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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
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Bloomington, IN 47405  
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Central Eurasian Studies

Faculty
Introduction
Area Certificate in Central Eurasian Studies
Course Descriptions

Faculty

Chairperson

Elliot Sperling

Hungarian Chair

Agnes Fulemile

Ottoman and Modern Turkish Studies Professor

Kemal Silay

Professors

Christopher Beckwith, Jamsheed Choksy, Devin DeWeese, William Fierman, Agnes Fulemile, György Kara, Toivo U. Raun, M. Nazif Shahrani, Mihály Szegedy-Maszák

Associate Professors

Christopher Atwood, Paul Losensky, Kemal Silay, Elliot Sperling

Assistant Professors

Gardner Bovingdon, Lynn Hooker, Ron Sela

Emeritus Professors

Gustav Bayerle, Yuri Bregel, Larry Moses, Thubten Norbu, Denis Sinor

Adjunct Professors

Henry Glassie (Folklore and Ethnomusicology), Matthias Lehmann (History)

Academic Advising

Goodbody Hall 157, (812) 855-2233

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Introduction

The focus of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies (CEUS) is the world cultural area known as Central Eurasia, a vast region that extends from Central Europe to the Pacific Ocean and from the Arctic to the Indian subcontinent. The primary fields of study covered in the department are the languages, history, religions, and other aspects of the cultures of Central Eurasia, particularly of the Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Mongolian, Persian, Tibetan, Turkish, and Uzbek peoples.

Students may count most of the department's courses toward such specific requirements of the College's bachelors's degree as distribution in arts and humanities or social and historical studies, culture studies, and foreign language.

Two-year sequences are offered in the following languages: Azeri, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Kazakh, Mongolian, Persian, Tibetan, Turkish, Turkmen, Uygur, and Uzbek. Students should contact the department for information about language offerings.

Area Certificate in Central Eurasian Studies

A student may earn an area certificate as part of completing the bachelor's degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. To receive the area certificate in Central Eurasian Studies, undergraduates must complete 15 credit hours of history, civilization, or other culture courses in the Department of Central Eurasian Studies, of which a minimum of 6 credit hours must be at the 400 level, and two semesters of course work in one of the languages offered in the department (6-8 cr.). A minimum GPA of 3.000 is required in all courses taken for the certificate.

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Course Descriptions

Language Courses

Azeri

U105 Introductory Azeri I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Azeri required. Covers basic vocabulary and grammar, along with conversation, composition, reading, and translating from simple texts.

U106 Introductory Azeri II (4 cr.) P: U105 or consent of department. Continuation of the basic vocabulary and grammar of Azeri.

U205 Intermediate Azeri I (3 cr.) P: U106 or consent of department. Continuation of introductory Azeri. Review of grammatical structures and vocabulary, reading, and translating of selected texts.

U206 Intermediate Azeri II (3 cr.) P: U205 or consent of department. Continuing development of language skills. Additional new grammar concepts.

Estonian

U111 Introductory Estonian I (4 cr.) Provides basic knowledge of Estonian pronunciation, grammar (declension of nouns and pronouns, conjugation of verbs, elementary morphology and syntax), basic conversation, understanding of spoken and written language. The emphasis of the course is on communicative skills.

U112 Introductory Estonian II (4 cr.) P: U111. Continuation of the basic vocabulary and grammar of Estonian.

U211 Intermediate Estonian I (3 cr.) P: U112. Intermediate areas of grammar (morphology and syntax); vocabulary building through reading in and outside class; development of speaking skills by conversation and discussion and oral presentations in class; practice of writing skills by journal and short essays; development of listening comprehension skills.

U212 Intermediate Estonian II (3 cr.) P: U211. Continuation of intermediate vocabulary, grammar, speaking, and writing skills.

Finnish

U121 Introductory Finnish I (4 cr.) Enables students to converse about simple personal and social topics, meet basic needs, and read and write simple texts. Students also learn basic facts about Finnish culture and history.

U122 Introductory Finnish II (4 cr.) P: U121. Concentrated practice in Finnish pronunciation, grammar, elementary conversation, reading and writing. Increase of vocabulary.

