learning, tours of community foodservice related facilities, and experience in the university dining halls.
  • SPH-N 322 Management Systems in Dietetics (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 321; Dietetics majors only, or permission of instructor. Examines organizational design, human resource management, financial management, and basic marketing strategies as applied to the profession of dietetics.
  • SPH-N 325 Food Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.) C: SPH-N 320. Application of principles and experimental procedures in food chemistry. Four hours laboratory weekly.
  • SPH-N 331 Life Cycle Nutrition (3 cr.) Examines overall nutrition of life cycle: pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adults, and the elderly. Focuses on nutritional status and nutrient requirements as well as physiological changes in body function for all ages. Discusses special nutrition problems in each stage and contemporary nutritional issues.
  • SPH-N 336 Public Health Nutrition (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 231 or equivalent. Via lecture, discussions, and practical applications, the course will introduce students to the field of public health nutrition, including community assessment; program development, implementation, and evaluation; budget development; eligibility and services available through existing programs; cultural foodways; and the intersection of public policy and nutrition.
  • SPH-N 350 Topical Seminar in Nutrition/ Dietetics (1–3 cr.) The topical seminars relate to current issues in the field of nutrition/ dietetics. Possible topics for this seminar are weight reduction and fad diets, food additives, diet and human performance (diet for the athlete), vegetarianism, child nutrition, diet for senior citizens, diet and disease relationships. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-N 401 Issues in Dietetics (1 cr.) P: Dietetics majors only; senior standing; or permission of instructor. A culminating class to address current issues in dietetics, including such topics as medical ethics, CAM, and reimbursement for services. Students will develop a career portfolio and ready themselves for the dietetic internship process.
  • SPH-N 416 Nutrition Counseling and Education (3 cr.) Introduction to the theory and practice of nutrition counseling to individuals and groups. Focus is placed on techniques in interviewing, education, goal setting, behavior change, and evaluation. Individual and group settings are included. Role-playing and case studies are emphasized.
  • SPH-N 430 Advanced Nutrition I (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 231; CHEM-C 341/R 340. Functions of nutrients in human metabolism; evaluation and fulfillment of nutritional needs; current literature. Emphasis on the energy nutrients: protein, carbohydrates, and fats.
  • SPH-N 431 Medical Nutrition Therapy (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 231; ANAT-A 215; PHSL-P 215; junior class standing. Prerequisite or concurrent: CLAS-C 209. Dietary modifications for therapy in metabolic and pathological disorders with allowance for cultural patterns.
  • SPH-N 432 Advanced Nutrition II (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 430 or consent of department. A continuation of SPH-N 430. Nonenergy nutrients: water, vitamins, minerals, and as a summative focus, nutritional status.
  • SPH-N 433 Medical Nutrition Therapy Application (3 cr.) P: Prerequisite or concurrent: SPH-N 431. Application of principles of diet therapy through case study management, designing and preparing modified diets. Cumulative experience of designing, following, and reporting of a modified diet.
  • SPH-N 480 Mechanisms of Nutrient Action (3 cr.) P: Prerequisite or concurrent: SPH-N 430 or consent of instructor. Advanced study of nutrition biochemistry including nutrient regulation of gene expression, immune response to food allergens, detoxification and protective functions of nutrients, relationships between nutrients and cancer, how nutrients affect risk factors for cardiovascular disease, macronutrient metabolism during exercise.
  • SPH-N 491 Readings in Nutrition/Dietetics (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Readings proposal must be approved in advance. Planned readings in nutrition/dietetics to be conducted under the direction of a member of the faculty. Enrollment is limited to seniors or advanced juniors who are majors in the department. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-N 492 Research in Nutrition/Dietetics (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Undergraduate research in the field of nutrition/dietetics under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-N 496 Field Experience in Nutrition/ Dietetics (1–3 cr.) Field experience through on-the-job and related opportunities in nutrition/ dietetics. Regular critique will be held with supervisors; written progress reports are required. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-N 517 Research Presentations in Nutrition Science (1 cr.) P: Seminar presentations covering research in nutrition science. Seminar presentations covering research in nutrition science. Weekly research seminars presented by graduate students and graduate faculty or visiting faculty. Each student will prepare to present either a review of research literature or results of a research study they have conducted. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-N 520 Food Chemistry (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 118 or equivalent. Advanced study in the chemical and physical properties of food as related to use, quality, and preparation. Students will conduct library research to prepare a critical review of selected topics in novel areas of food chemistry and technology.
  • SPH-N 525 Food Chemistry Laboratory (2 cr.) P: Prerequisite or concurrent: SPH-Q 502. C: SPH-N 520. Application of principles and experimental procedures in food chemistry.  Students will design and conduct an independent research project in food science in addition to weekly topical group laboratory experiments.
  • SPH-N 530 Advanced Human Nutrition (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 231 and CHEM-C 341/R 340 or equivalents, or consent of instructor. Function of carbohydrates, protein and fat in human metabolism, energy balance, and review of current literature.
  • SPH-N 531 Medical Nutrition Therapy (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 231 and PHSL-P 215, or equivalents. Emphasis on the physiology, etiology, and dietary intervention in various diseased states. Includes in-depth analysis and reporting of a disease state and the role of diet and clinical research in its management.
  • SPH-N 532 Advanced Human Nutrition II (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 530. Emphasis is placed on vitamins, minerals, water, and phytochemicals.
  • SPH-N 533 Medical Nutrition Therapy Application (3 cr.) P: Prerequisite or concurrent with SPH-N 531. Application of diet therapy principles. Includes food preparation, designing special diets, and evaluating case studies. Effect of lifestyle and socioeconomic variables.
  • SPH-N 536 Applied Public Health Nutrition (3 cr.)

    Course includes community assessment; program development, implementation, and evaluation; budget development; eligibility and services available through existing programs; cultural foodways; and the intersection of public policy and nutrition.

  • SPH-N 539 Special Problems: Nutrition and Food Science (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Independent work on problems of special interest. Topic may vary.
  • SPH-N 550 Dietary Assessment Techniques (1 cr.) Instruction and practice using Nutrition Data System for Research software for the collection and analyses of 24-hour dietary recalls. Activities include analyses of recalls, food records, menus, and recipes.
  • SPH-N 600 Nutrigenomics (3 cr.) P: CHEM-C 483 or SPH-N 530. The study of nutrigenomics, the interaction between nutrition and an individuals genome or responses of an individual to different diets. Lecture/discussion of techniques and models, nutrient-gene interactions and events affecting cardiovascular disease, cancer and other conditions. Implications for food technology, public health and policy.
  • SPH-N 601 Phytonutrients (3 cr.) P: Prerequisite or corequisite: SPH-N 532 or permission of instructor. A study of phytonutrients, molecules produced by edible plants, in addition to the traditional vitamins, that influence human health, growth, metabolism, and disease risk.
  • SPH-N 620 Nutrition in Sports (3 cr.) P: SPH-N 231 and PHSL-P 215, or equivalents. The role of nutrition in athletic performance, especially the effects of various nutrition practices during training, competition, and recovery. Current concepts and controversies.
  • SPH-N 650 Seminar in Nutrition Science (1–3 cr.) Contemporary topics in the area of nutrition science are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-N 691 Readings in Nutrition Science (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-N 692 Research in Nutrition Science (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students. Repeatable for credit.
Public Health Administration - SPH-P
  • SPH-P 309 Public Health Administration (3 cr.) Students are expected to learn principles of population-based management in order to administer programs, services, and policies within the U.S. public health system. In addition, students examine the mission, structure, and processes of local, state, and federal organizations in delivering population-based programs, services and policies.
  • SPH-P 510 Organization and Administration of Public Health Programs (3 cr.) Students are expected to learn principles of population-based management in order to administer programs, services, and policies within the U.S. public health system. In addition, students examine the mission, structure, and processes of local, state, and federal organizations in delivering population-based programs, services and policies.
  • SPH-P 650 Seminar in Public Health Administration (1-3 cr.) This course provides students with a core set of public health administration concepts and skills required for competency in public health administration. Students will complete various applied assignments focused on the practice of public health administration and public health administration research.
  • SPH-P 680 Public Health Economics (3 cr.) Economics is a discipline to explain human beings' behaviors and also serves as an important point of view for analyzing public health issues and associated policies. This course will guide students to think through a number of public health issues using economics tools.
  • SPH-P 685 Public Health Policy and Politics (3 cr.) The course will provide advanced graduate students with an  orientation to public health policy, politics and processes in  the United States. Students will examine and critique current  public health policy issues at the federal, state and local levels  using several policy models and theoretical lenses. As the  course is designed for the MPH practice degree, students will  produce policy analyses and briefs for use in the public health  policy process.
  • SPH-P 691 Readings in Public Health Administration (1-3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Permision of instructor. Reading proposals must be approved in advance. Planned, specialized readings in public health administration of professional and/or research interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students. Reading proposals must be submitted by students seeking this independent study course, and must be approved by faculty in Public Health Administration. Class is repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-P 692 Research in Public Health Administration (1-3 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Research project must be approved in advance. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the public health administration graduate faculty. This can be in form of grant writing, or manuscript preparation, or data analysis. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students upon the approval of faculty.
  • SPH-P 696 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Public Health Administration (1–7 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-P 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Public Health Administration (1–3 cr.) P: Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall semester SPH-P 698 course. Enrollment in the spring semester SPH-P 698 course requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall SPH-P 698 course. This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Public Health Administration. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-P 792 Research in Public Health Administration and Policy (1-6 cr.) P: Students must have completed their first year of doctoral studies. Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Permision of instructor; Research proposals must be approved in advance. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the public health administration graduate faculty. This can be in form of grant writing, or manuscript preparation, or data analysis. The research project must be part of the student's trajectory toward their dissertation research. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students upon the approval of faculty.
Safety - SPH-S
  • SPH-S 101 Introduction to Safety (3 cr.) Provides an overview of the variety of careers available in the safety profession. Examines the broad areas practiced by safety professionals including regulatory compliance, environmental protection, ergonomics, industrial hygiene, emergency management, recreational safety, personal safety, healthcare, training and instruction, system safety, fire protection, and hazardous materials management.
  • SPH-S 151 Legal Aspects of Safety (3 cr.) Discusses legal requirements for safety, health, and environmental compliance. Emphasis is given to OSHA, EPA, and consensus standards, as well as other applicable Federal regulations.
  • SPH-S 201 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene (3 cr.) The concepts, principles, and techniques in the practice of industrial hygiene are presented. The identification, evaluation, and control of occupational health hazards are discussed. An orientation to selected instrumentation used to assess the workplace is provided.
  • SPH-S 202 Fundamentals of Fire Protection (3 cr.) Reviews fire protection codes and standards, principles, and practices; fire theory, fire-safe design, fire protection systems and equipment, and fire hazards. Emphasis on the life safety aspect of fire protection.
  • SPH-S 210 General Industry Standards (3 cr.) An introduction and analysis of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) general industry standards as they apply to both the private and federal sectors. Includes an inspection practicum.
  • SPH-S 214 OSHA Construction Standards (3 cr.) An introduction to and application of OSHA and Indiana OSHA construction standards as they apply to both the public and private sectors. Course includes an inspection practicum.
  • SPH-S 217 Safety: A Personal Focus (3 cr.) This course surveys current topics of interest in safety. Areas explored include injury problems, safety analysis, home safety, fire safety, personal protection, responding to emergencies, firearm safety, motor vehicle safety, occupational safety, recreational safety, school safety, and related issues.
  • SPH-S 231 Safety Engineering and Technology (3 cr.) Introduces safety engineering principles applied to the control of hazards associated with industrial processes, facilities, chemical processes, materials handling, machine operation, and electricity.
  • SPH-S 251 Incident Investigation and Analysis (3 cr.) Introduction of questioning and interviewing techniques for incident investigation and analysis. Examines injury causation theories, evaluation, reporting, legal aspects, and using investigation findings as a prevention tool. Reviews root causes in management systems.
  • SPH-S 255 Threats, Violence, and Workplace Safety (3 cr.) Emphasis on personal safety and survival through prevention, protection, and effective countermeasures for individuals and groups in the workplace. Examines potential methods for delivery and perpetuation of violence.
  • SPH-S 302 Introduction to Homeland Security (3 cr.) P: 9 credits of 200 level SPH-S courses. Explores relationships and interactions between private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at federal, state and local levels. Examines specific roles, responsibilities and vulnerabilities of private-sector and governmental agencies in protecting critical infrastructure as well as preventing, deterring, and responding to crises.
  • SPH-S 332 Ergonomics and Human Factors (3 cr.) P: Prerequisite or concurrent: ANAT-A 215 or SPH-K 205. The application of ergonomic principles and human factors techniques to the design and evaluation of workplaces and equipment.
  • SPH-S 336 Emergency Management (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 302. An all-hazard multidisciplinary response and recovery. Topics include identifying critical roles, risk assessment, strategies, planning concepts and methodologies, establishing effective integrated and coordinated programs, crisis management, communication and response.
  • SPH-S 345 Safety Program Management (3 cr.) P: 6 credits of SPH-S courses, or instructor consent. Principles, theories, and concepts of safety and health program management with comparisons of past, present, and future practices. Review of managing behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations. Focuses on managing a total safety program.
  • SPH-S 350 Topical Seminar in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of safety education. Possible topics for this seminar are new requirements for controlling hazardous material, the changing legal environment of the safety professional, new techniques in accident investigation, system safety and the safety manager, human factors, and workplace design. The topical seminars will relate to current issues in the field of safety education. Possible topics for this seminar are new requirements for controlling hazardous material, the changing legal environment of the safety professional, new techniques in accident investigation, system safety and the safety manager, human factors, and workplace design. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-S 354 Hazardous Materials and Waste Control (3 cr.) P: 6 cr. of SPH-S courses or instructor consent. Introduction and review of hazardous materials regulations and hazardous materials control methods, including hazardous wastes. Occupational and environment requirements and exposures, with guidance and common examples of materials that are toxic, corrosive, reactive, explosive, flammable, and combustible. These classes of materials will be considered from their generation to disposal.
  • SPH-S 370 Principles and Strategies of Behavioral Safety (3 cr.) Examines the principles, strategies, and methods of behavioral safety approaches in the workplace. Ways to improve safety culture and safety performance are explored through applied behavioral analysis, safety observation, and coaching.
  • SPH-S 402 Emergency Planning and Preparation (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 336. Addresses multiple facets of emergency planning and preparedness as part of comprehensive emergency management. Fundamentals of planning as applied to four phases of emergency management; how these phases overlap, interrelate, and complement each other; and critical steps in preparation will be examined.
  • SPH-S 410 Advanced Industrial Hygiene (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 201 and CHEM-C 102. Provides definitive application of principles and concepts for the solutions of workplace health and physical hazards. Program management techniques are discussed. Research procedures and techniques are introduced through individual and group projects.
  • SPH-S 411 Industrial Hygiene Sampling and Analysis (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 410 and CHEM-C 106. Advanced, in-depth study of the approaches to workplace sampling. Emphasis is on sampling methods, passive sampling, sampling devices, breathing zone, and area sampling strategy. Course will include lab sessions and field experience.
  • SPH-S 415 Safety Education and Training (3 cr.) P: 6 credits SPH-S courses or consent of instructor. Assessing training and education needs, establishing goals and objectives, planning and methods for delivery, using resources and evaluating effectiveness. Students develop evaluation instruments and conduct mock OSHA training. Emphasis is on improving safety performance in addition to compliance.
  • SPH-S 430 Exploring Safety Culture (3 cr.) Examines approaches to the development of a proactive safety culture in the workplace. Topics explore issues of sound business principles and management practices for the development of an effective safety culture.
  • SPH-S 436 Emergency Response and Recovery (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 336. Identifies various types of disasters and appropriate emergency management stakeholders. Explores theoretical frameworks, emergency and post-emergency activities typical challenges of response efforts: and, the tools and techniques of response and recovery are examined.
  • SPH-S 491 Readings in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Readings proposal must be approved in advance. Planned readings in safety education to be conducted under the direction of a member of the faculty. Enrollment is limited to seniors or advanced juniors who are majors in the department. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-S 492 Research in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Undergraduate research done in the field of safety education under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-S 496 Field Experience in Occupational Safety (1–10 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Junior/senior standing; Safety majors only. (Formerly HPER-S 444) Field experience through on-the-job and related opportunities in occupational safety. Students will be assigned to industrial and occupational enterprises offering professional development for the safety specialist. Periodic critiques will be scheduled with supervisory personnel. Written progress reports will be required. S/F only.
    Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-S 501 Program Development in Safety Management (3 cr.) Program development in safety management is examined, including needs assessment, programming, and evaluation options. Past, present and future management practices are critiqued; and selected safety management models (MBO, Keppner, Tregoe, MORT, Epidemiological, Systems) are analyzed. Adoption of management techniques consistent with current trends in safety risk decision making.
  • SPH-S 502 Instructional Strategies for Safety Education (3 cr.) Approaches to the preparation and delivery of comprehensive instructional programs in safety settings; topics include principles of program organization in safety education, specifying goals and objectives for safety instruction, planning lessons and units of instruction, identifying and utilizing methods and safety resource materials, and evaluating instructional effectiveness.
  • SPH-S 513 Safety Management in Business and Industry (3 cr.) Principles of safety management applicable to business and industrial settings, including accident causation theories, risk analysis and loss control, learning theories and behavioral factors applied to adult learners, selection of special educational techniques and materials, and program evaluation methods. Case studies, resource personnel, and field visitations.
  • SPH-S 514 Safety Standards for Industry and Construction (3 cr.) An overview and analysis of the OSHA Standards for Industry and Construction. Review of those standards most often violated with focus on standards that address the greatest risk of severe injuries and fatalities.
  • SPH-S 515 Safety Performance Measurement and Leadership (3 cr.) Various methods of measuring workplace safety performance are reviewed, including the roles, applications and limitations of leading and lagging metrics.  Discussion of ways that inadequate measures create barriers for leadership, and benefits of balanced approaches to safety measurement.  Measurement and leadership techniques, tools, and case studies are explored.
  • SPH-S 535 Crisis and Emergency Management (3 cr.) Advanced study of natural and man-made disaster events, past management and challenges facing emergency/disaster management in private and public sector organizations. Analyze and critique educational/training strategies and best practices found in the literature focusing on prevention and management of crisis or disaster.
  • SPH-S 536 Facility Emergency Planning (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 535 or instructor consent. Advanced study in theory and practice of security, safety and emergency facility planning. This includes steps for practical implementation of facility security, safety and emergency plans. Through guided team service learning experiences students create and implement hazard assessments and facility plans.
  • SPH-S 537 Threat Assessment, Mitigation and Security Planning (3 cr.) P: SPH-S 535 or instructor consent. Threat assessment, mitigation and security planning for private and public sector organizations. Safety & Health students learn to conduct threat assessments addressing the potential use of biological, chemical or radioactive agents to destroy priority targets, and to build successful strategies reducing security threats.
  • SPH-S 550 Workshop in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) Interesting topics of relevance to individuals in safety education and related disciplines are discussed in workshop fashion under the direction of faculty members. Emphasis on practical application, group involvement, and the use of resource personnel. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-S 552 Principles and Concepts of Workplace Safety Behavior (3 cr.) Study of the psychological and behavioral aspects of workplace safety. Identification of basic strategies and steps, including an in-depth exploration of relevant behavioral principles, processes, and systems for improving safety performance. Case studies are reviewed to identify related success factors.
  • SPH-S 590 Introduction to Research in Safety Management (3 cr.)

    Provides in depth coverage of research methods and techniques commonly applied in the areas of safety science, safety management, occupational safety, occupational health and injury and illness prevention. Emphasis on developing the capacity to critically interpret, evaluate and apply findings from the research literature in appropriate contexts.

