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Social Work | SWK

Pictured | Hailey Phelps | Social Work | Fremont, Indiana (hometown)
Club Affiliation | Theta Phi Alpha, Gamma Phi Chapter


Social Work | SWK

P Prerequisite | C Co-requisite | R Recommended
I Fall Semester | II Spring Semester | S Summer Session/s


  • SWK-S 100 Topics in Social Work: Understanding Diverse in a Pluralistic Society (1-3 cr.) This covers theories and models that enhance understanding of our diverse society. It provides content about differences and similarities in the experiences, needs, and beliefs of selected minority groups and their relation to the majority group.
  • SWK-S 102 Diversity in a Pluralistic Society (1-4 cr.) This course covers theories and models that enhance understanding of our diverse society. It provides content about differences and similarities in the experiences, needs and beliefs of selected minority groups and their relation to the majority group. These groups include, but are not limited to, people of color, women, gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons. This course analyzes the interrelationship of race, class, age, ethnicity, and gender and how these factors influence the social values regarding economic and social justice. Course content will be integrated through student writing and presentations. The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for School's of Social Work, requires Social Work Programs to demonstrate how each course in the curriculum helps students develop competencies expected of all who seek entry into the profession. Programs must document a match between course content and CSWE competencies defined in Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). This course, required in the BSW curriculum, draws upon basic knowledge and understanding of our diverse society. Course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate EPAS (CSWE, 2008) competencies 2.1.2 (values and ethics), 2.1.3 (critical thinking), 2.1.4 (engage diversity and difference in practice), and 2.1.5 (advance human rights and social and economic justice).
  • SWK-S 141 Introduction to Social Work (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to the profession of social work and the philosophical, societal, and organizational contexts within which professional social work activities are conducted. This course provides the opportunity for students to explore their interest in and potential for a career in social work. It introduces the knowledge, skills and values of social work as a profession and explores the role of social workers within the broad area of social welfare and social services. Social work practice requires extensive knowledge about the human condition, problems in living, problem solving, the delivery of human services, and the institutions that comprise today's social welfare system. Cognitive and interaction skills necessary for competent practice are introduced in this course. This course emphasizes the value base of social work practice and its commitment to social and economic justice. It assists students in assessing the congruence between their own values and those of the profession.
  • SWK-S 221 Human Growth and Development in the Social Environment (3 cr.) This course assists the undergraduate social work student in building a foundation for understanding human behavior and development in diverse contexts across the life course. The course emphasizes the interdependence of dynamic interactions between a person and that individual's environment, and thus introduces students to implications for human development through a person-in-environment lens. S221 Human Growth and Development in the Social Environment explores influences of the biological, social, cultural, psychological and spiritual dimensions on individual human development and behavior. Students examine how the diverse contexts in which individuals live impact the range of human development and behavior in themselves and others. Understanding human behavior and development from a multidimensional perspective builds a strong foundation for development of skills later in the curriculum. Specifically, foundational concepts presented in this course help students apply critical thinking to an understanding of the diversity of human functioning and implications for the processes of social work assessment, evaluation and intervention.
  • SWK-S 305 Introduction to Child Protection (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to child abuse and neglect from psychological, social, cultural, legal, and economic perspectives. Social workers in all professional work settings must know how to identify child maltreatment and family violence. Students must also be able to practice without discrimination and with respect, knowledge, and skills related to the clients' age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Students will learn the family dynamics and indicators of maltreatment and effective interventions at the micro, mezzo, and macro level, with an emphasis on strengths based, family-centered intervention strategies. Additionally, students will learn the extent of reported maltreatment of children, effects on children, treatment issues, the social worker's role in a multidisciplinary team approach, how to advocate for individuals and families, and will be introduced to the concept of personal accountability for outcomes. This course will also introduce to students the values and ethics of the social work profession in the child welfare arena, specifically the right of children to appropriate care, to be free of abuse and neglect, and to grow up in a safe environment. This course is available as an elective but is also the first of two specific course requirements for the child services certification available through public universities in Indiana and the Indiana Department of Child Services. These two courses include components of the Core Training curriculum for all new employees of the Department of Child Services.
