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Courses

World Languages and Cultures (NELC, EALC, CLAS, FREN, GER, ITAL, SPAN)
Arabic (NELC)
  • NELC-A 131 Basic Arabic I (4 cr.) Introductory language course in modern standard Arabic as in contemporary literature, newspapers, and radio. Focus on grammar, reading, script, conversation, elementary composition, and culture. PUL=1A,5
  • NELC-A 132 Basic Arabic II (4 cr.) Introductory language course in modern standard Arabic as in contemporary literature, newspapers, and radio. Focus on grammar, reading, script, conversation, elementary composition, and culture. PUL=1A,5
  • NELC-A 200 Intermediate Arabic I (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 131-A132, or consent of instructor. Grammar, reading, composition, conversation, and translation, using materials from classical, medieval, and modern literary Arabic. PUL=1A,5
  • NELC-A 250 Intermediate Arabic II (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 200, or consent of instructor. Grammar, reading, composition, conversation, and translation, using materials from classical, medieval, and modern literary Arabic. PUL=1A,5
  • NELC-A 300 Advanced Arabic I (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 200-A250, or consent of instructor. Modern standard/classical Arabic syntax and morphology. Development of advanced language skills in reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Translation and active vocabulary development. Readings in a variety of genres and periods. PUL=1A,5
  • NELC-A 350 Advanced Arabic II (3 cr.) P: NELC-A 300, or consent of instructor. Modern standard/classical Arabic syntax and morphology. Development of advanced language skills in reading, writing, and aural comprehension. Translation and active vocabulary development. Readings in a variety of genres and periods. PUL=1A,5
  • NELC-N 397 Peoples/Cultrs of Middle East (3 cr.) General anthropological introduction to social institutions and cultural forms of the Arab countries of North Africa and the Near East, Israel, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan. Topics include ecology, development of Islam and Muslim empires, traditional adaptive strategies, consequences of colonialism, independence and rise of nation-states, impact of modernization, changing conceptions of kinship, ethnicity, and gender.   PUL= 5, 2
Chinese (EALC)
  • EALC-C 351 Studies in East Asian Culture (3 cr.)

    Selected topics on East Asian culture. PUL=5,2

  • EALC-C 131 Beginning Chinese I (4 cr.) Introductory language course in Chinese with emphasis on comprehension and oral expression, grammar, reading, script, elementary composition, and culture. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 132 Beginning Chinese II (4 cr.) P: EALC-C 131 or equivalent. Continuation of introductory language course in Chinese with emphasis on comprehension and oral expression, grammar, reading, script, elementary composition, and culture. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 201 Second-Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 132 or equivalent. Both spoken and written aspects stressed, completing major grammatical patterns. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 202 Second-Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201 or equivalent. Both spoken and written aspects stressed, completing major grammatical patterns. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 301 Third-Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201-EALC-C 202 or equivalent. A further expansion on vocabulary and grammatical patterns focusing on reading and oral communication. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 302 Third-Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201-EALC-C 202 or equivalent. A further expansion on vocabulary and grammatical patterns focusing on reading and oral communication. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 320 Business Chinese (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 201-EALC-C 202 or equivalent. Acquisition of language skills for business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-E 331 Traditional Chinese Literature (3 cr.) An introduction to Chinese historical and religious writing, narrative prose, and lyrical poetry from roughly 1300 BCE to 1300 CE. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-E 333 Studies in Chinese Cinema (3 cr.) Critical and historical perspectives on Chinese cinema from the 1930s to the 1990s, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-E 334 Contemporary Chinese Cinema (3 cr.) An introduction to a representative selection of Chinese cinema since the 80s. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-E 335 Chinese Martial Arts Culture (3 cr.) A survey of history and style of Chinese martial arts, their theoretical bases, literary tradition of martial arts fiction, and cinematic expression of martial arts skills, chivalry and love. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-C 401 Fourth Year Chinese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 301-EALC-C 302 or equivalent. A further improvement of language proficiency. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-C 402 Fourth Year Chinese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-C 301-EALC-C 302 or equivalent. A further improvement of language proficiency. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-E 351 Studies in East Asian Culture (3-6 cr.) Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian culture, taught within one of the humanistic disciplines. PUL = 1A. May be repeated once for credit.