U221 Intermediate Finnish I (3 cr.) P: U122. Review of basic skills in the Finnish language, expansion of vocabulary and emphasis on constructing sentences and applying the knowledge of grammer into oral and written communication.

U222 Intermediate Finnish II (3 cr.) P: U221. Concentrated practice in the basic skills in the Finnish language, expansion of vocabulary, and sentence construction for oral and written communication.

Hungarian

U131 Introductory Hungarian I (4 cr.) Enables students to converse about simple personal and social topics, meet basic needs, and read and write simple texts. Students also learn basic facts about Hungarian culture and history.

U132 Introductory Hungarian II (4 cr.) P: U131. Concentrated practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in Hungarian language.

U231 Intermediate Hungarian I (3 cr.) P: U132. Enables students to converse about personal and simple academic topics, read and understand short literary and scholarly texts, and write to fulfill basic personal, business, and academic needs.

U232 Intermediate Hungarian II (3 cr.) P: U231. Concentrated practice in speaking, translating general texts from Hungarian into English and composing original Hungarian texts on various topics.

Kazakh

U175 Introductory Kazakh I (4 cr.) Provides students with a general knowledge of Kazakh language and culture. Familiarizes students with the sound system and alphabet of Kazakh through systematic presentation of basic grammar and practical use of the language stressing conversation, listening, reading, and writing. Students learn to understand and respond appropriately to simple questions and statements in Kazakh, use the language to deal with some basic everyday living situations, and read and react to a variety of simple Kazakh texts.

U176 Introductory Kazakh II (4 cr.) P: U175. Continues skills developed in U175.

U275 Intermediate Kazakh I (3 cr.) P: U176. Provides students with proficiency in the production of subordinate and complex sentences, using all the common aspects, moods, and tenses of the standard language. In addition, students will be able to read authentic texts with the use of language aids.

U276 Intermediate Kazakh II (3 cr.) P: U275. Continues skills developed in U275.

Mongolian

U141 Introductory Mongolian I (4 cr.) Introduction to the basic elements of Mongolian pronunciation, grammar, elementary conversation, reading and writing. Mastery of the main methods of linking sentences through converbs, when clauses, and relatives clauses.

U142 Introductory Mongolian II (4 cr.) P: U141. Continuation of the basic elements of Mongolian pronunciation, grammar, elementary conversation, reading and writing. Mastery of the main methods of linking sentences through converbs, when clauses, relatives clauses, and conditionals. Expansion of vocabulary.

U241 Intermediate Mongolian I (3 cr.) P: U142. Continued expansion of Mongolian grammar, especially with regard to syntax and forming complex sentences; increase of vocabulary by mastering word formation and bionomies; reading materials outside the textbooks; improving fluency through oral presentations, classroom discussions, and role-playing in practical situations; writing practice; pronunciation and translation practice.

U242 Intermediate Mongolian II (3 cr.) P: U241. Continued expansion of Mongolian grammar, especially with regard to syntax, forming complex sentences and expressing complex moods; increase of vocabulary by mastering word formation and bionomies; reading materials outside the textbooks; improving fluency through oral presentations, classroom discussions, and role-playing in practical situations; writing practice; pronunciation, translation, and transcription practice.

Persian

U177 Introductory Persian I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Persian required. Covers basic vocabulary and grammar, along with conversation, composition, reading, and translating from simple texts dealing with Iranian civilization. Credit given for only one of U177 or NELC P100.

U178 Introductory Persian II (4 cr.) P: U177 or consent of department. Continuation of the basic vocabulary and grammar of Persian. Credit given for only one of U178 or NELC P150.

U277 Intermediate Persian I (3 cr.) U178 or consent of department. Continuation of introductory Persian. Review of grammatical structures and vocabulary, reading, and translating of selected texts. Credit given for only one of U277 or NELC P200.

U278 Intermediate Persian II (3 cr.) P: U277 or consent of department. Continuing development of language skills. Additional new grammar concepts. Credit given for only one of U278 or NELC P250.

Tibetan

U151 Introductory Tibetan I (4 cr.) Introduction to the Tibetan language: pronunciation, grammar, and writing system. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing Tibetan.

U152 Introductory Tibetan II (4 cr.) P: U151. Introduction to the Tibetan language, continued reading, writing, grammar, and practice in speaking Tibetan. Introduction to Classical Tibetan.

U251 Intermediate Tibetan I (3 cr.) P: U152. Further development of skills in basic features of the Tibetan language. Students will begin reading selected portions of classical Tibetan texts and handling grammatical commentaries in modern Tibetan as part of an advanced systematic approach to the Tibetan language.

U252 Intermediate Tibetan II (3 cr.) P: U251. Continued expansion of development of skills in basic features of the Tibetan language. Students continue reading selected portions of classical Tibetan texts while they handle both spoken and written modern Tibetan.

Turkish

U161 Introductory Turkish I (4 cr.) Develops language skills needed to function in Turkish society through listening and speaking activities, writing and reading.

U162 Introductory Turkish II (4 cr.) P: U161. Further develops and expands communicative skills and grammar including language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of the course, students will have acquired basic skills to cope with situations of daily Turkish life, understand simple written instructions, and be able to skim more complex texts for general meaning.

U261 Intermediate Turkish I (3 cr.) P: U162. Continues basic communicative skills of reading, writing and listening through practice in short and long dialogues, everyday problem-solving situations, and role-model exercises.

U262 Intermediate Turkish II (3 cr.) P: U261. Continues to build on skills developed in first-semester class.

Turkmen

U107 Introductory Turkmen I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Turkmen required. Covers basic vocabulary and grammar, along with conversation, composition, reading and translating from simple texts.

U108 Introductory Turkmen II (4 cr.) P: U107 or consent of department. Continuation of the basic vocabulary and grammar of Turkmen.

U207 Intermediate Turkmen I (3 cr.) P: U108 or consent of department. Continuation of introductory Turkmen. Review of grammatical structures and vocabulary, reading, and translating of selected texts.

U208 Intermediate Turkmen II (3 cr.) P: U207 or consent of department. Continuing development of language skills. Additional new grammar concepts.

Uygur

U115 Introductory Uygur I (4 cr.) No previous knowledge of Uygur required. Covers basic vocabulary and grammar, along with conversation, composition, reading, and translating from simple texts. Credit given for only one of U115 or U181.

U116 Introductory Uygur II (4 cr.) P: U115 or U181 or consent of department. Covers basic vocabulary and grammar, along with conversation, composition, reading and translating from simple texts. Credit given for only one of U116 or U182.

U215 Intermediate Uygur I (3 cr.) P: U182 or U116 or consent of department. Continuation of introductory Uygur level. Review of grammatical structures and vocabulary, reading, and translating of short texts. Credit given for only one of U215 or U281.

U216 Intermediate Uygur II (3 cr.) P: U281 or U215 or consent of department. Continuation of introductory Uygur level. Review of grammatical structures and vocabulary, reading, and translating of short texts. Credit given for only one of U216 or U282.

Uzbek

U171 Introductory Uzbek I (4 cr.) Introduction to the literary language, covering pronunciation, grammar, syntax, reading, and writing. Introduction to culture and daily life of the Uzbeks.

U172 Introductory Uzbek II (4 cr.) P: U171. Furthers skills developed in first semester.

U271 Intermediate Uzbek I (3 cr.) P: U172. Continues basic grammar and emphasizes translation skills from Uzbek into English through advanced readings in journalistic and literary prose focusing on the daily life and culture of the Uzbek people.

U272 Intermediate Uzbek II (3 cr.) P: U271. Furthers skills developed in the first semester including all aspects of grammar of modern Uzbek.

Other Language Study

U299 Central Eurasian Languages (1-4 cr.) Languages of Central Eurasia. Various languages will be offered when available. May be repeated with a different language or at a different level for a maximum of 20 credits in any one language.

U399 Topics in Studies of Iranian Languages (3 cr.) An introduction to selected works of Iranian languages in relation to social history and religious, political, and linguistic developments. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 9 credits in U399 and/or NELC P360.

History, Civilization, or Other Culture Courses

U190 Introduction to Inner Asia (3 cr.) S & H P: Open only to freshmen and sophomores or by consent of instructor. Introductory survey of Inner Asian history and civilization. Concepts of the non-sedentary world, focusing on history, geography, pastoral nomadism, and shamanism. Inner Asian history from the rise of the non-Iranian peoples down to the present day.

U254 Introduction to the Ancient Near East and Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to ancient Near Eastern cultures from early farmers around 8000 B.C. to the Iron Age kingdoms of the Babylonians, Assyrians, and Iranians; emphasis on agriculture, literacy, urbanization, state formation, sociopolitical and religious institutions, and legal and economic developments. Archaeological and textual information will be utilized in conjunction with visual aids. Credit given for only one of U254 or NELC N245.

U284 The Civilization of Tibet (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to the diverse aspects of Tibetan civilization. Making extensive use of slides and other audiovisual materials, the course covers such topics as Tibet's literature, art, religion, society, history, and language. Strongly recommended for undergraduates intending to take higher-level courses in the Tibetan studies program.

U311 Prophets, Poets, and Kings: Iranian Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Traces the culture, society, and beliefs of Iran from ancient times through the Muslim conquest to the eighteenth century. Focuses on politics, religions (Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism, and Islam), administrative and social institutions, relationship between secular and ecclesiastic hierarchies, status of minorities, devotional and communal change, and Iranian influences on Islamic culture. Visual aids used in class. Credit given for only one of U311 or NELC N340.

U320 Topics in Central Eurasian Studies (1-4 cr.) Topic varies each semester. Some examples are "Buddhism in Central Asia," "Social Problems in Central Asia," "Everyday Life in Central Asia," and "Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia." See the online Schedule of Classes for current topics. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credits.

U324 Romanticism and the Rise of Nationalism (3 cr.) A & H, CSB P: 6 credit hours of literature. R: C205 or ENG L202. Examines the rise of romantic tendencies in eighteenth-century Europe and its effect on ethnicity, religion, language, and national identity. Analyzes the establishment of educational and cultural institutions in the service of nationalism by examining national anthems, epics and opera. Includes such authors as Goethe, Wordsworth, Byron, Novalis, Hoffmann, Hugo, Pushkin, Poe, Mérimée, Nerval, Vörösmarty, and Petöfi. Credit given for only one of CMLT C333 or U324.

U333 Finland in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H Evolution of twentieth-century Finland, including Russification and revolution, establishment of independence and civil war, interwar domestic politics and international relations, World War II and Finno-Soviet relations, economic development and rise of the welfare state, transformation of society and the changing role of women, and cultural history (literature, art, music).

U346 Literature of the Ottoman Court in Translation (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Study and analysis of selected readings from the Ottoman Court in English translation. May concentrate on a particular theme, period, or author. Special attention paid to the historical and cultural contexts of the works, as well as problems in translation, critical analysis, and interpretation. May be repeated once for credit with different topics.

U350 Turkish Literature in Translation (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Study and analysis of selected readings from Turkish literature in English translation. May concentrate on a particular theme, period, or author. Special attention paid to the historical and cultural contexts of the works, as well as problems in translation, critical analysis, and interpretation. May be repeated once for credit with different topics.

U368 The Mongol Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Impact of the Mongol conquest on the European, Islamic, Hindu, and Confucian worlds. Rise of the house of Chinggis Khan to the fall of the last directly related Khanates, the Golden Horde, under the double onslaught of Tamerlane and Muscovy.

U369 Inner Asia after the Mongol Conquest (3 cr.) S & H Inner Asian world during the era of Western expansion. Traces the parallel histories of eastern and western Inner Asia under the impact of Manchu and European expansion. Emphasis on Inner Asian development, rather than external influences.

U370 Uralic Peoples (3 cr.) S & H Uralic peoples in central, northern, and eastern Europe and Siberia. Their history, social organization, traditional economy, literature, folklore, and sociolinguistic patterns.

U372 Persian Literature in Translation (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Study and analysis of selected readings from Persian literature in English translation. May concentrate on a particular theme, period, or author. Special attention paid to the historical and cultural contexts of the works, as well as problems in translation, critical analysis, and interpretation. May be repeated with a different topic for a total of 9 credits in U372 and/or NELC N380.

