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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
Local (812) 855-1821 
Fax (812) 855-2060 
Contact College
 

Human Biology

Faculty
Introduction
Area Certificate in Human Biology
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Director

Associate Professor Whitney M. Schlegel (Biology)

Academic Advising

Kate Emblom, Jordan Hall A009, (812) 855-2250

E-mail

humbio@indiana.edu

Web Site

www.indiana.edu/~humbio/index.html

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Introduction

Many of the major problems facing humanity today, from environmental degradation and global change to AIDS, cancer, and the costs of health care, involve both a biological component and a social component. Scientific approaches to such problems are essential, but they must be broadly scientific, integrating what we know of the biological component with an understanding of the social, cultural, and ethical settings in which these problems exist. The Human Biology Program within the College of Arts and Sciences on the Bloomington campus of Indiana University offers courses anda certificate program that engage students in a deep understanding of cultural diversity and the international context of complex scientific issues.

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Area Certificate in Human Biology

Purpose

The certificate in Human Biology provides a broad and rigorous introduction to the biological sciences and relates these sciences to the problems raised by relationships of human beings to one another and to their environment. This distinctive program is designed to meet societal demand for students with broad biological knowledge and a scientific approach to problem-solving, who also possess an understanding of the social and cultural issues facing them as scientists. What is the biological basis of life, diversity, and disease? What is the biological basis of human behavior? How does the social construct of our society influence science and our understanding of what it means to be human? These are samples of the types of broad questions that can be explored within the Area Certificate in Human Biology.

Requirements

A student may earn an area certificate as part of completing the bachelor's degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. Students should contact the Human Biology Program advising office to apply for the certificate. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.700 at the time of admission and must maintain this GPA to graduate with the certificate. Additionally, in order to complete the certificate, students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 in courses taken for the certificate. Students will also be required to complete exit surveys and to develop an electronic portfolio that demonstrates the connections students have made between the courses they complete as part of the certificate and their goals for career and further study after graduation.

The certificate requires 27-28 credit hours as follows:

  1. Biology L112 Introduction to Biology: Biological Mechanisms (3 cr.)
  2. Biology L211 Molecular Biology (3 cr.)
  3. Medical Sciences M131 Disease and the Human Body (3 cr.)
  4. Anatomy A215 Basic Human Anatomy (5 cr.)
  5. Physiology P215 Basic Human Physiology (5 cr.) or BIOL P451 Integrative Human Physiology (4 cr.)
  6. Biology L350 Environmental Biology (3 cr.) or Anthropology B370 Human Variation (3 cr.)
  7. Psychological and Brain Sciences P201 An Introduction to Neuroscience (3 cr.) or P315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.) or P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
  8. Religious Studies R373 Religion, Ethics, and Medicine (3 cr.)
  9. Learning Enhancement in Biology L390 (1 cr.)

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Course Descriptions

B101 The Human Organism (3 cr.) N & M C: B102. Integrated study of human physiology, metabolism, genetics, evolution, environment, behavior, and culture examined through cases and collaborative learning to emphasize the scientific method and uncertainty as fundamental to scientific inquiry and discovery. Content will align with the expertise of faculty, student learning interests, and complex problems facing a global society.

B102 Seminar in Human Organisms (1 cr.) C: B101. Interdisciplinary, interactive, and community-building seminar promoting student-guided exploration of questions uncovered in B101. Students will deepen their understanding through written and oral work and projects. They will develop an e-portfolio to document and reflect upon their learning and personal growth.

B201 Human Dilemmas (3 cr.) N & M P: B101. C: B202. Social and ethical bases of the human biological experience and of the construction of scientific knowledge. In-depth consideration of contemporary issues using team- and case-based approaches, quantitative and qualitative data analyses, and effective communication of evidence, interpretations, and claims.

B202 Seminar in Human Dilemmas (1 cr.) C: B201. Interdisciplinary, interactive, and community-building seminar promoting student-guided exploration of questions uncovered in B201. Students will deepen their understanding through written and oral work and projects. They will develop an e-portfolio to document and reflect upon their learning and personal growth.

B301 The Intricate Human (3 cr.) N & M P: B201. C: B302. Complex interrelationships among human biology, environment, culture, society, and behavior examined through case-based and problem-oriented approach. Students research complex problems in human biology to identify effects of personal decisions and effects of scientific advances on society and the environment. Student inquiry emphasizes rationale for scientific judgments and peer review.

B302 Seminar in the Intricate Human (1 cr.) C: B301. Interdisciplinary, interactive, and community-building seminar promoting student-guided exploration of questions uncovered in B301. Students will deepen their understanding through written and oral work and projects. They will develop an e-portfolio to document and reflect upon their learning and personal growth.

B401 Complex Problems of Humanity (3 cr.) N & M P: B301. C: B402. Capstone experience focusing on the interface of science and society. Students apply the foundations of science to real-world problems like global warming, groundwater issues, fossil fuel consumption, infectious disease, and global healthcare, and consider the uses of scientific evidence and ways of knowing in identifying and implementing change.

B402 Seminar in Complex Problems of Humanity (1 cr.) C: B401. Interdisciplinary, interactive, and community-building seminar promoting student-guided exploration of questions uncovered in B401. Students will deepen their understanding through written and oral work and projects. They will develop an e-portfolio to document and reflect upon their learning and personal growth.

B460 Peer Instruction in Human Biology (3 cr.) P: Consent of Human Biology Program Director. Supervised teaching and mentoring experience in undergraduate Human Biology courses.

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