  • SPH-S 610 Occupational Risk Management (3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Evaluation and assessment of various workplace regulations. Seminars and directed reading focus on risk strategies utilized in recognizing, evaluating and controlling occupational and environmental hazards associated with public and private sectors.
  • SPH-S 632 Managing Occupational Health Programs (3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. (Formerly HPER-S 632) Examines occupational health from management perspective. Recognition, evaluation and control of stressors that may cause illness or impair health. Emphasis exposure to biological agents, toxic substances, occupational disease, nanotechnology, radiology, ergonomic risk factors, regulatory compliance, risk assessment, protective equipment and engineering controls.
  • SPH-S 650 Seminar in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) Contemporary topics in the area of safety education are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-S 691 Readings in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Reading proposals must be approved in advance. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-S 692 Research in Safety Education (1–5 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Research proposals must be approved in advance. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-S 695 Practicum in Safety Education (1–10 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission. Practical learning experiences are completed in appropriate professional settings under the direction of a faculty member. Practicum experiences must be approved in advance. Seminars are held periodically throughout the practicum. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-S 697 Safety Management Practicum (2 cr.) C: SPH-S 698. The graduate Practicum in Safety Management is designed to apply safety management experiences and skills which will help the student throughout their career.
  • SPH-S 698 Capstone in Safety Management (3 cr.) C: SPH-S 697. A capstone research project is to be designed to provide information which will assist Safety Management graduate students and their future or current worksite in certain safety related programs and responsibilities.
  • SPH-S 784 Advanced Seminar in Safety Management (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Advanced topics in the area of safety management are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-S 794 Doctoral Seminar in Safety Education (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Reviews research techniques in safety education and critiques examples of current and completed research projects and other professional literature. Particular attention is given to dissertations being planned or in progress. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
Environmental and Occupational Health
Environmental and Occupational Health - SPH-V
  • SPH-V 201 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health (3 cr.) Occupational health has become an increasingly important area within the field of environmental health. Occupational health, as discussed in this course, includes occupational safety as the two topics work together to protect the individual's health in the work environment. Noise exposures, physical hazards, chemical hazards and industrial hygiene are just a few of the topics covered in this class. Students will learn how to evaluate hazards in the work environment and interpret standards that apply to employee safety and health.
  • SPH-V 214 Environmental Regulations and Code Compliance (3 cr.) In this course, students will be introduced to the federal, state and local environmental regulations and learn about methods of compliance with these laws. At the federal level the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and others will be studied. At the state level, current regulations found in the Indiana State Department of Health administrative codes will be examined. Topics will include radon, lead-based paint, indoor air quality, food safety, and other relevant regulations. Active learning activities will be used to encourage class participation while maintaining interest in the course material.
  • SPH-V 215 Food Safety and Sanitation (3 cr.) Food safety is an important component of public health. This course is designed as a study of the principles of food-borne illness, sanitation, safety, personal hygiene, rodent and insect controls, regulations, and equipment affecting safe food handling in all operations. Students will study common pathogens and learn how pathogenic organisms can contaminate foods, principles of safe and sanitary food handling, and safety principles used to select, preserve, thaw, cook, and store foods. The course will include a discussion of food safety management practices such as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), public health policies, risk assessment, and federal food safety agencies and regulations. Active learning activities will be used to encourage class participation while maintaining interest in the course material.
  • SPH-V 235 Introduction to Public Health Biology (3 cr.) This course will examine the biological and chemical basis for human disease, its prevention and treatment. Topics covered will include the etiologies of acute and chronic diseases and their impacts on public health.
  • SPH-V 241 Foundations of Environmental Health (3 cr.) An understanding of Environmental Health issues that affect Public Health is essential for any student of Public Health. This course is designed to introduce the student to the many varied areas of Environmental Health and demonstrate the important role this field plays in Public Health.
  • SPH-V 310 Natural Resource Issues and Environmental Health (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor; completion of core and required courses. This course approaches the issues of human health from the broad perspective of natural resources such as air and water quality, climate change, and habitat fragmentation and how these issues impact public health.  In order to accomplish this task, this course will encompass a variety of readings, class discussion, guest speakers, and several experiential learning components (ELCs).
  • SPH-V 311 Human Health and Natural Environments (3 cr.) This course approaches the issues of human health and quality of life from the perspective of the natural environment. That is, in what ways do natural environments impact human health and an individual's reported sense of quality of life? In order to accomplish this task, this course will encompass a variety of readings, class discussion, guest speakers, and several experiential learning components (ELCs).
  • SPH-V 341 Environmental Health Management and Policy (3 cr.) Environmental health management and policy issues in public health using case-based approaches. Study of environmental health management and policy making at the local, county, state, federal and global scales.
  • SPH-V 422 Issues in Global Environmental Health: Investigations and Interventions (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide undergraduate students an overview of the most important environmental health challenges across the world. Many public health students may plan to seek employment opportunities in various environmental programs and projects of the United Nations other international agencies and some other international NGOs. This course will provide knowledge of global environmental health problems from toxicological, risk management and epidemiological perspectives. Additionally, region-specific intervention studies will be discussed for deeper understanding of mitigation options. Lectures will address issues in the areas of air, water and soil pollutions, global warming and climate change, infectious diseases, genetically modified foods etc. Strategies and programs that have successfully minimized the risks of environmental exposures and associated outcomes will be mapped.
  • SPH-V 442 Introduction to Toxicology (3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor; completion of core and required courses. Toxicology is the study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms and is an essential component of environmental health and public health. This course will provide the basic principles of toxicology in its application to public health. The course will be divided into three components: the general mechanism of toxic agents, the effect of toxic agents on target tissues and organs, and selective toxic chemicals or class of chemicals.
  • SPH-V 443 Environmental Sampling and Analysis (3 cr.) Collecting reliable and defensible environmental data requires proper sampling and analytical techniques, and is an essential job function for many environmental professionals. Currently, a diverse and diffuse array of environmental sampling and analysis tools are used in the field of environmental health. The overall objective of this class is to provide a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals of environmental sampling and analysis for students in environmental health and others interested in sampling and analytical work. Topics covered will include planning, sampling, analysis, QA/QC, and reporting with respect to air, water, solid liquid, and biological samples matrices. Active learning activities will be used to encourage class participation while maintaining interest in the course material.
  • SPH-V 496 Field Experience in Environmental Health (3-5 cr.) P: Permission of Instructor; Students must have completed all major coursework and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in public health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. S/F grading.
  • SPH-V 510 Human Health and Natural Environments (3 cr.) Numerous textbooks address the relationship between human health and natural environments from either the perspectives of toxicity or environmental degradation. This course approaches the issues of human health and quality of life from the perspective of the natural environment. That is, in what ways do natural environments impact human health and an individual’s reported sense of quality of life? In order to accomplish this task, this course will encompass a variety of readings, class discussion, guest speakers, and several experiential learning components (ELCs).
  • SPH-V 522 Global Environmental Health Issues (3 cr.) This graduate level course approaches issues of human health from the broad perspective of natural resources including air and water quality, climate change, disease vector migration, and habitat fragmentation and how these issues affect public health through increased vulnerabilities, impacts to recreational endeavors, and specific events such as heat islands.
  • SPH-V 532 Foundations of Global Environmental Health (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing, Permission of instructor. Global environmental health is concerned with health problems caused by environmental exposures that transcend national boundaries. This introductory graduate elective course for public health and other majors from the environmental, biological, medical, and social/behavioral sciences examines current and emerging global environmental health problems, priorities, programs, and policies using an interdisciplinary perspective. Covers climate change, environmental degradation, globalization, and other complex environmental factors affecting health. Discusses local, regional, and global initiatives and strategies designed to improve health/well-being and prevent and control disease. Course places special emphasis on the "One Health" concept which recognizes that the health of humans is connected to the health of animals and the environment and on environmental justice for low resource communities in the U.S. and low-income and middle-income countries.
  • SPH-V 533 Human Health Assessment Methods in Global Settings (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, at least one graduate-level environmental health class. The applied research course will examine health assessment strategies and instruments commonly used in surveys and other field research studies conducted in the low-resource communities in the U.S. and low- and middle-income countries. Students will learn how to select the appropriate health indicators for specific types of global health projects, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and receive hands-on training in their use. Emphasis on standardized data collection procedures and quality control. Training received in course is useful for public health and other students who plan to conduct field research on health-related topics for a graduate thesis or dissertation.
  • SPH-V 541 Environmental Health (3 cr.) Environmental health management and policy issues in public health using case-based approaches. Study of environmental health management and policy making at the local, county, state, federal and global scales.
  • SPH-V 542 Principles of Toxicology (3 cr.) Examines the basic concepts of toxicology as they apply to public health. Covers distribution cellular penetration, metabolic concision, and elimination of toxic agents and fundamental laws governing the interaction of foreign chemicals with biological systems. Applied to public health prevention using case study format concepts.
  • SPH-V 545 Exposure Assessment and Control (3 cr.) Addresses: methodologies and applications of exposure assessment, determination of exposure monitoring strategies, assessing dose-response and intervention control strategies, exposure assessment models, exposure route, populations at risk and ecological impacts.
  • SPH-V 546 Risk Assessment Policy and Toxic Regulations (3 cr.) Covers hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Through case studies, addresses concepts of risk management and their application to environmental health policies and toxic regulations.
  • SPH-V 548 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology (3 cr.) Examines effects of environmental factors on human health. Covers the health effects from exposure to physical, chemical and biological agents including the contribution of social, economic and cultural factors that are related to these exposures.
  • SPH-V 549 Public Health Biology (3 cr.) P: Biology and Microbiology. This course explores pathophysiology within the context of the disciplines and profession of public health. Students will understand the pathogenesis of various disease conditions and how to identify critical points at which such pathogenesis could be prevented or interrupted through lectures and labs.
  • SPH-V 625 Integrated Modeling for Environmental Health Research (3 cr.) This course introduces mathematical methods and quantitative techniques to model the transport and fate of chemicals in the environment as well as in the body. Statistical modeling approaches are applied to link the exposure scenarios with adverse health outcomes for risk assessment to support environmental decision making.
  • SPH-V 633 Field Research Methods in Global Environmental Health (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, at least one graduate-level environmental health or environmental science class, and at least one graduate-level class in one of the following fields: statistics, biostatistics, epidemiology. Introduction to methodological concepts and techniques commonly used in environmental health field research conducted in low-resource communities in the U.S. and low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Course emphasizes a problem-based, practical approach to field research. Includes qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods study designs commonly used in community health assessments, interventions, and evaluations. Development of knowledge and skills including ethical considerations and practices in global environmental health research, community participatory research, location and critiques of extant data sources, and global health research project design (identification of global environmental health problems, community needs assessment, research question conceptualization and hypothesis testing, variable selection, computerized database design, data analysis and interpretation, and presentation of results in community and scientific/ professional venues.
  • SPH-V 635 Interdisciplinary Field Research in Global Environmental Health (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing, SPH-V 533, SPH-V 633, and permission of instructor. Faculty-supervised, immersive field research experience in low-resource U.S. communities or other countries where students gain experience in the informed consent process, data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Students are required to present a written report and an oral/poster presentation at an approved seminar or similar venue to complete the field experience.
  • SPH-V 650 Special Topics in Environmental Health (3 cr.) This course is designed with the flexibility to provide the student with the opportunity to explore a variety of current issues in Environmental Public Health. Topics will vary by instructor and topic. Topics might include ethics, nanotechnology, alternative energy sources, or occupational diseases. Course format will also vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-V 691 Readings in Environmental Health (1–3 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission. Planned readings in specialized areas of professional interests in environmental health are conducted under the direction of a member of the Environmental Health graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to Advanced Graduate students, and reading proposals must be approved by faculty in Environmental Health. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-V 692 Research in Environmental Health (1–8 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission; Research proposals must be approved in advance. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the Environmental Health Graduate teaching faculty. Enrollment is limited to Advanced Graduate Students upon the approval of Faculty. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-V 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Environmental Health Health (1–7 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0; Instructor permission. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in public health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded by S/F only.
  • SPH-V 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Environmental Health (1–3 cr.) P: Permission of academic advisor; C: SPH-V 696; Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall semester SPH-V 698 course. Enrollment in the spring semester SPH-V 698 course requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall semester SPH-V 698 course. This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Environmental Health. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-V 741 Molecular Toxicology (3 cr.) P: Principles of Toxicology. This is a lecture, laboratory and discussion-based class. The molecular mechanisms of several toxicant classes is covered. Emphasis is placed on the effects of xenobiotics on cellular processes, including biochemical reactions and signaling pathways.
  • SPH-V 743 Environmental Health Sampling (3 cr.) P: Environmental Health. This course introduces students to the basic principles of environmental sampling and analysis to prevent or reduce public health hazards. Lectures and labs will examine sampling and analytical methods used to measure contaminants in the workplace and in community environments.
  • SPH-V 745 Advanced Toxicology (3 cr.) P: Principles of Toxicology. Advanced Toxicology is a course designed for the toxicology student interested in broadening his/her experience into the sciences of toxins (poisons) and their influences on biological systems and the environment. Course content will cover specific toxicant types (poisons, pesticides, solvents, oils, estrogen, estrogen mimics, triclosan, carcinogens, teratogens, natural toxins and pollutants), adsorption, distribution, metabolism, biological elimination, sequestration, and remediation.  Lectures will cover mammalian systems with emphasis on target organs, detoxification and adverse effects. Methods to extract toxicants from soil, water, air, and plant material will be covered from journal articles, EPA published methods, and methods developed in our labs. Pesticide toxicity and organ effects will be demonstrated in invertebrate systems focusing on routes of entry, solubility, sequestration, elimination, and detoxification.
  • SPH-V 747 Carcinogenesis (3 cr.) P: Principles of Toxicology. Fundamental aspects of oncology at the cellular and molecular levels; mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression, oncogene action, DNA damage and repair, carcinogenesis by radiation, chemicals, viruses; tumor immunology, anticancer therapies through lectures and laboratories.
  • SPH-V 749 Advanced Occupational Health (3 cr.) Lectures will provide an introduction to the principles and practice of occupational hygiene. Occupational hygiene is concerned with the Anticipation, Recognition, Evaluation and Control of work place hazards to health and safety.
  • SPH-V 750 Current Topics in Environmental Health (2 cr.) Course organization varies from year to year. We will be examining any environmental health topic from the basis for swimming beach water quality standards to low-dose exposures to agrochemical pesticides over long periods of time. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-V 752 Toxicology in Rural Environments (3 cr.) P: Principles of Toxicology. This course explores the way that toxicological risks are controlled in the rural environments - looking at the way that various government programs are established, organized and operated to prevent or control toxicological hazards in rural communities.
  • SPH-V 753 Rural Environment Epidemiology (3 cr.) P: Principles of Toxicology. This course offers an overview of selected important topics in rural environmental epidemiology. Epidemiologic methods for studying rural occupational and environmental determinants of disease will be presented in the context of studies of specific health outcomes, such as cancer, non-malignant respiratory diseases, adverse reproductive outcomes, and neurologic diseases.
  • SPH-V 755 Rural Public Health Policy and Environmental Law (3 cr.) This course will discuss and explore the intricacies of rural public health law and policy analysis in a context of competing ethics, values, and powers.
  • SPH-V 757 Women's Health: Law, Environment, and Health Policies (3 cr.) Through lectures this course will examine the preservation of wellness and the prevention of illness in women and their surrounding environments through the law.
  • SPH-V 782 Environmental Health Research Rotation (3 cr.) This course will provide doctoral students with an opportunity to work directly with faculty and research staff in a specific laboratory.
  • SPH-V 791 Advanced Environmental Health Readings (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. The main goal of this variable credit hour class is to help doctoral degree students develop some of the readings skills required for successfully completing the dissertation. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-V 792 Advanced Environmental Health Research (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. The main goal of this variable credit hour class is to help doctoral degree students develop some of the research skills required for successfully completing the dissertation. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-V 794 Environmental Health Seminar (1–3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to expose students to a broad range of environmental and occupational research, practice, and policy issues through seminar series. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-V 799 PhD Dissertation-Environmental Health (1–30 cr.) Every dissertation presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must represent the equivalent of at least 30 semester hours of work. Repeatable for credit.
Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Biostatistics - SPH-Q
  • SPH-Q 381 Introduction to Biostatistics (3 cr.) A conceptual approach is utilized to introduce students to sources of public health data. Basic concepts and models are available to understand and analyze data and information related to prevention of diseases and promotion of health and determinants of health behavior.
  • SPH-Q 390 Applied Biostatistical Methods I (3 cr.) P: SPH-Q 381 or equivalent (or permission of instructor). This course is designed to familiarize students with basic elements of probability and statistical inference. It will cover the basic features of one sample and two sample inference for discrete and continuous response data, primarily utilizing parametric methods. Topics covered include: Basic set theory and probability; Populations and samples; Random variables; Discrete and continuous distributions; Moments; Multivariate distributions; Independence and covariance; Distributions of functions of random variables.
  • SPH-Q 400 Introduction to Biostatistical Computing (3 cr.) P: SPH-Q 381 and STAT-S 320 or equivalent (or permission of instructor). This course is designed to familiarize students with statistical computing and data management with an emphasis on SAS. The course includes both a lecture and lab component. Topics will include: Producing descriptive statistics; Combining and transforming SAS data sets; Reading and writing files that are not in a SAS format; and Using the SAS macro language.
  • SPH-Q 501 Introduction to Statistics in Public Health (3 cr.) An applied approach to the collection, organization, analyses and interpretation of data pertinent to public health and vital statistics is outlined.  The application of statistical and biostatistical methods to public health is explained.
  • SPH-Q 502 Intermediate Statistics in Public HealthTitle (3 cr.) This course covers fundamental statistical techniques and data analytical approaches that are commonly used in public health research.  It has been designed to prepare graduate students to take advanced statistics courses and to help graduate students become independent researchers.
  • SPH-Q 503 Data Mining Applications in Public Health (3 cr.) Data Mining tools extract unknown and potentially valuable information from large databases. Includes: sampling techniques; unsupervised/supervised learning methods; model validation techniques for regression and classification. Designed to provide modern data tools/methods for analyzing large datasets.
  • SPH-Q 504 Construction and Analysis of Achievement Tests in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation. (3 cr.) Construction and Analysis of Achievement Tests in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation.Principles of construction, selection, interpretation of written achievement tests in health and safety, physical education and recreation, and other evaluative procedures; analysis of standardized tests. Project required to apply principles involved.
  • SPH-Q 601 Experimental Analysis and Design (3 cr.) P: SPH-Q 502 with a grade of B or better. Principles and resources for designing and analyzing experiments using ANOVA models. Includes between and within subjects designs, factorial arrangements and nested designs, analysis of covariance, trends, statistical power and effect size. Incorporates computer programs.
  • SPH-Q 602 Multivariate Statistical Analysis (3 cr.) P: SPH-Q 502. Multivariate statistical techniques and analytical procedures commonly used in applied research. The topics include matrix algebra, data screening. Multiple regression, multivariate analysis of variance and covariance, discriminant function analysis, logistic regression, and principle components and factor analysis.
  • SPH-Q 603 Categorical Data Analysis (3 cr.) P: SPH-Q 501 and SPH-Q 502. Health and health behavior science often include discrete data. Description and inference for binomial/multinomial variables using odds ratios; analysis of contingency tables; basic methods of generalized linear models (GLM); logit/logliner methods with GLM; basic analysis of categorized data using SAS.
  • SPH-Q 604 Linear Regression (3 cr.) P: One graduate level biostatistics or statistics course. In this course, students will learn how to analyze bivariate and multivariate data using simple and multiple linear regression procedures; know how to build a linear including model checking, variable selection and data transformation; developing basic facility in the analysis of data using SAS.
  • SPH-Q 605 Analysis of Multi-level and Longitudinal Data (3 cr.) P: A graduate level course in regression analysis. This course introduces modern statistical methods for longitudinal data analysis to graduate students who need to understand research reports/scientific papers, analyze empirical data, or interpret their results. The topics covered by this course include SAS tutorial, review of linear regression, linear mixed models, generalized linear mixed models, and generalized estimating equations (GEE).
  • SPH-Q 611 Statistical Packages in Research (3 cr.) This course serves as an introduction to SAS for data management, data analysis, and statistical reporting. Emphasis is placed on data management. The course will include lectures, computer lab practices, and a final project.
  • SPH-Q 612 Survival Analysis (3 cr.) P: One basic statistics/biostatistics course. Covers basic concepts of survival analysis, such as Kaplan-Meier estimates, hazard functions, survival functions, log-rank tests. Parametric inference includes likelihood estimation and the exponential, Weibull, log-logistic and other relevant distributions. Methods and theory for the Cox model.
  • SPH-Q 650 Special Topics in Biostatistics (1-3 cr.) Contemporary techniques in biostatistics are studied under the direction of faculty members with specialized areas of expertise. Specific topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic for a maximum of three enrollments.
  • SPH-Q 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Biostatistics (1–7 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only.
  • SPH-Q 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Biostatistics (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission required; Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall semester SPH-Q 698 course. Enrollment in the spring semester SPH-Q 698 requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall Culminating Experience course. C: SPH-Q 696 This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Biostatistics. Graded on S/F basis only Repeatable for credit.
Epidemiology - SPH-E
  • SPH-E 250 Public Health Surveillance and Monitoring (3 cr.) The focus of this course is disease surveillance and monitoring, to investigate and track infectious and communicable diseases, as well as non-infectious chronic diseases through systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data for use in prioritizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating health programs, activities, and practices.
  • SPH-E 311 Introduction to Epidemiology (3 cr.) (Formerly SPH-H 311) Epidemiology concepts, measures, and methods are introduced and applied to explain major health problems, their risks factors, processes, and changes in specific populations. Application of epidemiological methods to identification, surveillance, prevention, and disease control in individuals, families, and communities are addressed.
  • SPH-E 350 Infectious Diseases: Outbreaks and Field Investigations (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 311; SPH-Q 381 or equivalent (or permission of instructor). Students will learn the history and the basic methods of investigation, study the epidemiology, and examine case studies of important, new and emerging diseases and syndromes that affect human populations. Instruction includes definitions and nomenclature, outbreak investigation processes and procedures, disease surveillance and monitoring, and prevention and control efforts. Case-studies focus on acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, hepatitis, tuberculosis, HIV, sexually transmitted infections, malaria, and other vector-borne diseases.
  • SPH-E 353 Distribution and Determinants of Chronic DiseasesTitle (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 311; SPH-Q 381 or equivalent (or permission of instructor). This course will provide an introduction to chronic disease epidemiology. The course will discuss the pathogenesis and population distribution of some of the major chronic diseases that affect health (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer). Additionally, students will learn about the major risk factors for chronic disease and strategies for population-based prevention. Finally, students will get an introduction to basic methods for ascertaining exposures and outcomes as well as research designs for studying chronic diseases.
  • SPH-E 358 Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 311; SPH-Q 381 or equivalent (or permission of instructor). This course will build upon the concepts introduced in Introduction to Epidemiology by going into further detail regarding elements of study design, data analysis, and interpretation of results. Students will learn the basic methods utilized in epidemiology and how to apply them to public health. The course is also intended to provide an introduction to the basic skills needed to critically evaluate the epidemiologic literature relevant to public health professionals.
  • SPH-E 359 Epidemiologic Methods: Applications (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 311; SPH-Q 381 Or equivalent (or permission of instructor). The course covers applications of epidemiologic methods and procedures to the study of the distribution and determinants of health outcomes including disease risk, morbidity, injuries, disability, mortality in populations, and health disparities. Other topics include quantitative aspects of epidemiology, for example, data sources, measures of morbidity and mortality, evaluation of association and causality, and study design.
  • SPH-E 496 Field Experience in Epidemiology (3-5 cr.) P: Permission of Epidemiology Field Experience Coordinator; completion of all Public Health core and required courses; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. BSPH students in the Epidemiology concentration develop their public health skills through professional experiences in public health settings under the supervision of IU SPH-B faculty and facilitation of preceptors. The faculty coordinator and the preceptors conduct regular evaluations, provide written progress reports, and facilitate the development of the major independent project. Graded S/F.
  • SPH-E 610 An Introduction to Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics (3 cr.) Introduces basic epidemiological and biostatistical principles, concepts, and procedures for the surveillance and investigation of health-related states or events. Introduces collecting data and analyzing disease incidence and prevalence to provide analyses leading to effective interventions and preventions. Reviews sources of information, associations between diseases and precipitating factors, and statistical representations.
  • SPH-E 650 Special Topics in Epidemiology (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 651 This course provides students with a core set of epidemiologic concepts and skills required to critically evaluate research reports and review literature in epidemiology and public health. Students will have opportunities to lead an article discussion, present scientific information and to write a paper critique. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-E 651 Epidemiology (3 cr.) Epidemiology, public health's basic science, supports health monitoring, etiologic studies, intervention design and evaluation, and health policy. Health measures exercises use public data, and simulation. In a final proposal students apply epidemiologic principals to evaluate current literature, develop appropriate study design and methods, and strategies to limit threats to validity.
  • SPH-E 653 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3 cr.) An overview of concepts in chronic disease epidemiology and etiology; study design in epidemiologic research and causal inference; major chronic diseases and trends in both the U.S. and world-wide; prevention, and screening.
  • SPH-E 655 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3 cr.) Introduction to methods of infectious disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, cohort and case-control studies, dynamics of transmission and prevention, and vaccination programs. Determinants of diseases, distribution within the population, and their control, along with implications for policy and prevention, are discussed. Students analyze infectious disease outbreak using case studies.
  • SPH-E 656 Genetic Epidemiology (3 cr.) Genetic Epidemiology investigates the role of genetic factors in determining complex diseases in various environmental contexts. In this course, we will introduce the basic concepts in genetics and epidemiology, and further discuss important topics in genetic epidemiology. We will also discuss other critical issues raised in the analyses.
  • SPH-E 657 Social Epidemiology (3 cr.) Introduction to social epidemiology, including methods and key study findings of how social factors affect health outcomes. Topics include the role of socioeconomic status, race, gender, neighborhoods, work place, and social networks, and upstream determinants such as social capital, income inequality and social policies on health.
  • SPH-E 658 Intermediate Epidemiology (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 651 Epidemiology and SPH-Q 501 Introduction to Statistics in Public Health or equivalent (or permission of instructor). Intermediate Epidemiology will build upon the concepts introduced in SPH-E 651 by going into further detail regarding elements of study design, data analysis and interpretation, and inference in epidemiologic research. Principles and methods are illustrated with examples, and reviewed through problem sets and homework.
  • SPH-E 660 Spatial Epidemiology and Disease Mapping (3 cr.) Understanding the geographic (spatial) patterns of exposures and diseases is fundamental to conducting epidemiological and environmental research. Government agencies, research institutions, and private industries are seeking employees who can manipulate and analyze geographic data. This course is designed to provide practical spatial analytic skills that will translate to all professional settings. Specifically, this course will explore the importance of context and location (who, what, when, and where) to guide statistical analyses of causation (how and why). In particular, this course will introduce common spatial statistical methods used to quantify and describe spatial phenomena. Students will learn how to detect spatial patterns of disease, implement cutting edge Bayesian regression models, interpret findings from these models, and how to communicate these findings by visualizing (mapping) the results. Students will learn how to implement the aforementioned tasks in free open-source software packages (R, GeoDa and QGIS). Although this course does not require advanced statistical or epidemiological training, it is recommended that students have experience working with statistical software packages since assignments will require students to write and execute software command scripts.

