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Mathematical Science | MATH

Pictured | Shaytia Messick | Elementary Education, Special Education / Minor in Mathematics | Elkhart, Indiana (hometown)


Mathematical Science | MATH

P Prerequisite | C Co-requisite | R Recommended

  • MATH-A 100 Fundamentals of Algebra (4 cr.) P: A math placement exam score of level 2 or above, or an ALEKS assessment score of 16 or higher to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Designed to introduce linear models and their applications, graphing of linear and quadratic equations, and to foster the growth of proficiency in a range of algebraic topics including  factoring strategies. Does not satisfy the Campus General Education Mathematical Reasoning requirement.
  • MATH-K 300 Statistical Techniques for Health Professions (3 cr.) P: Must earn a grade of C or better in MATH-A 100 or a math placement exam score of level 3 or better, or an ALEKS assessment score of 36 or better. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. C: MATH-M 125. Credit given for only one of MATH-K 300 and MATH-K 310. Course introduces nursing/health science students to the basic concepts and techniques of data analysis needed in professional health care practice. Measurements, data analysis and statistics are examined. Differences in types of qualitative data and methods of interpretation are explored. Procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing are also studied. Emphasis is on the application of fundamental conception to real situations in client care.
  • MATH-K 310 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C- or better in MATH-M 115 or MATH-M 125 or a math placement exam score of level 5 or better, or an ALEKS assessment score of 61 or better. Transfer credit accepted. Credit given for only one of MATH-K 300 and MATH-K 310. Introduction to probability and statistics. Elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation, hypothesis testing, Bayesian inference, statistical decision theory. Special topics discussed may include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods.
  • MATH-M 107 College Algebra (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C or better in MATH-A 100 or equivalent, or an ALEKS assessment score of 36 or higher. Designed to provide algebraic concepts and skills including sets of real numbers, exponents, complex fractions, linear equations and quadratic equations, rectangular coordinates, polynomial and rational expressions, complex numbers, and The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra.
  • MATH-M 108 Quantitative Reasoning (3 cr.) Satisfy CW Gen Ed Fund Lit QR. P: C or higher in MATH-A 100 or ALEKS Assessment score greater than 30. Topics include numerical reasoning, descriptive statistics, and linear and exponential modeling as used in solving problems typically encountered in everyday life. Emphasis is on analytic thinking, argumentation and mathematical writing. Computers (spreadsheets, internet) and graphing calculators are used.
  • MATH-M 109 Mathematical Foundations of Analytics (3 cr.) P: C or higher in MATH-A 100 or ALEKS Assessment score greater than 30. Topics primarily include percents, ratios, proportions, rates of change, select topics in geometry, basic pattern recognition, data organization, measures of average and measures of variation, normal distribution and quadratic functions. Emphasis will be given on solving real-world problems by transforming them into mathematical models. Builds conceptual understanding and develops problem-solving skills.
  • MATH-M 111 Mathematics in the World (3 cr.) Satisfy CW Gen Ed Fund Lit QR. P: Must earn grade of C or better in MATH-A 100 or equivalent, or an ALEKS assessment score of 31 or higher. MATH-M 111 grade can replace IU South Bend MATH-M 110 grade. Conveys spirit of mathematical languages of quantity; students apply concepts from algebra, geometry, management science, probability, and statistics, and use scientific software to analyze real world situations.
  • MATH-M 115 Precalculus and Trigonometry (5 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C- or better in MATH-M 107, a math placement exam score of level 4 or above, or an ALEKS assessment score of 51 or higher to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Equivalent to MATH-M 125/MATH-M 126. Credit not given for both MATH-M 115 and MATH-M 125/MATH-M 126. Satisfies Campuswide General Education Fundamental Literacies: Quantitative Reasoning. Designed to prepare students for higher numbered mathematics and computer science courses. Algebraic operations; polynomials; functions and their graphs; conic sections, linear systems of equations; trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions.
  • MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C or better in MATH-A 100 or equivalent, or an ALEKS assessment score of 36 or higher. Set theory, logic, permutations, combinations, simple probability, conditional probability, Markov chains.
  • MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus 1 (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C- or better in MATH-M 125 or MATH-M 115 or a math placement exam score of level 5 or above, or an ALEKS assessment score of 61 or higher. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Primarily for students from business and the social sciences. Credit given for only one of the following: MATH-M 119, MATH-M 208, MATH-M 215. Sets, limits, derivatives, integrals, and applications.
  • MATH-M 120 Brief Survey of Calculus 2 (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C- or better in MATH-M 119 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Credit not given for both MATH-M 216 and MATH-M 120. A continuation of M119 covering topics in elementary differential equations, calculus of functions of several variables and infinite series. Intended for nonphysical science students.
  • MATH-M 125 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (3 cr.) Credit not given for both MATH-M 125 and MATH-M 115. Designed to prepare students for M215. Algebraic operations; polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic, functions and their graphs; conic sections; systems of equations; and inequalities.
  • MATH-M 126 Trigonometric Functions (3 cr.) P: Must have grade of C- or better in MATH-M 125 or a math placement exam score of level 5 or above, or an ALEKS assessment score of 61 or higher. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Credit not given for both MATH-M 126 and MATH-M 115. Satisfies Campuswide General Education Fundamental Literacies: Quantitative Reasoning. Designed to develop the properties of the trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions and to prepare for course in calculus.
  • MATH-M 127 Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry (5 cr.) P: C- or higher in MATH-M 107 or equivalent; or ALEKS Assessment score > 50. This course is designed to prepare students for calculus (M215). Subject matter includes polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their application.
  • MATH-M 208 Technical Calculus I (3 cr.) P: C- or higher in MATH-M 115 or C- or higher in MATH-M 125 and MATH-M 126. An introduction to differential and integral calculus for today's technology students. It covers analytic geometry, limits, derivatives, applications of the derivatives, the integrals, and transcendental functions and technical applications. The approach is semi-rigorous with emphasis on the applications of calculus to technology.
  • MATH-M 209 Technical Calculus II (3 cr.) P: C- or higher in MATH-M 208 or C- or higher in MATH-M 215. This is the second semester of differential and integral calculus for today's technology students. It covers application of the integral, limited techniques, integration techniques, infinite series, differential equations, and the Laplace transform. The approach is semi-rigorous with emphasis on the applications of calculus to technology.
  • MATH-M 215 Calculus I (5 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C- or better in MATH-M 115 or MATH-M 119 and MATH-M 126 or both MATH-M 125 and M 126 or a math placement exam score of level 6 or above, or an ALEKS assessment score of 76 or higher. Credit given for only one of the following: MATH-M 119, MATH-M 208, MATH-M 215. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, techniques of integration, infinite series.
  • MATH-M 216 Calculus II (5 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 215 or an equivalent transfer course to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Credit given for only one of the following: MATH-M 209, MATH-M 120, MATH-M 216. Limits, continuity, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, applications, techniques of integration, infinite series.
  • MATH-M 260 Combinatorial Counting and Probability (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 215 or an equivalent transfer course to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Credit not given for both MATH-M 260 and MATH-M 365. Permutations, combinations, counting principles, tree diagrams, binomial theorem, statistical experiments, conditional probability, independent events, random variables, probability density, cumulative distribution, expected values, standard deviations, binomial, Poisson, normal distribution, and the central limit theorem.
  • MATH-M 261 Statistical Inferences (2 cr.) P: Must have earned a grade of C- or better in MATH-M 260 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Credit not given for both MATH-M 261 and MATH-M 366. Estimates for population parameters, estimation judged by unbiasedness and mean square error, t-distribution, chi-square distribution, philosophy of hypothesis testing, probabilities in making conclusions after testing, estimation and hypothesis testing, linear and nonlinear least square regression equation for prediction and forecast.
  • MATH-M 295 Readings and Research (1-3 cr.) Admission only with permission of a member of the Mathematics Faculty who will act as supervisor. Does not count toward divisional distribution requirements.
  • MATH-M 301 Linear Algebra and Applications (3-4 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 215. Solving systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Selection of advanced topics. Applications throughout. Computer used for theory and applications.
  • MATH-M 311 Calculus 3 (3-5 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Transfer credit accepted. Elementary geometry of 2, 3, and n-space, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, minimum and maximum problems, multiple integration.