  • EALC-E 301 Chinese Language and Culture (3 cr.) The relationship of Chinese language to its culture and society. Four topics emphasized: (1) unique characteristics of Chinese; (2) influence of language structure on thought patterns and social behavior; (3) traditional conception of life as it affects verbal behavior; and (4) interaction between linguistic and other factors in social life. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-E 232 China Past and Present: Culture in Continuing Evolution (3 cr.) Chinese culture and its modern transformations. Intellectual, artistic, and literary legacies of the Chinese people. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-E 396 Studies in East Asian Culture (3 cr.) The objective of the course is to help students gain an understanding of Chinese culture and civilization from its roots. This course studies the I Ching (i.e., Book of Changes), and its influence on Chinese culture and civilization. The I Ching is the most influential ancient Chinese classic. No other book can match its influence in shaping Chinese thought, traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese written language, and popular Chinese cultural behaviors. PUL = 5,2
Classical Studies (CLAS)
Courses in Classical Archaeology
  • CLAS-C 412 Art and Archaeology of the Aegean (3 cr.) Introduction to the preclassical art and archaeology of the Aegean Basin: Greece, Crete, and the Aegean islands during the Stone and Bronze Ages (to about 1000 B.C.). Topics covered include Troy, Minoan Crete, and Mycenaean Greece. PUL=5,2
  • CLAS-A 301 Classical Archaeology (3 cr.) The material remains of the classical lands from prehistoric through Roman times and a variety of approaches by which they are understood. Archaeological theory and methods are illustrated through select sites, monuments, works of art, and other remains of cultural, artistic, and historical significance. (Equivalent to Herron H310 and IU Bloomington Classical Studies C206/Fine Arts A206; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=5,3
  • CLAS-A 418 Myth and Reality in Classical Art (3 cr.) An introduction to Greek iconography (the study of images) that explores contemporary approaches to narration and representation. The course examines the illustration of myth, history, and everyday life in Greek art in relation to ancient society. (Equivalent to Herron H418; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=5,2
  • CLAS-C 413 The Art and Archaeology of Greece (3 cr.) Art and archaeology of Greece from about 1000 B.C. through the Hellenistic period. Special attention given to the development of Greek architecture, sculpture, and vase painting. (Equivalent to Herron H413; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=5,2
  • CLAS-C 414 The Art and Archaeology of Rome (3 cr.) Development of Roman architecture, sculpture, and painting from the beginning through the fourth century A.D. Consideration given to the major archaeological sites. Continuation of C413, but C413 is not a prerequisite. (Equivalent to Herron H414; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=5,2
Courses in Classical Civilization
  • CLAS-C 205 Classical Mythology (3 cr.) Introduction to Greek and Roman myths, legends, and tales, especially those that have an important place in the Western cultural tradition. PUL=5,1A
  • CLAS-C 209 Medical Terms from Greek and Latin (2-3 cr.) Basic knowledge of some 1,000 words, together with materials for formation of compounds, enables student to build a working vocabulary of several thousand words. Designed for those intending to specialize in medicine, dentistry, or microbiology. Does not count toward the foreign language requirements or the distribution requirement. PUL=1A
  • CLAS-C 310 Classical Drama (3 cr.) Masterpieces of ancient Greek and Roman theater studied in relation to literary, archaeological, and artistic evidence for their production and interpretation. PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 101 Ancient Greek Culture (3 cr.) CLAS-C101 is an historical and topical introduction to ancient Greek culture. From prehistorical to Hellenistic cultures, CLAS-C101 surveys the geography, economics, politics, philosophy, religion, society, technology, and daily lives of ancient Greeks by studying representative works of art, architecture, and literature. PUL=5,1, 2
  • CLAS-C 351 The Golden Age of Athens (3 cr.) Literary and artistic masterpieces of classical Greece viewed against the intellectual, cultural, and political background of democratic Athens. PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 361 The Golden Age of Rome (3 cr.) Literary and artistic masterpieces of the Augustan age viewed in connection with the foundation of the Roman Empire. PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 386 Greek History (3 cr.) Political, social, and economic developments in the Greek world from the age of Mycenae and Troy until the Roman conquest (30 BC). Greek colonial world, Athens and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic age. Archaeology as a source of political and social history. (Equivalent to HIST-C 386; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 396 Classical Studies Abroad (1-9 cr.) P: Acceptance into an approved Indiana University overseas study program. Credit for foreign study in classical languages, civilization, and archaeology when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Credit in CLAS-C 396 may be counted toward a minor in classical studies or classical civilization with approval of undergraduate advisor. PUL=5, Rise-I May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  • CLAS-C 491 Topics in Classical Studies (3 cr.) A detailed examination of a particular aspect of classical civilization using a variety of literary and archaeological evidence. PUL=5,2
  • CLAS-C 495 Individual Reading in Classics (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. PUL=5,2 May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • CLAS-C 321 Classical Myth and Culture in Film (3 cr.) This course will consider the apparently timeless appeal of the classical world and its mythology to modern filmmakers, reflected in the recent release of blockbuster films. What do they see (or imagine they see) in the remote, foreign civilizations of antiquity that still appeals to a modern popular audience? In this course we will compare films with the literary sources on which they are based, examining how the films depict, recast, or distort classical sources, and the extent to which they reflect modern cultural values and interests, ending with an examination of Greek myth in a modern setting, comparing the book and film versions. PUL=5
  • CLAS-C 102 Ancient Roman Culture (3 cr.) CLAS-C102 explores the culture and history of ancient Rome, both as a distinct past society, and as a cultural force that continues to shape modern life. We will focus on several questions: How was Roman society organized? How did Rome's particular history shape how Roman society developed? What was daily life like for various social classes (elite and poor, free and slave, etc.)? What was the role of religion? How do we interpret different types of evidence about the past, including written and archaeological sources? How does ancient Rome continue to shape the world we inhabit today? PUL=5,1,2
  • CLAS-C 350 Greek Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Survey of Greek literature through selected literary works of such authors as Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Plato. PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 360 Roman Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Survey of Roman literature through selected literary works of such authors as Plautus, Terence, Catullus, Cicero, Horace, Virgil, Ovid, Petronius, Juvenal, Tacitus, and Apuleius. PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 387 Roman History (3 cr.) Political, social, and economic developments in the Roman world from the age of Kings to the late Roman Empire (Equivalent to HIST-C 387; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=2,5
  • CLAS-C 419 Art and Archaeology of Pompeii (3 cr.) Survey of the archaeological evidence of the best-preserved ancient city, noting its importance to our knowledge of everyday life in the first century A.D. (Equivalent to HER-H 419; students may not receive credit for both courses.) PUL=5,1,2
  • CLAS-C 210 Medical Terminology from Latin and Greek Roots (2-3 cr.) Provides students with (a) basic vocabulary of some 1,000 words and (b) understanding of formation of compounds, to enable students to build working vocabulary of several thousand words. Designed for students intending to specialize in medicine, nursing, dentistry, health sciences, microbiology, or related fields. PUL=1A
  • CLAS-C 213 Sport and Competition in the Ancient World (3 cr.) An introduction to athletics in Greek and Roman societies and the Classical World. With historical and comparative analysis of ancient literature, art, architecture, and other material artifacts, C213 studies the origins and developments of classical competitions of strength, speed, stamina, and skill within the contexts of ancient Mediterranean cultures, and draws connection to modern competition. PUL = 5
Courses in Latin
  • CLAS-L 131 Beginning Latin I (4 cr.) Fundamentals of the language; develops direct reading comprehension of Latin. PUL=1A,5
  • CLAS-L 132 Beginning Latin II (4 cr.) P: CLAS-L 131 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). Fundamentals of the language; develops direct reading comprehension of Latin. PUL=1A,5
  • CLAS-L 200 Second-Year Latin I (3 cr.) P: CLAS-L 132 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). Reading from select authors, emphasizing the variety of Latin prose. Examination of the concept of genre. Grammar review and/or prose composition. PUL=1A,5
  • CLAS-L 250 Second-Year Latin II (3 cr.) P: CLAS-L 200 or placement (please email Program Director or wlac@iupui.edu). Reading from Virgil's Aeneid with examination of the epic as a whole. Prosody of dactylic hexameter and study of poetic devices. Grammar review. PUL=1A,5
  • CLAS-L 495 Individual Reading in Latin (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of department. PUL=1A,5 May be repeated once for credit.