U373 Persian Mystical Literature in Translation (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Examines the Persian literature of Islamic mysticism in English translation. Following an introduction to the history and doctrines of Sufism, the class will turn to detailed readings and discussions of works in several prose and poetic genres: hagiographic biography, allegorical epic, mystical lyric, and gnostic meditation. Credit given for only one of U373 or NELC N385.

U374 Environmental Problems and Social Constraints in Northern and Central Eurasia (3 cr.) Analysis of environmental, social, and economic issues in the immense region of Central and Northern Eurasia. Examines the new geo-political situation that emerged after the collapse of the U.S.S.R. and the crucial role the region plays in global security and stability.

U388 Chinese Inner Asia to 1949 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA History of Chinese Inner Asia from the rise of the Qing dynasty to the Chinese Communist victory in 1949-1951. Focus includes Qing systems of indirect rule, colonization, the New Policies, religion and modernity, indigenous nationalist movements and their interaction with both outside powers, and the Soviet and Chinese Communist movements.

U392 Shrine and Pilgrimage in Central Asian Islam (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Surveys the complex of religious belief and practice centered on shrines and pilgrimage to holy places in Islamic Central Asia, from the earliest accounts down to the present, with emphasis on the role of shrine-centered religious activity in the social, political, economic, and cultural life of Central Asia.

U393 The Yasavi Sufis and Central Asian Islam (3 cr.) A & H, CSA Surveys the history and legacy of the Yasavi tradition of Sufism in Islamic Central Asia from the twelfth century to the present, and other issues in the religious history of Central Asia linked to the Yasavi tradition.

U394 Islam in the Soviet Union and Successor States (3 cr.) A & H, CSA The course will examine the historical background and contemporary status of Islam and the nationalities of Islamic heritage in Russia and the newly independent republics of the former U.S.S.R. The focus will be on understanding the distinctive pressures experienced and exerted by Islam, as a religion and as a social system, in the Soviet and post-Soviet context.

U395 Central Asian Politics and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An introduction to the politics and society of Soviet and post-Soviet Central Asia. Examines the methods and effects of Communist party rule in the region and the emergence of new independent states.

U397 (ANTH E397, NELC N397) Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan. Topics: ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, gender. Credit given for only one of ANTH E397, CEUS U397, or NELC N397.

U398 (ANTH E398) Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to societies and cultures of contemporary Muslim successor states of former Soviet Central Asia, Western China (Xinjiang), and Iran and Afghanistan. Topics: ecology, ethnohistory, traditional subsistence strategies, family, kinship, gender, sociopolitical organization, impact of colonial rule of tsarist and Soviet Russia and China, development of modern nation-states in Iran and Afghanistan, dynamics of current conflicts and future prospects. Credit given for only one of CEUS U398 or ANTH E398.

U423 Hungary between 1890 and 1945 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA The rise of Hungarian capitalism at the turn of the century; transformation of Hungarian society: industrialization, education, national and social conflicts; ethnic minorities; impact of WWI; dissolution of Habsburg Empire: 1918-19 revolution; interwar period; WWII.

U424 Hungarian Literature from Its Beginnings to 1900 (3 cr.) A & H The shift from oral to written literature; conflict between Latin Middle Ages and the cult of the vernacular during the Reformation; Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Realism examined in relation to other literatures of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; interrelationship of urbanization and literary modernity at turn of the century.

U426 Modern Hungarian Literature (3 cr.) A & H Socioeconomic modernization and literary modernity at the turn of the century; Hungary's influence on the culture of the Habsburg monarchy; naturalism, symbolism, art nouveau, expressionism; the influence of Marx and Freud; urbanization and populism; socialist realism and its opposition in the postwar years.

U427 Hungary from 1945 to Present (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction of one-party system in 1945; political oppression; socialization of agriculture; revolution of October 1956; economic reforms in 1968; decline of "reform" Marxism; widening gap between establishment and population; political apathy; economic crisis in 1980s; elections of 1985; reintroduction of market economy; rebirth of multiparty system in 1988.