  • SWK-S 322 Small Group Theory and Practice (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program. P or C: SWK-S 221. C: P or C: SWK-S 221. The course examines the significance of the small group as both the context and means for social development of individuals and as a vehicle for generalist practice. It includes discussion of the individual as a member of a variety of groups, including the family. The course covers group theories as well as mezzo practice strategies. Generalist social work practice recognizes the importance of groups in the life of individuals and societies. Groups are one of the most important vehicles for the social development of the individual as well as one of the basic structures by which a society organizes itself. They are often the means in which both individual and collective empowerment can occur, enabling the parties involved to effect change in their environment. Because of this significance, the study of group process and group practice is essential for social work. S322 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Small Group
  • SWK-S 331 Generalist Social Work Practice I: Theory and Skill (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program; P or C: SWK-S 102, SWK-S 221 and ENG-W 131. C: P or C: SWK-S 102, SWK-S 221 and ENG-W 131. This course focuses primarily on the application of basic generalist social work skills that demonstrate an understanding and application of the continuum of social work practice in the helping relationship. The course focuses on the beginning phase of the problem-solving process and related skills. This course is designed to provide students with a beginning understanding of generalist social work practice. This course uses a range of perspectives including strengths perspective, empowerment perspective and person-in-environment perspective. Theory and Skills I is the first course in the Social Work practice professional foundation area. The course is based on the assumption that professional practice is built on a combination of knowledge, skills, and values. Integration of these Social Work concepts is accomplished mainly by lectures, role playing, and exercises. BSW graduates are expected to demonstrate the integration and application of the ten core competencies identified by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work academic programs. The content and assignments in this course are designed to introduce, reinforce and/or emphasize selected practice behaviors associated with this course, and to assist students in developing the social work core competencies. These competencies are evidenced by corresponding practice behaviors. This course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate the following CSWE competencies: EP 2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly, EP 2.1.2 - Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice, EP 2.1.3 Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments, EP 2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice, 2.1.6 Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research- analysis, EP 2.1.10 a, b Engage and assess with individuals. I, II, S
  • SWK-S 332 Generalist Social Work Practice II: Theory and Skills (3 cr.) P: SWK-S 331. Generalist SWK-S 251. P: or C: SWK-S 322 C: P: or C: SWK-S 322 The course examines the significance of the small group as both the context and means for social development of individuals and as a vehicle for generalist practice. It includes discussion of the individual as a member of a variety of groups, including the family. The course covers group theories as well as mezzo practice strategies. Generalist social work practice recognizes the importance of groups in the life of individuals and societies. Groups are one of the most important vehicles for the social development of the individual as well as one of the basic structures by which a society organizes itself. They are often the means in which both individual and collective empowerment can occur, enabling the parties involved to effect change in their environment. Because of this significance, the study of group process and group practice is essential for social work. S322 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Small Group Functioning serves as a linkage between the HBSE I and III courses. It is based on the strengths and empowerment perspectives and uses a systems analysis for understanding the impact of the small group on both the individual and society. This course focuses on group dynamics and practice, with an emphasis on the small group. In addition, the course is designed to enhance students' effectiveness for group participation and leadership. The course analyzes different social work roles and the various interventions used in working with groups. It offers a discourse on the individual as a member of a variety of groups, including the family and the formal organization as a composite of groups. The course activities include student participation in a small group experience where they will have the opportunity to learn selected skills for practice with small groups while studying the specifics of group theory and group dynamics. BSW graduates are expected to demonstrate the integration and application of the ten core competencies identified by the Council on social work Education, the accrediting body for all social work academic programs. The content and assignments in this course are designed to introduce, reinforce and/or emphasize selected practice behaviors associated with this course, and to assist students in developing the social work core competencies. These competencies are evidence by corresponding practice behaviors. This course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate EP 2.1.4 (engage difference and diversity in practice), EP 2.1.5 (advance human rights and social and economic justice), EP 2.1.7 (apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment), EP 2.1.9 (respond to contexts that shape practice) and EP 2.1.10 (engage, assess, intervene and evaluate practice with groups). S322 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Small Group Functioning serves as a linkage between the HBSE I and III courses. The courses should be taken in sequence or concurrently. I, II, S