French (FREN)
Courses for Graduate Reading Knowledge
  • FREN-F 491 Elementary French for Graduate Students (3 cr.) Introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Open with consent of instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Credit not given for both F491 and any French course at the 100 level. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 492 Readings in French for Graduate Students (3 cr.) P: F491 or consent of instructor. Credit not given for both F492 and any French course at the 100 or 200 level. PUL=1A,5
Undergraduate Courses
  • FREN-F 410 French Literature of the Middle Ages (3 cr.) P: F300 or consent of department. Introduction to Old French language and literature. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 428 Seventeenth-Century French Literature (3 cr.) P: F300 or consent of department. Classical writers of prose, poetry, and plays such as Descartes, Pascal, Corneille, Moliere, La Fontaine, Racine, Mme de Lafayette. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 443 Nineteenth-Century Novel I (3 cr.) P: F300 or consent of department. Stendhal, Balzac, and others. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 444 Nineteenth-Century Novel II (3 cr.) P: F300 or consent of department. Flaubert, Zola, and others. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 496 Study of French Abroad (3-8 cr.) P: consent of chairperson. Course involves planning for research project during year preceding study abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by end of semester following foreign study. May be taken once only. Does not count as a 400-level course in residence for major or minor. PUL=1A,5; RISE-I
  • FREN-F 299 Special Credit in French (3-6 cr.) Nonnative speakers of French may receive a maximum of 6 hours of special credit at the 200 level upon completion of F328 with a grade of C or higher. French or Francophone students may receive a maximum of 6 credit hours at the 200 level upon completion of F328 with a grade of C or higher and one other upper-division French course. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 131 First-Year French I (4 cr.) Introductory language courses. This is the first course for beginning students of French with no experience in the language with emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills, as well as awareness of French and Francophone cultures. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students/. Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses as a greatly reduced fee. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 132 First-Year French II (4 cr.) P: FREN-F 131, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. This is the second course for beginning students of French and follows FREN-F 131 with emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills, as well as awareness of French and Francophone cultures. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students/. Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses at a greatly reduce fee. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 203 Second-Year Composition, Conversation, and Reading I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 132, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. This is the third course in the French-language sequence and follows F132. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students. PUL=1A,5 Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses at a greatly reduce fee. This course is offered every fall only in the classroom and every spring only as an online course.
  • FREN-F 204 Second-Year Composition, Conversation, and Reading II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 203, placement test results, or by authorization of the Program. This is the fourth course in the French-language sequence and follows F203. This course is not open to native speakers of French. If you have previous experience learning French, please take the placement exam: http://tc.iupui.edu/testing/students. PUL=1A,5 Placing into and successfully completing language courses above the FREN-F 131 level (FREN-F 132 or above) may allow you to request special credits for the skipped courses at a greatly reduce fee. FREN-F 204 is offered every spring only in the classroom and every fall only as an online course.
  • FREN-F 296 Study of French Abroad (1-6 cr.) P: acceptance in an overseas study program in France. Credit for foreign study in French language and/or literature done at second-year level when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. Does not count towards the major. PUL=1A,5; Rise-I
  • FREN-F 300 Lectures et analyses littéraires (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Preparation for more advanced work in French literature. Readings and discussion of one play, one novel, short stories, and poems, as well as the principles of literary criticism and "explication de texte." PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 307 Masterpieces of French Literature (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Includes material from both classical and modern periods. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 326 French in the Business World (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Introduction to the language and customs of the French-speaking business world. Designed to help prepare students to take the examination for the "Certificat pratique de francais commercial et conomique" offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 328 Advanced French Grammar and Composition (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent or by authorization of the program Study and practice of French thinking and writing patterns. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 330 Introduction to Translating French and English (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. A comparative study of the style and grammar of both languages, with focus on the difficulties involved in translating. Introduction to the various tools of the art of translation. PUL=1A,2
  • FREN-F 331 French Pronunciation and Diction (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Thorough study of French phonetics and intonation patterns. Corrective drill. Includes intensive class and laboratory work. Oral interpretation of texts. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 360 Introduction socio-culturelle à la France (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. A study of France and its people through an examination of France's political and cultural development. PUL=5,1A
  • FREN-F 371 Topics in French (3 cr.) Topics in French literature and culture will be explored from a variety of perspectives. The course will be given in English. Does not count towards the major. PUL=2,5 May be taken twice for credit if topic differs.