  • MATH-M 325 Problem Seminar in Actuarial Science (1-6 cr.) P: Must earn a grade of C- or better in M 463. A problem-solving seminar to prepare students for the actuarial examinations. May be repeated up to three times for up to six credits.
  • MATH-M 343 Introduction to Differential Equations with Applications I (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 216. Ordinary differential equations and methods for their solution, including series methods and the Laplace transform.  Applications of differential equations.  Systems, stability, and numerical methods.  Partial differential equations of mathematical physics, Fourier series.
  • MATH-M 344 Introduction to Differential Equations with Applications II (3 cr.) P: Must have earned a grade of C- or better in Math-M 311 and Math-M 343 to enroll. Ordinary differential equations and methods for their solution, including series methods and the Laplace transform.  Applications of differential equations.  Systems, stability, and numerical methods.  Partial differential equations of mathematical physics, Fourier series.
  • MATH-M 347 Discrete Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Transfer credit accepted. Injective and surjective functions; inverse functions; composition; reflexive, symmetric, and transitive relations; equivalence relations; sets including complements, products, and power sets; cardinality; introductory logic including truth tables and quantification; elementary techniques of proof including induction and recursion; counting techniques; graphs and trees; discrete probability.
  • MATH-M 365 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3-4 cr.) P: MATH-M 209 or MATH-M 212, or MATH-M 216. Credit not given for MATH-M 365 and MATH-M 463/MATH-M 466. Elementary concepts of probability and statistics. Combinatorics, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, moments. Statistical inference, point estimation, confidence intervals, test of hypotheses. Applications to social and natural sciences.
  • MATH-M 366 Elements of Statistical Inference (3 cr.) Introduction to statistical theory. Basic sampling distributions. Order statistics. Point estimation, maximum likelihood estimation, the Cramer-Rao bound, least squares method, confidence intervals, hypothesis-testing concepts, Neyman-Pearson lemma, likelihood ratio tests, linear models, large sample theory, contingency tables, goodness-of-fit tests.
  • MATH-M 371 Elementary Computational Methods (3 cr.) Interpolation and approximation of functions, solution of equations, numerical integration and differentiation. Errors convergence, and stability of the procedures. Students write and use programs applying numerical methods.
  • MATH-M 380 History of Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 208, MATH-M 211, or MATH-M 215. Brief study of the development of algebra and trigonometry; practical, demonstrative, and analytic geometry; calculus, famous problems, calculating devices; famous mathematicians and chronological outlines in comparison with outlines in the sciences, history, philosophy, and astronomy.
  • MATH-M 391 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216. Transfer credit accepted. Elementary logic, techniques of proof, basic set theory, functions, relations, binary operations, number systems, counting. Bridges the gap between elementary and advanced courses. Not open to students who have received credit for MATH-M 403, MATH-M 413, or MATH-M 420.
  • MATH-M 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra I (3 cr.) P: Must have completed M 301 and M 391 or M 347. Study of groups, rings, field extensions, with applications to linear transformations.
  • MATH-M 404 Introduction to Modern Algebra 2 (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 403. Study of groups, rings, field extensions, with applications to linear transformations.
  • MATH-M 405 Number Theory (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 216 or MATH-M 212 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Numbers and their representation, divisibility and factorization, primes and their distribution, number theoretic functions, congruence, primitive roots, Diophantine equations, quadratic residues, sums of squares.
  • MATH-M 409 Linear Transformations (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 301. The study of linear transformations of a finite dimensional vector space over the complex field. Canonical forms similarity theory; inner products and diagonalization of normal transformations.
  • MATH-M 413 Introduction to Analysis 1 (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 391 or three courses at or above the 300-level. It is strongly recommended that students who have had little experience writing proofs take MATH-M 391 before taking MATH-M 413. It is strongly recommended that students who have had little experience writing proofs take MATH-M 391 before taking MATH-M 413. Modern theory of real number system, limits, functions, sequences and series, Riemann-Stieltjes integral, and special topics.
  • MATH-M 414 Introduction to Analysis 2 (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 413. Continuation of Math-M 413. Functions of several variables, Taylor series, extreme values.  Manifolds in Euclidean space, Implicit function Theorem, Inverse Function Theorem.  Divergence Theorem and other classical theorems of vector calculus. Special topics.
