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College of Arts
and Sciences (College)
2006-2008
Academic Bulletin

College Programs
College of Arts and Sciences (College) 
Kirkwood Hall 104 
130 S. Woodlawn 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
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Anthropology

Faculty
Introduction
Major in Anthropology
Minor in Anthropology
Area Certificate in Global Human Diversity
Departmental Honors Program
Field and Overseas Study
Course Descriptions

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Faculty

Chairperson

Eduardo Brondizio

Distinguished Professor

Richard Bauman

Rudy Professor

Emilio Moran

Chancellor's Professors

Raymond DeMallie, Anya Peterson Royce

Professors

Geoffrey Conrad, Della Cook, Paula Girshick, Kevin Hunt, Paul Jamison, Douglas Parks, Christopher Peebles, K. Anne Pyburn, Nazif Shahrani, Jeanne Sept, Nicholas Toth, Kathy Schick, Richard Wilk

Associate Professors

JoŽlle Bahloul, Eduardo Brondizio, Gracia Clark, Philip LeSourd, Beverly Stoeltje

Assistant Professors

Susan Alt, Sara Friedman, Shane Greene, Frederika Kaestle, Stacie King, Sarah Phillips, Laura Scheiber, Marvin Sterling, Daniel Suslak, Wesley Thomas, Catherine Tucker

Lecturer

April Sievert

Faculty Emeriti

Robert Meier, Patrick Munson, Karen Vitelli

Academic Advising

Student Building 055, (812) 856-0905

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Introduction

Anthropology is the interpretive, scientific, and comparative study of humankind. The Department of Anthropology (ANTH) offers courses in the history of the discipline, museum studies, general anthropology, and the four subfields: anthropological linguistics, archaeology, bioanthropology, and social/ cultural anthropology.

Anthropological linguistics concentrates on human communication through language: the structure of languages, the history of their development and interrelationship, and the social contexts for language use. Archaeology explores the material remains of cultures in the recent and distant past, seeking to understand how people once lived. Bioanthropology emphasizes primate origins, evolution, and present-day biological/genetic variation and adaptation of human populations. Social/ cultural anthropology studies contemporary and historical cultures and societies of every scale worldwide, organized by both geographical areas and interpretive themes.

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Major in Anthropology

Purpose

The anthropology major acquaints students with basic principles, methods, and findings in anthropological study. Students may acquire a general background in anthropology or develop particular interests in one of the subfields.

Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in anthropology, including:

  1. B200, E200, L200, and P200.
  2. One advanced course (300-400 level) each in three of the four subfields with prefixes "B" for bioanthropology, "E" for social and cultural anthropology, "L" for anthropological linguistics, and "P" for archaeology.
  3. Remaining credit hours are distributed across advanced courses in any of the four subfields according to student interest. A student may count one additional course at the 200 level. A105, A303, E105, and E303 do not count toward the major.

Students planning to major in anthropology should begin by taking 200-level courses for introduction to the four subfields. Students must also complete the degree requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences.

Recommendations

Each of the four subfields of anthropology has different expectations as to the course work that best complements the interests and skills of students in each subfield. Course work taken in other departments should be selected in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The senior capstone seminar A410 is recommended for majors.

Graduate work in anthropology often requires knowledge of one or more foreign languages, and students should plan their undergraduate programs accordingly.

Minor in Anthropology

Students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours in anthropology to include

  1. No more than one course at the 100 level.
  2. At least one course selected from B200, E200, L200, and P200.
  3. One additional course at the 200 level or above.
  4. At least two advanced courses (300-400 level) selected in conjunction with the advisor to suit the student's interests.

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Area Certificate in Global Human Diversity

Purpose A student may earn an area certificate as part of completing the bachelor's degree and in addition to completing requirements for a major. The Area Certificate in Global Human Diversity is available to students outside the anthropology major. This certificate explores the cultural, biological, linguistic, and historical diversity of human societies worldwide. The certificate program prepares students to address major problems of identity, race, conflict, power, and access to resources using perspectives from all four subfields of anthropology.

Requirements

The certificate requires 24 credit hours, normally 8 semester courses, and comprises both required and elective courses. Students must take at least one course in bioanthropology, and at least one foundational course in Social and Cultural Anthropology, along with courses having area or topical focus. An internship is strongly encouraged. For further information, contact the anthropology advising office.

  1. ANTH E205, Peoples of the World (3 cr.), or ANTH E210, Human Diversity Across Space and Time (3 cr.).
  2. Two courses from the following:
    B200 Bioanthropology.
    E200 Social and Cultural Anthropology.
    L200 Language and Culture.
    P200 Introduction to Archaeology.
  3. Internship or field project (either under A496 or as part of a course).
  4. Two topical or thematic anthropology courses selected after consulting with an advisor.
  5. Two area or regional courses selected after consulting with an advisor.

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Departmental Honors Program

The anthropology honors program offers tutorial guidance to superior students who want to develop in-depth research interests. Students may enter the program in the second semester of their sophomore year or at any time during their junior year. Ordinarily, only students with outstanding academic records will be accepted, but applicants' strength of interest and commitment are also considered. Acceptance is made by the department chairperson or honors advisor, who will assign the student to a faculty tutor. Honors students must enroll in A399 Honors Tutorial in Anthropology, in which a thesis must be prepared from original research. A399 may be repeated once. A one-hour oral examination over the thesis will be administered during the senior year by a three-member committee, of which one member is to be selected from outside the Department of Anthropology. Eligible and interested students should consult with the departmental honors advisor.