  • SPH-E 659 Intermediate Epidemiological Methods (3 cr.)

    The intermediate course in analytic epidemiology methods will focus on interpretation of findings, study design, analytic approach, and results. Students will be introduced to different viewpoints regarding controversial approaches to study design, analysis and interpretation and will complete exercises involving critiques of published work and analysis of existing data.

  • SPH-E 661 Introduction to R: Software for Statistical Computing (3 cr.) Data visualization and analysis are primary skills that all public health professionals utilize. These skills are crucial to communicate key public health messages to the stakeholders and the general public. In addition, master's level public health students are be expected to conduct data analysis upon graduation. This is an important skill-set that is valued by government agencies, research institutions, and private industries who employ public health graduates. This course is designed to provide practical data management, manipulation, visualization and analytic skills that will translate to all professional settings. This course will provide students with an opportunity to use R, a free software, to perform statistical computing. The R language provides a rich environment for working with data, especially for statistical modeling and graphics. This course will emphasize data manipulation and visualization, as well as reinforce statistical modeling courses. In particular, this course will introduce the R statistical language - which is a rich environment for working with data. Students will learn how to import, clean, manage, manipulate and display data. They will also learn how to create print quality tables using R functions. Though this course will emphasize data manipulation and visualization, it will also reinforce statistical modeling courses. Most importantly, this is a hands-on, project-based course to enable students to develop skills and to solve data problems using R.
  • SPH-E 670 Meta-analysis and Systematic Review for Public Health Research (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 651 Epidemiology and SPH-Q 501 Introduction to Statistics in Public Health or equivalents. This course will familiarize students with the tools to summarize a defined area of existing literature, culminating in students conducting their own publication-quality systematic review/meta-analysis. Topics we will cover include: literature reviews, meta-analysis and meta-regression, assessing and addressing heterogeneity across studies, and assessing and addressing bias in studies.
  • SPH-E 680 Nutritional Epidemiology (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 651 and SPH-Q 501 or equivalent. This course introduces basic concepts of epidemiology, basic methods of dietary assessment, reviews various topics in nutrition and chronic diseases and teaches the skills needed for critical evaluation of the nutrition epidemiology literature.
  • SPH-E 691 Readings in Epidemiology (1-3 cr.) P: Instructor permission, SPH-651. Planned readings in specialized epidemiology areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students, and reading proposals must be approved by faculty in Epidemiology. Repeatable once for credit
  • SPH-E 692 Research in Epidemiology (1-3 cr.) P: Instructor Permission. Research projects are conducted under the direction of a member of the Epidemiology graduate faculty. This can be in the form of grant writing, or manuscript preparation, or data analysis. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students upon the approval of faculty. Repeatable three times for credit.
  • SPH-E 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Epidemiology (1–7 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in public health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only.
  • SPH-E 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Epidemiology (1–3 cr.) P: Permission of academic advisor. C: SPH-E 696. Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall semester SPH-E 698 course. Enrollment in the spring semester SPH-E 698 course requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall semester SPH-E 698 course. This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Epidemiology. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-E 758 Advanced Epidemiology (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 658; SPH-E 659 or equivalent (or permission of instructor).

    Causal inference from observational data is a key task of epidemiology. This course will first present the concepts underlying causal theory and then show how epidemiologic concepts and methods introduced in E658 and E659 can be understood within this general framework. Epidemiologic concepts such as confounding, comparability, overall effects, direct effects, intermediate variables, selection bias, and information bias will be formally defined within the context of counterfactual theory.

  • SPH-E 759 Advanced Epidemiological Methods (3 cr.) P: SPH-E 658; SPH-E 659 or equivalent (or permission of instructor). This course will present advanced statistical methods used in Epidemiology. Topics covered include: Marginal Effects and Potential Outcomes Estimation; Propensity Scores; Analysis of Time-Dependent Treatments; Cox-Proportional Hazards Model; Longitudinal and Hierarchical Data Analysis; Generalized Estimating Equations; GLMs and GAMs.
  • SPH-E 790 The Logic and Rationale of Epidemiological Research: Advanced Research MethodologyTitle (3 cr.) P: Enrollment in E-790 is restricted to PhD students only. This is an advanced course in the research methods that epidemiologists use to answer empirical questions. This course advances doctoral students in analytical epidemiology and the process of epidemiological research. This course provides training in constructing the argument, determining the best study design, and articulating the rationale for analysis.
  • SPH-E 792 Independent Research in Epidemiology (1–3 cr.) P: SPH-E 651; Instructor permission; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Research project is conducted under the direction of faculty member of the graduate faculty. This can be in form of grant writing, or manuscript preparation, or data analysis. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students, and project proposals must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-E 793 Independent Readings in Epidemiology (1–3 cr.) P: SPH-E 651; Instructor permission; Readings proposal must be approved in advance. Planned readings in specialized epidemiology areas of professional interest are conducted under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enrollment is limited to advanced graduate students.
    Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-E 794 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology (1 cr.) P: SPH-E 651 This course will equip students with skills to apply epidemiological concepts to critically evaluate research reports in the public health and medical literature. Students will have opportunities to lead discussions, and present their proposed dissertation studies. The class will invite guest speakers to present their research relevant to epidemiology and public health. Graded on S/F basis only.
  • SPH-E 799 Dissertaion Research in Epidemiology (1–12 cr.) P: Qualifying exams must be passed prior to enrollment in dissertation credits. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-E 894 Doctoral Competency Evaluation (1 cr.) P: Completion of three semesters of SPH-E 794 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology. This course requires students to synthesize and to integrate knowledge acquired through their coursework in epidemiology. Students will be evaluated on Epidemiology PhD competencies.
Interdepartmental
Interdepartmental - SPH-X
  • SPH-X 242 Travel Study: Wellness of Nations (6 cr.) From global perspectives, students critically analyze physical, social and mental health, and quality of life of populations in nations. Students assess the many indigenous factors that culturally influence health and wellness, and acquire instructions and field experiences with our international partner universities.
  • SPH-X 505 Principles and Foundations of Public Health (3 cr.) An introduction to the five core areas of public health and the manner in which public health is related to multidisciplinary approaches to address health-related challenges in diverse communities.
  • SPH-X 511 Public Relations (3 cr.) Principles of public relations, human relations, identification, and analysis of publics, problem solving, and techniques in communication media.
  • SPH-X 561 Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.) Sources of revenue and budgetary procedures for public leisure service agencies. Fund management, financial analysis, purchasing, contractual agreements, and other fiscal concerns.
  • SPH-X 580 Introduction to Qualitative Inquiry in Public Health Research (3 cr.) This course provides an overview of origins and philosophies behind various techniques in qualitative public health research. Topics include: life history and narratives, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, case study, focus group, research question formulation, data collection techniques, and methods of analyzing qualitative data.
  • SPH-X 590 Introduction to Research in Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (3 cr.) Methods and techniques of research; potential and completed problems analyzed with view to selection of topics; standards for writing research papers.
Interdepartmental Graduate School - SPH-G
  • SPH-G 599 Thesis Research (0 cr.) P: Previous enrollment in the required number of thesis credits. Master's students who have enrolled in 30 or more hours of graduate course work applicable to the degree and who have completed all other requirements of the degree except the thesis of final project of performance may enroll in G599.  Requires section authorization. Repeatable.
  • SPH-G 901 Advanced Research (6 cr.) P: Previous enrollment in the number of dissertation credits whiich is required for the student's degree. Available to graduate students who have completed all course requirements for their doctorates, have passed doctoral qualifying examinations, and have the requisite number of degree credit hours, this course provides the advanced research student with a forum for sharing ideas and problems under the supervision of a senior researcher. Repeatable five times for a maximun of six total enrollments.
Kinesiology
Athletics - SPH-A
  • SPH-A 265 Athletic Training Education I (1 cr.) P: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. Students will be introduced to concepts of experiential and service learning in order to orient them to the roles and responsibilities of the athletic training student at IU and gain the most from the learning experience while in the program. The student will participate in 30 clinical education hours. During this time, the student will write personal reflections about clinical education experiences.
  • SPH-A 269 Clinical Education in Athletic Training I (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Introductory clinical education for students admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP). Students will complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200-300 hours of practical experience each semester under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers.
  • SPH-A 270 Clinical Education in Athletic Training II (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Introductory clinical education for students admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP). Students will complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200-300 hours of practical experience each semester under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers.
  • SPH-A 279 Recognition and Evaluation of Lower Extremity Injuries in the Physically Active (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Educates the athletic training student in principles and procedures of soft tissue evaluation of lower extremity injuries. Includes skill development and practice in evaluating techniques for assessing lower extremity trauma.
  • SPH-A 281 Recognition and Evaluation of Upper Extremity Injuries in the Physically Active (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Educates the athletic training student in principles and procedures of soft tissue evaluation of upper extremity injuries. Includes skill development and practice in evaluation techniques for assessing upper extremity trauma.
  • SPH-A 282 Strapping and Bandaging of the Physically Active (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Advanced course in the recognition of injuries and their need for support and bandaging. Lecture and demonstration of emergency procedures as well as general strapping and bandaging.
  • SPH-A 283 General Medical Issues in Athletic Training (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Development of knowledge related to general and medical conditions confronting the Development of knowledge related to general and medical conditions confronting the athletic trainer. An emphasis is placed on understanding the signs, symptoms, and predisposing conditions to theses illnesses and conditions. An introduction to principles of pharmacology, assessment and treatment of illness. Off-campus service learning activities may be required. Make consistent with Accreditation Standards may be required.
  • SPH-A 361 Coaching of Football (2 cr.) Fundamentals of offensive and defensive line and backfield play; technique of forward passing; outstanding rules; offensive plays; most frequently used defenses.
  • SPH-A 363 Coaching of Baseball (2 cr.) Fundamentals of pitching, catching, batting, base running, infield and outfield play; offensive and defensive strategy; organization and management.
  • SPH-A 364 Coaching of Track and Field (2 cr.) Fundamental procedures in conditioning and training for cross country, track, and field. Gives basic understanding of each event's coaching strategy and coaching psychology. Home meet organization and management.
  • SPH-A 365 Athletic Training Education II (1 cr.) P: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, SPH-A 270. Students are assigned to a clinical education site. The student's preceptor will specify class-goals. The student will work on evidence-based practice projects, and will become proficient in advanced taping and strapping techniques. The student will write personal reflections about clinical education experiences.

  • SPH-A 366 Coaching of Gymnastics (2 cr.) Practical and theoretical experiences in gymnastics: students participate in performance of skills in the gym and in class discussion sessions dealing with conducting of meets, organizing workouts, ordering equipment, officiating, history and development of gymnastics, governing bodies, and psychology of coaching.
  • SPH-A 367 Coaching of Swimming and Diving (2 cr.) Theory and methods of coaching swimming and diving, covering technical, administrative, and organizational aspects of the process. Emphasis on fundamentals, conditioning, and coaching psychology.
  • SPH-A 368 Coaching of Tennis (2 cr.) Theory and methods of coaching tennis, covering technical, administrative, and organizational aspects of the process. Emphasis on fundamentals, tactics, conditioning, and conduct of practice sessions.
  • SPH-A 370 Coaching of Soccer (2 cr.) Theory and methods of coaching soccer, covering technical, administrative, and organizational aspects of the process. Emphasis on execution of advanced skills and team offense and defense patterns, conditioning the player, and organizing practice sessions.
  • SPH-A 371 Coaching of Volleyball (2 cr.) Theory and methods of coaching volleyball, covering technical, administrative, and organizational aspects of the process. Emphasis on execution of advanced skills and team offense and defense patterns, conditioning the player, and organizing practice sessions.
  • SPH-A 381 Clinical Education in Athletic Training III (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Intermediate clinical education for students admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP). Students will complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200-300 hours of practical experience each semester under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers.
  • SPH-A 382 Clinical Education in Athletic Training IV (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Intermediate clinical education for students admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP). Students will complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200 - 300 hours of practical experience each semester under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers.
  • SPH-A 383 Principles and Techniques of Therapeutic Modalities (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Physics and physiological principles behind the use of therapeutic modalities selected to treat the injured physically active person. The class includes lecture, demonstration, and laboratory experience in the application of therapeutic modalities.
  • SPH-A 384 Principles and Techniques of Therapeutic Exercise (4 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. (Formerly HPER-A 384) Principles in the use of physical medicine and rehabilitation techniques to treat the injured physically active person, to facilitate enhanced recovery and safe return to activity. Lecture, demonstration, and laboratory experienced in the principles of therapeutic exercise.
  • SPH-A 387 Management of Dance Injuries (3 cr.) An introduction to the health care issues encountered by dance professionals. Students will recognize basic problems and injuries that occur in the field and have a solid understanding of essential first aid and treatment concepts.
  • SPH-A 465 Athletic Training Education III (1 cr.) P: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, SPH-A 382. Students complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200-300 hours of practical experience under direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers. Students are introduced to instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization.