  • MATH-M 415 Elementary Complex Variables (3 cr.) P: Must have earned a grade of C- or better in MATH-M 311 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Algebra and geometry of complex numbers, elementary function of a complex variable, power series, integration, calculus of residues, conformal mappings. Applications to physics.
  • MATH-M 420 Metric Space Topology (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 347 or MATH-M 391. Topology of Euclidean and metric spaces. Limits and continuity. Topological properties of metric spaces, including separation properties, connectedness, and compactness. Complete metric spaces. Elementary general topology.
  • MATH-M 427 Combinatorics (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 347 or MATH-M 391. An introduction to combinatorics, the study of discrete mathematical structures. Topics include enumerative methods, generating functions, famous number families, elementary graph theory, and strategies for combinatorial problem solving.
  • MATH-M 435 Introduction to Differential Geometry (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301 and MATH-M 311. An introduction to the geometry or curves and surfaces. Topics will include arc length torsion, Frenet formulae, metrics, curvatures, and classical theorems in these areas.
  • MATH-M 436 Introduction to Geometries (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 347 or MATH-M 391. R: MATH-M 403. Non-Euclidean geometry, axiom systems. Plane projective geometry, Desarguesian planes, perspectivities, coordinates in the real projective plane. The group of projective transformations and subgeometries corresponding to subgroups. Models for geometries. Circular transformations.
  • MATH-M 445 Probability Theory for Risk Management (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 463. Single and multivariate probability distributions, functions of random variables, mixed distributions, probability inequalities, basic concepts of risk management and insurance, probability models and methods for quantitative risk assessment, preparation for SOA/CAS Exam P/1.
  • MATH-M 446 Financial Mathematics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 451. This course is a continuation of Math-M451, the Mathematics of Finance,and prepares students for the second professional actuarial examination, Exam2/Financial Mathematics(FM). Topics include the rate of return of an investment, term structure of interest rates, cash flow duration, cash flow convexity and immunization. This course will also offer an introduction to derivative securities such as forwards, options and futures. Basic insurance strategies will also be covered.
  • MATH-M 447 Mathematical Models and Applications 1 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 301 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth.
  • MATH-M 448 Mathematical Models and Applications II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 447. Formation and study of mathematical models used in the biological, social, and management sciences. Mathematical topics include games, graphs, Markov and Poisson processes, mathematical programming, queues, and equations of growth.
  • MATH-M 451 The Mathematics of Finance (3 cr.) P: Two courses from the following: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 311, MATH-M 343, MATH-M 365, MATH-M 447 and MATH-M 463. Course covers probability theory, Brownian motion, Ito's Lemma, stochastic differential equations, and dynamitic hedging. These topics are applied to the Black-Scholes formula, the pricing of financial derivatives, and the term theory of interest rates. I (even years)
  • MATH-M 463 Introduction to Probability Theory I (3-4 cr.) C: MATH-M 311, may be enrolled concurrently. Counting techniques, the meaning of probability.  Random experiments, conditional probability, independence.  Random variables, expected values and standard deviations, moment generating functions, important discrete and continuous distributions.  Poisson processes.  Multivariate distributions, basic limit laws such as the central limit theorem.
  • MATH-M 466 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 463. Rigorous mathematical treatment of problems in sampling and statistical inference. Sufficient statistics, exponential distributions, monotone likelihood ratio, most powerful tests, minimum variance estimates, shortest confidence intervals, linear models and analysis of variance, nonparametric methods.
  • MATH-M 467 Advanced Statistical Techniques I (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 466. Statistical techniques of wide application, developed from the least-squares approach: fitting of lines and curves to data, multiple regression, analysis of variance of one-way and two-way layouts under various models, multiple comparison.
  • MATH-M 468 Advanced Statistical Techniques II (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-M 466. Analysis of discrete data, chi-square tests of goodness of fit and contingency tables, Behrens-Fisher problem, comparison of variances, nonparametric methods, and some of the following topics: introduction to multivariate analysis, discriminant analysis, principal components.