  • SWK-S 352 Social Welfare Policy and Practice (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program and SWK-S 251. This second course in social welfare policy builds on S251 by exploring in depth the current social welfare delivery system through policy analysis using a variety of frameworks and developing policy practice skills.  The course also develops beginning policy practice skills so that students will know how to work toward social change congruent with social work ethics and the profession's commitment to social and economic justice. The course emphasizes critical thinking and beginning policy practice skills to help students both understand and influence global, national, state, local, and agency policies that affect delivery of social services in local communities.  The course develops policy analysis and policy practice skills within the context of social work ethics and the profession's commitment to social and economic justice.  The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for School's of Social Work, requires Social Work Programs to demonstrate how each course in the curriculum helps students develop competencies expected of all who seek entry into the profession.  Programs must document a match between course content and CSWE competencies defined in Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS).  This course, required in the BSW curriculum, draws upon basic knowledge and understanding of our diverse society. Course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate the following CSWE competencies: EPAS 2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice; EPAS 2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice; EPAS 2.1.5 Promote human rights and social justice; EPAS 2.1.8 Engage in policy practice to deliver effective social work services; and EPAS 2.1.9 Respond to and shape an ever-changing professional context.
  • SWK-S 371 Social Work Research (3 cr.) P: Junior Standing. The general goal of this basic social science research methods course is to introduce and develop skills needed to conceptualize a problem, make use of available literature, design a research strategy, evaluate, organize, and integrate relevant data (both existing and new), derive useful solutions based on knowledge, and communicate those solutions to clients and colleagues.  The attainment of this goal will prepare students to continue their own professional education, contribute to the development of the profession as a whole, and maintain their service to clients at a standard commensurate with the current level of knowledge. This is the first course in the research professional content area and provides basic knowledge about research methodology as it applies to social work. Social work practice and research share common features and processes as both are fundamentally problem-solving enterprises. Students are encouraged to generalize the basic concepts and principles of science presented within this course for use in the knowledge building activities that take place throughout the broader curriculum. Underlying principles of science and logic are emphasized and special attention is directed toward the recognition of common sources of error and bias in the implementation and interpretation of research studies as it affects the outcomes of research utilization. Students will be better able to recognize the impact of race, gender, age, and sexual orientation on the research process.  BSW graduates are expected to demonstrate the integration and application of the ten core competencies identified by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work academic programs. The content and assignments in this course are designed to introduce, reinforce and/or emphasize selected practice behaviors associated with this course, and to assist students in developing the social work core competencies. These competencies are evidenced by corresponding practice behaviors. This course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate EPAS: 2.1.3 critical thinking; 2.1.2 values and ethics; 2.1.4 diversity and difference; 2.1.5 Social Justice; 2.1.6 research-informed practice and practice-informed research; 2.1.10(d) evaluation of practice.
  • SWK-S 372 Statistical Reasoning in Social Work (3 cr.) This introductory statistics course is designed for students who wish to master some very important tools used by contemporary social work practitioners to better understand the world of practice. The primary purpose of the course is to enable students to gain an understanding of the basic principles that guide statistical reasoning, especially as they relate to making informed decisions about the quantitative aspects of their practice. Students will learn how to collect and organize data, examine it for patterns and relationships, and analyze it for purposes of drawing plausible and defensible conclusions. We do not "prove" in social work research, but look for relationships between variables. The basic philosophy upon which this course is grounded is the belief that statistical reasoning (i.e., thinking, meaning, and interpretation) should precede statistical methods. It is assumed that, for most beginning students, many of the concepts and principles used by statisticians are likely to be experiences as foreign and confusing. Complex computational formulas and mathematical notations have been known to intimidate many students, and when that occurs, it can interfere with learning. Therefore, the course is based on pedagogy of active learning that engages students in a problem solving process that enables them to gain an understanding of the kinds of questions in relation to which statistics can help. It emphasizes the use of statistics in the real life situations. It attempts to engender in students an understanding of basic statistical concepts and the ability to synthesize the components of their statistical efforts in ways that will enable them to communicate their results in a clear and convincing manner. It should be noted that this course meets the prerequisite requirement for students wishing to apply for admission to the IU MSW program. It is classified as a BSW elective, and as such, it may be taken as either a graded or as a pass/fail option. If this course is taken for the BSW Math/Physical Science requirement, it should be taken as a graded course.