  • FREN-F 380 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Designed to develop conversational skills through reports, debates, and group discussions with an emphasis on vocabulary building, mastery of syntax, and general oral expression.  PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 396 Study of French Abroad (1-6 cr.) P: Acceptance in an overseas study program in France. Credit for foreign study in French language or literature when no specific equivalent is available among departmental offerings. PUL=1A,5; Rise-I. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • FREN-F 402 Introduction to French Linguistics (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Introduction to the structure of the French language: phonology, morphology, and syntax. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 421 Fourth-Year French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Advanced work in language with a focus on syntax. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 423 Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Advanced course in translation. The problems and techniques of translating French/ English and English/French using a variety of texts and concentrating on the use of various stylistic devices. PUL=1A,2
  • FREN-F 430 Modern Short Narratives (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Structural and interdisciplinary approaches to short French narratives of the modern period, eighteenth-century fiction (short stories, tales, etc.), and nonfiction (essays, commentaries, etc.). PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 450 Colloquium in French Studies (2-3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Emphasis is on topic, author, or genre. PUL=2,1A,5
  • FREN-F 451 Le francais des affaires (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Investigates in depth some of the topics touched on in FREN-F 326. Designed to help prepare students to take the examination for the Diplome francais profesionnel by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 452 La civilisation et littérature québécoises (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. The study of the history of French Canadian literature and civilization from its origins down to the present, leading to the "Quiet Revolution" as seen through the contemporary poetry, novels, and drama of Quebec. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 453 Littérature contemporaine I (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Twentieth-century French literature. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 454 Littérature contemporaine II (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Twentieth-century French literature. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 460 French Fiction in Film (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Involves reading works of French fiction and studying them as works of literature, followed by the viewing of a film version of each work and the preparation of a comparative analysis of the two versions. PUL=2,1A
  • FREN-F 461 La France Contemporaine (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. France since 1945: political, social, economic, and cultural aspects. PUL=5,1A
  • FREN-F 480 French Conversation (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 328, FREN-F 330 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Designed to develop conversational skills through intensive controlled conversation with an emphasis on the use of linguistic devices and the mastery of oral expression. Both FREN-F 380 and FREN-F 480 may be taken for credit. PUL=1A,5
  • FREN-F 493 Internship in French (3 cr.) P: Senior standing or consent of internship director. A field experience in the applied use of French in a professional workplace environment. Previous course work and experience are integrated in a practical application locally or in a French-speaking country. Directed readings, journal, reports, final project. PUL=4,2,5
  • FREN-F 495 Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. For majors only. PUL=5,2
  • FREN-F 497 Capstone in French (1-3 cr.) P: Authorization of the Program. A senior level summative experience for French majors that integrates students' undergraduate study in the discipline. Students showcase academic progress through a capstone portfolio, a reflective journal, discussions with a faculty capstone director, and by a final presentation to students and faculty. PUL=3,2
  • FREN-F 391 Studies in French Cinema (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. This course explores the complex interplay between French literature and film adaptations through the analysis of selected novels and short stories in relation to film versions of the same. PUL-1A,2
  • FREN-F 336 Structure of French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. This course will introduce major themes in linguistics, the scientific study of language. Topics to be covered include the development and spread of human language and the acquisition of native languages during childhood as well as a brief overview of each branch of linguistics: phonetics (sounds), morphology (words), syntax (phrases), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (interpretation), with a focus on the French language. This course is taught in French. PUL=1A,2,5
  • FREN-F 350 Structure of French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. Emphasis in this class is on a topic, author or genre within francophone studies. Class is taught in French. PUL=1A,5,6
  • FREN-F 334 French for the Medical and Technical World (3 cr.) This course addresses the French language and francophone cultural specifics for communicating in medical and technical settings. The objectives of this class are to provide vocabulary in the domain of the health-related fields in contextualized situations while reviewing the basics of French grammar. Students are to achieve an advanced level of proficiency in the target language in both production and receptive skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) as well as to gain awareness of the range of health care and technology issues as related to the francophone patient. Class taught in French. PUL=1A,2
  • FREN-F 434 Advanced French for the Medical and Technical World (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. This course addresses the French language and francophone cultural specifics for communicating in medical and technical settings. The objectives of this class are to provide vocabulary in the domain of the health-related fields in contextualized situations while reviewing the basics of French grammar. Students are to achieve an advanced level of proficiency in the target language in both production and receptive skills (speaking, writing, listening, reading) as well as to gain awareness of the range of health care and technology issues as related to the francophone patient. Course taught in French. PUL=1A,2
  • FREN-F 352 Structure of French (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204. This course invites post-intermediate students of French to improve their language skills while exploring the complex history and culture of Quebec. Drawing on cultural products from the earliest days of exploration to the present day, this course introduces students to an array of texts that sample Quebecois literature, popular culture, art, music, and politics. The interdisciplinary approach will challenge students to improve their French language skills while learning about one of our closest French-speaking neighbors: Quebec. Readings for the course are thematically organized to delve into issues central to understanding the many facets of contemporary Quebecois identity, while prompting students to search for a range of materials online. Class taught in French. PUL=5,1A,6
  • FREN-F 315 FRENCH CONVERSATN & DICTION 1 (3 cr.) P: FREN-F 204 or equivalent, or by authorization of the Program. Combined lectures on problems of pronunciation and phonetic transcription, and oral practice sessions. PUL=1A, 5
Graduate Courses
  • FREN-F 507 Foreign Language Institute (1-6 cr.) Intensive interdepartmental course involving work or literature in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), language practice, and discussions and demonstrations of important developments and concepts in methodology. Intended primarily for Master of Arts for Teachers degree students and for prospective high school teachers.