  • MATH-M 471 Numerical Analysis 1 (3 cr.) P: Need MATH-M 301, MATH-M 311, and CSCI-C 101. Interpolation and approximation of functions, numerical integration and differentiation, solution of nonlinear equations, acceleration and extrapolation, solution of systems of linear equations, eigenvalue problems, initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations, and computer programs applying these numerical methods.
  • MATH-M 472 Numerical Analysis 2 (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in each of MATH-M 343 and MATH-M 471 (or M 571) to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. Interpolation and approximation of functions, numerical integration and differentiation, solution of nonlinear equations, acceleration and extrapolation, solution of systems of linear equations, eigenvalue problems, initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations, and computer programs applying these numerical methods.
  • MATH-M 491 Putnam Examination Seminar (1 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 215 or an equivalent transfer course to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. The Putnam Examination is a national mathematics competition for college undergraduates at all levels of mathematics study. It is held in December each year. This problem seminar is designed to help student prepare for the examination.
  • MATH-M 505 Basic Number Theory I (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 216 Calculus II and MATH-M 403 Modern Algebra. Congruencies, unites modulo n, lattices and abelian groups, quadratic residues, arithmetic functions, Diophantine equations, Farey fractions, continued fractions, partition function, the Sieve method, density of subsets of integers, c-function, the prime number theorem.
  • MATH-M 513 Complex Variables 1 (3 cr.)
  • MATH-M 546 Control Theory (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 343. Examples of control problems; optimal control of deterministic systems; linear and nonlinear. The maximal principle; Stochastic control problems.
  • MATH-M 551 Markets and Asset Pricing (3 cr.) P: Two courses from the following: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 311, MATH-M 343, MATH-M 365, MATH-M 447. The concept of arbitrage and risk-neutral pricing are introduced within the context of dynamical models of stock prices, bond prices and currency exchange rates.  Specific models include multi-period binomial models, Markov processes, Brownian motion and martingales.
  • MATH-M 560 Applied Stochastic Processes (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 463 or MATH-M 365, or consent of instructor. Simple random walk as approximation of Brownian motion. Discrete-time Markov chains. Poisson, compound Poisson, and birth-and-death chains; Kolmogorov's backward and forward equations; steady state. Diffusions as limits of birth-and-death processes. Examples drawn from diverse fields of application.
  • MATH-M 562 Statistical Design of Experiments (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 365, MATH-M 466, or consent of instructor. Latin square, incomplete blocks, and nested designs. Design and analysis of factorial experiments with crossing and nesting of factors, under fixed, random, and mixed effects models, in the balanced case. Blocking and fractionation of experiments with many factors at two levels. Exploration of response surfaces.
  • MATH-M 565 Analysis of Variance (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 466 and some matrix algebra. General linear hypothesis. Least squares estimation. Confidence regions. Multiple comparisons. Analysis of complete layouts. Effects of departures from underlying assumptions. Analysis of covariance.
  • MATH-M 571 Analysis of Numerical Methods I (3 cr.) P: CSCI-C 101, MATH-M 301, MATH-M 311, or consent of instructor. Solution of systems of linear equations, elimination and iterative methods, error analyses, eigenvalue problems; numerical methods for integral equations and ordinary differential equations; finite difference, finite element, and Galerkin methods for partial differential equations; stability of methods.
  • MATH-M 572 Analysis of Numerical Methods II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 343, MATH-M 571. Solution of systems of linear equations, elimination and iterative methods, error analyses, eigenvalue problems; numerical methods for integral equations and ordinary differential equations; finite difference, finite element, and Galerkin methods for partial differential equations; stability of methods.
  • MATH-M 574 Applied Regression Analysis (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 466 or MATH-M 365 or MATH-M 261. Least square estimates of parameters; single linear regression; multiple linear regression; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals in linear regression models; testing of models, data analysis and appropriateness of models; optional topics about nonlinear regression, i.e. logistic regression, Poisson regression, and generalized linear regression models.
  • MATH-M 575 Simulation Modeling (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 209 or MATH-M 216; MATH-M 365, MATH-M 463, or CSCI-C 455; CSCI-C 101. The statistics needed to analyze simulated data; examples such as multiple server queuing methods, inventory control, and exercising stock options; variance reduction variables and their relation to regression analysis. Monte Carlo method, Markov chain, and the alias method for generating discrete random variables.
  • MATH-M 576 Forecasting (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 301, MATH-M 365, or MATH-M 466. Forecasting systems, regression models, stochastic forecasting, time series, smoothing approach to prediction, model selection, seasonal adjustment, Markov chains, Markov decision processes, and decision analysis.
  • MATH-M 577 Operations Research: Modeling Approach (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 209, MATH-M 212, MATH-M 216, or MATH-M 301. Credit not given for both MATH-M 577 and MATH-M 447. Mathematical methods of operations research used in the biological, social, management sciences. Topics include modeling, linear programming, the simplex method, duality theory, sensitivity analysis, and network analysis.
  • MATH-M 578 Operations Research II (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 577. Network Optimization Models: The Terminology of Networks, the Shortest-Path Problem, The Minimum Spanning Tree Problem, The Maximum Flow Problem, The minimum Cost Flow Problem, The Network Simplex Method, A network Model for Optimizing a Projects Time-Cost Trade-Off, PERT and CPM.
  • MATH-M 800 Mathematical Reading and Research (1-12 cr.)
  • MATH-N 390 The Natural World (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 215 or an equivalent transfer course to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Explores an important scientific or technological issue in modern society.  Applies scientific methods and interdisciplinary perspectives in an examination of the subject.  Investigates the broader implications and ethical dimensions of scientific research and technological advancement.
  • MATH-T 101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 1 (3 cr.) P: A grade of C or better in MATH-A 100 or a math placement exam score of level 3 or better, or an ALEKS assessment score of 36 or higher. Elements of set theory, counting numbers. Operations on counting numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers. Only open to elementary education majors.
  • MATH-T 102 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C or better in MATH-T 101 Prime numbers and elementary number theory. Elementary combinatorics, probability, and statistics.
  • MATH-T 103 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers III (3 cr.) P: Must earn grade of C or better in MATH-T 101 Descriptions and properties of basic geometric figures. Rigid motions. Axiomatics. Measurement, analytic geometry, and graphs of functions. Discussion of modern mathematics.
  • MATH-T 201 Problem Solving (3 cr.) P: C or better in MATH-T 102 and C or better in T 103, or C- or better in M 118 and M 125. Provides experiences in mathematical problem solving for future teachers of mathematics, and for others interested in mathematical thinking. Exploration and development of the general processes of mathematical thinking, including monitoring and reflection, conjecturing, justifying and convincing.
  • MATH-T 336 Topics in Euclidean Geometry (3 cr.) P: Must have earned grade of C- or better in MATH-M 301 to enroll. Can be currently enrolled. Transfer credit accepted. A study of the central aspects of two-dimensional Euclidean geometry from historical and axiomatic points of view as well as through hands-on and/or computer-based exploration of geometric concepts and constructions.
  • MATH-T 436 Secondary Mathematics for Teachers (3 cr.) P: Must have completed MATH-T 103. Emphasizes developing a deeper understanding of secondary mathematics by examining its fundamental ideas from an advanced perspective. Topics selected from real and complex number systems, functions, equations, integers, polynomials, congruence, distance and similarity, area and volume, and trigonometry.
  • MATH-T 490 Topics for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.) P: MATH-T 103. Development and study of a body of mathematics specifically designed for experienced elementary teachers. Examples include probability, statistics, geometry, and algebra. Open only to graduate elementary teachers with permission of the instructor.
  • MATH-T 610 Topics in Analysis (3 cr.) This course will cover graduate-level knowledge in Analysis applications, including Real Analysis, Complex Analysis, Fourier Analysis, and other topics in Analysis.
  • MATH-T 620 Topics in Topology/Geometry (3 cr.) Students will develop graduate-level knowledge in essential concepts of Topology/Geometry including topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry, Point set topology, Differential Topology, Differential Geometry, and other topics in Topology/Geometry.
  • MATH-T 640 Topics in Applications (3 cr.) Students will develop graduate-level knowledge in Differential Equations and Applications including Numerical Methods, Mathematics of Finance, Graph Theory, Mathematical Physics, and other topics.
  • MATH-W 109 Mathematical Typesetting (1-2 cr.) This course introduces the creation of mathematical and scientific documents in the universal typesetting software LATEX.

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