  • SWK-S 400 Special Topics in Fields of Practice (1-6 cr.) In-depth study of a special field of social work practice, such as family and child welfare, health care, mental health.
  • SWK-S 401 Integrative Practicum Seminar I (3 cr.) This course is designed to facilitate integration of material gained from social work practice and theory courses with the realities of practice in the field as they occur in the student's practicum placement, S482 Social Work Practicum I. This course combines an exploration of social work practice with specific application to client situations. To allow students to fully explore issues and questions from the practicum experience, this course is taught in seminar format. Students are expected to share in the success of the seminar by presenting and sharing material from their practicum with seminar participants. BSW graduates are expected to demonstrate the integration and application of the ten core competencies identified by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work academic programs. The content and assignments in this course are designed to provide the opportunity for demonstration of the social work core competencies and practice behaviors as well as the presentation of products produced during the concurrent practicum. This course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate all ten of the EPAS competencies as students build their eportfolios. However, emphasis is given to 2.1.1 (professional identity), 2.1.2 (values and ethics), 2.1.4 (diversity), 2.1.5 (human rights and social and economic justice), 2.1.8 (social policy), 2.1.9 (organizational context) and 2.1.10 (a) and (b) (engaging and assessing practice). Students will utilize course assignments from their upper-level social work courses and products from the S481 practicum as potential evidence that demonstrates they have achieved competence. Discussion in seminar, as well as individual consultation with the faculty liaison, will provide guidance for appropriate activities and products demonstrating competence of the identified practice behaviors. Curricular emphasis is placed on 23 of the 41 practice behaviors identified by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) for professional practice at the BSW level. Remaining practice behaviors are achieved in the second semester of field education in S482/S402 Social Work Practicum II and Social Work Practicum II Integrative Seminar. 
  • SWK-S 402 Integrative Practicum Seminar II (3 cr.) This second semester of field seminar provides a continuing forum for the integration of academic learning with agency-based field placement. Taken as a co-requisite with S482 Field Practicum II, this course provides students with educational and administrative support to synthesize knowledge from all previous social work courses and the experiential learning from field, increases communication between student, liaison, agency, and provides opportunities critical thinking in problem-solving practice challenges, utilizing collaborative conferencing with peers, and transitioning from student to social work practitioner. The seminar includes discussions on selected topics and issues related to the learning experiences in the field (both instructor- and student-initiated) with emphasis on student demonstration of core competencies for generalist social work practice. Through facilitated discussion, students learn about social work practice in various settings and assist each other in seeing the similarities and differences in applying generalist social work practice, knowledge, and skills across service delivery systems and practice methods. BSW graduates are expected to demonstrate the integration and application of the ten core competencies identified by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work academic programs. The content and assignments in this course are designed to introduce, reinforce and/or emphasize selected practice behaviors associated with this course, and to assist students in developing the social work core competencies. These competencies are evidenced by corresponding practice behaviors. This course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate all ten of the EPAS competencies as students complete their eportfolio and as such, serves as a capstone experience for the BSW curriculum. However, emphasis is given to 2.1.2 (values and ethics), 2.1.3 (critical thinking), 2.1.6 (research), 2.1.7 (human behavior and the social environment), 2.1.9 (community context) and 2.1.10 (c) and (d) (intervening and evaluating practice). This course serves as a capstone experience for the BSW curriculum where students gather and organize products that demonstrate their competence in their electronic portfolio. 
  • SWK-S 423 Organization Theory and Practice (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program, SWK-S 322. This course provides the theoretical and conceptual foundation for understanding organizational functioning and behavior, and introduces the knowledge and skills necessary for generalist social work practice and leadership within an organizational context. The course assists the undergraduate social work student in building a knowledge base about organizations and organizational life from the perspective of consumers, practitioners, and leaders. It also aims at developing students' ability to work differentially with selected organizations and systems recognizing the unique characteristics, capabilities and needs of modern organizations and the clients they serve. The course focuses on the relationship between service ideology, organizational structure, processes, and culture and how these facets of an organization enhance or inhibit the well being of consumers and practitioners. The course devotes discrete attention to practical skills in organizational survival for the social worker, theory and practice of leadership within human service organizations, managing staff and volunteers in human service organizations, particularly non-profit organizations, organizational change and innovation, fundraising and budgeting, developing and sustaining culturally-competent and client-centered organizations, and the relationship of organizations to communities, community stakeholders and the political process. It also addresses the impact of globalization and technology at the agency level. This course builds on the knowledge and skills of generalist practice gained from S322, S331, and S332. The orientation of this class is informed by systems theory, the ecological and strengths perspectives, theories on innovation and organizational change, and the concepts of power, empowerment, and culturally competent practice. The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for School's of Social Work, requires Social Work Programs to demonstrate how each course in the curriculum helps students develop competencies expected of all who seek entry into the profession. Programs must document a match between course content and CSWE competencies defined in Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). This course, required in the BSW curriculum, draws upon basic knowledge and understanding of our diverse society. Course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate the following CSWE competencies: 2.1.4 (Engage diversity and difference in practice.); 2.1.5 (Advance human rights and social and economic justice.); 2.1.7 (Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.); 2.1.9 (Respond to contexts that shape practice.); 2.1.10 a (Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.); 2.1.10 b (assess with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.); 2.1.10 c (Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.); 2.1.10d (Evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.)  
  • SWK-S 433 Community Behavior and Practice Within a Generalist Perspective (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program and all Social Work courses. C: SWK-S 482. Course provides the theoretical foundation about community functioning and behavior and the knowledge and skills of community interventions geared to mitigate social, political and economic injustice and bring social change.
  • SWK-S 442 Intermediate Practice-Policy Seminar in Selected Fields of Practice (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program; all 300-level courses. C: SWK-S 481. This course focuses the student upon a specific field of social work practice in increased depth, provides further opportunity for synthesis of student learning from previous courses, and seeks to integrate social welfare policies and policy analysis with social work practice.   Repeatable for credit.
  • SWK-S 460 Scholarly Writing Seminar (3 cr.) This course prepares BSW/MSW students to successfully complete scholarly writing tasks. Topics addressed include expectations and standards for scholarly writing, conducting searches of professional literature, using effective paraphrasing and summarization skills, writing logically and coherently, and appropriately citing references adhering to APA format. The course is intended to support students' efforts on writing tasks assigned in future courses. I, II, S
  • SWK-S 472 Practice Evaluation (3 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program, all 300 level courses. P or C: SWK-S 423, SWK-S 433 and SWK-S 482. The purpose of this course is to educate students to evaluate systematically their own practice within the context of generalist practice. The course covers the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate practice with individuals, groups and communities and organizations.
  • SWK-S 481 Social Work Practicum I (2-7 cr.) P: admitted to the BSW program; all 300-level courses. P or C: SWK-S 442 S-F grading. Field education provides the opportunity for social work students to demonstrate competency in practice, integrating knowledge, values and skills gained in the professional education curriculum. The first practicum experience in the Bachelor of Social Work program allows the student to develop and demonstrate beginning practice competency, laying the foundation for the final field experience (S482). S481 Social Work Practicum I builds upon the theoretical and experiential learning of both S231 Generalist Social Work Practice I: Theory and Skills and S332 Generalist Social Work Practice II: Theory and Skills both taught during the Junior year. S481 Social Work Practicum I affords the student an opportunity to make application of practice knowledge, values, and skills within an organizational structure of a human service agency. In the agency settings, students are expected to demonstrate beginning competency in working with clients, utilizing community resources, interacting with other professionals, and in functioning effectively within an organization. Furthermore, students are expected to identify and work to alleviate (at a beginning level) oppressive conditions in the lives of their clients. As an essential complement to S481 Social Work Practicum I, each student will participate in a bimonthly integrative seminar course, S401 Integrative Seminar I, designed to assist the student to conceptualize his/her practice with the projected aim of professional integration. S401 Seminar activities are designed to be compatible with and supportive of the development of practice behaviors outlined in the competencies defined by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).
  • SWK-S 482 Social Work Practicum II (2-7 cr.) P: Admitted to the BSW program and SWK-S 481 442; P or C: SWK S 423 433, 472. This course is the continuation of SWK-S 481 agency-based field experience which provides opportunities for students to demonstrate the practice behaviors outlined in the competencies defined by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in preparation for professional practice at the BSW level.  Demonstration of competencies requires the application and integration of classroom concepts and principles and the development of skills for generalist practice. The S482 practicum placement continues at the same agency as arranged for S481 with the student increasing the practicum time to 20 hours per week for the 16-week semester, with continued weekly supervision from an approved agency-based field instructor.  The learning plan developed by the student and agency-based field instructor, and approved by the faculty liaison in S481, is continued and updated to provide opportunity for students to demonstrate the requisite practice behaviors.  Students complete a minimum of 320 hours of supervised agency practice during this semester experience. BSW graduates are expected to demonstrate the integration and application of the ten core competencies identified by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work academic programs. The content and assignments in this course are designed to provide the opportunity for demonstration of the social work core competencies and practice behaviors as well as the presentation of products produced during this practicum for evaluation by field instructors, faculty liaisons and the student themselves.  As this practicum builds upon the theoretical and experiential learning experiences provided in the professional coursework, students will have previously taken all required social work courses and will be concurrently enrolled in S402 Integrative Practicum Seminar II, taught by a faculty member who serves as the field liaison, which is geared to helping the student conceptualize his/her practice with the projected aim of professional integration and developing competence.  Students MUST take S402 and S482 concurrently:  If students fail one or both of the S402 and S482 courses and are allowed to reenroll in the BSW program, they will be required to successfully complete BOTH COURSES concurrently.
  • SWK-S 490 Independent Study (1-6 cr.) Intensive study of specific areas relative to social work profession and practice.
  • SWK-S 501 Professional Social Work at the Master's Level: An Immersion (3 cr.) An overview of social work providing basic orientation to available resources and expectations of graduate education in the Master of Social Work program. The overview also includes the definition, scope, history, ethics, and values of the profession.
  • SWK-S 502 Research I (3 cr.) Introduces students to the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate their own practice and the effectiveness of social service programs within which they work. I
  • SWK-S 503 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3 cr.) Focuses on individual development and functioning at all system levels with particular emphasis on the interplay of individual, family, and group system needs and resources over time. Special attention is given to issues of values and ethics and to the impact of inequality, discrimination, and differential access to opportunity within society on the development and functioning of both the individual and the family systems. I
  • SWK-S 504 Professional Practice Skills I (3 cr.) Introduces students to knowledge, values, and skills for generalist social work practice. The course prepares students to enhance the well-being of people and to ameliorate environmental conditions that affect them adversely. Includes laboratory experiences to provide opportunities for students to develop basic social work skills through experiential and simulation activities. Focus is on core interactional skills of social work practitioner differentially applied at all system levels and with diverse populations. II
  • SWK-S 505 Social Policy Analysis and Practice (3 cr.) Examines the political and legislative processes as these influence the development of social policy and services. Included are legislative and political processes, models of policy analysis, service delivery, and policy implementation. The effects of these on people are considered from global, political, economic, and social policy perspectives. I
  • SWK-S 513 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (3 cr.) Presents theoretical frameworks for understanding organizations, communities, and society as both targets and instruments of change, focusing on the ways that organizational, community, and societal structures and processes enhance or inhibit the well-being of people. Course content includes selected social problems. Special attention is given to the impact of inequality, discrimination, and differential access to opportunity on the larger systems, as well as on individuals and groups within them. S
  • SWK-S 514 Practice with Individuals and Families I (3 cr.) Focuses on generalist social work practice with individuals, families, and groups. I
  • SWK-S 618 Social Policy and Services (3 cr.) A group of courses covering topics or content including social problems, special populations, particular social service areas, and social indicators that predict areas of future social policy transformation. (Student selects one course.) I
  • SWK-S 516 Social Work Practice II: Organizations, Communities, Society (3 cr.) This course is concerned with helping communities and other social units empower themselves and eradicate oppressive situations and practices through networking, political participation, leadership development, mobilization, utilization of resources, and other strategies and techniques. II
  • SWK-S 517 Assessment in Mental Health and Addictions (3 cr.) Recognizing the social, political, legal, and ethical implications of assessment. Students critically examine various conceptual frameworks, apply bio-psychosocial and strengths perspectives to understand its multidimensional aspects. I
  • SWK-S 555 Social Work Practicum I (3 cr.) This course is an educationally directed practice experience in social work practice settings with approved field instructors. II
  • SWK-S 600 Seminar in Social Work (1-10 cr.) These courses are chosen from electives offered by the Social Work department on various subjects, or taken at a graduate-level in a related field, as approved by the program director. (elective)
  • SWK-S 623 Practice Research Integrative Seminar (3 cr.) Provides content from various research methodologies, including qualitative and quantitative designs, to support advanced interpersonal social work practice. I
  • SWK-S 651 Social Work Practicum II (4 cr.) C: Concurrent with SWK-S 643, SWK-S 644, or SWK-S 645. Agency-based field experience for interpersonal practice concentration students. 257 clock hours. I
  • SWK-S 652 Social Work Practicum III (1-5 cr.) C: Concurrent with SWK-S 643, SWK-S 644, or SWK-S 645. Agency-based field experience for interpersonal practice concentration students. 386 clock hours. II
  • SWK-S 661 Executive Leadership Practice (3 cr.) Addresses administrative, management, leadership, and supervisory skills necessary for leadership practice. S
  • SWK-S 683 Community-Based Practice in Mental Health and Addiction (3 cr.) Provides knowledge and skills relevant to various aspects of social work practice in revention, intervention, and treatment of selected addictions.
  • SWK-S 251 History and Analysis of Social Welfare Policy (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide a historical perspective on the evolution of social welfare policies and programs and allow students to develop beginning policy analysis skills so that students will be able to identify gaps in the service delivery system and inequitable or oppressive aspects of current policy delivery. Students acquire knowledge of the prevailing social, political, ideological, and economic contexts that gave rise to the various social welfare policies and programs and have influenced how programs and policies have changed over time. In addition, the students acquire knowledge of manifest and latent functions of social welfare organizations' activities, their relationship to each other. In addition, the interrelationship and sources of conflict between the evolving profession of social work and social welfare services are explored.  In this class students will build critical thinking skills as they consider forces and influences that have lead to the social service delivery system that exist today which will allow them to explore practical methods to influence policy in S 352. A particular emphasis in this course is to increase students understanding of how social welfare policies impact vulnerable people and build a passion for advocating for social and economic justice. The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for School's of Social Work, requires Social Work Programs to demonstrate how each course in the curriculum helps students develop competencies expected of all who seek entry into the profession. Programs must document a match between course content and CSWE competencies defined in Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). This course, required in the BSW curriculum, draws upon basic knowledge and understanding of our diverse society. Course content contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate the following CSWE competencies: EP 2.1.1 Identify with the social work profession; EP 2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice; EP 2.1.3 Apply critical thinking; EP 2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice; EP 2.1.5 Promote human rights and social justice; EP 2.1.7 Apply knowledge of human behavior; EP 2.1.8 Engage in policy practice to deliver effective social work services. I, II.
  • SWK-S 685 Mental Health and Addiction Practice with Individuals and Families (3 cr.) Students enrolled in this course develop knowledge, values and ethics, skills, and judgment necessary for competent application of selected evidence based, best practice, approaches for service to and for children, youth, adults, and families affected by mental health and addiction issues. II
  • SWK-S 687 Mental Health and Addiction Practice with Groups (3 cr.) Students enrolled in this course develop professional knowledge and skills for group work services to and for persons affected by mental health and addictions issues. The phases of group development and intervention during the various group work stages provide a conceptual framework for the course. S

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