  • FREN-F 575 Introduction to French Linguistics (3 cr.) An introduction to phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures of French, and to recent linguistic developments.
  • FREN-F 580 Applied French Linguistics (3 cr.) Evaluation of language teaching methods according to recent claims in learning theory.
  • FREN-F 528 Comparative Stylistics and Translation (3 cr.) This is an introductory course to the practice and evaluation of translation. Students will get hands-on experience with many different text types from a variety of areas and professions and develop skills to translate them into both English and French. At the same time, students will have the opportunity to discuss some of the theoretical and professional issues involved in translation as a profession.
  • FREN-F 529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • FREN-F 530 Specialized Translation II (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and resources for the translation of technical, scientific and medical documents, as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
German (GER)
International Study or Work Internship Option
  • GER-G 493 Internship in German (1-6 cr.) P: consent of program director

    PUL=4,1A; RISE=RSIL(0x) / RSEL(0x)

  • GER-G 498 Individual Studies in German (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of Program Director 1-6 credit hours toward the major in German may be earned through individual study or international work internship abroad or locally. There is a 3 credit limit for one individual study or work project. PUL = 2, RISE=RSRE(0x)
Undergraduate Courses
  • GER-G 492 Elementary German for Graduate Students II (0 cr.) These courses are taught concurrently with G095-G096 and prepare students for the German reading proficiency exam. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 491 Elementary German for Graduate Students I (0 cr.) These courses are taught concurrently with G095-G096 and prepare students for the German reading proficiency exam. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 134 Introductory German for Business I (3 cr.) Introductory courses for students and professionals in business and engineering who need basic communicative skills for the workplace. In addition to the four basic language skills, intercultural communication and basic technical, business, and scientific vocabulary are introduced. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 135 Introductory German for Business II (3 cr.) Introductory courses for students and professionals in business and engineering who need basic communicative skills for the workplace. In addition to the four basic language skills, intercultural communication and basic technical, business, and scientific vocabulary are introduced. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 383 Nineteenth-Century German Literature in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Works and writers of German literature, 1830–1900. Analysis of such concepts as realism, naturalism, and neoromanticism, their theories and styles; exemplary writers such as Buechner, Heine, Nietzsche, Hauptmann, and others. Offered in English. PUL=2,5
  • GER-G 384 Twentieth-Century German Literature in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, with emphasis on Rilke, Thomas Mann, Kafka, and Brecht. Offered in English. PUL=2,5
  • GER-G 299 German for Advanced Credit (3 or 6 cr.) Nonnative speakers of German may receive a maximum of 6 hours of advanced credit with the grade of “S” upon completion of G300 or higher with a grade of C or higher. Native speakers of German may receive a maximum of 6 advanced credits upon completion of two German courses at the 300-400 level with the grade of C or higher. A student who skips a sequential course (e.g., G203 or G204) may receive 3 advanced credits upon successful completion of a higher-level course. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 95 German for Reading Proficiency I (3 cr.) These courses stress mastery of passive vocabulary and recognition of grammatical forms needed for reading skills. Designed for students in science, technology, the professional schools, and for those desiring sufficient proficiency in reading and translating German to enable them to work with German materials in their fields. These courses do not fulfill the foreign language requirement of the School of Liberal Arts. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 96 German for Reading Proficiency II (3 cr.) These courses stress mastery of passive vocabulary and recognition of grammatical forms needed for reading skills. Designed for students in science, technology, the professional schools, and for those desiring sufficient proficiency in reading and translating German to enable them to work with German materials in their fields. These courses do not fulfill the foreign language requirement of the School of Liberal Arts. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 381 German Literature to 1750 in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature in the medieval, Reformation, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Offered in English. PUL=2,5
  • GER-G 382 Classicism and Romanticism in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Major works and writers of German literature, 1750–1830, to include the periods of the Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Classicism, and Romanticism; representative writers such as Schiller, Goethe, Kleist, and the Grimm brothers. Offered in English. PUL=2,5
  • GER-G 131 First-Year German I (4 cr.) Introduction to present-day German and selected aspects of German life. Intensive drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 132 First-Year German II (4 cr.) Continuation of introduction to present-day German and selected aspects of German life. Intensive drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 203 Second-Year German I (3 cr.) P: GER-G 132, or equivalent or placement by testing. Intensive review of grammar. Further development of oral and written use of the language. Selections from contemporary German readings and media. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 204 Second-Year German II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 203 or equivalent or placement by testing. Review of grammar. Readings of modern German with stress on discussion in German. Writing of descriptive and expository prose. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 265 German Culture in English Translation (3 cr.) A survey of the cultural history of German-speaking countries, as well as of contemporary civilization, with an emphasis on individual aspects of culture traced through several epochs. PUL=5,2
  • GER-G 303 Deutsch: Mittelstufe I (3 cr.) P: GER-G 230 or equivalent or placement by testing. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in GER-G 117 through GER-G 230. Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignments of literary and nonliterary texts. Conducted in German. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 304 Deutsch: Mittelstufe II (3 cr.) P: GER-G 303 or equivalent. Advanced oral and written communication. Study of selected advanced grammatical topics. Reading of primarily nonliterary texts. Conducted in German. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 331 Business German I (3 cr.) P: Third-year language proficiency or consent of instructor. Emphasis on acquisition and use of business vocabulary, idiom, and style. Translating, reading, and writing skills are developed using constructions common to business German, as well as current materials (reports, journals) in the field. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 333 German Translation Practice (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. Introduction to the theory and practice of translation. Discussion of techniques and stylistic approaches. Emphasis on German/English translation using a variety of texts, including technical texts, business communication, and texts on current topics. PUL=1A,2
  • GER-G 340 German Language and Society Past and Present (3 cr.) P: GER-G 203 or equivalent or consent of instructor Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in G100 through G250. Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignment of short literary texts and one novel or play. Conducted in German. PUL=5,1A
  • GER-G 355 Theater Spielen (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. This combined reading, discussion, pronunciation, and performance course provides an applied introduction to contemporary German theater and drama, along with intensive practice of oral language skills. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 365 Deutsche Kultur Heute (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or consent of instructor. A critical investigation of contemporary culture in the German-speaking countries, including institutions and major personalities, customs, traditions, changing mentalities, and lifestyles as they compare with contemporary U.S. culture. Taught in German. PUL=5,1A
  • GER-G 370 German Cinema (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production. Offered in English concurrently with GER-G 371. No credit given towards German major. PUL=2,5
  • GER-G 371 Der deutsche Film (3 cr.) P: Third-year proficiency or equivalent. Survey of German cinema from the films of expressionism and the Weimar Republic through the Nazi period to the present. Emphasis on film as a form of narrative art and on the social and historical conditions of German film production. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 391 German Colloquium in English Translation (3 cr.) No knowledge of German required. May be taken as an elective by other students. Emphasis on one topic, author, or genre in German literature, or other aspect of German culture. No credit given toward German major. PUL=5,2
  • GER-G 401 Deutsche Kultur in Amerika (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Advanced undergraduate course. Provides an overview of the cultural heritage of German-Americans and assists students in researching German heritage with a view toward developing research skills with original materials. The course is in a seminar format with students actively participating in discussions and presentations. Taught in German. PUL=5,1A,2
  • GER-G 407 Knights, God, and the Devil (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the development of early German cultural life by reading and analyzing texts of the periods covered. Lecture materials cover historical and cultural background. Period texts are placed in contexts of other cultural phenomena, including art and music. As much reference as possible is made to the European context of the emerging German literacy language. Taught in German. PUL=5,1A,2; RISE=RSRE(0x)
  • GER-G 408 Love, Nature, and the Age of Romanticism (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the cultural capital of courtly Germany, Weimar, and its relationship to German Romanticism, including readings and discussions of works by Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Tieck, and the Grimm brothers. Literary examples are accompanied by pictorial, filmic, and musical illustrations. Taught in German. PUL=5,1A,2; RISE=RSRE(0x)
  • GER-G 409 German Myths, Fairy Tales and Social Transformation (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Survey of literary representations of nineteenth-century German life at a time of change from rural to urban transformation. Text selection includes a variety of shorter forms: fairy tales, short stories, novella, satire and drama. Taught in German. PUL=5,1A,2; RISE=RSRE(0x)
  • GER-G 410 20. Jahrhundert: Kultur und Literatur (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Survey of cultural and intellectual life of the German-speaking countries of the twentieth century through the reading of exemplary literary works. Discussion of literary movements from the turn of the century until the present. Texts are analyzed within the context of other cultural phenomena, including film and music. Conducted in German. PUL=5,1A,2; RISE=RSRE(0x)
  • GER-G 423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Advanced course in German-English translation providing intensive translation practice in many text categories: commercial and economic translations, scientific, technical, political, and legal texts. Applied work combined with study of theory and methodology of translation, comparative structural and stylistical analysis, and evaluation of sample translations. Use of computer-assisted translation management. PUL=5,1A
  • GER-G 431 Advanced Business German (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Focus is on the contemporary business idiom and current economic issues facing Germany. Active practice of specialized business language, both for oral and written communication. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 445 Oberstufe: Grammatik (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. Survey and practice of complex grammatical structures; systematic expansion of vocabulary. Discussion and writing based on current materials, such as newspapers, films, and radio programs. PUL=1A,5
  • GER-G 465 Structure of German (3 cr.) P: GER-G 300 or consent of instructor. The course introduces students to the core disciplines of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, and semantics. While the approach is generally a cross-linguistic one, special emphasis is placed on examples from German. PUL=2,1A
  • GER-G 490 Das deutsche Kolloquium (3 cr.) P: Fourth-year German language proficiency or consent of instructor. Concentration on a specific topic, genre, or author in German literature, film, or other aspect of culture. PUL=5,1A,2
  • GER-G 493 Internship in German (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of program director. A field experience in the applied use of German in a professional work place environment. Previous course work and language knowledge are integrated in professional application locally and/or in a German-speaking country. Directed journal, report, final investigative project. Minimal length of internship linked to weekly work schedule.  PUL=4,1A; RISE=RSIL(0x) / RSEL(0x)
  • GER-G 498 Individual Studies in German (1-6 cr.) P: Consent of program director. 1-6 credit hours toward the major in German may be earned through individual study or international work internship abroad or locally. There is a 3 credit limit for one individual study or work project. PUL=2,1A; RISE=RSRE(0x)
  • GER-G 300 Fifth Semester German (3 cr.) P: GER-G 204 or placment. Comprehensive review of grammatical points introduced in G100 through G250. Reading proficiency, systematic vocabulary building, composition, and discussion through the assignment of short literary texts and one novel or play. Conducted in German. PUL=1A,5
Graduate Courses
  • GER-G 507 Foreign Language Institute (1-6 cr.) Intensive interdepartmental course involving language laboratory and other audiovisual equipment and techniques, lecture, assignments in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), and discussions of classroom use of applied linguistics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GER-G 563 German Culture Studies I (3 cr.) The formation of cultural traditions in the German-speaking countries prior to the twentieth century.
  • GER-G 564 German Culture Studies II (3 cr.) Culture of the German-speaking countries in the twentieth century.
  • GER-V 605 Selected Topics in German Studies (1-3; 9 max. cr.) Selected Topics in German Studies.
  • GER-G 528 Comparative Stylistics and Translation (3 cr.) This is an introductory course to the practice and evaluation of translation. Students will get experience with many different text types from a variety of areas and professions and develop skills to translate them into both English and German. Discussion of the theoretical and professional issues involved in translation as a profession.
  • GER-G 529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • GER-G 530 Specialized Translation II (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) This class provides an overview of the methods and resources for the translation of technical, scientific, and medical documents, as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • GER-G 551 Structure of Modern German (3 cr.) Taught concurrently with GER G465.  Systematic development of writing and speaking skills, proceeding from exercises to specific forms, such as Brief, Aufsatz, Referat, Vortrag. Focus on usage and style.
Italian (ITAL)
  • ITAL-M 131 Basic Italian I (4 cr.) Introductory language course in contemporary Italian. Focus on grammar, reading, conversation, elementary writing, and culture. PUL=1A,5
  • ITAL-M 200 Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.) P: ITAL-M 132 or equivalent. Intermediate study of contemporary Italian conversation, grammar, reading, and writing. Introduction to brief literary texts. PUL=1A, 5
  • ITAL-M 132 Beginning Italian 2 (4 cr.) P: ITAL-M 131 or equivalent. Continuation of introductory language course in contemporary Italian. Focus on grammar, reading, conversation, elementary writing, and culture. PUL=1A, 5
  • ITAL-M 250 Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.) P: ITAL-M 200 or equivalent. Continuation of intermediate study of contemporary Italian conversation, grammar, reading, and writing. Introduction to brief literary texts. PUL=1A, 5
Japanese Studies (EALC-J)
  • EALC-J 393 Japanese Literature in Translation I (3 cr.) Survey of the classical genres of Japanese literature. I: Ancient period to end of Momoyama. II: Tokugawa and modern periods. PUL=2,5
  • EALC-J 131 Beginning Japanese I (4 cr.) Introductory language courses designed for students who have not had any prior training in Japanese. Drills for basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 132 Beginning Japanese II (4 cr.) P: EALC-J 131 or equivalent. Introductory language courses designed for students who have not had any prior training in Japanese. Drills for basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 201 Second-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 132 or equivalent. A continuation of practice in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 202 Second-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 201 or equivalent. A continuation of practice in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing of Japanese. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 301 Third-Year Japanese I (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second years of Japanese. More advanced level of speaking, reading, writing, and listening proficiency. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 302 Third-Year Japanese II (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 201-EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Review of grammatical points acquired in the first and second years of Japanese. More advanced level of speaking, reading, writing, and listening proficiency. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 310 Japanese Conversation (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Designed to develop conversational skills through controlled linguistic patterns, reports, and group discussion. More advanced level of oral communication. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 330 Business Japanese (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 202 or equivalent. Emphasis on acquisition and use of business vocabulary, idiom, and style. Oral practice is emphasized. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 394 Japanese Literature in Translation II (3 cr.) Survey of the classical genres of Japanese literature. I: Ancient period to end of Momoyama. II: Tokugawa and modern periods. PUL=2,5
  • EALC-J 401 Fourth-Year Japanese (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 302 or equivalent. Advanced level of communications skills in speaking and writing. Study of advanced grammar and reading of newspaper articles. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 402 Fourth-Year Japanese (3 cr.) P: EALC-J 401 or equivalent. Advanced level of communications skills in speaking and writing. Study of advanced grammar and reading of newspaper articles. PUL=1A,5
  • EALC-J 498 Individual Studies in Japanese (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of the program director. PUL=5,2. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • EALC-E 231 Japan: The Living Tradition (3 cr.) An introduction to the patterns of Japanese culture: society, history, visual arts, literary masterpieces, performing arts, and living religious traditions. PUL=5,2
  • EALC-E 351 Studies in East Asian Culture (3-6 cr.) Selected issues and problems of importance to the understanding of East Asian culture, taught within one of the humanistic disciplines. PUL = 1A. May be repeated once for credit.
  • EALC-E 472 Modern Japanese Fiction (3 cr.) The novels, short stories, and theories of fiction of prominent Japanese writers of the modern period. PUL=2,5
Spanish (SPAN)
Courses in Literature in Translation
  • SPAN-S 231 Spanish-American Fiction in Translation (3 cr.) Representative prose fiction of Spanish America. Background lectures on the evolution of the short story and novel. Readings and discussions will concentrate on the fiction of the twentieth century. PUL=2,5
  • SPAN-S 240 Modern Spanish Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Readings from authors such as Unamuno, Cela, García Lorca, Jiménez, Pérez de Ayala, and Ortega y Gasset. PUL=2,5
  • SPAN-S 230 Cervantes’ Don Quixote in Translation (3 cr.) Detailed textual analysis of Cervantes’ masterpiece, with readings and class discussion on its relationship to the Renaissance and the development of the world novel. PUL=2,5
  • SPAN-S 241 Golden Age Literature in Translation (3 cr.) Masterpieces of Spanish literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Representative authors will include: Lope de Vega, Cervantes, Garcilaso, Quevedo, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, and Góngora. PUL=2,5
Undergraduate Courses
  • SPAN-S 431 Survey of Spanish Poetry I (3 cr.) P: S313 or equivalent, and S360, or consent of instructor. Spanish poetry from its beginnings to contemporary times. Works of medieval, Renaissance, romantic, and contemporary roots. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 432 Survey of Spanish Poetry II (3 cr.) P: S313 or equivalent, and S360, or consent of instructor. Spanish poetry from its beginnings to contemporary times. Works of medieval, Renaissance, romantic, and contemporary roots. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 457 Modern Spanish Novel I (3 cr.) P: S313 or equivalent, and S360, or consent of instructor. Reading of representative nineteenth- and twentieth-century novels and study of development of the novel. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 491 Elementary Spanish for Graduate Students (3 graduate; 4 undergraduate cr.) Introduction to the structure of the language necessary for reading in graded texts of a general nature. Open with consent of instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 461 Contemporary Spanish Literature I (3 cr.) P: S313 or equivalent, and S360, or consent of instructor. Selected twentieth-century novels, plays, and essays. Historical background and literary movements. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 455 Modern Spanish Drama I (3 cr.) P: S313 or equivalent, and S360, or consent of instructor. Selected readings from the works of representative authors of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, with lectures on the development of the Spanish theater. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 298 Second-Year Spanish (3 or 6 cr.) Non-native speakers may receive a maximum of 14 credits by completing a 300-level course with a C or higher (S298 plus 8 hours at the 100 level). Native speakers of Spanish are eligible for a maximum of 6 hours of “S” credit (S298) upon completion of S313 with a C or higher. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 410 The Acquisition of Spanish (3 cr.) P: S326 or equivalent Examines current topics in the acquisition of Spanish. Provides an introduction to research on the first and/or second language acquisition of Spanish and to the pedagogical applications of these findings. Students develop a background in these fields and have opportunities to link theory and practice.
  • SPAN-S 409 Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) P: S326 or equivalent

    Topics include sociolinguistic and phonological and syntactic variation, field methods, discourse analysis, language and power, language ideology, language attitudes, languages in contact, language and gender, language and the law, bilingualism, linguistic politeness, and speech act theory.

  • SPAN-S 330 Studies in Hispanic Cultures (3 cr.) P: Students should have advanced-level reading and writing skills in English; ENG-W 131.

    Introduction to the varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking peoples to English-speaking students. Focus on belief and knowledge systems, the customs and other socio-cultural behaviors, and the artistic and cultural products that characterize the Spanish-speaking peoples of the world. Taught in English; credit not applicable to the Spanish major or minor. PUL=5,2

  • SPAN-S 131 First-Year Spanish I (4 cr.) Introductory language sequence of courses. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills as well as awareness of Hispanic cultures. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 132 First-Year Spanish II (4 cr.) P: SPAN-S 131, or transfer equivalent, or placement by testing. Continuation introductory language sequence of courses. Emphasis on developing basic speaking, writing, listening, and reading skills as well as awareness of Hispanic cultures. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 142 Beginning Spanish for Law Enforcement I (3 or 4 cr.) Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of law enforcement personnel. Service-learning component available. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 143 Beginning Spanish for Law Enforcement II (3 or 4 cr.) P: SPAN-S 142. Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of law enforcement personnel. Service-learning component available. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 160 Beginning Spanish for Health Care Personnel I (3 cr.) Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of health care personnel. Service-learning component available. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 161 Beginning Spanish for Health Care Personnel II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 160. Beginning language instruction in Spanish with an emphasis on the communicative needs of health care personnel. Service-learning component available. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 203 Second-Year Spanish I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 132, or 8-10 credit hours of college-level Spanish or placement by testing. A continuation of training in the four skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 204 Second-Year Spanish II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 203 or 10-14 credit hours of college-level Spanish or placement by testing. Continuation of SPAN-S 203. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. This course is designed to integrate the four basic language skills into a review of the major points of Spanish grammar. Course work will combine grammar exercises with brief controlled compositions based on reading assignments and class discussion in Spanish. PUL=1A,2
  • SPAN-S 313 Writing Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Not open to heritage or native speakers of Spanish. Students are strongly encouraged to have already successfully completed ENG-W 131 before enrolling in SPAN-S 313. Grammar review, composition, and themes in Spanish with a focus on the development of academic writing skills. PUL=1A,2
  • SPAN-S 315 Spanish in the Business World (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Introduction to the technical language of the business world with emphasis on problems of style, composition, and translation in the context of Hispanic mores. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. Not open to heritage or native speakers of Spanish. Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions, with emphasis on vocabulary usage, word order, tense relationships, and linguistic devices. Class time is the same as for a 4 credit hour course. PUL=1A,5; RISE=SL03 May be repeated once for credit.
  • SPAN-S 319 Spanish for Health Care Personnel (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 or equivalent. A course designed specifically for those interested in learning Spanish in the context of material related to health care systems. Emphasis placed on vocabulary necessary for communicative competence in the medical fields. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 323 Introduction to Translating Spanish and English (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. A comparative study of the style and grammar of both languages with a focus on the difficulties involved in translating. Introduction to the techniques and process of translation through intensive practice. PUL=2,1A,6; RISE=EL02
  • SPAN-S 360 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent. Using fiction, drama, and poetry from both Spain and Latin America, this course introduces strategies to increase reading comprehension and presents terms and concepts useful in developing the critical skills of literary analysis. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 363 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent. