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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

India Studies

Faculty
Introduction
Major in India Studies
Certificate in India Studies
Minor in India Studies
Overseas Study
Course Descriptions
Cross-Listed Courses

Faculty

Director and Rabindranath Tagore Professor of Indian Cultures and Civilizations

Sumit Ganguly

Associate Director

Arvind Verma (Criminal Justice)

College Professor

Henry Glassie (Folklore and Ethnomusicology)

Professors

Jamsheed Choksy (Central Eurasian Studies), Sumit Ganguly (Political Science, India Studies), David L. Haberman (Religious Studies), John Walbridge (Near Eastern Languages and Cultures)

Associate Professors

Purnima Bose (English), Steven Raymer (Journalism), Rakesh H. Solomon (Theatre and Drama), Elliot Sperling (Central Eurasian Studies), Arvind Verma (Criminal Justice)

Assistant Professors

Rubiana Chamarbagwala (Economics), Michael Dodson (History, India Studies), Rebecca Manring (India Studies, Religious Studies), Radhika Parameswaran (Journalism), Pravina Shukla (Folklore and Ethnomusicology)

Academic Advising

825 E. Eighth Street, (812) 855-5798

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Introduction

The India Studies Program (INST) seeks to provide for the interdisciplinary study and critical analysis of the cultures and civilizations that have developed on the Indian subcontinent from ancient times to the present. The primary focus of the program is on present-day or modern India, but in order to understand modern India, it is important to have some basic knowledge about the great periods in the history of India that have shaped modern Indian social reality. This approach requires a sophisticated understanding of the country's highly developed arts, music, literature, drama, philosophy, religions, and social and political structures. In addition to providing an overall, comprehensive education about Indian civilizations, the program allows for more specialized work in (a) literary and performance studies, (b) philosophical and religious studies, and (c) social, political, and historical studies. The India Studies Program also offers beginning and intermediate-level courses in several Indian languages. All students in the program are encouraged to take language classes, as well as to consider study abroad in India.

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Major in India Studies

Purpose

The India Studies Major is designed primarily for undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences at the Bloomington campus. The major may also be of interest to students in the various professional schools. The program offers regular work in beginning, intermediate, and advanced modern standard Hindi and classical Sanskrit. Students interested in instruction in other South Asian languages should consult the India Studies director. The India Studies Program, together with cognate programs in Central Asian, West Asian, and East Asian studies, also makes possible advanced work in Buddhist studies and Islamic studies with a focus on India.

Requirements

Students must complete the following:

  1. A second major (B.A.) in a department of the College of Arts and Sciences. (Students completing a simultaneous second degree program in the College or through another school should check with the advisor for details.)
  2. Two semesters (a minimum of 10 credit hours) of modern standard Hindi, Classical Sanskrit, or an appropriate substitute-Arabic, Persian, Tibetan, a sequence of courses in Indo-Anglian literature or a semester/year course of study in India-all of which must be approved in advance by the director of India Studies and must fulfill the 10 credit hour language requirement.
  3. A minimum of 15 credit hours of India Studies courses, including the following:
    1. I300
    2. At least one course at the 300 level from the Literary and Performance Studies group;
    3. At least one course at the 300 level from the Philosophical and Religious Studies group;
    4. At least one course at the 300 level from the Social, Political, and Historical Studies group;
    5. One additional course at the 300 level chosen from any one of the three groups.
  4. One course (3 credit hours) at the 400 level in India Studies.

See the India Studies Advising Office, 825 E. Eighth Street, for a listing of courses in each group.

Students must also complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Note: With the approval of both departments and the College, one course may be cross-listed in both majors. A minimum of 25 College of Arts and Sciences credit hours must be taken in each major subject area.

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Certificate in India Studies

The undergraduate area certificate in India Studies requires 24 credit hours, including the core course for India Studies, I300 Passage to India: Emperors, Gurus, and Gods; two courses each from the three areas of specialized work in India Studies (i.e., two courses from the Literary and Performance Studies group, two courses from the Philosophical and Religious Studies group, and two courses from the Social, Political, and Historical Studies group), with the remainder of the units coming from interdisciplinary electives in any of the areas of specialization. See the India Studies Advising Office, 825 E. Eighth Street, for a listing of courses in each group. Of the total 24 credit hours, at least 15 credit hours must be taken from courses at the 300 level or above. It should be noted that under certain circumstances, other courses that include some aspect of the study of India may, by special arrangement and with the permission of the director of India Studies, be counted towards the certificate program. The first two years of language instruction in Hindi or Sanskrit, however, will not count towards completion of the certificate.

Finally, it should be noted that only four courses from a student's major may be double-counted towards the India Studies certificate.

The India Studies Program encourages work in elementary, intermediate, and advanced Hindi and Sanskrit. All students in the certificate program are strongly urged to study either Hindi or Sanskrit (and preferably both) and to begin the study of the languages at the earliest possible opportunity. Students in the program should also consider the possibility of studying in India and should consult about this possibility with the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304 (www.indiana.edu/~overseas). India also has a rich English-medium cultural tradition (in such areas as Indo-British literature, drama, and Third World studies, among others), so students may choose to focus their work on these English language traditions.

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Minor in India Studies

Requirements

15 credit hours, chosen in consultation with the director, including:

  1. I300.
  2. At least one course from the Literary and Performance Studies group.
  3. At least one course from the Philosophical and Religious Studies group.
  4. At least one course from the Social, Political, and Historical Studies group.
  5. At least 9 credit hours at the 300 level or above.

See the India Studies Advising Office, 825 E. Eighth Street, for a listing of courses in each group.

Only two courses from a student's major may be counted towards the India Studies minor.

All students in the minor program are strongly urged to study either Hindi or Sanskrit (and preferably both) and to begin the study of the languages at the earliest possible opportunity. The first two years of language instruction in Hindi and Sanskrit, however, will not count toward completion of the minor. India also has a rich English-medium cultural tradition (in such areas as Indo-British literature, drama, and Third World studies, among others), so students may choose to focus their work on these English language traditions.

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Overseas Study

Students in the program should also consider the possibility of studying in India and should consult with the director about opportunities, and with the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304.

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Course Descriptions

H100 Beginning Hindi I (5 cr.) Introduction to the Hindi language, the writing system and basic grammar. Graded exercises and readings leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Development of reading and writing competence and simple conversations based on personal information, courtesy expressions, greetings in contemporary Hindi. Classroom use of stories, tapes, films and songs.

H150 Beginning Hindi II (5 cr.) P: H100 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of the first semester. Graded exercises and reading for mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Composing short dialogues on everyday survival topics. Improve reading skill to understand main ideas from the simplest connected texts. Writing competence is increased to be able to write letters and journals, etc.

H200 Second-Year Hindi I (3 cr.) P: H150 or equivalent proficiency. Reading mythology, folklore, modern short stories, essays and poetry, including several examples from Hindi literature. Students compose and perform dialogues based on the material read and the usage of role playing cards.

H250 Second-Year Hindi II (3 cr.) P: H200 or equivalent proficiency. Promotes rapid reading skills and vocabulary building. Study of grammar is based on Hindi reading material and includes regular grammar drills. Students sharpen composition skills by retelling stories and making brief synopsis from the reading material orally and in writing. Increase speaking skill to narrate and describe with short connected discourse.

I211 Introduction to South Asian History S & H South Asia today encompasses India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka. Introduction to some of the principal historical themes and cultural features of this diverse region from the Neolithic era to the present day.

I212 The Civilization of Tibet (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to the diverse aspects of Tibetan civilization. Topics include Tibet's literature, art, religion, society, history, and language.

I300 Passage to India: Emperors, Gurus, and Gods (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Critical survey of the development of the major periods of Indian civilization(s), including Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Islamic, and Sikh historical periods as well as the emergence of India as a modern nation-state, together with an introduction to the art, music, literature, drama, philosophy, religion, and social reality of the subcontinent.

I303 Issues in Indian Culture and Society (3 cr.) Examination of the culture and society of India through the study and analysis of a specific issue or theme. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

I320 Contemporary India: History, Politics, and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Critical survey of social, economic, and political trends in modern India (1947-present) primarily through the study of relevant novels. Lectures and readings provide students with knowledge of modern Indian history and politics, caste and class relations, the evolution of India's political institutions since independence, and current debates in Indian society.

I339-I340 Elementary Sanskrit I-II (5-5 cr.) Introduction to Sanskrit, a classical language of ancient India. Basic grammatical structure and vocabulary in preparation for the reading of both secular and religious texts. Credit not given for both I339-I340 and LING L339-L340.