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Field and Overseas Study

Anthropology is predominantly founded on field research and students are encouraged to register for a field school. Many course requirements for the major or minor in anthropology and other departments can be met through approved field schools, and field school elective hours are applicable to any College major. Fellowship support is usually applicable to field school registration and some field programs offer additional financial aid to participants. Anthropology credit for field school participation is only guaranteed for programs directed by IU anthropology faculty or with advance approval by the director of undergraduate studies. Opportunities for participating in fieldwork with IU faculty exist outside of formal field school courses. For more information about field schools and fieldwork, contact the Department of Anthropology, Student Building 130, (812) 855-1041; for study abroad, contact the Office of Overseas Study, Franklin Hall 303, (812) 855-9304.

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Course Descriptions

General Anthropology

A105 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.) S & H Human biological evolution and prehistory from the earliest archaeological record through the rise of civilization. Credit given for only one of the following: A105, A103, or A303. A105 does not count toward major. I Sem., II Sem.

E105 Culture and Society (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the ethnographic and comparative study of contemporary and historical human society and culture. May be taken simultaneously with A105. Credit given for only one of the following: A104, E105, E303, or A304. E105 does not count toward major. I Sem, II Sem.

A150 Freshman Seminar in Anthropology: Topics (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the study of anthropology through the applicability of anthropological theory and method to specific social and cultural issues. May be repeated once with different topic.

A200 Topics in Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H P: Freshman or sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Course is geared to the non-major and emphasizes the development of skills in the use of anthropological approaches to study of human behavior and belief. Topics will vary. May be repeated once for credit with different topic.

A205 Anthropology Today: Selected Topics in Current Research (1-4 cr.) Selected topics in anthropological methods, techniques, and area or thematic studies. Course content will draw on the fieldwork experiences and/or current research of the instructor(s). May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A208 Topics in the Anthropology of the Arts and Expressive Behavior (3 cr.) A & H Introduction to selected topics in the anthropology of art, performance, music, literature, folklore, belief, and ritual. Examines the methods anthropologists use to study the arts or other expressive behaviors and explores art and expression in a variety of cultural settings.

A303 Evolution and Prehistory (3 cr.) S & H R: Junior standing. Introductory course for more advanced students. Human beings' place in nature, emergence of humans and contemporary races, development of culture from Paleolithic onward, problems arising from interaction of biological and cultural phenomena. Not open to students who have taken A105. A303 does not count toward major. SS.

A306 Anthropological Statistics (3 cr.) Fundamentals of univariate and bivariate statistics, construction and interpretation of graphs, and computer-assisted data analysis. Both statistical methodology and theory will be emphasized as well as computer literacy. Students will examine the primary literature in all branches of anthropology to familiarize themselves with the role of statistics in anthropological research. Credit given for only one of the following: A306, Criminal Justice P291, Economics E270 or S270, Sociology S371, Mathematics/Psychological and Brain Sciences K300 or K310, or SPEA K300. (Note that although SPEA K300 fulfills the statistics requirement, it counts as non≠College of Arts and Sciences credit hours).

E303 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H R: Junior standing. Introductory course for more advanced students. Approaches to the study of contemporary cultures: structure, process, and change. Topics include kinship, economy, politics, religion, and worldview. Not open to students who have had E105. Not sequential with A303. E303 does not count toward major.

A399 Honors Tutorial (3 cr.) P: Consent of departmental honors advisor. Research and writing, culminating in honors thesis. May be repeated once.

A400 Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology (3-4 cr.) Seminar in various anthropology topics not covered by other anthropology courses, excluding ethnography and ethnology. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

A401 Cultural Resource Management (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. The anthropologist in the decision-making process for preservation and conservation of prehistoric and historic sites, structures, artifacts, etc. Legal procedures and anthropological values applicable to land use changes that threaten cultural resources.

A403 Introduction to Museum Studies (3 cr.) Introduction to general principles, goals, and objectives of museum practice. Museum history, administrative organization, physical plant design, restoration, acquisition, exhibit, and educational programs.

A405 Museum Methods (3 cr.) P: A403 or consent of instructor. Methods and techniques of museum design, administration, accessioning, conservation and restoration, acquisition of specimens, curatorial work, exhibition, and education.

A406 Fieldwork in Ethnography and Linguistics (1-4 cr.) Eight weeks of summer fieldwork designed and carried out by the student in consultation with faculty members. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours.

A408 Museum Practicum (1-4 cr., 8 cr. max.) P: A403, A405, or consent of instructor. Independent work of student's choice in one aspect of the field of museum work. Relevant readings required. May be repeated.

A410 Anthropology Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) S & H P: Senior status or advanced anthropology students. Selected topics in anthropology approached using concepts from all four subfields of the discipline. Asks students to examine the goals of anthropology and apply what they have learned in previous coursework to current research and contemporary issues. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

A495 Individual Readings in Anthropology (1-4 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. May be taken in successive semesters for credit.

A496 Field Study in Anthropology (1-8 cr.) P: Consent of chairperson. Supervised fieldwork of an anthropological nature arranged through an outside agency or institution, such as an internship, apprenticeship, or volunteer work at a governmental office, zoo, or archaeological site. One credit hour per full week of fieldwork. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Bioanthropology

B200 Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M Bioanthropology of humans, basic biological principles, morphology, function of evolutionary history. Human evolution from lower forms, environmental factors, speciation and differentiation into varieties, mixture, growth, sexual differences, and constitutional variability. I Sem., II Sem.

B301 Laboratory in Bioanthropology (3 cr.) N & M P or C: B200 or consent of instructor. Laboratory investigations of human skeletal biology, including age and sex determinations, bone pathologies, and forensic identification; human paleontological and primate observations; variability in living populations, including anthropometry, blood grouping, and dermatoglyphics. Emphasis on a bicultural perspective in applying methods and techniques of bioanthropology.

B310 Bioanthropology: A History of Ideas (3 cr.) S & H P: B200, B301, or permission of instructor. Emergence of modern bioanthropology as an academic discipline, emphasizing the careers of prominent scholars and theoretical contributions they made. Influences of funding institutions and major departments on the directions of research. Relationships to other fields of study.

B350 Issues in Human Origins: Creation and Evolution (3 cr.) A review of the creation/ evolution controversy in a seminar setting. Fundamentals of organic evolution covered, especially pertaining to the origin of our species. Additionally, the major arguments as set forth by "scientific creationists" are presented, along with an appraisal of the "balanced treatment" notion that has been proposed for inclusion in public school curricula.

B368 The Evolution of Primate Social Behavior (3 cr.) N & M Major patterns of social organization in the order Primates, with focus on several important primate species. Examination of Darwinian theories of behavioral evolution. Particular attention paid to the influence of food-getting and diet on social behavior.

B370 Human Variation (3 cr.) N & M P: Sophomore standing. Variation within and between human populations in morphology, gene frequencies, and behavior. Biological concepts of race, race classification along with other taxonomic considerations, and evolutionary processes acting on humans in the past, present, and future.

B400 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.) Selected topics in bioanthropology. Analysis of research. Development of skills in analysis and criticism. Topic varies. May be taken for a total of 9 credit hours as long as the topic changes.

B405 Fieldwork in Bioanthropology (cr. arr.) P: Consent of instructor. Fieldwork involving the collection and analysis of biological or biosocial data on prehistoric and contemporary human populations. The materials or data may be paleontological, archaeological, physiological, or ecological in nature. 1 credit hour per full week of fieldwork. SS.

B464 Human Paleontology (3 cr.) P: B200-B301. Human fossils: their structure, classification, evolution, geologic range, and geographical distribution.

B466 The Primates (3 cr.) N & M P: A105, B200-B30l, or consent of instructor. Paleontology, functional morphology, behavior, and natural history of the infrahuman primates. Emphasis on behavioral and ecological correlates of morphology.

B470 Human Adaptation: Biological Approaches (3 cr.) N & M Examines the concept of adaptation within the framework of bioanthropology, anthropology, and other disciplines. Focuses on individual and population responses to heat, cold, solar radiation, high altitude, and nutritional and disease stress.

B472 Bioanthropology of Aboriginal America (3 cr.) P: B200. Bioanthropological survey of past and present aboriginal inhabitants of

North and South America: origins and antiquity, archaeological and ethnic relationships.

B480 Human Growth and Development (3 cr.) P: B200-B301. Characteristics of normal growth and development from birth to maturity, establishment of constitutional qualities, and aging. Anthropology of individual considered from standpoint of causal factors, patterns of expression, and methods of assessment.

Social and Cultural Anthropology

E101 Ecology and Society (3 cr.) S & H The course examines the evolution of human management of resources. Forms of resource use are studied in terms of demographic, social, organizational, and cultural characteristics.

E102 Anthropology of America (3 cr.) R: Freshmen only. Anthropological analysis of American society: marriage, descent, kinship organization, religion, social stratification, and economic basis of social structure.

E110 Indians of Mexico: Ancient and Modern (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to the cultures and societies of the pre-Columbian and contemporary Indians of Mexico. Considers their religion, arts, social and political organization, subsistence, and everyday life, including roles of women and men. The relationship of the Indian to the colony and the nation is also examined in terms of opposition and integration.

E200 Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H Intermediate survey of theories and problems in social and cultural anthropology. Historical development, methods of inquiry, focal problems, and contemporary theoretical perspectives. I Sem., II Sem.

E205 Peoples of the World (3 cr.) S & H All peoples have to confront similar challenges in order to survive and thrive as individuals and as societies. This course will examine how eight or nine cultures around the world shape their values, behaviors, institutions, and stories in response to external and internal challenges.

E210 Human Diversity across Space and Time (3 cr.) S & H Provides a synthetic approach to human diversity including such aspects as biology, linguistics, culture, and psychology. What do humans have in common? Why do we vary so much? Is physical appearance a good measure of difference?

E230 American Ethnic Diversity (3 cr.) S & H This course focuses on racial and ethnic groups within the United States, including Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, Jewish Americans and the self-defined "white ethnics." Topics will include the nature of prejudice and stereotypes, the immigrant experience, ethnic strategies for success, education, the arts and competitive sports as a means of expression and social mobility.

E240 Southwestern American Indian Ritual and Belief (3 cr.) S & H, CSA This seminar will examine the beliefs and rituals of several of the Indian peoples of the Southwest, particularly the Apache, the Navajo, and the Pueblo peoples. After setting the historical and ethnographic context, we will look at beliefs and rituals focusing on origins, sacred places, healing, the natural environment, life passages as well as other topics. Credit given to anthropology majors and minors.

E250 Voices of Women in Ethnographic Study (3 cr.) S & H Ethnographic approaches to women's experience and influences on that experience, such as the 16th- and 17th-century witch hunts and popular fairy tales in print and film. Students may conduct interviews individually, write a contemporary fairy tale, and work in groups to research specific topics.

E260 Culture, Health, and Illness (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Across the world, ideas about and experiences of health, "disease," and medicine are profoundly shaped by culture. Introduction to cross-cultural approaches to understanding health and illness, covering topics such as ethnomedicine, ritual healing, gender and health, and international development and global health.

E300 Culture Areas and Ethnic Groups (1-3 cr.) An ethnographic survey of a selected culture area or ethnic group. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

E302 Laboratory in Ethnography (3 cr.) S & H P: ANTH E105 or E200, or permission of the instructor. Students learn the approaches and methods of ethnography by conducting their own hands-on field research projects in and around the community. Students complete a series of ethnographic lab assignments on participant observation, mapping and visual technologies, interviewing, and writing up research findings.

E306 Hasidic Culture and Oral Tradition (3 cr.) The contemporary Hasidic community is studied in terms of its history, beliefs and values, and unique social system. Factors affecting continuity and change, religious revitalization, and sect development will be considered. Special attention will be given to Hasidic tales, as well as plays, memoirs, and anthropological studies.

E307 Shamanism and Spirit Possession (3 cr.) S & H An overview of anthropological approaches to two important religious phenomena: shamanism and spirit possession. Topics include how individuals are called to these vocations, whether curing rituals "work," and the nature of shamanism in the modern world.

E310 Introduction to the Cultures of Africa (3 cr.) A & H, CSA R: ANTH E105 or E200 or E303 or AFRI L231 or L232. Explores the vitality and diversity of African cultures today in communities ranging from town neighborhoods to remote villages and from desert to rainforest. Demonstrates the tenacity and creativity of human societies facing severe political, social, and ecological pressures, but also contributes new questions and answers to global debates about family values, ethnicity, terrorism, hunger, and economic growth.

E312 African Religions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA An introduction to the variety of religious beliefs and practices in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines important themes that are common to indigenous religions and looks at the impact of Islam and Christianity. The focus is on how religion is interwoven with social, political, and economic aspects of life and is expressed in myth, ritual, and art.

E319 American Indian Religions (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduces religions of the peoples indigenous to North America. Concerns include traditional and contemporary native rituals, mythology, folklore, and symbolism occurring throughout these many cultures including topics such as art, architecture, cosmology, sustenance, modes, trade, history, gender, and taboos.

E320 Indians of North America (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Ethnographic survey of culture areas from the Arctic to Panama plus cross-cultural analysis of interrelations of culture, geographical environment, and language families.

E321 Peoples of Mexico (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Surveys modern Indian groups, peasant societies, problems of acculturation, and urbanization in contemporary Mexico.

E322 Peoples of Brazil (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Cultural traditions in Brazil: Indian, Iberian, and African; evolving regional subcultures. Current issues about Brazilian society.

E323 Indians of Indiana (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An introduction to the history and culture of the two principal Native American Nations of Indiana, the Miami and the Potawatomi. The course takes an ethnohistorical approach, investigating the past and present of these communities on the basis of anthropological research as well as historical documents.

E324 Native American Art (3 cr.) A & H, CSA This course is an introduction to the visual arts of Native Americans in the period since contact. Topics will include the artist (traditional and contemporary); the relationship of art, myth, and ritual; the effects of contact with other cultures on Indian arts; and shamanism and art. Class discussion will be illustrated with slides and movies. The class will visit and utilize the collections of Indian art at the Mathers Museum.

E327 Native Amazonians and the Environment (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Study of how native peoples in the Amazon Basin have used the environment from prehistoric times to the present. Examination of archaeological evidence, current pressures from development processes, and indigenous knowledge as the key to balancing conservation and development.

E328 Ecological Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H Survey of anthropological approaches to the study of human interaction with the environment: history of ideas, major theories, critiques, and contemporary approaches.

E329 Indians in the United States in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Position of the Indian as an ethnic minority, including health, education, economy, and political consideration of proposals to change the Indians' status.

E330 Indians of South America (3 cr.) S & H, CSA The cultural development and contemporary life of aboriginal societies in the lowland and Andean areas of the continent. Ethnic relationships and characteristics of major cultural groups are examined through detailed study of representative tribal units.

E332 Jewish Women: Anthropological Perspectives (3 cr.) S & H, CSA This course will be devoted to the analysis of women's place in Jewish society and culture. The Jewish woman will be studied through the investigation of images and representations, of gender dimension in kinships and family structures, and of religious roles. Special attention will be given to the evolution of traditional patterns in contemporary society and history.

E333 Peoples of the Andes (3 cr.) S & H Explores the cultures of prehistoric and current groups of the slopes and high reaches of the Andes, from Colombia to southern Chile. Considers historic and current contexts of socioeconomic, political, and environmental change that have shaped the cultures of their nations. The Quichua (Quechua), Aymara, and Mapuche cultures receive special attention.

E334 Jews in Moslem Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA This course will investigate ethnicity processes in Moslem society through the case study of Middle Eastern Jewish communities. These minorities will be studied through an analysis of their culture, their social organization and religious practices, and their relationships with their Moslem neighbors.

E335 Ancient Civilizations of Mesoamerica (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Historical ethnography of the major pre-Columbian civilizations, especially the Aztec, the Maya, and the Zapotec and Mixtec. Emphasis on the social life, cultural achievements, religion, worldview, and political systems to illustrate the diversity and richness of Amerindian life before the Spanish conquest.

E340 Indians of Mexico and Central America (3 cr.) S & H, CSA R: E105, E200, E303, or sophomore standing. Ethnographic survey of Indian populations of Mexico and Central America, both past and present. Position of Indians within larger political contexts; options and strategies characterizing these relationships.

E345 China through Anthropological Eyes (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An introduction to the anthropology of modern China. Examines representations of China and how those portrayals have been influenced by East-West relations. Focuses on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, particularly the socialist era and recent decades.

E348 Peoples and Cultures of Russia, Ukraine, and Newly Independent States (3 cr.) S & H, CSA An introduction to the peoples and cultures of Eurasia, especially the former Soviet Union. Uses case studies and ethnographies to learn about the histories of specific regions and groups, and to discuss religion and tradition, historical memory and cultural heritage, gender, childhood, and popular culture.

E370 Peasant Society and Culture (3 cr.) S & H, CSA P: Junior standing. Examination of the development of peasantries in world perspective. Historical formation, economic function, and sociopolitical role of peasantries in relation to their sociocultural contexts. General worldview, religious outlook, and political ideology of folk societies. Prospects for change in peasant societies.

E371 Modern Jewish Culture and Society (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Introduction to the methods and theories of social anthropology as applied to Judaism and Jewish identity. Review of the main social anthropological approaches to Jewish ritual and mythology, from evolutionist theory to structural analysis. Analytical reading of ethnographic works on modern Jewish communities and ritual practices.

E372 Racism, Anthropology of Prejudice (3 cr.) S & H Review of anthropological approaches to racism and prejudice as they are expressed in specific contexts such as the colonial system, multiracial and multiethnic societies, and anti-Semitic social systems.

E380 Urban Anthropology (3 cr.) P: E200. Urban social organization in cross-cultural perspective. Theoretical perspectives on urbanism and urbanization. Problems include kinship and social networks, politico-economic factors, and cultural pluralism. Strategies of anthropological research in urban settings.

E381 Ethnographic Analysis of Family, Work, and Power (3 cr.) S & H P: E105 or E200 or consent of instructor. This course teaches ethnographic analysis as a set of intellectual and practical tools students can use to define and answer questions about the implications of economic and social changes in their own lives and the world at large. Students will learn to identify and debate the patterns of loyalty, authority, and conflict established by specific relations in families and workplaces whether these are described in readings or presented in actual situations.

E382 Memory and Culture (3 cr.) S & H Remembrance is analyzed as a cultural and social reality. Review of the theoretical literature on collective memory as it unfolds in written, narrative, visual, and audiovisual art; in architecture and monuments; in private and public ritual; in genealogy; and in the social experience of the body.

E385 Applied Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H Survey of the applications of anthropological theory and method to meet societal needs in the areas of education, health, industry, food production, and rural development.

E387 The Ethnography of Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSB Europe is viewed as an idea, an identity, and an historical consciousness. Students explore the meaning of this idea in the contemporary development of social and cultural anthropology, and in such social areas as regionalism and nationalism, ethnic identity, gender and kinship, religion, the city versus the village, and political life.

E392 Ethnography of the United States (3 cr.) S & H "American culture" is familiar the world over as values, styles, and material goods. Yet American diversity (ethnic, regional, individual) makes "American culture" an elusive subject within the United States. Thus, the United States has long been the focus of ethnographic experimentation and innovation. Seminar explores recent themes, debates, and opportunities for ethnographic discovery in the United States.

E394 Stories and Stereotypes: Discourses of Difference (3 cr.) S & H Uses texts, movies, and stories to investigate ideas about differences and sameness, self and other. Viewing personal experience and local knowledge ethnographically, the class examines how stereotypes, conspiracies, or understanding of others develop and are then encapsulated in the discourse of everyday life.

E397 (CEUS U397) Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan. Topics: ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, gender. Credit given for only one of ANTH E397, CEUS U397, or NELC N397.

E398 (CEUS U398) Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3 cr.) S & H, CSA General anthropological introduction to societies and cultures of contemporary Muslim successor states of former Soviet Central Asia, Western China (Xinjiang), and Iran and Afghanistan. Topics: ecology, ethnohistory, traditional subsistence strategies, family, kinship, gender, sociopolitical organization, impact of colonial rule of tsarist and Soviet Russia and China, development of modern nation-states in Iran and Afghanistan, dynamics of current conflicts and future prospects. Credit given for only one of ANTH E398 or CEUS U398.

E400 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.) Intensive examination of selected topics in anthropology. Emphasis on analytic investigation and critical discussion. Topics vary. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

E404 Field Methods in Ethnography (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Introduction to the methods and techniques anthropologists use in ethnographic research. Preparation of a research proposal, interviewing, and the use of the life histories and case studies.

E405 Principles of Social Organization (3 cr.) P: E200. Comparative analysis of the social organization of selected societies from the perspectives of major theoretical positions in social and cultural anthropology.

E407 Visual Anthropology: Filmmaking (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Experimental filmmaking concerning social behavior, institutions, and customs.

E408 Talk, Tales, and Television: Africa, Europe, the United States (3 cr.) Colonialism, the slave trade, apartheid, African music, Roots, Hollywood. These subjects link Americans, Europeans, and Africans together, and they are portrayed through talk, television, film, radio, and performance at specific sites. Using specific examples, we will examine these tools of communication critically to better understand the ideas and images that circulate back and forth across the Atlantic.

E412 Anthropology of Russia and Eastern Europe (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Explores the contradictory effects of socialism's "fall" through a study of new ethnographies of postsocialist societies. Regional inquiries will be related to broader intellectual issues such as globalization, social suffering, commodification and cultural identity, ethnicity and nation building, armed conflict, and gender inequalities.

E416 Anthropology of Tourism (3 cr.) S & H Explores the phenomenon of tourism from an anthropological perspective. Looks at tourism as linked to consumer culture, transnational movements of people and goods, post-colonial settings, global capitalism, and the politics of ethnic and national identities.

E417 African Women (3 cr.) S & H, CSA The remarkably active roles that African women play in their communities bring them respect, but also heavy responsibilities. This course follows the themes of autonomy and control of resources, considering both economic resources such as land, labor, income and cattle, and social resources such as education, religion, and political power.

E418 Globalization and Consumer Culture (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Examines processes of globalization and economic and cultural integration, including the origin and spread of mass-consumer society. Topics include the theories of consumption, mass media and advertising, and the relationship between modernity and consumerism. Examples from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the United States are included.

E420 Economic Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H R: E105, E200, or E303. Examines the economic systems of diverse peoples and asks fundamental questions about human nature and how people make important decisions in their lives. Includes studies of gift giving, markets, globalization, gender, and economic development.

E421 Food and Culture (3 cr.) S & H Discussion of the economy of food production, trade and consumption on a global basis. Gives a cross-cultural and historical perspective on the development of cooking and cuisine in relationship to individual, national, and ethnic identity. Relates cuisine to modernity, migration, and forms of cultural mixing and Creolization.

E423 Life Histories (3 cr.) S & H Life histories give ethnographies accessibility, emotional impact, deep contextualization, and a deceptively transparent opening for authentic voices. An exploration of the complex issues of power and knowledge underlying this method, including interviewing strategies, consent, confidentiality, editing and publishing choices, and considers its position within broader research agendas. We discuss classic examples, recent narrative collections and contemporary experimental texts.

E425 Ethnozoology: Studies in American Indian Subsistence (3 cr.) Survey of faunal and floral use by late prehistoric and early historic American Indian groups. Entails library research, and writing and presentation of papers.

E427 Human Adaptation: Cultural Approaches (3 cr.) S & H Reviews cultural and behavioral responses to environmental stresses such as extreme cold in the Arctic, hypoxia at high altitude, low productivity due to water scarcity in arid lands, and environmental patchiness in the humid tropics.

E430 Kinship Organization (3 cr.) S & H P: E200 or graduate standing. A review of the history and theory of kinship analysis in the British and American traditions.

E436 The Politics of Marriage (3 cr.) S & H What is the state of marriage today? How do we understand marriage as a social, political, and economic institution? Examines marriage across cultures and time periods. Discusses topics such as arranged marriages, marriage and racial politics, marital citizenship, wedding industries, and battles over same-sex marriage.

E440 Political Anthropology (3 cr.) P: E105, E200, or E303. Cultural dimensions of politics and political organizations. Emphasis on national and transnational structures, nationalism and ethnonationalist movements, and local-level politics from ethnographic and comparative perspectives.

E444 People and Protected Areas: Theories of Conservation (3 cr.) S & H Seminar course that explores major theories and approaches to conservation, from "fortress conservation" to community-based and participatory strategies. Considers the implications of protected areas for local human populations and cultural diversity. Evaluates outcomes and unintended consequences of protected areas, and controversies over the "best" way to protect natural resources.

E445 Seminar in Medical Anthropology (3 cr.) S & H This advanced seminar in medical anthropology focuses on theoretical approaches to understanding the body and notions of health, illness, and disease across cultures. Concentrates on interpretive and critical (political economy) approaches to issues of health and includes critical study of Western biomedicine.

E451 Myth and Legend: Cultural Meanings and Interpretations (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Anthropological approaches to the study of myth and legend. Emphasis on analysis of tales in their social context.

E455 Anthropology of Religion (3 cr.) S & H Critical evaluation of current approaches to the analysis of religious myth, ritual, and symbolism. Problems in understanding religious beliefs of other cultures. Modern development of the anthropology of religion.

E457 Ethnic Identity (3 cr.) S & H P: E105, E200, E303, or consent of instructor. Nature of ethnic groups and identity viewed in cross-cultural perspective: effects of colonialism and nationalism on ethnic groups; use of identity as an adaptive strategy; stereotypes and stereotyping; symbols and styles of ethnic identity; and retention and elaboration of local styles.

E460 The Arts in Anthropology (3 cr.) A & H An overview of visual art, music, dance, drama, and oral literature, viewed as structural entities, as aspects of human behavior, and in terms of their anthropological context.

E462 Anthropological Folklore (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. Function, forms, and interpretations of folklore in traditional societies. Folklore as an expression of continuity and change.

E463 Anthropology of Dance (3 cr.) A & H Techniques of dance research, bibliographic and archival sources, historical and comparative studies, function and structure of dance, distribution of dance styles, and symbolic aspects of dance performance. A variety of dance forms will be considered in their social and cultural contexts.

E475 Law and Culture (3 cr.) CSA This seminar is an introduction to classic anthropological writing on cultural concepts of law, conflict, and social ordering, concentrating on ethnographic approaches since the 1960s. Focus is cross-cultural, following the emphasis of the works themselves on Africa, native North America, and the contemporary United States. Discussions emphasize the historical context of individual works and critical rereadings from the vantage points offered by contemporary anthropological theory.

E480 Theory of Culture Change (3 cr.) P: E105, E200, or E303, and junior standing. Survey and evaluation of anthropological approaches to theoretical problems of culture change in general. Discussion of processes, patterns, causes, and rates of culture change. Case studies.

E485 Art and Craft of Ethnography (3 cr.) S & H Ethnography is the defining core of social and cultural anthropology; field research is at the heart of ethnography. The definition and purpose of ethnography, the role of ethnographer, voice, ethics, modes of presentation, standards, craft, art, and evaluation are examined through specific cases and exemplary ethnographies.

E490 Development and Anthropology (3 cr.) P: E420, ECON E103, or consent of instructor. The theory of development; the way anthropology has been employed in development schemes in Melanesia, Southeast Asia, India, Africa, and elsewhere; the practical problem of relating to development bodies such as the Agency for International Development (USAID) and Third World governments; the ethical problem of such relationships.

Anthropological Linguistics

L200 Language and Culture (3 cr.) S & H An introduction to the study of language and its relations to the rest of culture. I Sem., II Sem.

L310-L311 Elementary Lakota (Sioux) Language I-II (4-4 cr.) Introduction to Lakota (Sioux), an American Indian language spoken on the Northern Plains of the United States. Course focuses on developing elementary reading and writing skills as well as oral fluency in the Lakota language within the context of Lakota culture.

L312-L313 Intermediate Lakota (Sioux) Language I-II (4-4 cr.) Study of more complex Lakota grammatical structures, with emphasis on development of active reading, writing, and speaking skills.

L318 Navajo Language and Culture (3 cr.) CSA An introduction to the Navajo language and an exploration of it as an integral dimension of Navajo culture. Topics, including Navajo history, kinship, ritual life, beliefs, and literature, will be grounded in the appropriate dimensions of Navajo grammar. In addition, the course provides a case study to review the major issues in the field of language and culture.

L320 American Indian Languages (3 cr.) S & H An introductory survey of the native languages of the Americas. Topics to be covered include history of the study of American Indian languages, genetic and typological classifications, structures of selected languages, the comparative (historical) study of selected language families, and the interplay between language and culture. The diversity of New World languages will be emphasized.

L330 Mesoamerican Languages: Structure, History, Social Context (3 cr.) S & H Introductory survey of the indigenous languages of Mesoamerica. Covers the genetic and typological classification of these languages and the social and historical contexts in which they have been and continue to be spoken. Students will have hands-on opportunities to work with native speakers of these languages.

L400 Topical Seminar in the Ethnography of Communication (3 cr.) Current issues in linguistic anthropology, designed to acquaint the student with readings and points of view not covered in the introductory courses. Topics such as languages of the world, variation in language, problems in linguistic structure, and culture and communication. Topic varies. May be taken for a total of 9 credit hours as long as the topic changes.

L407 Language and Prehistory (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the areas of linguistic research that are most relevant to the work of archaeologists and students of prehistory. Topics include mechanisms of linguistic change, the comparative method, genetic and areal relationships among languages, and applications of linguistic reconstruction to the study of ancient cultures and populations.

Archaeology

P200 Introduction to Archaeology (3 cr.) S & H Introduction to the goals, methods, and theories that archaeologists use to learn about the past. The pursuit and interpretation of archaeological evidence are explored by reviewing case studies from across the globe and diverse time periods. Topics include food and subsistence, culture change, social life, political economies, and archaeological ethics.

P210 Life in the Stone Age (3 cr.) S & H Examination of the major developments in the Stone Age, emphasizing technological innovations, changes in subsistence patterns, and geographic and ecological expansions of human populations. The course will consist of two weekly lectures and a laboratory practicum where students will learn to make and use stone tools.

P220 The Rise and Fall of Ancient Civilizations (3 cr.) S & H Archaeology of the earliest high civilizations of the Old and New Worlds (Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, China, Mesoamerica, and Peru). Both an introductory survey of prehistoric civilizations and an exploration of the nature and development of civilization and the state.

P230 Archaeology of the Ancient Maya (3 cr.) S & H, CSA This is a course about the ancient Maya. Lecture and discussion will cover what is known about the Maya past and how the past relates to the present day. Writing, architecture, mythology, mathematics, agriculture, political structure, and economy will be considered.

P240 Archaeology and the Movies (3 cr.) S & H Examines how archaeologists and archaeological knowledge are represented in popular cinema and compares these views with the work that archaeologists actually do. Topics include the history of archaeology, archaeological ethics, and archaeological interpretation. Feature films studied cover archaeological practice, the archaeology of early humans, Rome, and ancient Egypt, and related topics.

P301 Archaeological Methods and Analyses (3 cr.) P: P200 or consent of instructor. Laboratory analysis of archaeological materials (classification, description, quantification) within a framework of answering specific questions about past human behavior and activities: chronology, subsistence, seasonality, tool functions. Credit not given for both P400 and P301.

P302 Invention and Technology (3 cr.) The evolution of technology is explored from prehistoric times onward. The origins of the major inventions of humankind are traced from their earliest beginnings in the Stone Age up to the Industrial Revolution. Credit not given for both E410 and P302.

P310 Prehistory of Europe and Asia (3 cr.) S & H Prehistoric cultures of Europe and Asia, from Old Stone Age through Iron Age.

P314 Earlier Prehistory of Africa (3 cr.) S & H A survey of prehistoric developments on the African continent from 2.5 million years ago to the end of the Stone Age, including topics such as the archaeology of human origins, the emergence of fully human ways of life, and the economic and cultural patterns of prehistoric hunter-gatherers.

P315 Later Prehistory of Africa (3 cr.) S & H A survey of prehistoric developments on the African continent from about 20,000 years ago to the appearance of written history.

P330 Historical Archaeology (3 cr.) S & H We will examine the ways in which historical archaeologists investigate Colonial and American cultures and lifeways in various regions of North America throughout time. Special attention will be given to understanding the long and complex history of Native American/European interactions, North American social systems, interaction with and exploitation of the environment, technologies, and material culture. The theory and methods used by historical archaeologists will also be emphasized.

P350 Archaeology of Ancient Mexico (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Surveys the archaeology of ancient Mexico. Traces cultural developments of indigenous peoples from the Olmec to the Aztec, and examines issues, controversies, and current debates in Mexican archaeology. Topics include the transition to settled villages, initial complexity, craft production, urbanization, ideology, gender, religion, warfare, and the conquest.

P360 North American Archaeology (3 cr.) S & H An exploration of the archaeology of North America by addressing current issues and debates, including the peopling of the New World, hunter-gatherer research, origins of agriculture, socio-political complexity and inequality, trade and exchange, post-colonial culture contact, and archaeological ethics. Archaeological evidence from several regions and culture areas is emphasized.

P361 Prehistory of the Midwestern United States (3 cr.) S & H A survey of prehistoric cultural developments in the midwestern United States from the earliest human occupations until initial European contact, set primarily within a framework of changing ecological adaptations.

P362 Prehistory of the Southeastern United States (3 cr.) A survey of substantive and conceptual contributions of archaeology to the prehistory and protohistory of the Southeast. Course covers periods from the earliest first Americans to Euro-American colonization: circa 10,000 B.C. to A.D. 1600.

P363 North American Prehistory through Fiction (3 cr.) S & H Students consider fictionalized accounts of life in prehistoric North America, written by anthropologists, Native Americans, and novelists, as a means to think critically and creatively about the past. They explore the role and place of narrative and imagination in constructions of the past and consider how authors utilize available data.

P365 Archaeology of Western North America (3 cr.) S & H An exploration of the archaeology of western North America by addressing current topics, including Paleoindian research, hunter-gatherer continuums, farming communities, emergent complexity, interregional exchange, postcolonial culture contact, and archaeological ethics. Emphasis is placed on archaeological evidence west of the Mississippi River. Theoretical foundations and methodological advances will also be considered.

P370 Ancient Civilizations of the Andes (3 cr.) CSA Prehistoric cultural development in Andean South America: early hunters and gatherers, the beginning of agriculture, the growth of regional civilizations, and the rise and fall of the Inca Empire.

P371 Prehistory of Lowland South America (3 cr.) CSA A survey of the ecological background of prehistoric lowland South American cultures, their cultural content, their chronology, and the significance of major sites to the development of cultures in South America.

P380 Prehistoric Diet and Nutrition (3 cr.) N & M How the long-term history of human diet has influenced our genetic, physiological, cultural, and socioeconomic development. Evolutionary and ecological perspectives on modern human diet and nutrition, including survey of modern human and nonhuman primate diets and the record of prehistoric human diet and methods of dietary reconstruction.

P385 Paleolithic Technology Laboratory (3 cr.) N & M P: Consent of instructor. Identification, analysis, classification, measurement quantification, and illustration of Paleolithic artifacts.

P390 Geoarchaeology and Taphonomy (3 cr.) An exploration of the dynamic process of archaeological site formation. Focus on geoarchaeological and taphonomic studies of archaeological materials, site context and environment, and how these approaches help us understand prehistoric lifeways.

P399 Undergraduate Seminar (3 cr.) P: P200 or consent of instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in archaeology. Development of skills in analysis and criticism. Topic varies. May be taken with a different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

P405 Fieldwork in Archaeology (1-8 cr.) Archaeological work directed toward field techniques: excavation and preservation of materials, surveying, photography, and cataloging. 1 credit hour per full week of fieldwork. SS.

P406 Laboratory Methods in Archaeology (1-6 cr.) P: P405 or consent of instructor. Specialized training in laboratory procedures and analysis of archaeological materials. Major categories of material culture to be studied include lithics, ceramics, and faunal and floral remains. Emphasis is on processing, sorting, identifying, and analyzing material recovered from the previous Fieldwork in Archaeology (P405).

P409 Archaeological Ethics (3 cr.) This seminar explores the professional responsibilities of archaeologists by examining timely issues, such as the differences and, sometimes, conflicts between international law and professional ethics, and between archaeologists and others (e.g., Native Americans, antiquities collectors) who affect and are affected by archaeological work. Some background in archaeology is helpful.

P425 Faunal Osteology (5 cr.) N & M Lecture and laboratory introduction to the preparation, collection, identification, and interpretation of faunal specimens from archaeological sites. Also includes an introduction to forensic identifications and to zooarchaeological literature.

P426 Problems in Zooarchaeology (5 cr.) A course designed to allow students to obtain additional practice in identification and interpretation of faunal specimens. Includes individual projects in preparation, preservation, and curation of faunal collections, as well as encouraging the preparation of a publication-ready paper.

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