  • SPH-A 481 Clinical Education in Athletic Training V (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. (Formerly HPER-A 481) Advanced clinical education for students admitted into the Athletic Education Program (ATEP). Students will complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200-300 hours of practical experience each semester under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers.
  • SPH-A 482 Clinical Education in Athletic Training VI (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Advanced clinical education for students admitted into the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP). Students will complete laboratory experiences as well as gain approximately 200-300 hours of practical experience each semester under the direct supervision of certified athletic trainers or other health care providers. (spring semester)
  • SPH-A 483 Principles of Sports Officiating (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Topics include such sports as football, baseball, basketball, volleyball, and gymnastics. Ethics of sport officiating: mastery, interpretation, and application of sports rules. Laboratory and classroom experiences.
  • SPH-A 490 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Aligns and defines the importance of the administration role in athletic training. Lectures and reports cover bookkeeping, budget management, athletic medical records, drug testing, and legal aspects of sports medicine.
  • SPH-A 488 Advanced Athletic Training Techniques (3 cr.) Designed for athletic training majors, this course provides an anatomical foundation for the understanding and analysis of human movement, specifically applied to assessment, exercise and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The course addresses theoretical concepts and clinical practices in the assessment and rehabilitation of sports-related injuries, including assessment of joint structures, joint mobility, various anatomical alignments, strength and flexibility testing, as well as gait analysis.
  • SPH-A 494 Senior Seminar in Athletic Training (1 cr.) P: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. A seminar designed to assimilate all previous experience of the student athletic trainers as well as prepare them for the athletic trainers certification examination. Practical job-related skills which the athletic trainer will be confronted with, will be addressed in this class.
  • SPH-A 581 Athletic Training Principles for the Spine (3 cr.) This course is intended to discuss advanced aspects of injury management with particular emphasis on philosophy of care for the athlete. Class lectures and discussion will focus on detailed assessment techniques and treatment of connective tissue, management of acute and chronic trauma to the spine and pelvis in sport. Particular emphasis will be placed on current research in prevention and treatment in physically active individuals.
  • SPH-A 582 Current Topics in Athletic Training (3 cr.) Study of the various problems confronting an athletic trainer. These experiences are developed through lectures, demonstrations, and discussions with authorities (including physicians and lawyers) in the areas of concern.
  • SPH-A 583 General Medical Conditions in Athletic Training (3 cr.) This course is designed to enhance the athletic trainer's knowledge of the pathogenesis, pathology, and clinical manifestations of common illnesses, infectious diseases, and other medical conditions commonly seen in the athletic / physically active population. Illness / condition recognition, assessment, differential diagnosis, referral and treatment in different patient populations will be discussed in lectures, labs, and through clinical experiences. It will also provide a comprehensive and relevant understanding of the various aspects of pharmacology as is relates to the pathological conditions covered. The course will identify the basic principles of pharmacology including concepts of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Common indications, contraindications, and adverse reactions of medications covered in the course will include those pertinent to sports related injuries and conditions. It will explore a wide range of substances including prescription medications, as well as some over-the-counter (OTC) medications. The focus will be on major drug groups and will highlight both the sports medicine and clinical medicine issues.
  • SPH-A 584 Administration of Athletic Training (3 cr.) Provides classroom and practical experience in developing pre-athletic physical examinations; athletic training responsibilities as viewed by the administrator of athletic programs; certification examination requirements; and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
  • SPH-A 585 Rehabilitation and Conditioning of Athletes (3 cr.) Introduction to the scientific background necessary for understanding, planning, and conducting conditioning and rehabilitation programs for athletes; procedures, methods, and factors for developing such programs.
  • SPH-A 586 Athletic Training Principles for Therapeutic Modalities (3 cr.) Physical and chemical properties of hydro- and electrotherapy with an emphasis on the physiological and anatomical principles, techniques, and legal aspects of application.
  • SPH-A 587 Athletic Training Principles for Upper Extremities (3 cr.) Evaluation and advanced management of injuries to the upper extremity including, but not limited to, the head, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. Assessment of throwing mechanics and surgical procedures needed to correct injuries will also be covered.
  • SPH-A 588 Anatomical Basis of Athletic Injuries (3 cr.) A gross anatomy course focusing on the extremities. Emphasis will be placed on the link between anatomical structure, sports medicine, athletic injuries, and rehabilitative techniques. The course is designed to be a self-guided learning experience. The laboratory portion of the class will comprise the majority of time; activities include cadaver dissection, 3-D computerized images, and extremity models. However, several classroom lectures will be presented to supplement the laboratory experiences.
  • SPH-A 589 Rehabilitation Principles and Techniques in Athletic Training II (3 cr.) This course will be a continuation of the rehabilitation course sequence relating the scientific background necessary for understanding, planning, and developing rehabilitation programs for athletes. It will continue to emphasize the composition, structure, and biomechanical behavior of connective tissues as it relates to healing. The course will enhance the athletic trainer's understanding of the pathomechanics and functional biomechanics of sports-related injuries and pathological conditions commonly seen in the physically active population. In addition, it will address theoretical concepts and clinical practices in the assessment and rehabilitation of sports related injuries, including muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, posture and body mechanics, proprioception, and functional / activity specific exercise. Emphasis will be in the development of clinical skills necessary for the design and progression of rehabilitation programs.
  • SPH-A 590 Athletic Training Principles for Lower Extremities (3 cr.) Evaluation and advanced management of injuries to the lower extremity including, but not limited to, the foot, ankle, knee, hip, and sacroiliac joints. Assessment of gait, orthotic construction, and surgical procedures needed to correct severe injuries. Relevant orthopedic controversies concerning injury management.
  • SPH-A 610 Introduction to Athletic Training Research (2 cr.) This course will address a variety of introductory topics related to critical review of research in medical sciences and athletic training. Topics vary by semester. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-A 611 Advanced Topics: Athletic Training Research (2 cr.) This course will address varied advanced topics related to experimental design and presentation of research in medical sciences and athletic training. Topics vary by semester. S/F grading. Repeatable once for credit with different topic. (spring semester)
  • SPH-A 695 Practicum in Athletic Training (2 cr.) P: Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Only open to Athletic Training majors. Practical field experience under supervision; seminar sessions. Only S/F grades given.
Communication - SPH-C
  • SPH-C 213 Introduction to Sport Communication (3 cr.) An introduction to the area of sport communication. Emphasis is placed on the fields within sport communication, including, but not limited to: sport information, public relations, media relations, player relations, radio and TV sports production, marketing and research, interactive media, media trends, production competencies, and employment options and trends.
  • SPH-C 251 Sport and the Electronic Media (3 cr.) The purpose of this class is to introduce the concepts and ideas relating to electronically-mediated sport communication. Included in the class are modules relating to visual and field communication, and new media-based written and aural forms of sport communication. Students are required to create, edit, and analyze content.
  • SPH-C 329 Issues in Sport Communication (3 cr.) Examines issues in sport communication utilizing extensive student participation in case scenarios, role playing, and sport communication profiles. Special attention is given to topics including: historical and theoretical features of the field, personal and organizational processes, sport media, services and support systems, sociological and legal aspects.
  • SPH-C 497 Internship in Sport Communication (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Internship must be approved in advance. A field learning experience for sport communication majors. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-C 580 Sport Communications (3 cr.) The application of communication theories to the sport industry. Examination of public and media relations with a special focus on message development, image building and crisis management of sport organizations.
  • SPH-C 582 Creative Sports Writing (3 cr.) This class will offer an overview of sports writing from its origins to its current status in the 21st century. The course will enable students to learn fundamentals of the sports writing process from informatic gathering to writing and editing copy. Students will gain skills necessary for working in today's sport departments and will also learn how to critically analyze others' articles. This class is about writing well and grammar counts. Students must convey stories clearly, accurately, and creatively.
  • SPH-C 584 Leadership and Sport Communication (3 cr.) An introduction to contemporary theories and practical applications of leadership attitudes, behaviors, and strategies that help sport management professionals communicate effectively. Special attention is given to issues in understanding human behavior in organizational context, motivation, group resource maximization, managing conflict, directing organizational cultures, managing and leading through chaos and complexity, and how leaders in sport can succeed through effective professional communication.
  • SPH-C 586 Understanding Sport Media (3 cr.) Examination of sports societal influence focusing on media issues from a socio-cultural-historical perspective. As well as, contemporary perspectives. Focus on converging worlds of print journalism, electronic media, public relations, advertising documentary and emerging technologies as expressed in the new commercial reality of sport.
Kinesiology - SPH-K
  • SPH-K 140 Foundations and Principles of Physical Education (2 cr.) C: SPH-K 141 Introduction to kinesiology as a discipline and physical education as a subdiscipline for students interested in teaching physical education. Historical and philosophical perspectives on the teaching of physical education as a profession.
  • SPH-K 141 Fundamentals of Human Movement (3 cr.) C: SPH-K 140 Introduction to identification, analysis, and evaluation of fundamental motor patterns, progressions in skill development, and skills for effective teaching. Analysis, evaluation, and development of personal movement and sport skills.
  • SPH-K 150 Introduction to Kinesiology and Public Health (3 cr.) Introductory course designed to provide students with an overview of both the foundations of public health and kinesiology. Specifically, this course will introduce students to the five core knowledge areas of public health including epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health science, health administration, and social and behavioral sciences as well as the core areas of kinesiology including history of physical activity, exercise physiology, biomechanics, and motor control. The connection between the scholarship of kinesiology and goals of public health will be emphasized.
  • SPH-K 200 Microcomputer Applications in Kinesiology (3 cr.) A hands-on introduction to use of microcomputers as problem-solving tools in physical education. Application programs in word processing, spreadsheets, data management, and graphics applied to specific problems in physical education, athletics, and sports.
  • SPH-K 203 Teaching Practicum in Physical Education (1 cr.) P: Admission to PETE. C: SPH-K 214. Supervised early experience in teaching physical education skills. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 205 Structural Kinesiology (3 cr.) Overview of basic human body structures and functions appropriate for beginning students in physical education. Fundamental concepts concerning the interaction of biological and mechanical aspects of the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular structures. Emphasis on practical application to study and teaching of skilled human movement.
  • SPH-K 206 Recreational Sports Programming (3 cr.) Overview of the programmatic elements and techniques that currently exist in recreational sports, including informal, intramural, club, and extramural programming; value and benefits of recreational sports; programming techniques; publicity and promotion; facility utilization; equipment concerns; safety; liability; and program observation.
  • SPH-K 214 Basic Methods of Teaching Physical Education (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 140; SPH-K 141; Admission to PETE. Introduction to teaching methods in physical education including writing goals, objectives, and lesson plans; peer teaching; self-evaluation of teaching; teaching and learning styles; skill analysis; and assessment. Includes observation and teaching experiences.
  • SPH-K 216 Foundations of Physical Activity and Public Health (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 205, This course is designed to introduce the field of physical activity and public health and provide students with foundational principles of both public health science and exercise science to promote improved health through physical activity.
  • SPH-K 217 Group Physical Activity/Exercise Instruction (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 205, To apply the CDC/Physical Activity (PA) and ACSM exercise recommendations to group movement for apparently healthy populations of varying abilities. Compose and evaluate group movement experiences utilizing a research-based approach to group exercise instruction of various formats.
  • SPH-K 218 Individual Physical Activity/Exercise Instruction (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 205, SPH-K 216, Admission to Health Fitness Specialist major or Fitness Instruction minor. To provide content knowledge and practical application of physical activity (PA) and exercise best practices for apparently healthy participants in preparation for one-on-one coaching and instruction of movement programs.
  • SPH-K 219 Performance and Teaching of Stunts, Tumbling, and Novice Gymnastics (1 cr.) Instruction and practice teaching of fundamental stunts, tumbling activities, and novice gymnastic movements.
  • SPH-K 224 Teaching of Dance Activities (2 cr.) Methods and materials of folk, square, social, and modern dance. Terminology, fundamental skills, selection, and presentation of dances. Emphasis on planning dance units and teaching of dances. Fundamentals of locomotor and nonlocomotor skills as well as experiences in creative movement activities. Instruction in rhythmic movement progressions and development of materials for unit plans.
  • SPH-K 280 Basic Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (2 cr.) Course will focus on basic principles of prevention recognition and management of sport-related injuries.
  • SPH-K 283 Group Fitness Practicum (2 cr.) P: SPH-K 205, Provides guidelines and practical experience for instructing safe, effective, and purposeful group functional training: indoor cycling, water fitness, sports conditioning and bootcamp group fitness formats; course formats utilize a coaching-style approach to group fitness. Provide guidelines and practical experience for instructing group exercise for older adults and large exercisers.
  • SPH-K 290 Movement Experiences for Preschool and Elementary School Children (2 cr.) Covers potential outcomes of preschool and elementary school motor development programs, how to implement such programs, and appropriate movement experiences for young children.
  • SPH-K 301 Job Search Strategies for Kinesiology Students (1 cr.) This course is designed to assist junior and senior level kinesiology students prepare for their professional endeavors after college. It will help students develop a career plan by addressing general job search strategies, as well as strategies specific to the fields of healthcare, fitness, and wellness, sport marketing and management, and sport communication.
  • SPH-K 303 Physical Education Laboratory/ Field Experience (0–3 cr.) Laboratory or field experience in physical education.
  • SPH-K 313 Tools of Learning (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 214. Methods and materials of cooperative, low-level, and lead-up games and activities and recreational, leisure, and adventure/challenge activities. Emphasis on use of such activities in developing and teaching units for all age groups.
  • SPH-K 314 Intermediate Methods in Teaching Physical Education (3 cr.) Emphasizes the continued development of effective teaching skills and knowledge in the physical education context. Includes knowledge about the teaching process including management, motivation, teaching styles, and assessment.
  • SPH-K 316 Theories of Advanced Conditioning (2 cr.) Practical application of conditioning and physical training theory to teaching and coaching of sport and fitness activities using track and field as a model. Physiological aspects of physical training; biomechanical analysis of skills, skill progressions, and teaching techniques. Discusses interval, circuit, plyometric, and Fartlek training.
  • SPH-K 317 Theory and Practice of Resistance Training (2 cr.) Teaching and training methods, analysis of correct training techniques and error detection, and the physical adaptations related to strength and power training. Discusses how to design a comprehensive long-term training program based on the scientific foundations. This course will follow NSCA guidelines.
  • SPH-K 323 Teaching Individual and Dual Activities (2 cr.) P: SPH-K 214. Teaching of a variety of individual and dual sports, games, and activities for K-12. Analysis of skills, progressions, error analysis and correction, teaching techniques, unit planning, skill assessment, and evaluation and teaching experiences.
  • SPH-K 325 Teaching of Team Sports (2 cr.) P: SPH-K 214. Teaching of a variety of team sports, games, and activities for K-12. Analysis of skills, progressions, error analysis and correction, teaching techniques, unit planning, skill assessment, and evaluation and teaching experiences.
  • SPH-K 326 Lifeguard Training and Water Safety Instructor (3 cr.) P: Advanced swimming proficiency and 17 years of age. Instruction and analysis of swimming and lifesaving skills. Teaching methods and organizational techniques for all levels of swimming. Qualifying students receive the A.R.C. WSI Certification.
  • SPH-K 327 Behavioral Aspects of Physical Activity and Exercise (3 cr.) Provides students with practical experience in physical activity/exercise coaching utilizing behavior models and theories and physical activity/fitness best practices. Students examine physical activity theories and motivational techniques needed to assist participants with physical activity perspectives/interventions. Students apply behavioral techniques to actual clients and evaluate the outcomes of their efforts.
  • SPH-K 334 Cultural Diversity in American Sport (3 cr.) Examination of the historical and contemporary experiences and accomplishments of black athletes. Investigation of the impact of sociological variables on their social and athletic participation.
  • SPH-K 335 Theories of Conditioning for Coaching (3 cr.) P: Limited to coaching minor students or permission of instructor. A practical application of conditioning and physical training theory of coaching and high level fitness. The class utilizes physiological principles of conditioning to prepare athletes for optimal performance. Discusses various types of training and organization of workouts for endurance, speed, and strength.
  • SPH-K 375 Practicum in Preschool and Elementary School Physical Education (3 cr.) Supervised teaching experiences in physical education with preschool and elementary school children. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 385 Practicum in Adapted Physical (1–3 cr.) P: SPH-K 398; Instructor permission. A practical learning experience in adapted physical education with disabled children. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 391 Biomechanics (3 cr.) An introduction to the mechanics of human motion. Includes linear and angular kinematics and kinetics in the context of human motion; mechanics of fluids; mechanics of muscles; analysis of selected sports activities.
  • SPH-K 395 Fitness Specialist Practicum (2 cr.) P: SPH-K 218. Students will learn and apply effective program design and exercise leadership, specifically with youth who are considered overweight and/or obese, in this content-based, performance-based, and process-based course. Students will create safe, effective program designs based on individual client needs and goals. Students will be exposed to a variety of programming options, and provided with tools for personalizing and individualizing exercise programs based on a client’s personal profile (medical history, assessment and goals). Graded on S/F bassis.
  • SPH-K 398 Adapted Physical Education (3 cr.) Study of conditions that require physical education programs to be adapted to the special needs of individuals. Principles and practices in the application of exercise and activities for persons with specific disabling conditions.
  • SPH-K 405 Exercise and Sport Psychology (3 cr.) An overview of the field, including psychological aspects of sport performance, coaching, and the relationship of exercise with mental health. Various theoretical orientations will be addressed with an emphasis on empirical research.
  • SPH-K 409 Basic Physiology of Exercise (3 cr.) P: ANAT-A 215 or SPH-K 205 and PHSL-P 215 or equivalent. A survey of human physiology parameters as related to physical exercise and work and the development of physiological fitness factors. Physiological foundations will be considered. Not available for graduate credit.
  • SPH-K 412 Exercise in Health and Disease (3 cr.) P: Prerequisite or corequisite: SPH-K 409, PHSL-P 431 or instructor consent. Designed for students preparing for careers in medical professions: In-depth scientific study of etiology, pathophysiology, and mechanisms of exercise intervention for chronic diseases: including, not limited to, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, diabetes (including complications), hyperlipidemia, obesity, cancer, and chronic obstructive lung disease.
  • SPH-K 414 Professional Seminar in Physical Education (1 cr.) P: EDUC-M 456 and concurrent EDUC-M 482. Course focus on problem solving, reflection, and professional development during student teaching semester. Portfolio completion and exit interview.
  • SPH-K 416 Physical Activity/Fitness Administration (3 cr.) Provide research and content information for administration of Physical Activity (PA)/Fitness business practices. Learn trends and best program practices for PA/Fitness businesses. Discuss contemporary issues and participate in group problem solving activities for a business. Integrate knowledge through researching a specific business of interest using PA/Fitness Administrative best practices.
  • SPH-K 417 Physical Activity and Disease: Prevention and Treatment (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 409 Provides an overview of the role of physical activity in the prevention of disease and disability. The causes of common diseases, physiological impact, and treatment side effects of common diseases will be discussed to enable effective exercise prescription within special populations.
  • SPH-K 419 Fitness Testing and Interpretation (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 218, SPH-K 409. Provides practical experience with various fitness testing protocols, basic exercise prescription, and interpretation of fitness data.
  • SPH-K 420 Exercise Leadership and Program Design (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 417, and SPH-K 419. The course is designed to be a culminating experience for the health fitness specialist student to demonstrate practical application of the theory, techniques and skills of safe, effective, efficient exercise leadership and program design in a variety of supervised settings with both apparently healthy and special populations. This course serves as a foundation for becoming a qualified candidate for the ACSM Health, Fitness Instructor national certification.
  • SPH-K 421 Special Topics in Physical Education (1–3 cr.) An in-depth investigation of a contemporary topic in the field of physical education. Topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 427 Administration, Maintenance, and Construction of Aquatic Facilities (3 cr.) Information in pool management, maintenance, and construction, with emphasis on the newest design information and construction techniques.
  • SPH-K 435 Philosophical Foundations of Coaching (3 cr.) P: Limited to Coaching minor students or instructor consent. A philosophical approach to coaching for various sports. Topics include, but are not limited to different coaching styles and strategies, growth and development characteristics, legal issues and liability, pedagogical considerations, coaching relationships, and other issues and problems related to sport.
  • SPH-K 444 Issues in Physical Education and Sport (3 cr.) A senior seminar. Major arguments, pro and con, on a number of controversial ideas in physical education and sport. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 450 Special Topics in Kinesiology (1–3 cr.) Workshops, institutes, clinics, or seminars in kinesiology. Credit will depend on the nature of the project undertaken and the length of time involved. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 452 Motor Learning (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 205 or ANAT-A 215, PHSL-P 215, or consent of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors only. An examination of factors that affect the acquisition and performance of motor skills. Topics include perception, psychomotor learning, practice methods, and theories of neuromuscular integration.
  • SPH-K 455 Practicum in Coaching (2 cr.) P: Junior/senior standing. Limited to coaching minor students or permission of instructor. Students will serve as an assistant under an experienced coach and will participate in weekly seminars.
  • SPH-K 464 Small Boat Sailing Instructor (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission. U.S. Sailing Small Boat Sailor Level 1 Instructor course. Course topics include sports psychology, sports physiology, lesson planning, risk management, and teaching techniques.
  • SPH-K 472 Professional Diver Development (3 cr.) P: SPH-I 371 or instructor permission. The course is designed to prepare experienced divers for entry into the Professional Diving Industry.  Content includes an introduction to the business of diving, leadership development, boating and navigational skills, photo and video production, equipment troubleshooting, full-face communication mask training, and dive skill mastery.
  • SPH-K 473 Laboratory Teaching in the Physical Education Program (1 cr.) Prepractice teaching experience. Students assist and help teach activities in the Physical Education Program. Students must have had a course in the teaching of that activity before they are allowed to assist. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 480 Current Trends in Physical Education (1–3 cr.) Focuses on promoting quality physical education in K-12 programs. Topics are designed to address four areas of critical importance: 1) curriculum and instruction, 2) innovative activities, 3) adapted physical education, and 4) assessment.
  • SPH-K 485 Practicum in Physical Education and Athletics (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission. A practical learning experience in teaching and/or coaching under guidance of faculty and supervisor. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for up to 3 credits.
  • SPH-K 486 Field Experience in Fitness and Wellness (1-8 cr.) P: Completion of all Public Health Core and Fitness and Wellness Courses, and departmental permission. BSPH students in the Fitness and Wellness degree develop their public health skills through professional experiences in public health settings under the supervision of IU SPH-K faculty and facilitation of preceptors. The faculty coordinator and the preceptors conduct regular evaluations, provide written progress reports, and facilitate the development of the major independent project. S/F grading. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 488 Athletic Training Techniques (3 cr.) Designed for athletic training majors, this course is to provide an anatomical foundation for the understanding and analysis of human movement, specifically applied to assessment, exercise and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The course will address theoretical concepts and clinical practices in the assessment and rehabilitation of sports-related injuries, including assessment of joint structures, joint mobility, various anatomical alignments, strength and flexibility testing, as well as gait analysis.
  • SPH-K 490 Motor Development and Learning (3 cr.) Motor learning and development principles throughout the life span. Emphasis on observing and analyzing characteristic movement behavior, motor learning, and motor performance, with application to developmentally appropriate movement experiences.
  • SPH-K 492 Research in Kinesiology (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Open to junior or senior majors or minors in kinesiology. Permission of department chair is required. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 495 Tools of Learning for Elementary School Children (3 cr.) Creative and playground equipment appropriate for teaching elementary school children. Techniques for integrating cognitive, affective, and psychomotor behavior through the use of this equipment.
  • SPH-K 496 Laboratory Assisting or Field Experience in Kinesiology (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission. Student will assist in either an ongoing or a new research project, or obtain some other field experience, under the guidance of a faculty sponsor. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 497 Internship in Exercise Science (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Internship must be approved in advance. A field learning experience for exercise science majors. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 503 Workshops in Kinesiology (1–3 cr.) Designed to cover a variety of topics in the area of kinesiology. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 506 Computer Applications in Kinesiology (3 cr.) Hands-on applications in the use of microcomputers as problem-solving tools in physical education. Programming applications and problems in physical education, sport sciences, administration, athletics, and research.
  • SPH-K 520 METLAB for Data Analysis (3 cr.) P: Any statistics course is recommended. This course is intended for programming novices, with little or no background in any programming language. We will cover the basics of programming in general and MATLAB in particular, with a focus on writing programs to organize, structure, and analyze types of data common in behavioral and physiological research. Topics include variables, scripts and functions, selection statements, loops, string manipulation, data structures, file input and output, data plotting, indexing, statistics, and curve fitting. Throughout the course, students will write a series of functions to analyze a real data set. Challenges and strategies related to research data will be emphasized.
  • SPH-K 524 Exercise and Physical Activity for People with Disabilities (3 cr.) Provides in-depth knowledge regarding exercise and physical activity as it applies to people with disabilities across the life span. Topics addressed include assessment, determinants, programming, physiological responses to exercise, adaptations, and accessibility issues. Particular focus will be placed on childhood onset conditions.
  • SPH-K 527 Adherence to Physical Activity (3 cr.) An overview of empirical research and theoretical perspectives on adherence to various forms of physical activity. Research on special populations will be emphasized.
  • SPH-K 530 Mechanical Analysis of Human Performance (3 cr.) P: ANAT-A 215 or equivalent; PHYS-P 201 recommended. Newtonian mechanics applied to human movement. Analysis of sports techniques.
  • SPH-K 533 Advanced Theories of High-Level Performance (3 cr.) An integrative analysis of the physiological, psychological, and biomechanical principles, mechanisms, and phenomena underlying the acquisition of the capacities and abilities required for high-level physical performance.
  • SPH-K 535 Physiological Basis of Human Performance (3 cr.) P: PHSL-P 215 or equivalent. A study of physiological changes that occur with exercise. Emphasis on the cardiorespiratory, muscular, and biochemical adaptations to training, and how these affect human performance. Physiological principles are applied to athletic training, adult fitness, weight regulation, and physical therapy.
  • SPH-K 536 Obesity/Body Composition (3 cr.) P: PHSL-P 215 or equivalent. Study of a variety of contemporary issues related to obesity. Topics may include obesity and health risks, factors promoting fat deposition and metabolism, traditional versus nontraditional weight-loss programs, and adherence to weight-loss programs. Recommendations are presented for developing a comprehensive weight management program.
  • SPH-K 541 Nature and Basis of Motor Skill (3 cr.) An overview of neural mechanisms underlying motor control. Application of neurophysiological principles to human motor performance.
  • SPH-K 542 Neuromuscular Control of Movement (3 cr.) An overview of neural mechanisms underlying motor control. Includes applications of neurophysiological principles to human motor performance.
  • SPH-K 543 Cortical Control of Human Movement (3 cr.) This multidisciplinary course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and neurobehavioral foundations of voluntary human movement. Seminar-based lectures will emphasize the structure and functional involvement of cortical and subcortical regions associated with purposeful action (e.g., goal-directed reaching, speech, and locomotion). In addition, case descriptions will be discussed to provide students with a link between neuropathogenesis and specific motor deficits.
  • SPH-K 545 Childhood Motor Development (3 cr.) Study of the developmental aspects of human performance, including the processes of growth and motor development from conception to adolescence. Emphasizes research on cognitive, affective, and psychomotor development and their impact on the motor behavior of children.
  • SPH-K 546 Adolescent Motor Development (3 cr.) Study of the developmental aspects of human performance, including the processes of growth and motor development throughout adolescence. Emphasizes research on cognitive, affective, and psychomotor development and their impact on the motor behavior of the adolescent.
  • SPH-K 547 Developmental Movement for Children (3 cr.) A developmental approach to the physical education of children, covering the impact of developmental movement experiences, curriculum development, teacher behavior, class management, play environments, and a variety of developmentally appropriate movement activities. Students participate in classroom instruction, group projects, and a variety of contemporary game, rhythm, and self-testing activities.
  • SPH-K 550 Special Topics in Kinesiology (1–3 cr.) Selected topics in physical education. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 551 Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions (3 cr.) Provides professionals with a working knowledge of a variety of disabling conditions and health impairments. The characteristics, etiology, and pathology, plus behavioral, cognitive, physiological, and medical implications will be discussed. Students will experience selected medical terminology and medical/behavioral management procedures of educational rehabilitation settings.
  • SPH-K 552 Motor Assessment of Persons with Disabilities (3 cr.) Neurologic bases and factor structures of motor ability in normal and exceptional populations; movement problems associated with specific syndromes; assessment of motor development with structured and unstructured tests and checklists.
  • SPH-K 553 Physical Activity and Health (3 cr.) Provides an overview of the role of physical activity in the prevention of disease and disability. Explores the health related consequences of inactivity and discusses interventions designed to increase physical activity within populations. The course will focus on obesity and it health related consequences.
  • SPH-K 554 Seminar in Physical Activity and Wellness (3 cr.) Provides an environment in which students can explore and critically analyze areas of research relevant to physical activity, fitness, and wellness.
  • SPH-K 555 Problems in Adapted Physical Education (3 cr.) A study of problems as they relate to philosophy, procedures, and practices in adapted physical education.
  • SPH-K 556 Physical Activity Assessment in Public Health (3 cr.) Students will learn the theory and practice of physical activity assessment methods and technology. Physical activity assessment methodology, statistical analysis and data interpretation will be emphasized. Practical experiences using current assessment techniques will be provided. Focus will be placed on measurement and monitoring of both physical activity and sedentary behavior, as well as understanding the  delineation between these two health factors.
  • SPH-K 562 Exercise Prescription in Health and Disease I (3 cr.) Health fitness laboratory evaluation for exercise prescription for apparently healthy adults. Topics include 1) risk stratification, 2) laboratory evaluation and interpretation of blood chemistries, body composition, pulmonary functions, and exercise testing and 3) exercise prescription, with modification of prescription for pediatrics, obstetrics, and geriatrics.
  • SPH-K 563 Cardiac Assessment in Exercise Testing (3 cr.) Physiology, assessment techniques, and interpretation of basic cardiac rhythm, 12 lead EKG, and adjunctive imaging techniques in clinical exercise testing. Introduction to basic cardiac pharmacology.
  • SPH-K 565 Physical Activity Behavioral Interventions (3 cr.) Scholarly knowledge and practical experience related to physical activity coaching utilizing behavior models and theories and physical activity best practices. Students examine PA/wellness trends and philosophies, health behavior theories and motivational techniques. Application of coaching/behavioral techniques to actual clients/community integrates theory and best practices.
  • SPH-K 566 Preventive/Rehabilitative Exercise Program Administration (3 cr.) An overview of program structure, management, marketing, budget, and finance for corporate fitness, preventive medicine, sports medicine, and hospital-based rehabilitation.
  • SPH-K 569 Basic Pharmacologic Implication for Exercise and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (3 cr.) Basic pharmacology of cardiac, pulmonary, metabolic, and related conditions and their implications for the exercise/allied health professions. Course concludes with AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support Provider training (with certification).
  • SPH-K 573 Supervision in Physical Education (3 cr.) Principles of, problems in, and procedures for administering a city physical education program from the viewpoint of a city director or school administrator.
  • SPH-K 577 Seminar and Practicum in Adapted Physical Education (3 cr.) Participate in a research seminar or practicum experience related to adapted physical education. Seminar is for graduate students conducting research as part of a dissertation or thesis. Practicum is designed to provide non-thesis graduate students with experiences in real-world settings. Decisions regarding seminar or practicum enrollment must be instructor approved.
  • SPH-K 578 Cognitive Ergonomics (3 cr.) Human factors and ergonomics refer to the study of how people interact with their work environment. This course is designed to provide an advanced level review of the cognitive principles of this science by presenting a systematic application of relevant information about human capabilities, limitations, and behaviors with regard to the design of machines and their use within specific environments. Emphasis will be placed on the interactive nature of human machine systems from an information processing perspective, and the development of ergonomic models and techniques used to assess the design of modern workplaces.
  • SPH-K 580 Advanced Technology in Ergonomic Analysis (3 cr.) This course extends competencies in 3D CAD software for virtual world measurement and testing applications.  Motion capture EMG, Force plates and Jack Human Simulation software are used to design and evaluate tools and job tasks using CAD processes.
  • SPH-K 581 Participatory Ergonomics (3 cr.) Course presents facilitation methodologies employed by ergonomic change teams. Models, basic principles and skills practice will be presented in: organizational change, data collection, group process and training development.
  • SPH-K 582 Macro-Ergonomics: Socio-technical Systems Design (3 cr.) Course presents ergonomics in the design of socio-technical systems. Social, technical, and environmental systems are considered as influences on the design, implementation and ergonomic evaluation of jobs and work systems.
  • SPH-K 583 Physical Ergonomics (3 cr.) Course surveys topics in physical ergonomics. Musculoskeletal structure and function are examined in relation to commonly occurring sources of strain in workplace and total design.
  • SPH-K 584 Human Error (3 cr.) Course presents a conceptual model of human error and associated cognitive mechanisms. This frame work is used to describe and analyze human error in the performance of tasks and use of products.
  • SPH-K 585 Work Design (3 cr.) This course presents work design analysis methods and development tools. Course examines the way in which workers perform job tasks, how workers interact with their tools and workspace, and the operational environment.
  • SPH-K 586 Industrial Design and Ergonomics (3 cr.) This course surveys the traditional relationships of industrial design and ergonomics. Course examines how aesthetic and functional needs directs the interaction of people with their environment.
  • SPH-K 587 Assessment in Ergonomics (3 cr.) Students will be prepared in the use of ergonomic assessment tools and methodologies for research and professional settings. Students will receive hands-on experience in the development and implementation of ergonomic solutions.
  • SPH-K 588 Ergonomics (3 cr.) This is an advanced level course that focuses on research and experimentation to determine the interaction between specific human physical traits and the design of tasks, equipment, and environments with the goal of matching human capabilities with demands through the application of ergonomics methods and techniques.
  • SPH-K 589 Introduction to CAD in Ergonomics (3 cr.) This course introduces 3D CAD software and Rapid Prototyping production for research and professional ergonomic applications.
  • SPH-K 599 Master’s Thesis (1–5 cr.) P: Submission and approval of master's thesis committee form. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 607 Internship in Ergonomics (8 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Internship must be approved in advance. This course provides students a practical placement in the ergonomics profession. The placement opportunity can be used as practical hours necessary for student's professional certification.
  • SPH-K 625 Physical Activity and Mental Health (3 cr.) A general survey of the literature. Information on both clinical and healthy populations will be presented, as will detrimental psychological outcomes.
  • SPH-K 630 Biomechanics of Human Performance (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 530 and PHYS-P201 or equivalent. Study of the mechanical principles of human motion through detailed analysis and specific movements; general applicability of the principles. Forces, moments, stability, and linear and angular momentum.
  • SPH-K 631 Quantitative Mechanical Analysis of Human Motion (3 cr.) Newtonian study of linear and angular kinematics and kinetics of the human body. Quantitative study of sequential link chains. Computation of joint forces and torques and of muscular forces.
  • SPH-K 633 Factors Affecting Human Performance (3 cr.) Study of human movement based on scientific foundations of human performance, including advanced kinesiological theories and neuromuscular integration.
  • SPH-K 634 Respiratory Physiology of Exercise (3 cr.) A system approach to the pulmonary and respiratory responses to acute and chronic exercise. Emphasis on ventilatory and respiratory adaptations associated with athletic performance to physical activity in health and disease.
  • SPH-K 635 Cardiovascular Physiology of Exercise (3 cr.) A systems approach to the cardiovascular responses to acute and chronic exercise. Emphasis on myocardial and circulatory adaptations associated with athletic performance to physical activity in health and disease.
  • SPH-K 636 Cardiopulmonary Assessment Lab (3 cr.) A study of the biochemical adaptations that occur during acute exercise or as a result of prolonged exercise training, with emphasis on the biochemical regulators of intermediary metabolism. Laboratory techniques include bio-assay of blood-borne metabolites, muscle enzyme activity, and energy substrate storage/utilization.
  • SPH-K 637 Intermediary Metabolism (3 cr.) An integrative analysis of the biochemical regulators of intermediary metabolism, with emphasis on the enzymatic, hormonal, and metabolic control of energy production in skeletal muscle. Biochemical principles are applied to human exercise performance.
  • SPH-K 638 Biochemical Adaptations to Exercise (3 cr.) This course provides content on the research-based finding of 1) how exercise alters biochemical function in skeletal muscle, the liver, and adipose tissue; 2) why biochemical monitoring of athletes is necessary; 3) the methodological limitations of studies in this area; and 4) how to apply biochemical methods to monitor training.
  • SPH-K 639 Laboratory Techniques for Exercise Biochemistry (2 cr.) A detailed evaluation, including hands-on practice of the laboratory skills needed in a typical exercise biochemistry laboratory. Experiences will include phlebotomy, titrations, and several spectrophotometric hematological laboratory techniques.
  • SPH-K 641 Topics in Motor Integration (3 cr.) P: SPH-K 541. A discussion of current research concerns in motor integration. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 651 Rehabilitation of Persons with Physical Disabilities (3 cr.) Identification, analysis, and evaluation of physically disabling conditions; rehabilitation procedures including muscle testing, therapeutic exercise, and exercise prescription. Identification, analysis, and evaluation of persons with physical disabilities; rehabilitation procedures including muscle testing, therapeutic exercise, and exercise prescription.
  • SPH-K 652 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3 cr.) Advanced study of disease etiology and mechanisms of exercise intervention for cardiovascular, pulmonary, immune, and metabolic disease.
  • SPH-K 664 Seminar in Physical Education (1–3 cr.) Problems in physical education. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 691 Readings in Physical Education (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.. Guided readings for broadening information about and understanding of the profession. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 693 Independent Study and Research (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.. Independent research conducted under the guidance of a graduate faculty member. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 694 Seminar in Human Performance (1–3 cr.) Topics vary. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-K 695 Practicum in Physical Education (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.. Practical field experience under supervision; seminar discussions. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Physical Activity (1–7 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 697 Internship in Kinesiology (2–8 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.. Off-campus professional field experience in school or agency situation under qualified supervision. Offered only after completion of course work for master's degree. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 698 M.P.H. Culminating Experience in Physical Activity (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Students must be in their final year of the MPH program to enroll in the fall SPH-K 698 course. Enrollment in the spring SPH-K 698 requires successful completion (passing grade) of the fall culminating experience course. C: SPH-K 696. This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate the extent to which they have met the MPH Program Competencies in Physical Activity. Graded on S/F basis only. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 705 Experimental Laboratory Techniques (2–5 cr.) Experimental investigation of problems in the area of human performance, including laboratory design and advanced research techniques.
  • SPH-K 791 Readings in Human Performance (2–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.. Advanced readings from domestic and foreign publications in one or more areas, including biomechanics, physiology of exercise, and sports psychology (including motor learning and control). Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 792 Research in Human Performance (2–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0.; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-K 799 Ph.D. Dissertation (1–30 cr.) P: Instructor permission. Repeatable for credit.
Marketing and Management - SPH-M
  • SPH-M 211 Introduction to Sport Management (3 cr.) An examination of the broad spectrum of career opportunities available in the sport management profession. Special emphasis on career planning, sport management terminology, and an overview of specific skills and courses required for professional preparation in sport management.
  • SPH-M 304 Sport Industry Studies (1–4 cr.) A topical course in sport studies and emerging trends. Through lectures, group projects, experiential learning, and study of the current and future state of various elements of sport marketing, sport management, and sport communication, students will gain a greater understanding of the challenges facing today's sport professionals. Topics will change semester by semester. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-M 318 Managing the Sport Enterprise (3 cr.) P: Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. An introduction to management theory as it relates to sport delivery systems. Includes the study of organizational structure, leadership, motivation, ethics, and decision making. Application of theoretical material to managerial function of sport delivery organizations.
  • SPH-M 328 Issues in Intercollegiate Athletics (3 cr.) Examination of current issues in intercollegiate sport in America. This course presents the historical foundation of current issues and solutions, and examines current positions and arguments.
  • SPH-M 333 Sport in America: Historical Perspectives (3 cr.) Study of the evolution of sport in the United States within the larger context of historical developments in society; women's sport experiences in relation to the development of sport; examination of sport as a reflection of American culture from the founding of the colonies to the present.
  • SPH-M 382 Sport in American Society (3 cr.) An introduction to sport sociology, in which students critically examine American sport from a social context and analyze the interrelationship between sport and American culture. Lectures, discussions, videos, guest speakers, and investigative analyses.
  • SPH-M 404 Colloquium in Sport Management (1–3 cr.) A sport management colloquium that is focused on experiential learning, content projects, and study of the current and future state of various elements of sport marketing, sport management, sport communication, and sport administration. Through hands-on projects and interactions with industry professionals, students will gain a greater understanding of the challenges facing today's sport administration professionals. Colloquium topics will change by semester. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-M 411 Legal Issues in Sport Settings (3 cr.) P: BUS-L 201; Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. An introduction to legal principles involved in sport. Tort liability including intentional tort, negligence, and product liability. Covers constitutional law issues, particularly as they relate to athletic eligibility, athletes' rights, sex discrimination, and drug testing. Discussion of sport contracts.
  • SPH-M 415 Sport Promotions and Public Relations (3 cr.) P: Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. An introduction to the theories and techniques of sport promotions, public relations, and fund-raising.
  • SPH-M 418 Sport Marketing (3 cr.) P: SPH-M 211 and BUS-M 300 or BUS-M 301; Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. Examination of the elements of the marketing mix as they pertain to the sport enterprise. Also includes the coverage of decision making and planning from the sport manager's perspective and the impact of corporate sponsorship on the delivery of sport.
  • SPH-M 423 Financial Principles in Sport (3 cr.) P: Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. An introduction to the basic financial and managerial accounting concepts necessary to be financially literate in the sport business industry. Examination of the various means for financing sport organizations.
  • SPH-M 425 Sport Governance in the Global Community (3 cr.) P: Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. An introduction to the organization and governance of sport services and businesses. Examination of sport delivery systems in the United States including Olympic sport, sport through education systems, professional sport leagues, sport clubs, sport development, the coordination of sport in the United States. The class then examines U.S. sport in its international context.
  • SPH-M 426 Sales Management in Sport (3 cr.) The application of sales strategies to the sport industry.
  • SPH-M 428 Strategic Management in the Sport Industry (3 cr.) P: Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. Study of the sport industry with an emphasis on developing an understanding of how firms within the sport industry develop and apply competitive strategies.
  • SPH-M 495 Practicum in Sports Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Practicum must be approved in advance; Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. Practical job-related learning experience in sport management or marketing under supervision of professional in area. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-M 497 Internship in Sport Management (1–6 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Internship must be approved in advance; Admission to Sport Marketing and Management program. A field learning experience for sport management majors. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-M 510 Administrative Theory of Competitive Sports Programs (3 cr.) Organization of high school athletics with reference to national, state, and local control. Staff, program, budget, health and safety, facilities, and other phases of administration.
  • SPH-M 511 Legal Issues in the Sport Environment (3 cr.) An introduction to legal principles involved in amateur sport. Constitutional law issues such as athletic eligibility, NCAA due process, gender discrimination, and drug testing. In-depth explanation of tort liability. Contracts in amateur sport settings.
  • SPH-M 512 Issues in Commercial Sports (3 cr.) An introduction to the business and legal issues confronting the commercial sport industry today. Major topics include league organization and governance, collective bargaining, antitrust law, the influence of the media, and social issues pertinent to professional sport. Focuses primarily on the NFL, MLB, and NBA.
  • SPH-M 513 Sport and Higher Education (3 cr.) Examination of contemporary issues in college sport in the United States, the historical foundation of college sports, and the role of sport in higher education. Discussion of possible reforms in collegiate athletics.
  • SPH-M 514 Sport Marketing and Sponsorship (3 cr.) Examination of strategic market planning and its impact on sport marketing. Covers elements of the marketing mix, licensing and merchandising, event marketing, and sponsorship.
  • SPH-M 515 Principles of Management in the Sport Industry (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principles of management theory and application to contemporary sport management. Students are expected to develop a general understanding of basic management principles and concepts in preparation for sport management careers working with and through others to achieve organizational objectives in a very competitive, diverse, and dynamic environment.
  • SPH-M 516 The Sport Industry (3 cr.) A study of the sport industry with an emphasis on developing an understanding of how firms within the sport industry create a competitive advantage.
  • SPH-M 517 Contemporary Sports Law Issues (3 cr.) Comprehensive analysis of timely legal issues impacting participation, administration, or consumption of amateur and/or professional sports.
  • SPH-M 518 Governance in Sport Management (3 cr.) This course provides students with an advanced study of the governance of sport infrastructures, services, and businesses, nationally and internationally. It is no longer sufficient to merely understand the domestic side of sport management. Through multiple forms of assessment and contemporary case study, this course allows students to critically analyze issues in the global governance of sport.
  • SPH-M 520 Research in Sport Management (3 cr.) This course covers theories and concepts related to research methods and data analysis in sport management. Specific focus will be given to action components of the research process including: design and formulation, research strategies, methodological tools, and data analytical methods necessary to perform research.
  • SPH-M 521 History of Sport in the United States (3 cr.) Study of the historical development of sport as an institution in American society: the rise of organized sport, factors affecting sporting developments, sport as an influence in society, sport in education.
  • SPH-M 522 The Role of Sport in Society (3 cr.) Significance of sports in society; examination of relationships between sports and other elements of the culture; how sports contribute to human welfare in an advanced technological society.
  • SPH-M 525 Psychological Foundations of Exercise and Sport (3 cr.) Addresses theoretical and empirical aspects of topics, including exercise and mental health, anxiety and sport performance, "personology" and sport, overtraining, exercise adherence, and perceived exertion.
  • SPH-M 581 Sales and Service Management in Sport (3 cr.) The application of sales and service management strategies to the sport industry. Examination of customer relationship management methods and sales techniques in sport.
  • SPH-M 583 Sport Public Relations (3 cr.) The application of public relations practices to the sport industry. Examination of public relations strategies and techniques in sport organizations.
  • SPH-M 585 American Sport through Film (3 cr.) The study and analysis of American sport through the use of sport films and sport documentaries. Emphasis is upon how films and documentaries portray American sport and the interaction of sport with American culture.
  • SPH-M 611 NCAA Compliance (3 cr.) NCAA compliance policy and practice issues. Adaptation of regulations, application, and governance of the NCAA and member institutions. History, development of the membership and association regulations, enforcement and administration procedures.
  • SPH-M 614 Sport Sponsorship and Retention (3 cr.) The application of sponsorship acquisition methods to the sport industry. Examination of sport sponsorship retention strategies and sponsorship evaluation methods in sport.
  • SPH-M 615 Financial Analysis in Sport (3 cr.) P: SPH-X 561 or equivalent. Exploration of current financial status in the main segment of the sport industry. Emphases placed on professional and collegiate sport. Topics include fee structures, financial ratios, financial impact analysis, attendance and price setting strategies, financial forecasting, relationships between financial analysis and strategic planning.
  • SPH-M 677 Internship in Athletics (3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Off-campus professional field experience in a school or agency situation under qualified supervision. Offered only after completion of course work for master's degree. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-M 687 Internship in Sport Management (2–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Graduate GPA of at least 3.0. Off-campus professional field experience in agency situation under qualified supervision. Offered only after completion of course work for master's degree. Only S/F grades given. Repeatable for credit.
Physical Activity Instruction - SPH-I
  • SPH-I 100 Experiences in Physical Activity (1–3 cr.) Instruction in a specified physical education activity that is not regularly offered by the Department of Kinesiology. Emphasis on development of skill and knowledge pertinent to the activity. Repeatable for credit with different activity.
  • SPH-I 102 Group Exercise (1 cr.) A total fitness class that emphasizes cardiorespiratory conditioning, flexibility, muscular endurance, strength and balance. A variety of activities will be featured utilizing such equipment as steps, weights, resistance bands and music. S/F graded. Fee charged. Repeatable once for credit.
  • SPH-I 103 Archery (1 cr.) Instruction in archery skills, including care and construction of tackle. Instruction follows guidelines of the Outdoor Education Project of AAHPERD. Emphasis on fundamental skills and shooting form. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 106 Basic Fishing Techniques (1 cr.) Basic and innovative techniques for catching largemouth bass. This course is an overview of techniques involved in catching bass, conservation of the species, and long range goals for its maintenance. Lecture only.
  • SPH-I 109 Ballroom and Social Dance (1 cr.) Students will learn steps and patterns in the following six dances: waltz, tango, foxtrot, cha-cha, rumba, and swing/jive. (Possibly samba and hustle as well). Every class period we will learn steps in three of the dances and alternate dances each day. As part of the learning process of social dancing, students will rotate partners during the class period. To increase the time students spend dancing, female students will also learn to dance the leader's part. For this purpose, students will be rotated alphabetically.
  • SPH-I 111 Basketball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental skills of shooting, passing, ball handling, footwork, basic strategies of offensive and defensive play, and interpretation of rules.
  • SPH-I 112 Bicycling (1 cr.)