U436 Finnish Civilization to 1800 (3 cr.) S & H Knowledge of Finnish not required. Historic background of Finnish civilization. Social conditions, religious architecture, and folklore in the Middle Ages. Social and economic development with political background in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Literature and scholarly research.

U450 Turkish Oral Literature (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: Consent of instructor. Folklore studies and the rise of nationalism, folk narratives in Turkey and among Turkic peoples, folk theatre in Asia Minor; rituals in Turkey and in the neighboring countries (Iran, Balkan countries, Middle East); riddles and proverbs, folk poetry, folk songs, and folk dances in Turkey.

U459 Seminar in Turkish Studies (3 cr.) CSA A topical seminar dealing with a variety of social issues in Turkey. Special emphasis is given to educational and political issues. May be repeated twice for credit.

U469 Modern Mongolia (3 cr.) Examines Mongolia's turbulent history from independence from China's last dynasty in 1911 through theocracy, revolution, and communism to today's market democracy. Also focuses on social, economic, cultural, and demographic changes. No prerequisite.

U481 Survey of Tibetan Literature in Translation (3 cr.) A & H Introduction to different styles of Tibetan literature in translation: preclassical; classical (including historiography, canonical scriptures translated from Indian languages and Chinese, and Tibetan religious literature); Bonpo literature; and folk literature (epics, poetry, and drama).

U483 Introduction to the History of Tibet (3 cr.) S & H, CSA A survey of Tibetan history from the earliest times to the present, including the Tibetan empire of the seventh-ninth centuries, the impact of Buddhism on Tibetan political and social structure, aspects of Tibet's relations with neighboring peoples, the development of the Dalai Lama's government, and the current circumstances of the Tibetan people.

U484 The Religions of Tibet (3 cr.) A & H A survey of the whole of Tibetan religions, Buddhist as well as pre-Buddhist. Will be of utmost importance for every student of Tibetan because the whole of Tibetan life is pervaded by religion. Accompanied by slides.

U488 Readings in Modern Tibetan Texts (3 cr.) Primarily designed as an intermediate course in literary Tibetan, filling the gap between introductory Tibetan and readings in Buddhist religious texts or advanced readings. The choice of texts will largely depend on the interests of the students.

U489 Tibet and the West (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines Western perception of Tibet during the past 700 years. Presents Tibetan history and culture during this period and compares Tibetan civilization with the popular concepts about Tibet that prevailed in the West during this same period.

U490 Sino-Tibetan Relations (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Historical, cultural, social, and political relations between China and Tibet from prehistoric times to the present, indicating the major changes affecting both the political boundaries and the legal position of Tibet in relation to China.

U493 Islamic Central Asia, Sixteenth-Nineteenth Centuries (3 cr.) S & H Development of political and social patterns in Central Asia up to Russian conquest. Topics include the role of nomads and their integration into sedentary culture, emergence of ethnicity, interrelations of diverse ethnic groups, and cultural and political decline of Central Asia since the sixteenth century.

U494 Central Asia under Russian Rule (3 cr.) S & H Survey of political and social history of Russian domination of Central Asia from mid-nineteenth century to present. Special attention given to motives for and methods of Russian expansion, to formation of modern nations in Soviet Central Asia, and to the impact of that region on the Soviet Union.

U496 Ethnic History of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H A survey of the gradual formation of major ethnic groups that inhabit Central Asia at present, with a description of their traditional culture.

U497 Inner Asian Peoples and Nationality Policy in the People's Republic of China (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to the major Inner Asian peoples in the modern People's Republic of China, identifying them by language and location and briefly sketching their modern histories. Students will also be introduced to the policies and ideas by which they have been governed during the last several decades.

U498 Religion and Power in Islamic Central Asia (3 cr.) Selected topics dealing with the impact of religious categories (the sacred, holy men and saints, sacred literature, religious institutions, etc.) on the structure and development of Inner Asian societies. Application of methodology of comparative religion and the history of religion to the Inner Asian context.

Related History Department Courses

C393 Ottoman History (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

D321 Hungarian History and Civilization to 1711 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

D322 Hungarian History and Civilization, 1711-1918 (3 cr.) S & H, CSA

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