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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Political Science

Faculty
Introduction
Major in Political Science
Interdepartmental Major in Political Science and Economics
Interdepartmental Major in Political Science and Philosophy
Interdepartmental Honors Program in Political Science and Philosophy
Minor in Political Science
Interdepartmental Minor in Political Science and Economics
Departmental Honors Program
Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Chairperson

Professor Jeffrey C. Isaac

Rudy Professors

Edward G. Carmines, Jeffrey C. Isaac

Arthur F. Bentley Professor

Elinor Ostrom

Warner O. Chapman Professor

Edward G. Carmines

Donald A. Rogers Professor

William Thompson

Rabindranath Tagore Professor of Indian Cultures and Civilizations

Sumit Ganguly

Professors

William Bianco, Jack Bielasiak, Norman Furniss, Russell Hanson, Jeffrey Hart, Marjorie Hershey, Gregory Kasza, Michael McGinnis, Karen Rasler, Jean C. Robinson, Robert Rohrschneider, William Scheuerman, Gerald Wright, Jr.

Associate Professors

Yvette Alex-Assensoh, Judith Failer, Lawrence Hanks, Dina Spechler

Assistant Professors

Eileen Braman, Aurelian Craiutu, Michael Ensley, Lauren Morris MacLean, Brian Rathbun, Armando Razo, Abdulkader Sinno, Beate Sissenich, Regina Smyth

Adjunct Faculty

Jeannine Bell (Law), Gardner Bovingdon (Central Eurasian Studies), William Fierman (Central Eurasian Studies), Luis Fuentes-Rohwer (Law), Scott Kennedy (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Eugene McGregor (School of Public and Environmental Affairs), Patrick O'Meara (African Studies), James Perry (School of Public and Environmental Affairs), Evan Ringquist (School of Public and Environmental Affairs), Charles Wise (School of Public and Environmental Affairs), Lois Wise (School of Public and Environmental Affairs)

Senior Lecturer

Christine Barbour

Academic Advising

Marsha Franklin, Joelene Bergonzi; Woodburn Hall 210, (812) 855-6308

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Introduction

Courses in the Department of Political Science (POLS) introduce students to fundamental issues in the political process, conditions that create the need for governments, structure and procedures of governments, control of governments and enforcement of responsibility, and relationships among governments. The department prepares students to assume the duties of citizenship; provides special knowledge and skills useful in public service, law, business, and other careers; and lays a foundation for the scholarly study of government and politics.

The department also has two interdepartmental majors: political science and economics, and political science and philosophy.

The department has a general minor in political science, and one interdepartmental minor: political science and economics.

Requirements for these options are listed below.

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Major in Political Science

Requirements

Students must complete 30 credit hours in political science, including:

  1. Y205. It is strongly recommended that Y205 be taken in the first 9 credit hours of course work in Political Science.
  2. At least 15 credit hours of 300- and 400-level political science courses, excluding Y480, Y481, Y484, Y496, and Y499.
    1. At least one course in American politics or public policy, law, and administration (Y301-Y320, Y324-Y326, Y349, Y373, Y394)
    2. At least one course in comparative politics or international relations (Y332 Y372, Y374-Y376, Y407)
    3. At least one course in political theory and methodology (Y379, Y381-Y388, Y395, Y405, Y406).
  3. One Y490 Senior Seminar.

No more than 6 credit hours of 100-level courses and 9 combined credit hours of Y200 and Y401 (courses with variable topics) may be included in the 30 credit hours. Note: Y200 and Y401 may be repeated only once for credit.

Students must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The Department encourages students to consider internships, overseas study, and service learning as complements to their major in political science.

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Interdepartmental Major in Political Science and Economics

Purpose

The interdepartmental major in political science and economics explores important issues arising in both the public and private sectors and provides students with the basic theoretical tools necessary to investigate these issues. Note: Any economics course may be replaced by the honors equivalent. Also, students in the Liberal Arts and Management Program may substitute approved sections of L316 (LAMP Junior Seminar) for E370.