    Beginning instruction in the principles of fitness through a cycling program. Fitness testing will be done and cardiovascular training will be emphasized. Proper riding technique, safety, and other features of competitive and recreational cycling will be discussed. Lecture only.

  • SPH-I 113 Billiards (1 cr.) Instruction in basic skills, including bridge forming, stroke techniques, bank shots, and cue ball spin. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 117 Bowling (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the fundamentals of approach, release, arm swing, methods of scoring, rules, and etiquette on the lanes. Explanation of lane construction, lane condition, and automatic machines. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 119 Personal Fitness (2 cr.) Designed to help students understand the basics of physical fitness and how being physically fit related to healthy living. Emphasis is on developing a personalized program of exercise for a lifetime of beneficial physical activity. Geared to all students including those not having had previous athletic or physical education experience. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 121 Conditioning and Weight Training (1 cr.) Instruction in basic principles of conditioning and weight training. Emphasis on muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance. S/F graded.
  • SPH-I 127 Fencing (1 cr.) Instruction in guard position, footwork, and basic defensive and offensive skills. Emphasis on fencing with "'foil"' and an overview of the sabre and epee. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 130 Army Physical Fitness (2 cr.) P: Open to ROTC cadets only. The path to total fitness requires a combination of physical conditioning, mental conditioning, and common-sense dietary considerations. Army Physical Fitness is for those willing to accept a disciplined regimen proven to lead to total fitness.
  • SPH-I 132 Beginning Irish Dance (1 cr.) Beginning level that focuses on trebles or shuffles. Students weave steps and combinations of steps into complete jugs and reels. Class will work on dance phrases by repeating exercises for correct foot placement and body carriage. Students will learn about both types of Irish dances by identifying different music, rhythms, and steps.
  • SPH-I 133 Fitness and Jogging I (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the basic principles of fitness as they apply to a jogging program. Emphasis on cardiorespiratory endurance and flexibility. Basic concepts underlying Dr. Kenneth Cooper's aerobic program. For students without prior experience in jogging programs, aerobics levels I through III.  S/F graded.
  • SPH-I 134 Middle Eastern Dance (1 cr.) This course focuses on the classical solo women's dance of the Middle East that is popularly known as belly dance. This dance will improve flexibility, strength, conditioning, rhythm, and coordination. Class involves warm-ups and stretches and progresses to short dance combinations, choreographies and improvisational exercises accompanied by traditional and world music.
  • SPH-I 135 Golf (3 cr.) Beginning instruction in techniques for putting, chipping, pitching, iron swing, and wood strokes. Rules and etiquette of golf. Students play on par 3 courses. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 137 Indoor Climbing (1 cr.) Introduces climbing and belaying techniques. Highly experience-based course where students engage in site setting, climbing safety, proper belay techniques and new skill demonstrations. Includes an introduction to lead climbing and belaying lead falls.
  • SPH-I 138 Indoor Climbing-Intermediate (1 cr.) Builds on the basic climbing skills learned in Indoor Climbing and help develop lead climbing skills and lead belaying technique and skills. Highly experience-based course where students engage in site setting, climbing safety, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-I 140 Beginning Brazilian Ju-Jitsu (1 cr.)