I347 Meditation Traditions of India (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Survey and analysis of the practice of meditation in Hindu, Buddhist and Jain traditions of India. Focus on the philosophical and structural basis of meditation and the relation of meditation to the monastic traditions of India. The role of the holy person and the importance of the guru-student relationship.

I349-I350 Intermediate Sanskrit I-II (4-4 cr.) P: I339/I340 or permission of instructor. These courses build directly on the grammatical, lexicographical, and semantic foundation given in the elementary courses. The main emphasis is on reading, translating, and interpreting Sanskrit texts. Grammatical analysis of the reading material will be complemented by the study of syntax. Issues of historical grammar will be discussed.

I362 International Relations of South Asia (3 cr.) S & H Focuses on terrorism, nuclear proliferation, inter-state war and ethnic conflict in South Asia as these issues relate to American foreign and security policy.

I368 Philosophies of India (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Historical and critical-analytic survey of the major intellectual traditions of the cultures and civilizations of India. Attention to early philosophizing and the emergence of the classical schools in Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain traditions. Attention also to contemporary thought in India, including critical theory and subaltern theorizing. Credit given for only one of INST I368, PHIL P328, or REL R368.

I370 Literature of India in Translation: Ancient and Classical (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Survey of the ancient and classical Sanskrit literature of India in translation, presented in cultural context.

I371 Medieval Devotional Literatures of India (in translation) (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Survey of medieval Indian devotional literatures with reference to the various cultural milieus in which they were produced and their impact on and importance for contemporary Indian cultures.

I380 Women in South Asian Religious Traditions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA A historical view of the officially sanctioned roles for women in several religious traditions in South Asia, and women's efforts to become agents and participants in the religious expressions of their own lives.

I402 Introduction to the History of Tibet (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Surveys Tibet's history from its earliest period through the present, including the Tibetan empire of the seventh through ninth centuries, the impact of Buddhism on political and social structures, Tibet's relations with neighboring peoples, the development of the Dalai Lama's government, and the current issues of Tibet.

I412 Criminal Justice in India (3 cr.) Presents an overview of the Indian criminal justice system, issues related to crime, and its control mechanism in the country. Topics include Indian history, system of government, constitution, court system, police, corrections, and the phenomenon of crime.

I496 Individual Readings in Indic Studies (1-6 cr.) R: Reading knowledge of Sanskrit and Hindi. Selected substantive topics investigated from ancient, medieval, and modern texts about the civilization of India. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

L100 Elementary Indian Languages I (5 cr.) Language instruction in the specific Indian language named in the online Schedule of Classes. Various languages will be offered when available. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment.

L150 Elementary Indian Languages II (5 cr.) P: L100 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment.

U100 Beginning Urdu I (5 cr.) Introduction to the Urdu language and basic grammar. Graded exercises and readings leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Simple conversations based on personal information, courtesy expressions, and greetings in contemporary Urdu. Classroom use of stories, tapes, films and songs.

U150 Beginning Urdu II (5 cr.) P: U100 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of the first semester. The writing system of Urdu and development of reading and writing. Graded exercises and reading for mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Composing short dialogues on everyday survival topics.

U200 Second-Year Urdu I (3 cr.) P: U150 or equivalent proficiency. Urdu short stories, essays, poetry (gazals), dramas, newspapers and magazine articles, etc. will be utilized for reading. Initiate basic communicative tasks related to daily activities and various situations.

U250 Second-Year Urdu II (3 cr.) P: U200 or equivalent proficiency. Promotes rapid reading skills and vocabulary building. Study of grammar is based on Urdu reading material and includes regular grammar drills. Students sharpen composition skills by retelling stories from the reading material orally and in writing. Increase speaking skill to initiate, sustain and close a general conversation on a range of topics.

Cross-Listed Courses

Central Eurasian Studies
U489 Tibet and the West (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

Communication and Culture
C413 Global Villages (3 cr.) S & H

English
L383 Studies in British or Commonwealth Culture (3 cr.) A & H (with appropriate focus approved by director)

History
J300 Seminar in History (3 cr.) S & H (with appropriate focus approved by director)

Religious Studies
R153 Religions of the East (3 cr.) CSA
R250 Introduction to Buddhism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA, TFR
R358 Hinduism (3 cr.) A & H, CSA

Theatre and Drama
T468 Non-Western Theatre and Drama (3 cr.) A & H, CSA (with appropriate focus approved by director)

By special arrangement and with the permission of the director, courses not listed above that substantially address India Studies may be included in the minor.

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