Requirements

Students must meet the following course requirements for a total of 42 credit hours:

  1. Mathematics requirements: Finite Mathematics M118 and Calculus M119 or M211 (These courses do not count toward the 42 credit hours required for the major.)
  2. Economics E201, E202, E321, and at least three additional economics courses. Two of these three courses must be numbered above E321. The following courses cannot be used to meet this requirement: E175, E370, E496, Y398.

At least 18 credit hours in political science to include the following:

  1. One course chosen from Political Science Y204, Y205, Y210, Y303, Y394, or Y405
  2. Another 15 credit hours in political science chosen from Y200, Y202, Y204, Y205, Y210, Y301-Y308, Y326, Y343, Y346, Y349, Y350, Y376, Y394, Y401, Y405, Y481, Y490, or Y499. (Y200 or Y401 may be repeated once for credit, for a maximum of 9 credit hours possible for these two courses. No other courses may be repeated for credit.)
  3. Statistics requirement: ECON E370 or POLS Y395

Special Considerations

  1. Students meeting requirements 1-3 above with a total of 39 credit hours will be allowed to use 3 credit hours toward the major from preapproved sections of COLL E104 (Topics) courses. A list of preapproved sections of COLL E104 (Topics) is available each semester in the Departments of Economics and Political Science.
  2. No more than 6 credit hours of honors thesis credit (3 credit hours from Economics E499, and 3 credit hours from Political Science Y499) may be counted toward the major.
  3. A maximum of 3 credit hours of Political Science Y484 (for teaching interns only) may be counted toward the major.

Students must also complete the degree requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences.

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Interdepartmental Major in Political Science and Philosophy

Requirements

Students must take a minimum of 42 credit hours, with a minimum of 18 credit hours in each department. Students must also complete the degree requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Political Science

  1. At least 18 credit hours, with no more than two 100-level courses counting toward the minimum.
  2. At least one 300- or 400-level course in each of the following areas:
    1. American Politics (Y301-Y320, Y324-Y326, Y349, Y373, Y394)
    2. Comparative Politics or International Relations (Y332-Y348, Y350-Y372, Y374 Y376, Y407)
  3. At least two 300- or 400-level courses in political theory selected from Y379, and Y381-Y388, Y406.
  4. 4.      Y490 Senior Seminar in Political Science

Philosophy

  1. At least 18 credit hours, with no more than one 100-level course counting toward the minimum and with at least 12 credit hours at or above the 300 level
  2. At least one course above the 100 level in each of the following three areas:
    1. Ethics and value theory
    2. History of philosophy
    3. Epistemology and metaphysics
  3. One of the following logic courses: P150 or P250

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Interdepartmental Honors Program in Political Science and Philosophy

Students with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3 and minimum 3.5 in political science are eligible for the interdepartmental honors program in political science and philosophy, which culminates with an honors thesis. The honors program has two requirements:

  1. One honors thesis*
  2. One of the following pairs of courses:
    POLS Y480 Colloquium and Y499 Honors Thesis or
    PHIL P498 Senior Seminar and P499 Honors Thesis
The choice of the pair depends on whether the student's honors director is a political science or philosophy faculty member. The thesis will be judged by an honors committee that consists of members from both departments.

*Although the thesis will typically involve topics and issues from both disciplines, exceptions will be allowed with the approval of the directors of undergraduate studies from both departments.

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Minor in Political Science

Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  1. A total of 18 credit hours in Political Science, of which at least 9 shall be at the 300 or 400 level
  2. Y205. It is strongly recommended that Y205 be taken in the first 9 hours of coursework in political science.
  3. At least two courses in one of the following blocks of courses and at least one course from one of the other two blocks:
    1. American politics, public policy, law, and administration (Y301-Y320, Y324-Y326, Y349, Y373, Y394)
    2. Comparative politics or international relations (Y332-Y372, Y374-Y376, Y407)
    3. Political theory and methodology (Y379, Y381 through Y388, Y395, Y405, Y406)
  4. Only three hours of credit in Y481 may be counted toward the minor.
  5. At least 9 credit hours of the above courses must be taken in residence at the Bloomington campus.