    Instruction in the basic ground fighting techniques, throwing, joint locks, chokes, and some self-defense derived from Caique Brazilian Ju-Jitsu. Students should achieve rudimentary technical skill and learn the philosophy and concepts used in ground-fighting martial art practice as well as applying these concepts to competitive ground fighting. Focus is placed on body posturing, position control, flow-drills, and submission techniques.

  • SPH-I 143 Modern Arnis (1 cr.) Instruction in basic weapon handling and self-defense using concepts and drills taken from the Remy Presas Modern Arnis system. Students should achieve rudimentary technical skill and learn the philosophy and concepts to empty-hand martial art practice as well as applying these concepts to empty-hand martial art practice. Focus is placed on footwork, body posturing, weapon control, flow-drills, and disarms.
  • SPH-I 144 Chi Gong (1 cr.) Designed to give students an understanding and an appreciation of the function of chi gong. Qigong (another spelling of this ancient Chinese art) is an energy balancing and energy generation and restoration method of training consisting of visualizations and affirmations combined with a series of gentle movements that can be easily learned by anyone who wants to improve and sustain their health and wellness. Students are expected to learn a set of chi gong and other basic techniques of tension release and energy restoration. Grading will be based on attendance.
  • SPH-I 145 Introduction to the Martial Arts (1 cr.) A basic introduction to the martial arts, including karate, hapkido, jujitsu, judo, aikido, kung-fu, boxing, and wrestling. Students will learn the core concepts of each art, and thus gain a working understanding of what the martial arts are all about, and the differences between them.
  • SPH-I 146 Jeet Kune Do Concepts (1 cr.) Instruction in the basic concepts of Jeet Kune Do philosophy and techniques derived from Jun-fan Kickboxing and Wing-chun Kung Fu. Students should achieve rudimentary technical skill in the art of Jun-fan Kickboxing and Wing-chun and learn the philosophy and training concepts of Jeet Kune Do.
  • SPH-I 147 Hapkido (1 cr.) Instruction in techniques for throwing, blocking, striking, kicking, and self-defense applications of joint locks. Students should achieve technical skill level of yellow belt. Judo uniform required.
  • SPH-I 148 T'ai Chi Ch'uan (1 cr.) Introduction to the slow movements of t'ai chi ch'uan. Course provides instruction in William C. C. Chen's 60 movement form, physics of body leverage, history, philosophy, and cultural context. One of the most popular forms of exercise in China today.
  • SPH-I 149 Judo (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in techniques for throwing, grappling skills and limited self defense. Students should achieve technical skill level of yellow belt. Judo uniform required.
  • SPH-I 150 Tae Kwon Do (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in techniques of blocking, kicking, striking, punching, limited free fighting, and self-defense. Students should achieve technical level of yellow belt. Karate uniform required.
  • SPH-I 151 Self Defense (1 cr.) Instruction in techniques for practical common sense self defense skills and situations. No uniform required.
  • SPH-I 152 Japanese Ju-Jitsu (1 cr.) Introduces the basic instruction and application of techniques, one-step sparring, and joint locks as well as presenting requirements for rank testing in Japanese Ju-jitsu. Basic techniques include striking, kicking, blocking and body movement designed to improve balance, coordination and power. This course will also cover the cultural and philosophical base of Japanese Ju-jitsu. Techniques are drawn from Small Circle Ju-jitsu.
  • SPH-I 153 Aikido (1 cr.) Introduces the basic instruction and application of techniques as well as presenting requirements for rank testing in the Japanese martial art of Aikido. Basic techniques include striking, blocking, redirection, off-balancing, throwing and body movement designed to improve balance, coordination and power. This course will also cover the cultural and philosophical base of Aikido. Techniques are drawn from Ueshiba Aikido.
  • SPH-I 157 Escrima (1 cr.) Instruction in basic weapon handling and self-defense using concepts and drills taken from the Inosanto/Kali blend and Lameco Escrima. Students should achieve rudimentary technical skill and learn the philosophy and concepts used in stick-based martial art practice as well as applying these concepts to empty-hand martial art practice. Focus is placed on footwork, body posturing, weapon control, flow-drills and disarms.
  • SPH-I 158 Shotokan Karate (1 cr.) Beginning Shotokan provides instruction in the basics of Karate, offensive and defensive techniques, as well as the philosophical underpinning of the Japanese martial arts.
  • SPH-I 159 Racquetball (1 cr.) Instruction in basic skills for beginning players. Includes both four-wall singles and doubles games.
  • SPH-I 164 Sailing (2 cr.) Beginning instruction in the principles of sailing. Rigging, proper sailing technique, and other features of small craft sailing. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 165 Soccer (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental techniques, rules, basic team tactics, and strategies. Emphasis on competitive game scrimmages and fundamental drills.
  • SPH-I 168 Swimming—Nonswimmers (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in self-rescue remedial swimming skills and several basic strokes. For students with no swimming skills. S/F graded.
  • SPH-I 181 Tennis (1 cr.) Beginning instruction in the fundamental skills of serves and forehand and backhand strokes. Competitive play in women's, men's, and mixed doubles tennis.
  • SPH-I 185 Volleyball (1 cr.) Instruction in fundamental skills of power volleyball, including the overhand serve, bump, set, dig, and spike. Team offensive and defensive strategies.
  • SPH-I 187 Weight Training (1 cr.) Instruction in basic principles and techniques of conditioning through use of free weights. Emphasis on personalized conditioning programs. S/F graded. Fee charged. Repeatable once for credit.
  • SPH-I 190 Yoga I (1 cr.) Instruction in basic principles and techniques of yoga. Emphasis on personalized training. Repeatable once for credit.
  • SPH-I 197 Ice Skating Instruction (1 cr.) Beginning ice skating class that includes introduction to the mechanics of skating and basic skills such as stride, crossover, stopping, and backward skating. Students will be taught intermediate skills such as hockey-stop, backward crossovers, edge control, and turns as skill level determines. Students will be evaluated at end of semester through written examination and skill demonstrations. Written exam will test knowledge of skating mechanics, techniques, and safety as well as equipment. Skill demonstration will learned skills. Fee charged. Repeatable once for credit.
  • SPH-I 203 Intermediate Archery (1 cr.) Instruction in use of compound bow archery skills, including care and construction of tackle. Instruction follows guidelines of the Outdoor Education Project of AAHPERD. Emphasis on fundamental skills and shooting form.
  • SPH-I 209 Ballroom and Social Dance II (1 cr.) In depth instruction in ballroom dance, including the foxtrot, waltz, cha-cha, tango, rhumba, samba and quick step beyond the E109 beginning level.
  • SPH-I 211 Advanced Basketball (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 111. Review of fundamental basketball skills including passing, dribbling, shooting, rebounding, and defense. Instruction in the principles of motion offense including spacing, screening, rebounding, and passing. Instruction in man-to-man defense and zone defenses.
  • SPH-I 220 Training Theories for Endurance Events (2 cr.) Survey of theories and techniques associated with training for endurance type activities. Designed for the self-coached athlete and aspiring coach. Applicable to running, cycling, and swimming.
  • SPH-I 227 Intermediate Fencing (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 127 or instructor consent. Builds upon basic knowledge of fencing. Instruction of advanced skills and new techniques with an emphasis on the tactical aspect of fencing at a competitive level. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 232 Intermediate Irish Dance (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 132 or instructor consent. Focuses on hornpipes, treble and hop reels.  Control, strength, flexibility, proper posture, body alignment, body carriage and a sense of timing are all benefits the student should experience, in addition to an appreciation for traditional Irish Step and its music.
  • SPH-I 230 Advanced Army Physical Fitness (2 cr.) P: SPH-I 130 or instructor consent. Continuing along the path to total fitness begun in SPH-I 130, this course emphasizes the leadership aspect of Army Physical Fitness. Students will lead PT sessions, participate in and lead formation runs, and continue the disciplines regimen begun in SPH-I 130.
  • SPH-I 235 Intermediate Golf (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 135. Instruction in the use of the full iron and wood swing. Emphasis on special golf shots including:  sand shots, shots from rough, hill lies, playing from hazards and different type greens. Students play on par 3 course. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 240 Intermediate Brazilian Ju-Jitsu (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 140. Instruction in intermediate ground fighting techniques, throwing, joint locks, chokes, and some self-defense derived from Caique Brazilian Ju-Jitsu. Students should achieve intermediate technical skill and learn the philosophy and concepts used in ground-fighting martial art practice as well as applying these concepts to competitive ground fighting. Focus is placed on body posturing, position control, flow-drills and submission techniques for competition. Students should achieve Yellow Belt proficiency.
  • SPH-I 244 Intermediate Chi Gong (3 cr.) P: SPH-I 144. This class introduces Chi-Lel Qigong (Chi Gong) Level II, the Body and Mind Method, and enhances skills in Lift Chi Up/Pour Chi Down, Level I. Chi-Lel Qigong techniques of tension release and restoration will be taught. Based on ancient Qigong (Chi Gong) practices, Chi-Lel Qigong is a restorative art which includes a series of movements, visualization and related methods such as standing meditation. Students will achieve basic proficiency in the second level of this practice.
  • SPH-I 245 Cultures and Traditions of the Martial Arts (2 cr.) Examination of the cultures and traditions that shape the martial arts of East Asia, with greatest emphasis on the influence of China upon its neighbors. Martial arts from India, Indonesia, Thailand, Korea, Japan, etc., will also be covered. Lectures and video.
  • SPH-I 246 Intermediate Jeet Kune Do Concepts (1 cr.) Instruction in core concepts of Jeet Kune Do philosophy and techniques derived from Jun-fan Kickboxing and Wing-chun. Students should achieve intermediate technical skill in the art of Jun-fan Kickboxing and Wing-chun and continue to grow in their comprehension of the philosophy and concepts of Jeet Kune Do. Focus is placed on individual development and the application of basic techniques toward more advanced, dynamic training.
  • SPH-I 247 Intermediate Hapkido (1 cr.) Designed to give students an increased understanding and an appreciation of the art of hapkido. Content emphasis involves advanced applications of basic hapkido techniques and self-defense. Students should achieve the technical level of a green belt in hapkido.
  • SPH-I 248 Intermediate T’ai Chi Ch’uan (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 148 or instructor consent. This intermediate course examines the everyday practice of t'ai chi ch'uan. Course presents refinement of William C. C. Chen's 60 movement form, da lu, and push-hands. Provides examples of neutralizing, throwing, striking, and strategic and philosophic concepts.
  • SPH-I 249 Judo—Intermediate (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 149. Instruction includes intermediate throwing and grappling techniques and free exercise (randori). Students should achieve technical skill level of green belt. Judo uniform required.
  • SPH-I 250 Intermediate Tae Kwon Do (1 cr.) P: Yellow belt technical level or consent of instructor. Instruction in advanced applications of basic techniques and free fighting. Students should achieve technical level of green belt. Karate uniform required.
  • SPH-I 259 Racquetball—Intermediate (1 cr.) Extension of basic skills. Improvement of techniques and strategy.
  • SPH-I 264 Intermediate Sailing (2 cr.) Learn to rig and sail a variety of boats. To sail and control a boat in simulated emergencies and obtain ability in jury rigging. To learn trapeezing skills and spinnaker trimming and reach an intermediate level of racing knowledge and skills.
  • SPH-I 268 Swimming—Intermediate (1 cr.) (Formerly HPER-E 268) Instruction designed to help the less skilled swimmer master the five basic strokes, be proficient in self-rescue and basic rescue skills.
  • SPH-I 270 Introduction to Scientific Scuba (2 cr.) Introduction to the theory and practical skills for basic scuba. Program designed to give participants knowledge of physics and physiology as applied to breathing with a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). Swimming ability and scuba medical history form required. Letter graded. This is a non-certification course. Fee charged. Repeatable once for credit.
  • SPH-I 272 Scuba Knowledge Development (1 cr.) Scuba knowledge development through web based and CD-ROM sessions for International Scuba certification. Completes all Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) open water certification knowledge sessions and examinations.
  • SPH-I 275 Aquatic Conditioning (1 cr.) Acquire a moderate to high level of aerobic capacity while using the water, equipment, and other useful techniques, skills, and/or ideas. Achieve student's desired goal through fitness utilizing the water.
  • SPH-I 281 Tennis—Intermediate (1 cr.) Instruction in spin service, volley, lob, and advanced drive placement. Emphasis on singles and doubles playing strategies.
  • SPH-I 285 Advanced Volleyball (1 cr.) Instruction in advanced skills of power volleyball. Emphasis on execution of advanced techniques; applying team offense and defense strategies.
  • SPH-I 290 Yoga II (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 190 or equivalent. Intermediate yoga builds upon material presented in SPH-I 190 Beginning Yoga. The class will continue an emphasis on breath and release work through yoga, including variations on familiar asanas, continued explorations of the body systems, and deeper understanding of the health benefits of this practice. The energizing and strengthening value of standing poses will also be featured. Grading is based on attendance, effort, and the completion of out-of-class written assignments.
  • SPH-I 335 Golf—Advanced (1 cr.) P: Handicap of 15 or less, or instructor consent. Course emphasizes stroke refinement, course management and strategy, and self-analysis and correction. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 340 Advanced Brazilian Ju-Jitsu (1 cr.) Instruction in advanced ground fighting techniques, throwing, joint locks, chokes, and some self-defense derived from Caique Brazilian Ju-Jitsu. Students should achieve advanced technical skill and be well practiced in the philosophy and concepts used in ground-fighting martial art practice as well as applying these concepts to competitive ground fighting. Focus is placed on position control, flow, and submission technique. Competition is stressed. Students should achieve Advanced Yellow Belt proficiency.
  • SPH-I 347 Advanced Hapkido (1 cr.) Designed to give students an increased understanding and an appreciation of the art of hapkido. Content emphasis involves advanced applications of hapkido techniques and self-defense. Students should achieve the technical level of a blue belt in hapkido by midterm and brown belt by finals.
  • SPH-I 348 T’ui Shou (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 248 or instructor consent. Introduction to the techniques, skills, and strategies of t'ai chi ch'uan t'ui shou (push-hands). Course provides instruction and practice of Yang Style.
  • SPH-I 349 Advanced Judo (1 cr.) Students will be introduced to advanced judo. This will prepare student for the physical side of judo. With repetition drills, directional throwing, advanced training methods, students will begin to develop their own "style" of judo. Students should achieve the skill level of Sankyu or brown belt.
  • SPH-I 350 Advanced Tae Kwon Do (1 cr.) Designed to give students an increased understanding and an appreciation of the art of karate and taekwondo. Content emphasis involves advanced applications of basic taekwondo techniques, one-step sparring, forms, and introduction to free fighting. Students should achieve a technical level of a blue belt in taekwondo (Korean karate) by midterm and brown belt by finals. Karate uniform required.
  • SPH-I 364 Sailing Practicum (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 164 or instructor consent. Practical and theoretical experience in the administration of organized sailing activities. Topics include fleet management, waterfront facilities, sailing instruction, community sailing, and sailboat race management.
  • SPH-I 370 Scuba Certification (2 cr.) P: Prerequisite or concurrent: SPH-I 270 and good health. National scuba certification program for recreational divers. Program includes lecture and pool sessions to enable students to participate in the openwater qualification dives with PADI Referral (valid 12 months). Dives may be completed with IU or any PADI International facility. Additional fees required.
  • SPH-I 371 Advanced Scuba (3 cr.) P: SPH-I 370 or National SCUBA certification. This course focuses on development of advanced SCUBA and research diving techniques. Program includes lecture and pool sessions designed to give participants practical experience with mixed gas diving. Scientific diver techniques, and advanced openwater skill development. Additional fees required.
  • SPH-I 374 Keelboat and Powerboat Safety (2 cr.) This course will emphasize the safe use and operation of auxiliary powered sailboats and powerboats. Topics include boat design, environmental conditions, navigation, emergency equipment, planning, and operation. Labs will provide hands on experience with Keel type sailboats and powerboats.
  • SPH-I 445 Independent Study in the Martial Arts (1 cr.) This course allows advanced students in the IU Martial Arts Program to continue their training and personal development in preparation for their instructor's certification in their respective art. Students in this course will meet with the IU Martial Arts Program Coordinator to discuss the personal and professional goals they have set for the semester. Focus will be placed upon teaching pedagogy, independent exploration into cross training with martial arts outside their area of expertise, and training regiment to ensure a prepared and well-rounded student. Completion of this course should coincide with the student's achievement of instructor certification.
  • SPH-I 447 Advanced Hapkido II (1 cr.) P: Brown belt (third kup) or higher technical level or instructor consent. Designed to be a black-belt preparation class and to give students an increased understanding and an appreciation of the art of hapkido. Content emphasis involves advanced applications of hapkido techniques and self-defense. Students should achieve the technical level of a red belt (second kup) or higher in hapkido by finals. Uniform required.
  • SPH-I 448 T’ai Chi Chu’an Sword (1 cr.) P: SPH-I 148 and SPH-I 248, or instructor permission. Master William C.C. Chen's 64 Movement T'ai Chi Ch'uan Sword form refines the continuous flowing movement introduced in the T'ai Chi Ch'uan Solo Form. Students gain practical experience in the body mechanics of t'ai chi ch'uan through the larger, faster movements and the use of a handheld object. This practice continues the meditative technique of t'ai chi ch'uan that develops the ability to shift both physical and psychological focus.
  • SPH-I 450 Advanced Tae Kwon Do II (1 cr.) P: Brown belt (third kup) or higher technical level or instructor consent. Designed to be a black-belt preparation class and to give students increased understanding and appreciation of the arts of karate and taekwondo. Content emphasis involves advanced applications of basic taekwondo techniques, one-step sparring, forms, and introduction to free fighting. Student should achieve technical level of red belt (second kup) or higher in taekwondo (Korean karate) by finals. Uniform required.
  • SPH-I 470 Diver Safety and Rescue (2–3 cr.) P: Scuba certification. Diver safety issues leading to rescue certification and divemaster (DM) training. This course will enable a student to develop in an academic setting an understanding of physics and physiology as applied to breathing with a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). Minimum of rescue diver and professional DM training. Fee charged.
  • SPH-I 471 Underwater Archaeology Techniques (2 cr.) Topics include historic shipwrecks from "age of exploration" to today.  Emphasis on documentation and interpretation of submerged cultural resources.  Includes reguired mock-shipwreck pool session and two openwater dives for recreational dive certification in underwater archaeology.
  • SPH-I 472 Scuba Instructor Development (2 cr.) Instructor preparation course for recreational scuba diving. Participants will complete all dive master requirements prior to standard national evaluation exams.
  • SPH-I 475 Lifeguard Certification (1 cr.) P: Must be able to swim 500 yards continuously. Instructions per American Red Cross standards prepares students to lifeguard at pools and non-surf beaches. To receive the "Lifeguard Training" certificate, students must hold current first aid and CPR certifications.
  • SPH-I 477 Water Safety Instructor (1 cr.) P: Must be able to swim 500 yards continuously. This course will prepare students to teach swimming from Levels I-VII and will include basic water safety, emergency water safety, aquatics, infant, preschool, toddlers, and water safety aide. Students will participate in two practice teaching and accompanying lesson plans. Letter grading.
Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Studies
Recreation - SPH-R
  • SPH-R 101 Introduction to Resource Development/Fundraising (3 cr.) Comprehensive overview of the importance of philanthropy in our society and on fundraising techniques and resources useful to future and current nonprofit professionals, volunteers, and donors. Emphasis on annual funds (including direct mail, special events, telemarketing, and online giving), capital campaigns, major gifts/planned giving, development services, and volunteer/staff roles in fundraising.
  • SPH-R 142 Living Well (3 cr.) Broaden your view of living well by actively pursuing healthy lifestyles. This course utilizes School of Public Health faculty and professionals throughout the Bloomington community to help students achieve balance in health, physical activity, and leisure pursuits. Students address concepts of peer mentoring and goal setting strategies to achieve this balance.
  • SPH-R 200 Foundations of Leisure and Public Health (3 cr.) (formerly: SPH-R 110) Introduction to leisure as a significant force in contemporary life, a human behavior spanning history and cultures, and an essential contributor to public health. Focus on the relation of leisure to the public health of individuals and communities by studying its social, psychological, historical, philosophical, economic, anthropological, and geographical foundations.
  • SPH-R 201 Annual Giving (2 cr.) Information, skills, and resources useful to nonprofit professionals, volunteers, and donors who want to create effective annual giving programs. Emphasis on integrating key fundraising components (direct mail, special events, telemarketing, personal solicitation, matching gifts, and technology) into coherent development plans.
  • SPH-R 202 Major Gifts and Planned Giving (2 cr.) (Formerly HPER-T 202) Techniques and best practices used to cultivate, solicit, and close large philanthropic commitments from individuals. Focus on different ways gifts can be designed (or "planned") to fit the needs of the donor and maximize the impact on the nonprofit recipient.
  • SPH-R 203 Development Services (2 cr.) Behind-the-scenes foundation for planning and managing innovative and effective resource development (fundraising) efforts. Emphasis on practical resources and techniques in research, stewardship, information systems, and development technologies.
  • SPH-R 210 Inclusion in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (3 cr.) Overview and rationale for the provision of recreation, park, and tourism services for all populations and ages with a focus on individuals with disabilities. Moral and legal issues, relevant terminology, accessibility guidelines, awareness of needs and abilities of under-represented groups, and techniques for the inclusion of individuals of all abilities.
  • SPH-R 212 Computers in Park, Recreation, Sport, and Tourism Management (3 cr.) An introduction to computer applications in parks, recreation, sports, and tourism. The primary emphasis is placed on word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, desktop publishing, electronic mail, and Internet computing skills.
  • SPH-R 220 Foundations of Public, Nonprofit, and Community Recreation (3 cr.) Exploration of the uniqueness of public and nonprofit recreation service providers, including their history and mission, while developing an understanding of community and societal issues related to their programs, services and administration of these agencies, and the nature of working in public service.
  • SPH-R 221 Recreation Facility Management (3 cr.) Exploration of the uniqueness of public and nonprofit recreation service providers, including their history and mission, while developing an understanding of community and societal issues related to their programs, services and administration of these agencies, and the nature of working in public service.
  • SPH-R 223 Recreation Based GIS (3 cr.) Introductory GIS course focusing on acquiring, mapping and analyzing geographic information as it relates to recreation, park and tourism issues.  Potential issues include planning, transportation, marketing, natural resource management and demographics.
  • SPH-R 230 Recreational Sport Programming (3 cr.) Overview of programmatic elements and techniques in recreational sports. Topics include informal, intramural, club, extramural, and instructional sports programming; values of recreational sports; and terminology and career opportunities in various recreational sport settings.
  • SPH-R 250 Topics in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (3 cr.) Emerging topics in recreation, parks, and tourism, emphasizing current research and practice. Specific topics vary. Repeatable once for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-R 301 Capital Campaigns (2 cr.) Advanced course in resource development/ fundraising focusing on the successful organization, implementation, and completion of a capital campaign. Especially applicable for future and current nonprofit managers and fundraisers.
  • SPH-R 303 Development Marketing and Analytical Services (2 cr.) Introduction to the integration of for-profit marketing practices into the nonprofit culture.
  • SPH-R 304 Statistical Applications in Leisure Studies (3 cr.) Introduction to the principles and practices of research analysis. Statistics is the mathematical tool used to describe research observations and to make inferences. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts and assumptions behind a statistical test and in the test's mathematical description.
  • SPH-R 311 Management in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (3 cr.) Study of management principles and practices of the public agency, non-profit association, and private for-profit enterprise operating parks, recreation areas and facilities, and providing recreation programs and services.
  • SPH-R 312 Career Perspectives & Internship Preparation (3 cr.) P: SPH-R 200. Survey of recreation, park, and tourism services as a career field, to familiarize students with concepts related to professionalism and the internship and job search process. Students will practice the process of career planning through self-assessment and exploration of career options, and will receive feedback on interview and writing skills.
  • SPH-R 314 Data-Based Decision-Making Methods (3 cr.) P: Completion of mathematical modeling requirement. Overview of the processes of research and evaluation as encountered in leisure services. Development of inquiry skills useful for planning and management, and various methods of effective information collection and synthesis. Practice using factual evidence to support programming or planning decisions and to document the outcomes of programs being implemented.
  • SPH-R 315 Leadership in a Diverse Society (3 cr.) Exploration into the nature of leadership and of diversity within oneself and society, including workplaces, work practices, and policies. Study of theoretical models of leadership, diversity, and social interaction, to explore how leadership can be enhanced through diversity.
  • SPH-R 321 Aquatic Management (3 cr.) Skills/knowledge necessary to assume a management role in the area of aquatics will be covered. Course will introduce aspects of managing a variety of aquatic settings, and will acquaint students with the latest trends in aquatic programs/facilities/equipment. Materials/testing to become certified in American Red Cross Lifeguard Management included.
  • SPH-R 335 Sport and Violence (3 cr.) This course explores the roots of violence from the content of sport. Foundations in the theoretical framework of sport in society from historical, sociological, and psychological perspectives are discussed as well as linkage to contemporary resources that address this problem.
  • SPH-R 350 Seminar in Recreation and Parks (1–3 cr.) ) Park and recreation current issues seminar. Topic varies with the instructor and year. Consult the online Schedule of Classes for current information. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-R 381 Leisure and Aging (3 cr.) Explores the role of leisure in adult development with specific focus on the aging process, leisure needs, and leisure services. Basic concepts associated with leisure, aging, targeting leisure services, research, and public policy are presented in light of forecasting leisure demand in the 21st century.
  • SPH-R 388 Marketing Principles for Leisure Services (3 cr.) P: SPH-T 201. Application of marketing principles to leisure service delivery systems, including procedures for developing marketing plans for leisure service organizations and agencies. Emphasis on organizing and analyzing the marketing process and planning the marketing mix, including product, price, place, and promotion.
  • SPH-R 389 Practicum in Fundraising (1–3 cr.) (Formerly HPER-T 399) Designed to facilitate the acquisition of practical knowledge and experiences in fundraising and resource development under faculty/agency supervision.
  • SPH-R 390 Graduate Prerequisite in Recreation and Park Administration (3 cr.) An overview of the various disciplines within the field of Recreation, Park, Tourism and Sport intended for graduate students with minimal background in recreation and leisure services.
  • SPH-R 391 Readings in Recreation, Park and Tourism Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission. Individualized advanced study of specific topics under faculty direction. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 395 Practicum in Recreation, Park and Tourism Studies (1–6 cr.) P: Instructor permission. Practical field experience under faculty supervision and with seminar discussions. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 396 Work Experience in RPTS (0 cr.) This class allows students on a visa to register when completing curricular practical training or other work experience, such as the 320 Hours, required for a Recreation degree. Repeatable.
  • SPH-R 401 Advanced Planned Giving: Wills and Estates (2 cr.) Advanced course for students contemplating a career in fundraising with a specialization in major gifts and planned giving. Pre-law students will also find this course useful.
  • SPH-R 410 Event Planning and Program Development (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Students learn event planning and program techniques while applying course materials to real-world experiences through service learning. Students will develop and facilitate event planning and recreation programs through the study of a variety of models including the event/program development cycle.
  • SPH-R 413 Fiscal Management for Leisure Service Organizations (3 cr.) Financing leisure products and services in public- and private-sector delivery systems. Emphasis on sources and methods of financing; forecasting cost and income; and budgeting, pricing and fiscal management through use of computer technology.
  • SPH-R 414 Legal Aspects of Recreation (3 cr.) Provides students with basic understanding of legal liability, the risk management process, negligence, intentional torts, constitutional torts, strict liability, standard of care, attractive nuisance, and other legal subjects. Introduction to personnel and contract laws well as strategies for reducing the probability of litigation.
  • SPH-R 425 Strategic Planning for Recreation, Park and Tourism Organizations (3 cr.) Study of strategic and comprehensive planning, its application and processes, including management components and influences. Emphasis on the planning process, public engagement techniques, research methods, trends analysis and planning models.
  • SPH-R 426 Human Resource Management in Leisure Services (3 cr.) Principles and practices of human resource management in recreation and leisure service agencies will be studied with emphasis upon the skills necessary to manage full-time, part-time, and seasonal employees as well as volunteers.
  • SPH-R 431 Youth Sport Management (3 cr.) P: SPH-R 230. Exploration and examination of youth sport history, philosophy, developmental stages of youth, sport management and programming, and current issues and events necessary to deliver youth sport programming within a variety of settings, agencies and/or organizations.
  • SPH-R 434 Legal Issues in Sport Settings (3 cr.) The course purpose is to provide a fundamental understanding of the American system of jurisprudence, statutory, tort, contract, trademark, and constitutional laws while educating students about the legal risks and issues inherent in the management of sport programs as a way to avoid or reduce the probability of litigation.
  • SPH-R 484 Workshop in Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies (1–6 cr.) Topics in recreation, park, and tourism studies, in an interactive setting emphasizing application, under the direction of faculty members. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-R 492 Research in Recreation, Park and Tourism Studies (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Cumulative GPA of at least 3.0; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Undergraduate independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 497 Professional Internship (12 cr.) P: Overall and major GPA of at least 2.0; completion of 320 Hours; instructor permission. Non-Recreational Therapy majors P: R392, R430, and at least junior standing. Recreational Therapy majors P: all recreational therapy classes, anatomy, physiology, lifespan development, and abnormal psychology. Supervised real world experience for students to practice the relevant knowledge and skills required to enter careers in recreation and leisure, and to extend their professional network. Interns will have a site supervisor and an Indiana University Internship Coordinator who assigns specific tasks and evaluates the intern's work.
  • SPH-R 499 Internship in Fundraising (1–3 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Internship must be approved in advance. Designed as a hands-on full-time work experience in fundraising and resource development for eight to fourteen weeks with a selected agency.
  • SPH-R 510 Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation (3 cr.) Exploration of philosophical, ethical, historical, and cultural foundations for recreation in society; challenge of leisure and role of recreation in present and future environments.
  • SPH-R 511 Organizational Leadership of Leisure Services (3 cr.) Organization and administration of public and not-for-profit agencies, with emphasis on leadership and management skills, including empowerment, envisioning, organizing, quality, and other contemporary management issues.
  • SPH-R 512 Administrative Theory and Management Practices in Leisure Services (3 cr.) Investigations of how administrative theory and management practices in leisure services have changed since 1900. Involves the study of contemporary and future management issues influencing the delivery of leisure services in public and nonprofit settings. Particular emphasis given to implications for leisure service managers and organizational responses.
  • SPH-R 522 Tourism Planning and Management in Recreation, Park, and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.) Introduction to the basic elements and concepts of tourism planning. Examines the planning process for developing regional tourism, as well as the most common approaches to planning for specific types of tourism and tourism-related facilities. Special emphasis given to the planning of city tourism.
  • SPH-R 523 Policy Studies in Outdoor Recreation and Tourism (3 cr.) Critical analysis of the historic development, current status, and changing patterns of public policy in outdoor recreation and tourism and related environmental sustainability as it pertains to the United States and selected countries. Intensive examination of selected public policy issues, particularly those affecting tourist and visitor experience and relative impacts.
  • SPH-R 524 Fundraising for Public and Nonprofit Agencies (3 cr.) Provides basic principles of professional fund-raising including why people give, how funds are raised, legal and ethical considerations, volunteerism, and institutional advancement. Applies to a broad array of graduate students in the fields of recreation, sports, fine arts, music, and education.
  • SPH-R 525 Foundations of Conservation, Parks, and Recreation (3 cr.) The course will explore the philosophical, ethical, historical and cultural foundations of conservation, park and recreation in America and its importance related to present environmental and social problems. The course will review current research in the field and philosophical frameworks.
  • SPH-R 526 Great Lakes Park Training Institute (1 cr.) Practicum in the management of a continuing education institute for park and recreation administrators, supervisors, and technicians.
  • SPH-R 528 Recreation Resource Administration (3 cr.) Examination of resource management approaches to recreation resource administration, including an ecological and sociological approaches to understanding complex problems and issues, management practices, resource policies, and allocation of resources. Special focus on legal and ethical aspects of resource management, environmental protection, personnel management, and budget formulation.
  • SPH-R 531 Planning and Design for the Built Environment (3 cr.) The course offers an analysis of park planning and design techniques in order to encourage health, active living, and improve quality of life in communities through deliberate, purposeful improvements to the built environment. The class will focus on procedures for developing community park and recreation plans, trail plans, feasibility studies and site specific plans including design characteristics for selected recreation, park, commercial use areas and support facilities. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to master course objectives as demonstrated through group discussion, readings mastery and submission of course assignments.
  • SPH-R 544 Legal Aspects of Recreation Administration (3 cr.) Concentrates on the legal aspects of parks, recreation, tourism, and sports. Provides students with an understanding of the risk management process, negligence, intentional torts, strict liability, standards of care, and attractive nuisance.
  • SPH-R 550 Special Concerns in Parks and Recreation (1–5 cr.) Current issues in a variety of park and recreation settings. Topics vary with instructor and year. Consult the Schedule of Classes for current information. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-R 571 Recreational Sports Administration (3 cr.) The study of recreational sports (informal/intramural/extramural/club sports) relevant to historical developments, philosophical foundations, programming implications, and administrative considerations.
  • SPH-R 572 Dynamics of Recreational Sport Environment (3 cr.) Study of the interaction of the participant in the recreational sports environment as it relates to the individual's self-awareness, social awareness, and physical awareness. The role of sport in society, from a global perspective, is examined with particular emphasis on the recreational sport participant.
  • SPH-R 573 Seminar in Recreational Sports (2 cr.) Focuses on the experiences that relate directly to the basic programmatic and administrative aspects of recreational sports services. Various topics discussed by faculty members and practitioners with specialized areas of expertise.
  • SPH-R 574 Human Resource Management in Recreational Sports (3 cr.) Principles and practices of human resource management in recreational sport organizations, emphasizing the skills necessary to manage full-time, part-time, and seasonal employees and volunteers. The course will consist of lectures, discussions, case studies, video presentations, and learning applications. Opportunities for supervisory skill development in the classroom will be provided.
  • SPH-R 588 Leisure and Aging (3 cr.) Explores the role of leisure in adult development with specific focus on the aging process, leisure needs, and leisure services. Basic concepts associated with leisure, aging, targeting leisure services, research, and public policy are presented in light of forecasting leisure demand in the 21st century.
  • SPH-R 595 Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies Workshops (1–6 cr.) Topics of relevance to individuals in the field of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies and related areas. Specific topics vary and conducted in workshop fashion under the direction of faculty members.
  • SPH-R 598 Master’s Project in Administration (2–4 cr.) Provides administration master's candidates with an understanding of processes, requirements, and expectations of the master's project. Provides a head start to the completion of the master's project.
  • SPH-R 599 Master’s Thesis (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Submission and approval of thesis committee form. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 685 Trends in Survey Methodology and Public Health Research (3 cr.) This course is designed for graduate students who are designing or implementing a survey either as part of a thesis/dissertation or other project. The course emphasizes hands-on experience in the design, administration, analysis and interpretation of survey data for quantitative research studies.
  • SPH-R 691 Readings in Recreation (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required.; Reading proposal must be approved in advance. Individualized advanced study of specific topics under faculty direction. Topic areas within which study contracts may be developed include park/recreation administration, recreational sports administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, tourism, armed forces recreation, and resource management. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 692 Research Seminar in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Studies (1 cr.) This advanced topical seminar is required of all Ph.D. students and M.S. students who intend to complete a thesis. The seminar substantively explores important topics in the conduct of evidence-based research in leisure studies.
  • SPH-R 693 Independent Study and Research (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required.; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Independent research conducted under guidance of a graduate faculty member. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 694 Seminar in Recreation (1–3 cr.) Seminars in one or more of the following emphasis areas are as indicated each semester in the Schedule of Classes: park/recreation administration, recreational sports administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, tourism, armed forces recreation, and resource management. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
  • SPH-R 695 Practicum in Recreation and Parks (1–6 cr.) P: Instructor permission. Field experience as specified in written individualized contracts with supervising faculty. Practicums are available in the following areas of emphasis: park/recreation administration, recreational sports administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, tourism, armed forces recreation, and resource management. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 696 M.P.H. Field Experience in Parks and Recreation (4 cr.) P: Permission of instructor, Minimum 3.0 GPA, and completion of the MPH Core and Required Courses. Public health skills are developed through professional experiences in public health settings facilitated by preceptors and supervised by faculty. Regular critiques will be held with supervisors, written progress reports and development of a major independent project are required. Graded on S/F basis only.
  • SPH-R 697 Internships in Recreation and Parks (2–8 cr.) P: Instructor permission; Internship must be approved in advance. Supervised off-campus professional field experience in appropriate agencies or other approved settings. Only S/F grades given. Internships are available in the following areas of emphasis: park/recreation administration, recreational sports administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, tourism, armed forces recreation, and resource management. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 698 Capstone Studies in Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Public Lands (3 cr.) The course provides students enrolled in distance education MS degree program with an understanding of processes, requirements, and expectations of the profession, and serves as a portfolio type project for students to end their degree requirements. The course is designed to frame the student's experience in the master's degree allowing them to develop a creative master's level project, that is applied or theoretical, demonstrating their proficiency with the complex knowledge, skills and abilities of the field of parks, recreation, tourism and public lands.
  • SPH-R 710 Social Psychology of Leisure (3 cr.) P: SPH-R 510 or instructor consent. Students gain an understanding of the application of social psychology to one important aspect of human life-leisure behavior.
  • SPH-R 711 Higher Education in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Studies (3 cr.) Investigation and discussion of current trends and issues affecting higher education in recreation, parks, and leisure services.
  • SPH-R 712 Inquiry Methodology in Leisure Behavior (3 cr.) In-depth study of the realm of research in leisure behavior. Conceptual and methodological issues involved in problem formulation and application of appropriate designs.
  • SPH-R 782 Advanced Research Inquiry in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Studies (2 cr.) P: Only for doctoral degree students. The course aims to supply in-depth, advanced knowledge relevant to inquiry method beyond an introductory graduate-level methodology course. It discourses updated research methods transpiring in social sciences in general and covers contemporary investigative approaches applied to the issues in recreation, park and tourism studies in specific.
  • SPH-R 784 Doctoral Teaching Seminar (2 cr.) P: Only for doctoral degree students. Graduate students will learn and exchange ideas, and skills/strategies that promote teaching excellence. We will examine concepts and methods related to the professional development of future teachers in higher education. This course is to prepare graduate students with necessary fundamental teaching skills.
  • SPH-R 791 Advanced Readings in Recreation (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required.; Open only to doctoral students; Reading proposal must be approved in advance. Individualized advanced study of specific topics under faculty direction. Topic areas within which study contracts may be developed are: park/recreation administration, recreational sports administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, tourism, armed forces recreation, and resource management. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 792 Advanced Research in Recreation (1–5 cr.) P: Instructor permission and a graduate GPA of at least 3.0 required.; Open only to doctoral students; Research proposal must be approved in advance. Research conducted under the direction of and with the advance approval of a member of the graduate faculty in one of the following areas: park/recreation administration, recreational sports administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, tourism, armed forces recreation, and resource management. Repeatable for credit.
  • SPH-R 794 Doctoral Seminar: Leisure Behavior (2 cr.) This course is a doctoral seminar in leisure behavior theory. The ontological approach to leisure serves to analyze the components of leisure behavior from antecedents to outcomes. What kind of behaviors exist when one is at leisure?
  • SPH-R 799 Ph.D. Dissertation (1–30 cr.) P: Instructor permission required. Repeatable for credit.
Outdoor Recreation, Parks, and Human Ecology - SPH-O
  • SPH-O 111 Campus Gardening Experience (1 cr.) This course provides opportunities for development and application of nature education and gardening skills in a natural setting. Students will learn general foundations and concepts and have opportunities to practice and apply leadership skills to nature education and gardening activities.
  • SPH-O 210 Introduction to Outdoor Recreation, Parks, and Human Ecology (3 cr.) Introduction to outdoor recreation and parks within a human ecological framework, defined as the study of the complex and varied systems of interactions between people and the environment. Examination of societal, recreation applications, and emerging recreation and leisure trends that have direct application to human ecology.
  • SPH-O 214 Wildflowers and Wild Edibles (3 cr.) Students will gain a knowledge for identification of wildflowers and wild edible plants. Activities may include a weekend field trip, a chance to improve skills in identifying local plants, as well as a culinary experience in wild edibles.
  • SPH-O 244 Natural History and Field Ecology (3 cr.) P: SPH-O 210. Investigation of general natural history and field ecology concepts in a laboratory setting. Weekly field trips.
  • SPH-O 250 Introduction to Equine Assisted Activities (3 cr.) This lecture and laboratory course introduces equine assisted activities. Topics include NARHA, history, teaching techniques, safety issues, volunteers, selecting/ training therapy horses, public relations, fund-raising, disabilities, choosing rider populations and mounting procedures. Student will be required to participate in hands-on experiences at PAL (People and Animal learning Services).
  • SPH-O 279 Outdoor Adventure Education (3 cr.) Overview focusing on theoretical concepts and common practices. Investigation and elucidation of theory and philosophy via a mixture of abstracted knowledge and practical involvement in a backcountry environment.
  • SPH-O 305 Integrated Resource Management (3 cr.) Provides a managerial understanding of ecological concepts, resource management practices, and resource policies related to natural resource/land management. Focus on allocation of resources, carrying capacity, resource protection, and environmental impacts of uses on natural resources.
  • SPH-O 310 Ecosystem Management (3 cr.) P: SPH-0 210. Study of basic concepts, theories, and importance for outdoor recreation, with particular emphasis on key aspects of ecosystems that are conducive to successful and sustainable environmental communities, impacts of strategies on resource sites, and best practices. Required field work.
  • SPH-O 313 Wilderness and Protected Lands (3 cr.) The philosophical turmoil of formal wilderness creation in the United States will be presented in this course. Discussion and debate of the European influences on wilderness thinking in the United States as well as examination of wilderness experiences of early European settlers to America will be addressed. The course traces the history of influential leaders in wilderness designations and the political climate of wilderness debates.
  • SPH-O 318 Outdoor Recreation Consortium (3 cr.) This course is designed to convey both practical information and direct experience to students about components of outdoor recreation and resource management. To accomplish this goal, this course enables students to participate in a one-week long outdoor recreation consortium at the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
  • SPH-O 322 Therapeutic Outdoor Instructional Techniques (3 cr.) Examination of basic teaching techniques and practices commonly used in the instruction and supervision of individuals in Therapeutic Outdoor Programming environments, including group leadership, program planning, and skills necessary in adventure settings: assessment, group management, facilitation, and debriefing, hygiene, food and water processing, trip planning, safety management, and camping techniques.
  • SPH-O 331 Wilderness First Responder (3 cr.) The course takes an in-depth look at emergencies that might be encountered in the backcountry. Wilderness First Responder is the most widely accepted standard in wilderness medical care for outdoor leaders. The curriculum uses the principles of long term care, improvised resources, and varying environmental conciliations as the framework for learning.
  • SPH-O 324 Outdoor Experiential Education: Instructional Techniques (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide an examination of the basic techniques and practices commonly used in outdoor programming. Of specific interest are techniques, skills, and procedures used in the instruction and supervision of individuals and groups in outdoor environments.
  • SPH-O 340 Interpretation and Tour Guiding (3 cr.) P: SPH-O 210. Introduction to personal-heritage interpretation and tour guiding. Exploration of the tenets and principles from various fields of study that encompass the body of knowledge used in the interpretation/tour guiding profession.
  • SPH-O 341 Field Techniques in Environmental Education (3 cr.) This is an intensive one-week course that uses the outdoors as a laboratory to share strategies, methodologies, and techniques to teach environmental education concept to others. The course offers training and subsequent certification in the three environmental education curriculums-Project Wild, Project Wet, and Project Learning Tree.
  • SPH-O 342 Applied Ecology: Water Communities (3 cr.) This is an intensive three-week course that uses Bradford Woods Outdoor Education Center as a laboratory to explore and investigate a variety of freshwater systems. This course investigates the important theories associated with freshwater ecology and explores the water communities common to southern Indiana.
  • SPH-O 343 Sustainable Agriculture (3 cr.) This course will present the fundamentals of specialty crop and animal sustainable agriculture based on an agroecological framework. Students will learn about and apply ecological, social, and economic concepts in evaluating for farm sustainability. The course includes both 'in-class' and field lab experiences.
  • SPH-O 360 Human Health and Natural Environments (3 cr.) P: SPH-O 210. Examination of the relationships among human health, quality of life, and natural environments from the perspective of cognitive, emotional, spiritual, and related domains. Experiential learning in local natural settings.
  • SPH-O 412 Ecotourism: Administration and Management (3 cr.) (Formerly HPER-R 429) Theoretical foundations, practical applications and best management practices in ecotourism, under the umbrella of sustainable tourism practices. Course foci include sustainability in ecotourism development and practice; nature-based and adventure tourism; social, environmental, cultural and economic impacts; spatial strategies for ecotourism destinations; and ecotourism as a business.
  • SPH-O 413 Applications in Outdoor Recreation, Parks, and Human Ecology (3 cr.) P: Senior Standing. Capstone course providing a forum for intensive study of emerging recreation and leisure trends having direct application to human ecology, culminating in discussion, presentation, and papers describing some aspect of outdoor recreation and park management within a human ecology paradigm.
  • SPH-O 420 Principles of Therapeutic Outdoor Programs (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide an examination of the principles and practices inherent in the emerging field of Therapeutic Outdoor Programs (TOP).  Topics covered include the historical development of TOP, research-based findings, specific techniques incurrent use, issues and trends in TOP, and emerging developments in therapeutic and managerial adaptations for the field.
  • SPH-O 430 Outdoor Adventure Programming: Foundations and Theories (3 cr.) Examination of the history, management, administration, and current issues in outdoor and adventure-based programs. Special attention to developing an understanding of organizational involvement, social and ecological issues, development of administrative and professional policy, program management, and current research findings.
  • SPH-O 431 Client Management in Adventure and Experiential Education (3 cr.) This course examines the models, theories, case studies, and practical implications for addressing the physical, emotional, and social needs of participants involved in adventure and experiential education.
  • SPH-O 504 Outdoor Experiential Education: Instructional Principles and Methods (3 cr.) Examination of the basic techniques and practices used in outdoor programming. Of specific interest are those techniques, skills, and procedures used in the instructing, teaching and supervision of individuals and groups in outdoor environments.
  • SPH-O 510 Human Heath, Quality of Life, and Natural Environments (3 cr.) This course approaches the issues of human health and quality of life from the perspective of the natural environments impact human health and an individual's reported sense of quality of life.
  • SPH-O 512 Ecotourism: Management and Systems (3 cr.) Integrates various concepts of natural resource management, tourism theory, and selected business practices to examine the form, functions, and impact of resource-based tourism.
  • SPH-O 514 Camping Administration (3 cr.) Organization and administration of camps; program planning, selection, and training of staff; campsite selection and development; and health and safety.
  • SPH-O 515 Principles of Outdoor/ Environmental Education (3 cr.) Basic principles, philosophies, and methods of both outdoor education and environmental education. Enables students to associate characteristics that relate to each field as well as aspects that differentiate both. Monthly field trips.
  • SPH-O 516 Outdoor Recreation Consortium (2 cr.) Conveys both practical information and direct experience to students about components of outdoor recreation and resource management.  Enables students to participate in a one-week outdoor recreation consortium at the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Also offers graduate students the opportunity for leadership roles associated with consortium topics.
  • SPH-O 517 Advanced Ecosystem Management in Outdoor Recreation (3 cr.) Exploration of the principles, theories, concepts, and practical realities of ecosystem management. Enables students to design, initiate, and coordinate to completion complex projects of an ecological nature.
  • SPH-O 519 Issues and Concepts in Adventure and Outdoor-Based Programs (3 cr.) Exploration of various issues and concepts associated with adventure and outdoor-based programs. Includes an experiential learning component. Offered in a seminar format.
  • SPH-O 520 Principles of Therapeutic Outdoor ProgramsPrinciples of Therapeutic Outdoor Programs (3 cr.) Examination of the principles and practices inherent in the field of Outdoor Experiential Therapy (OET). Topics include the historical development of OET, research and practice-based findings, specific techniques currently in use, issues and trends in OET, and emerging developments in therapeutic and managerial adaptations for the field.
  • SPH-O 521 Leadership in Challenge Education (2 cr.) SPH-O521 is a graduate-level course that investigates the philosophies, theories, research, and practice of facilitation in adventure education. We will combine elements of critical inquiry and discussion with direct experience as we shift between classroom and facilitation settings. Likewise, participants in the course will be required to negotiate and navigate the roles of student, collaborator, facilitator, and instructor as we build our understanding of what it means to engage in an educational experience through the lens of adventure facilitation. The course will include an overnight experiences at Bradford Woods, as well as integrating multiple out-of-the-classroom opportunities throughout the semester.
  • SPH-O 529 Introduction to Therapeutic Outdoor Programs (1 cr.) Exploration of concepts related to the past, present, and future trends of experiential therapy. Focus on reading and reflection, experiential training, and small group facilitation and discussion.
  • SPH-O 530 Outdoor Adventure Programming: Foundations and Theories (3 cr.) Examines the history, management, and current issues in outdoor and adventure-based programs. Special attention given to developing an understanding of organizational involvement, social and ecological issues in risk management.
  • SPH-O 531 Theoretical Foundations of Adventure/Experiential Education (3 cr.) Examines the models, theories, and research applications utilized in adventure and experiential education. Emphasis placed on developing an understanding of the salient models and resultant research, and integration of that knowledge into the development of "new" models and theories.
  • SPH-O 540 Wilderness in the American Mind (3 cr.) Examines the philosophical turmoil of formal wilderness creation in the United States. Discussion and debate of the European influences on wilderness thinking in the United States as well as examination of wilderness experiences of early European settlers to America. History of influential leaders in wilderness designations and the political climate of wilderness debates is traced.
  • SPH-O 541 Visitor Behavior (3 cr.) Examines the theory and findings of visitor and tourism research as it is conducted in recreation and leisure settings such as parks, museums, towns, historic sites, sporting facilities, and resorts. Topics include visitor motivations, expectations, social interaction, and assessment. Students learn techniques for gathering information from and about visitors.
  • SPH-O 543 Field Techniques in Environmental Education (3 cr.) Intensive one-week course that uses the outdoors as the laboratory to share strategies, methods, and techniques to teach environmental education concept to others. Offers training and subsequent certification in environmental education curricula such as Project Wild, Project Wet, and Project Learning Tree. These skills enable students to integrate this curriculum into their own formal or non-formal school programs.
  • SPH-O 594 Seminar: Health, Life, and Environment (3 cr.) This course approaches the issues of human health and quality of life from the perspective of natural environments. The course will encompass a variety of readings, class discussion, guest speakers, and several experiential learning components (ElC's).
Tourism, Hospitality, and Event Management - SPH-T
  • SPH-T 201 Tourism and Commercial Recreation (3 cr.) Analysis of private, commercial, and industrial recreation fields, focusing on economic impact, marketing strategies, consumer protection, and career opportunities.
  • SPH-T 203 Introduction to Lodging Management (3 cr.) Provides an overview and introduction of lodging management from historical and operational perspectives as well as current issues and future trends in lodging industry. Students acquire management insights to operations of front desk, housekeeping auxiliary facilities, and back office.
  • SPH-T 211 International Tourism (3 cr.) Overview of international tourism and its importance to world-wide destinations, focusing on the complexity of the world's diverse tourism opportunities, cultures, attractions, facilities, associated natural and cultural resources, and the role of sustainability in global tourism operations. Areas of investigation will range from conventional mass tourism to alternative tourism settings.
  • SPH-T 301 Sustainable Tourism (3 cr.) Examination of critical issues in sustainable tourism, including positive and negative influences of tourism on the destination's economy, culture, and environment, and the role of sustainability in both conventional mass tourism and alternative tourism settings.
  • SPH-T 302 Management of Food and Beverage Operations (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of food and beverage management; emphasizing how food service professionals create and deliver guest-driven service, enhance value, build guest loyalty, and promote repeat business.  Students learn theoretical and practical skills for effective management of food and beverage service operations relating to front and back of the house, leadership, management principles, service skills, service styles, and training of personnel.
  • SPH-T 311 Convention Management and Meeting Planning (3 cr.) To enhance their effectiveness in the tourism and commercial recreation industry, students should extend this programming focus to include nonrecreational facilities and services, particularly those associated with various groups and types of?meetings such as conventions, banquets, receptions, and special events.
  • SPH-T 321 Resort Management (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of resort management, including the history of travel, evolution of resort management, resort design, and the emerging trends of resort development. In addition, the students will explore a variety of managerial problems and apply problem-solving skills to a critical issue (e.g. marketing).
  • SPH-T 323 Festival and Event Management (3 cr.) Focus on key management, marketing and operational areas in festival & event tourism, including managing culture and leisure experiences, merchandising and retail, catering, ticketing and pricing operations, the role of politics and policy, and issues in the economics of event tourism and risk management.
  • SPH-T 410 Event Planning and Program Development (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. (Formerly HPER-R 430) Students learn event planning and program techniques while applying course materials to real-world experiences through service learning. Students will develop and facilitate event planning and recreation programs through the study of a variety of models including the event/program development cycle.
  • SPH-T 333 Festival and Event Tourism (3 cr.) P: SPH-T 201. Study of key operational areas including destination branding, social impacts, heritage interaction, urban regeneration, the role of politics and policy, and the economics of event tourism. Application of current best practices through case studies in local arts and cultural events, food and wine festivals, mega sporting events, and heritage settings.
  • SPH-T 411 International Meeting Planning (3 cr.) Course addresses the organization and production of international corporate business meetings, seminars, incentive trips, and conventions using innovative and cost-effective programs impacted by changing business needs.  International issues include organizing and/or hosting international events, managing international finances, cultural considerations, international contracting, marketing, and legalities, and convention safety and security.
  • SPH-T 431 Green Operations in Hospitality Services (3 cr.) Overview of green management in the hospitality business from the perspectives of history, operations, and future trends. Focus on green operations including waste management, design, marketing, and purchasing.
  • SPH-T 513 Economics and Marketing for Leisure and Tourism (3 cr.) Marketing's role in promoting tourism destinations with focus on the effects of economic, social, cultural, technological, and legal changes in tourism. Controllable variables essential to tourism marketing success are examined in addition to how marketing guides tourism destination's business strategy.
  • SPH-T 550 Foundational Issues: Research in Tourism (3 cr.) This class will provide an analysis of historical tourism research to provide the foundation, context, and background of contemporary issues and research agendas facing the tourism field today.
  • SPH-T 552 Contemporary Issues in Tourism Studies (3 cr.) A critical overview of tourism studies from different social science perspectives, including politics, economy, environment, society, culture, geography, community development, psychology, and marketing.
Wilderness and Outdoor Skills - SPH-W
  • SPH-W 110 Outdoor Adventure Leadership Skills (1 cr.) This course provides opportunities for application of pre-existing outdoor adventure skills in a natural setting. Students will learn general leadership concepts and have opportunities to practice and apply leadership skills to land- and water-based outdoor adventure activities.
  • SPH-W 111 Wilderness Survival (1 cr.) This course is designed to introduce the techniques required for wilderness survival and living skills and also to promote your awareness of self and nature, shelter construction, friction fire, and wilderness ethics. Classroom knowledge and skills will be followed with a weekend in the back country practicing and refining newly acquired skills.
  • SPH-W 112 Wilderness Survival-Advanced (1 cr.) P: SPH-W 111 or instructor consent. Introduces students to "gearless survival" skills, including creating basic stone tools, shelter, and fire by friction utilizing only essential natural materials.  Designed to promote awareness of self and nature, shelter construction, friction fire making, and wilderness ethic.
  • SPH-W 113 Backpacking (1 cr.) Introduces the basics of backpacking and backcountry camping, including proper equipment selection, use of topographic map, water purification, campsite selection, and Leave No Trace ethics. This is a highly experience-based course where students will engage in camp setting and maintenance, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 115 Leave No Trace (3 cr.) Provides the Leave No Trace principles and ethics and opportunity to practice minimum impact skills. Highly experienced-based course where students will engage in camp setting and maintenance, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 116 Wilderness First Aid (1 cr.) Help prepare students to obtain the Wilderness First Aid certification. Highly experience-based course where students will be followed by scenarios conducted outside the classroom. A third of the class time will be spent outside practicing skills in scenarios.
  • SPH-W 117 Swiftwater Rescue (1 cr.) Designed to help students respond quickly and safely to water emergencies. Topics include self rescue, broaching, entrapment, throw rope technique, Z-pulley systems, first aid, rescue equipment, kayak and raft rescue, swift water safety.
  • SPH-W 120 Fundamentals of Search and Rescue (2 cr.) This course prepares students for national certification as a Search and Rescue (SAR) Tech II according to the National Association of Search and Rescue. Content includes topics in three major areas: survival and support, search, and rescue. Course provides practical experience during simulated search and rescue operations during day/evening scenarios.
  • SPH-W 121 Wildland Firefighting (2 cr.) Provides basic knowledge/skills necessary to become qualified as a wildland firefighter for state or federal agencies. Topics of course are oriented toward suppression of wildland fires. Successful completion of the course and pack test (aerobic capacity) will qualify students for Red Card certification as a Wildland Firefighter.
  • SPH-W 122 Wilderness Living Skills (1 cr.) Designed to introduce students to the essential techniques for earth living (i.e fire by friction, shelter building, etc.) in a back country setting. Most class time will be spent in the field using experiential learning approaches with another portion taught from readings, presentations, and lectures.
  • SPH-W 125 Mountain Biking (1 cr.) Designed to introduce the practical knowledge and techniques of mountain biking: Based upon the International Biking Association (IMBA) rules of the trail. Learning proper trail use and care is a fundamental point covered to allow enjoyment of nature on the scenic trails surrounding Bloomington. Students participate through inquisitive learning as well as demonstrating new skills.
  • SPH-W 129 Map and Compass (1 cr.) Designed to introduce practical knowledge and techniques of topographic map and compass. Highly experience-based course where students engage in camp settings and maintenance, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 130 Orienteering (1 cr.) This course is designed to introduce you to the fundamentals of orienteering. Course topics include an overview of the sport in which the competitor is given a topographic map of a forest marked with a course consisting of a series of check points to be visited. Students will learn map reading and compass skills practicing their skills on an orienteering course.
  • SPH-W 132 Canoeing (1 cr.) Introduces the basics of canoeing, including paddle strokes, essential maneuvers, basic canoe rescues, and Leave No Trace ethics. Highly experience-based course where students will engage in camp settings and maintenance, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 133 Whitewater Canoeing (1 cr.) Designed to introduce the essential techniques required in whitewater canoeing. Topics covered include canoeing strategies and tactics, water safety, river dynamics, and relevant whitewater canoeing equipment. Highly experience-based course where students engage in genuine reflection and new skill development.
  • SPH-W 134 Whitewater Rafting (1 cr.) Designed to introduce the essential techniques required in whitewater rafting. Topics covered include rafting strategies and tactics, water safety, river dynamics, and relevant whitewater rafting equipment. Highly experience-based course where students engage in genuine reflection and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 135 Whitewater Kayaking (1 cr.) Designed to introduce the essential techniques required in whitewater kayaking strategies and tactics, water safety, river dynamics, and new skills demonstration.
  • SPH-W 136 Coastal Kayaking (1 cr.) This course will provide you with an overview of the essential skills and knowledge for safe paddling on inland protected waters. These skills include essential maneuvering strokes, wet exits, assisted and unassisted rescues, kayak equipment, safety planning, and Leave No Trace ethics.
  • SPH-W 137 Coastal Kayaking-Intermediate (1 cr.) Reviews fundamental coastal kayaking techniques and introduces advanced techniques in boat control, paddle, and water navigation on a large body of water. Highly experience-based course where students engage in camp settings and maintenance, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 138 Cross Country Skiing (1 cr.) This course will help you develop the fundamental skills and knowledge for cross country skiing and winter backcountry travel. This course introduces you to flat-track techniques then progresses to uphill and downhill techniques.
  • SPH-W 139 Snowshoeing (1 cr.) This course will entail two days of snowshoeing in a winter environment. It is designed to provide you with the overview of snowshoeing techniques and winter living skills. This is a highly experience based course where participants must engage in site setting, snowshoeing safety, genuine reflection and Leave No Trace ethics.
  • SPH-W 140 Snowboarding (1 cr.) This course is designed to introduce or further the skills of the student in snowboarding. Intended for all experience levels from beginners to advanced. The Nationally Certified Instructors of Paoli Peaks will tailor lessons to the specific wants and needs of the student to help advance their snowboarding skills.
  • SPH-W 142 Downhill Skiing (1 cr.) This course is designed to introduce or further the skills of the student in downhill skiing. Intended for all experience levels from beginners to advanced. The Nationally Certified instructors of Paoli Peaks will tailor lessons to the specific wants and needs of the student to help advance their downhill skiing skills
  • SPH-W 143 Ice Climbing (1 cr.) Introduces the basics of waterfall ice climbing in a top rope situation. Topics covered include safety, gear selection, movement on ice, and perfecting tool and crampon placements. Highly experience-based course where students will actively participate to learn the ice climbing, belaying skills, genuine reflection, and Leave No Trace ethics.
  • SPH-W 144 Rock Climbing (1 cr.) Designed to introduce an overview of rock climbing and belaying techniques that maximize your safety. Topics covered include safety, gear selection, general movement on rock, and perfecting hand and foot placements. Highly experience-based course where students engage in camp setting and maintenance, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration.
  • SPH-W 145 Rock Climbing-Intermediate (1 cr.) P: SPH-W 144 or instructor consent. This course is designed to build on skills introduced in Rock Climbing and introduce you to intermediate rock climbing techniques and anchor building. This is a highly experience based course where participants must engage in site setting, rock climbing safety, anchor building, decision making, and genuine reflection.
  • SPH-W 147 Indoor Climbing (1 cr.) Introduces climbing and belaying techniques. Highly experience-based course where students engage in site setting, climbing safety, proper belay techniques and new skill demonstrations. Includes an introduction to lead climbing and belaying lead falls. Fee charged.
  • SPH-W 149 Vertical Caving (1 cr.) Designed to introduce you to the essential techniques in vertical caving. Highly experience-based course where students engage in the use of equipment, rappelling technique, caving commands, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration in the beautiful cave throughout the Midwest.
  • SPH-W 190 Foundations of Outdoor Adventure (2 cr.) Experiential overview of basic concepts, principles, and practices in the areas of outdoor adventure and wilderness stewardship, emphasizing the construction of personal meaning in the context of lifelong learning.
  • SPH-W 148 Indoor Climbing-Intermediate (1 cr.) Builds on the basic climbing skills learned in Indoor Climbing and help develop lead climbing skills and lead belaying technique and skills. Highly experience-based course where students engage in site setting, climbing safety, genuine reflection, and new skill demonstration. Fee charged.
  • SPH-W 305 Introduction to Wilderness Leadership (2 cr.) This ten-week course introduces principles and practices in planning, leading, and evaluating outdoor trips. Students study wilderness leadership theory and techniques while also planning and implementing two weekend field practicum experiences. This course is typically the first step in becoming a trip leader with Outdoor Adventures.
  • SPH-W 331 Widerness First Responder (3 cr.) The course takes an in-depth look at emergencies that might be encountered in the backcountry. Wilderness First Responder is the most widely accepted standard in wilderness medical care for outdoor leaders. The curriculum uses the principles of long term care, improvised resources, and varying environmental conciliations as the framework for learning.
Recreational Therapy - SPH-Y
  • SPH-Y 225 Disability, Health, and Function (3 cr.) Students will be provided with a model of disabling conditions including physical, mental, developmental, intellectual, hearing and vision, and other disabilities related to aging. Content will focus on etiology, prognosis, symptomatic conditions, prevalence, and its relationship to public health. Models of disability and medical terminology will be covered.
  • SPH-Y 277 Foundations of Recreational Therapy Practice (3 cr.) The entry level course to Recreational Therapy, this class provides an overview of the foundations of practice and theory, and historical development and evolution of the Recreational Therapy profession. Students will become familiar with Recreational Therapy as an allied health profession, service delivery models, and practice settings.
  • SPH-Y 378 Recreational Therapy Assessment and Planning (3 cr.) P: SPH-Y 277 This class is the first in a two-part series to learn appropriate treatment skills for the entry-level recreational therapist. This is a service learning class, and the laboratory section must be taken simultaneously in order to receive credit for the class.
  • SPH-Y 379 Recreational Therapy Facilitation Techniques and Evaluation (3 cr.) P: SPH-Y 378 Basic concepts, methods, and techniques associated with the selection and implementation of therapeutic interventions, and the evaluation of the interventions towards the treatment goals of the patient. This is a service learning class, and the laboratory section must be taken simultaneously in order to receive credit.
  • SPH-Y 397 Recreational Therapy Internship and Professional Preparation (3 cr.) P: Prequisite or corequisite: SPH-Y 378 This course is designed to prepare students for their required professional internship through a review of skills, consideration of the best placement for their career goals, and planning for the job search. Professional preparatory skills will also be developed and honed.
  • SPH-Y 470 Contemporary Issues in Recreational Therapy (3 cr.) This course is designed to advance the student's knowledge of issues and concerns that influence the provision of recreational therapy services and the advancement of the profession. Students are required critically to examine and discuss issues impacting the health care field.
  • SPH-Y 472 Recreational Therapy in the Health Care Environment (3 cr.) P: SPH-Y 277 This course presents the foundation for understanding the contemporary health care system, as well as developing systematic program design, implementation and management of recreational therapy services. Students will understand the insurance and reimbursement systems; relevant guidelines and standards related to health care organizations; and the process of program development.
  • SPH-Y 560 Professional Development for Therapeutic Recreation (3 cr.) Contemporary principles and understanding for the delivery of therapeutic recreational service. Opportunities to refine personal and professional philosophy of therapeutic recreation.
  • SPH-Y 561 Advanced Therapeutic Recreation Processes (3 cr.) Techniques, approaches, procedures, and practices in the provision of therapeutic recreation service.
  • SPH-Y 562 Social Psychology of Therapeutic Recreation (3 cr.) An examination of the social psychology of therapeutic recreation service. Emphasis on social and organizational behaviors relevant to therapeutic recreation.
  • SPH-Y 563 Program Development and Consultation in Therapeutic Recreation (3 cr.) Concerns in developing and providing therapeutic recreational programs and consultation.

Academic Bulletins