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Interdepartmental Minor in Political Science and Economics

Purpose

The interdepartmental minor in political science and economics introduces students to important issues in both the public and private sectors.

Requirements

Students must meet the following course requirements for a total of 18 credit hours.

  1. Economics E201, E202, and one additional economics course (E175, E370, E496, and Y398 cannot be used to meet this requirement.)
  2. One course chosen from Political Science Y204, Y205, Y210, Y303, Y394, or Y405
  3. Another 6 credit hours in political science chosen from Y200, Y202, Y204, Y205, Y210, Y301-Y308, Y326, Y343, Y346, Y349, Y350, Y376, Y394, Y401, Y405, Y481, Y490, or Y499. (Y200 or Y401 may be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credit hours total of those two courses. No other courses may be repeated for credit.)

Note: This minor is not available to students choosing a major in economics or political science. The interdepartmental minor in Political Science and Economics is also not available to students choosing a minor in political science or a minor in economics.

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Departmental Honors Program

The Department of Political Science makes a special effort to give outstanding students opportunities appropriate to their abilities and interests. In addition to a number of topics courses and small seminars, the department offers a formal program leading to a B.A. with honors.

Admission to the program usually occurs at the end of the sophomore year. Students are eligible to apply if they have completed at least 9 credit hours in political science, including at least one 300-level course, with a minimum grade point average of 3.500 in political science and a minimum overall GPA of 3.300 in university courses. Students must complete an application and meet with the Director of Honors in Political Science to discuss the student's proposed program. To attain a degree with honors, students must:

  1. Present an acceptable honors thesis and defend it before a faculty committee. There are two paths to the thesis:
    1. The student researches and writes a thesis, usually over the course of two semesters. Honors students typically enroll in 3-12 hours of Y499 for one or two semesters (usually in the senior year). The total amount of credit is determined by the chairperson of the student's honors committee.
      The honors thesis is written under the direction of two faculty members: a faculty supervisor who serves as chairperson of the student's honors committee, and at least one additional member of the honors committee. Graduate students may not serve as honors supervisors.
    2. The student arranges with a faculty member to enroll in a graduate seminar in political science. The research paper for that seminar serves as the basis for the honors thesis, and the instructor of the graduate seminar becomes the chairperson of the student's honors committee. This path is used very infrequently.
  2. In both cases, during the fall and spring semesters of the year in which the thesis is being completed and defended, honors students are strongly recommended to enroll and participate in the "Honors Colloquium" section of Y480.

Any exceptions to the above requirements must be approved by the Director of Honors in Political Science.

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Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis

The Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis develops courses that provide students with an opportunity to relate theoretical analysis of contemporary policy issues to empirical field research. Students in both graduate and undergraduate courses participate in the design and implementation of small-scale, policy-relevant research projects. These projects help students gain practical experience in reasoning through policy problems, in conducting research, and in analyzing data. Students may also use data collected in these studies for their own research, such as class assignments and honors theses. High-quality work may be considered for publication in the workshop publication series. The subject matter of the courses varies from year to year, but a consistent theme is the comparative study of alternative institutional arrangements for dealing with public sector problems.

In addition to the development of specific courses, the workshop holds weekly colloquia where faculty and students at Indiana University and guest speakers address theoretical and policy problems of mutual interest. Reprints of recent studies in the workshop's publication series are available to students without charge.

Further information, including listings of current course offerings and publications, is available from the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis, 513 N. Park Avenue, Bloomington, Indiana 47405, (812) 855-0441.

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Course Descriptions

Y100 American Political Controversies (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to current or past American political controversies. The course content presents multiple sides of complex issues. Topics vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated once for credit; however, the course may be counted only once toward a political science major.

Y101 Principles of Political Science (3 cr.) S & H Introductory survey of the discipline of political science: integrates basic elements of American politics, political theory, comparative politics, and international relations. Intended especially for actual or prospective majors.

Y102 International Political Controversies (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to current or past controversial issues in international and comparative politics, presenting multiple sides of complex issues. Topics vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated once; however, it may be counted only once toward a political science major.

Y103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system and its political party base. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

Y105 Introduction to Political Theory (3 cr.) A & H Perennial problems of political philosophy, including relationships between rulers and ruled, nature of authority, social conflict, character of political knowledge, and objectives of political action. Credit not given for both Y105 and Y215. I Sem., II Sem.

Y107 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) S & H Examines countries around the world to investigate fundamental questions about politics. Topics include democratic development, promotion of economic prosperity, maintenance of security, and management of ethnic and religious conflict. Critical thinking skills encouraged. Cases for comparison include advanced industrialized democracies, communist and former communist countries, and developing countries. Credit given for only one of Y107 and Y217.

Y109 Introduction to International Politics (3 cr.) S & H Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organization, major international issues. Credit not given for both Y109 and Y219. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

Y200 Contemporary Political Problems (3 cr.) S & H Extensive analysis of selected contemporary political problems. Topics vary from semester to semester and are listed in the online Schedule of Classes. May be repeated once for credit. I Sem., II Sem., SS.

Y202 Politics and Citizenship in the Information Age (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the influence of the news media on citizen preferences and behavior in the information age. Analysis of the forces shaping the media, the relation between the media and politics, and the effect on citizens. Topics include decision making and development of critical skills in response to the information age.

Y204 Institutional Analysis and Governance (3 cr.) S & H Introduces the design and development of political, economic, and social institutions that support democratic governance or its alternatives. Uses theory to understand connections among individual choice, collective action, institutions, and constitutional order. Institutional analysis as a mode of reasoning about contemporary policy problems, law, and public affairs.

Y205 Analyzing Politics (3 cr.) S & H Introduces the approaches and techniques used to study politics. Includes an introduction to social science language, concepts, and critical research skills. Overview of political science research approaches, including case study, surveys, and model-building. Emphasizes skills such as interpreting the presentation of data in charts, graphs, and tables, and elementary analysis of qualitative and quantitative data.

Y210 Honors Seminar (3 cr.) S & H Intensive examination of selected political topics for freshman and sophomore honors students. Emphasis on

critical discussion and preparation of brief papers. May be repeated once for credit.

Y211 Introduction to Law (3 cr.) S & H An introduction to law as a method for dealing with social problems and as an aspect of the social and political system. An introduction to legal reasoning, procedures, and materials. Usually includes comparison of U.S. to other societies' approaches to law. Mock court situations usually included.

Y212 Making Democracy Work (3 cr.) A & H Nature and justifications for democratic politics and the problems confronting democracy today. Demise of liberalism in America; rise of identity politics and its significance; racial inequality and the problems of deliberative democracy; problems of political alienation and participation.

Y243 Governance and Corruption across the World (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of problems of governance and corruption in developing and/or more developed countries. Examines conditions for effective governance and challenges to economic growth and provision of public goods. Addresses political causes and consequences of corruptions. Case studies will vary and may be drawn from Asia, Latin America, Africa, Central and Eastern Europe, and North America.

Y249 Religion, Politics, and Public Policy (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the effects of religious belief, behavior, and institutions on political processes and public policy. Implications of religion as an alternative source of public legitimacy in contemporary societies. Topics may include controversies or developments in American, comparative, or international politics.

Y280 Political Science Laboratory (1 cr.) Offered concurrently with Y205 or a 300-level political science course. Information on topic and course affiliation available in the online Schedule of Classes. May be repeated twice for credit.

Y281 Modern Political Ideologies (3 cr.) A & H Assesses leading political ideologies of the past two centuries, e.g. conservatism, liberalism, socialism, communism, fascism, feminism, environmentalism, anarchism, populism, and various forms of religious fundamentalism. Analyzes those ideologies as forms of thought and as motivators of political agency and organization that have shaped the contours of the modern political world.

Y301 Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.) S & H Theories of American party activity; behavior of political parties, interest groups, and social movements; membership in groups; organization and structure; evaluation and relationship to the process of representation.

Y302 Public Bureaucracy in Modern Society (3 cr.) S & H Examines public bureaucracy, with special emphasis on the United States, as a political phenomenon engaging in policy making and in the definition of the terms of policy issues. Considers the role of bureaucratic instruments in promoting social change and in responding to it.

Y303 Formation of Public Policy in the United States (3 cr.) S & H Processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy in American society.

Y304 Constitutional Law (3 cr.) S & H American political powers and structures; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system.

Y305 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (3 cr.) S & H Extent and limits of constitutional rights; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting American constitutional system.

Y306 State Politics in the United States (3 cr.) S & H Comparative study of politics in the American states. Special emphasis on the impact of political culture, party systems, legislatures, and bureaucracies on public policies.

Y307 Indiana State Government and Politics (3 cr.) S & H Constitutional foundations, political development, organizational and functional process and growth, and current problems of Indiana government. Readings, case studies, problems.

Y308 Urban Politics (3 cr.) S & H Political behavior in modern American communities; emphasizes the impact of municipal organization, city officials and bureaucracies, social and economic notables, political parties, interest groups, the general public, and protest organizations on urban policy outcomes.

Y311 Democracy and National Security (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of fundamental tensions between democratic values and the requirements of national security. Topics include homeland security and civil liberties in an age of terror, civil-military relations, oversight of intelligence operations, effects of interventions and wars on democracy abroad and at home, and debates over the morality of United States security policies.

Y313 Environmental Policy (3 cr.) S & H Examines the processes of social decision reconciling human demands on the natural world with the ability of nature to sustain life and living standards. Analyzes the implications for public policies in complex sequential interactions among technical, economic, social, and political systems and considers the consequences of alternative courses of action.

Y315 Political Psychology and Socialization (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of the relationship between personality and politics. Use of major psychological theories and concepts to understand the attitudes and behavior of mass publics and political elites.

Y317 Voting, Elections, and Public Opinion (3 cr.) S & H Determinants of voting behavior in elections. The nature of public opinion regarding major domestic and foreign policy issues; development of political ideology; other influences on the voting choices of individuals and the outcomes of elections; relationships among public opinion, elections, and the development of public policy. Credit not given for both Y316 and Y317.

Y318 The American Presidency (3 cr.) S & H Examination of the American presidency both in historical setting and in contemporary context. Topics such as presidential elections, roles and resources of the president, structures and processes of the presidency, presidential leadership and behavior, relationships of the presidency and other participants in policy making.

Y319 The United States Congress (3 cr.) S & H Evolution and development of the contemporary Congress. Topics such as electoral processes; organizational structures and procedures of the Senate and House of Representatives; involvement of Congress with other policymaking centers; lawmaking, representative, and oversight activities of the national legislature.

Y320 Judicial Politics (3 cr.) S & H Examines the American judicial system in the contemporary context. Analysis of the trial and appellate courts with a focus on the United States Supreme Court. Topics include analyses of the structure of the judicial system, the participants in the system, and the policy making processes and capabilities of the legal system. The course concludes with an assessment of the role of courts in a majoritarian democracy.

Y324 Women and Politics (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of women in contemporary political systems, domestic or foreign, with emphasis on political roles, participation, and public policy. Normative or empirical examination of how political systems affect women and the impact women have on them. Topics vary semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

Y325 African American Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines the African American political condition, with special emphasis on political thought and behavior. The course analyzes not only how the political system affects African Americans, but also the impact African Americans have on it. Themes for this course may vary.

Y326 American Social Welfare Policy (3 cr.) S & H Values and social welfare policy. Development, current status, politics, and proposals for reform of social security and private pensions, income maintenance policy, health care, and housing. The future of the welfare state.

Y329 Racial and Ethnic Politics in the United States (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A survey of minority group politics in the United States. The course examines the socio-economic position and political history of various demographic groups and highlights key public policy debates central to the future of ethnic politics and race relations in the United States. Compares theories of racial formation in the context of a political system predicated on majority rule.

Y332 Russian Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Political process and government structure in the Russian state. Political institutions inherited from tsarist empire and the Soviet state (1917-1991), history of subsequent political reform. Political problems of ethnic conflict, creating democratic institutions, and of transition from socialism to market economy.

Y333 Chinese Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Explores contemporary politics and policy issues in the People's Republic of China. Influence of revolutionary practice and ideology; analysis of contemporary economic, political and social organizations; examination of policy issues including social reforms, economic growth, and democratization and globalization.

Y334 Japanese Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Political development of Japan, with emphasis on changing attitudes toward modernization; cultural and sociological factors affecting the functioning of contemporary political institutions; and the implication of Japanese experience in modernization of other developing societies.

Y335 Western European Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSB Development, structure, and functioning of political systems, primarily in France, Italy, and Germany. Political dynamics of European integration.

Y337 Latin American Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Comparative analysis of political change in major Latin American countries, emphasizing alternative explanations of national and international developments; examination of impact of political parties, the military, labor and peasant movements, Catholic Church, multinational corporations, regional organizations, and United States on politics; public policy processes in democratic and authoritarian regimes.

Y338 African Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Explores politics in Sub-Saharan Africa. Examines relevance of "traditional" political systems; impact on colonialism; building new nations and states; authoritarian regimes; process of democratization; management of ethnic, regional, religious and class conflict; political challenges of economic development; role of international actors, including the United States, United Nations, World Bank, and non-governmental organizations; and globalization.

Y339 Middle Eastern Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Political culture and change in selected Middle Eastern and North African countries. Topics include political elites, traditional cultures, modern political ideology, institutions of political control, conflict management, and social reform policies.

Y340 East European Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Compares political change in the East European states, and emphasizes the legacies of authoritarianism and communism and the post-communist transition to democracy. Topics include the building of political institutions, the inclusion of citizens into the polity, the reform of the economy, the management of ethnic and social conflicts, and integration into the European Union.

Y342 Topics on the Regional Politics of Africa (3 cr.) S & H Problems of political development within regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Political party organization and tactics, recruitment of political and administrative leadership, tactics of voluntary associations, patterns of international relations. May be repeated once for credit with consent of instructor and departmental undergraduate advisor.

Y343 The Politics of International Development (3 cr.) S & H Examines the key debates and issues regarding how "poor" countries develop economically and socially. Analyzes the interactions between politics and economics in the development process at the global, national, and local levels. Cases for comparison will include countries from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East.

Y345 Comparative Revolutions (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of major modern revolutions. Focus on the social, economic, and political causes of revolutions; the rise of revolutionary movements; and the strategies for gaining and consolidating power.

Y346 Politics in the Developing World (3 cr.) S & H Focuses on politics in the developing world (Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East). Comparison of political history; experiences of colonialism and post-colonial authoritarian systems; political economy; development and globalization; democratization and management of protest and conflict; and interactions with international actors and transnational social movements.

Y347 German Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSB Survey of the German political system including governmental institutions, the origins and role of political parties, opportunities for citizens to participate in politics, and current political culture. Special attention is paid to the question of how well Germany's democracy functions after experiencing several regime changes.

Y348 The Politics of Genocide (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Comparative study of major twentieth-century genocides. Examines the political conditions, ideologies, and movements leading up to mass murder, and the ethnic and global context of genocide. Focuses on the question of responsibility and accountability from the viewpoints of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders in the national and international communities.

Y349 Comparative Public Policy (3 cr.) S & H Investigates public policies and policy making among advanced industrial democracies from a comparative perspective. Usually covers policy areas such as immigration, health care, education, and taxation.

Y350 Politics of the European Union (3 cr.) S & H Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of European Union institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade.

Y351 Political Simulations (1-3 cr.) A course tied to simulations of international organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, or the Organization of American States. May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

Y352 The Holocaust and Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examination of the socioeconomic conditions and political ideologies leading up to the Holocaust, and the political, administrative, and social context for the genocide from the vantage of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. Focus on the individual, national, and international responses to and responsibilities for the Holocaust. Consideration of the Holocaust's legacies for the post-war world.

Y353 The Politics of Gender and Sexuality (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Analysis of the gendered roles of women and men in politics and examination of the interplay between gender relations and public and private institutions. Includes exploration of political and social movements that attempt to influence public policy about gender and/or sexuality in the United States and in other countries. Examines how different social, economic, and political practices play a role in the construction of gender and sexuality. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Y356 South Asian Politics (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to the legacy of British colonialism in South Asia, to the development and decay of political institutions, to questions of economic growth, to social movements, and to regional conflicts.

Y360 United States Foreign Policy (3 cr.) S & H Analysis of institutions and processes involved in the formation and implementation of American foreign policy. Emphasis is on post­World War II policies.

Y361 Contemporary Theories of International Politics (3 cr.) S & H Theories used in the study of international politics: systems theory, field theory, conflict theory, alliance and coalition theories, balance-of-power theories, and an introduction to game and bargaining theory.

Y362 International Politics of Selected Regions (3 cr.) S & H The region studied will vary with the instructor and the year. Current information may be obtained from the Department of Political Science. May be repeated once for credit, with permission of the departmental undergraduate advisor.

Y363 Comparative Foreign Policy (3 cr.) S & H Compares factors that influence foreign policy and the foreign policy process. Focuses on domestic or internal sources of foreign policy behavior, including impact of individual leaders, group decision-making processes, bureaucratic politics, ideology and political culture, historical experience, and type of political system. Classroom simulations are central to the course.

Y364 International Organization: Political and Security Aspects (3 cr.) S & H International organizations as lateral extensions of the Western state system, exercising influence in accordance with a variety of strategies. Strategies employed by the United Nations in the political and security area.

Y366 Current Foreign Policy Problems (3 cr.) S & H Critique of foreign policy issues: communism, containment, imperialism, and others. Research papers and classroom presentation for critical discussion.

Y367 International Law (3 cr.) S & H Sources and consequences of international law; relationship to international organizations and world order; issues of national sovereignty, human rights, conflict resolution, international property rights, world trade, environmental change, and other topics.

Y368 Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy (3 cr.) S & H R: Y332. Behavior of Russia and USSR in world affairs from 1945 to the present. Emphasis on impact of geographic assets and vulnerabilities, historical experience, domestic politics, and the changing international environment.

Y372 The Analysis of International Politics (3 cr.) S & H R: Y109 or equivalent. Introduction to the systematic study of international politics, focusing on the major approaches of decision making (microanalysis) and the international system (macroanalysis) and on a number of specific methodologies, such as game theory, content analysis, simulation, and quantitative/ statistical techniques.

Y375 War and International Conflict (3 cr.) S & H The nature of war. Theories and evidence on the causes of war. Discussion of the ways in which war has been conceived and perceived across time and of methods employed to study the phenomenon of war.

Y376 International Political Economy (3 cr.) S & H Theories about the interaction between the international economic and political systems are the subject of this course. Works from each of the main traditions-liberal, Marxist, and statist-will be assigned. Specific topics covered will include (among others): the politics of trade, aid, foreign investment, and international monetary affairs; theories of dependency and imperialism; the politics of international competition in specific industries; the stability/ instability of international economic regimes.

Y379 Ethics and Public Policy (3 cr.) A & H Examines questions at the intersection of ethics and public policy. What morally problematic means are justified in pursuing political ends? What should be the ends of public policy? What are the moral responsibilities of public officials when they try to answer the first two questions? Uses ethical theory to examine concrete cases in public policy and concrete cases to test the adequacy theory.

Y381 Classical Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Plato to Machiavelli.

Y382 Modern Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSB An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Machiavelli to the present.

Y383 Foundations of American Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H Explores the evolution of American political ideas from colonization through ratification of the Constitution and its implementation.

Y384 Developments in American Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H Explores the evolution of American political ideas under the Constitution of the United States, and its promises and problems.

Y386 African American Political Thought (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Focuses on the various ideologies and strategies informing the African American political struggles in the United States. Readings focus on thinkers and activists from the rebellion against slavery to the contemporary debates about institutional racism and reparations. Features work by African American thinkers associated with a broad range of movements.

Y388 Marxist Theory (3 cr.) A & H Origin, content, and development of Marxist system of thought, with particular reference to philosophical and political aspects of Russian Marxism.

Y394 Public Policy Analysis (3 cr.) S & H Place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements, and constitutional problems. Particular reference to American political experience.

Y395 Quantitative Political Analysis (3 cr.) N & M P: MATH M118 or A118 or equivalent. Introduction to methods and statistics used in political inquiry, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, measures of association, analysis of variance, and regression. Credit given for only one of the following: POLS Y395, CJUS K300, SOC S371, ECON E370 or S370, MATH/PSY K300, K305, or K310, ANTH A306, or SPEA K300.

Y401 Topics in Political Science (3 cr.) S & H Topic varies with the instructor and year; consult the online Schedule of Classes for current information. May be repeated once for credit.

Y405 Models and Theories of Political Decision Making (3 cr.) S & H P: One course in political science at the 200 level or above. R: ECON E201. Introduces collective choice and game theory for understanding how societies make political decisions. Examines how institutions, or the political context in which decisions are made, affect group choices. Theories of individual and group decision making, collective choice, and social dilemmas. Applications to congressional politics, intergovernmental relations, and parliamentary democracies.

Y406 Problems in Political Philosophy (3 cr.) A & H Centers on conflicting interpretations of justice, liberty, and equality, as well as certain problems of democracy, including the tension between majority rules and minority rights, and the correlation of rights and duties. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Y407 Problems in Comparative Politics (3 cr.) S & H Exploration of issues and themes in the field of comparative politics. Includes advanced methodological, empirical, and theoretical approaches. Topics vary. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Y480 Undergraduate Readings in Political Science (1-6 cr.) Individual readings and research. No more than 6 credit hours total may be taken. May be taken only with consent of instructor.

Y481 Field Experience in Political Science (1 6 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing, 15 credit hours of political science, and project approval by instructor. Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based on field experience. Directed readings, field research, research papers. Certain internship experiences may require research skills. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Y484 Practicum (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Faculty-directed participation in the various aspects of academic teaching and research. Students will assist a faculty member in such activities as directing simulations, grading, teaching discussion sections, doing research. Individual assignments will vary by instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

Y490 Senior Seminar in Political Science (3 cr.) P: Senior standing or consent of department. Research paper required. Seminar sessions arranged to present papers for evaluation and criticism by fellow students. Subject matter varies by semester.

Y496 Foreign Study in Political Science (3-8 cr.; once only) P: Consent of instructor. Course involves planning of research project during year preceding summer abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by end of semester following foreign study.

Y499 Honors Thesis (1-12 cr.) P: Approval of instructor and departmental honors director. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours.

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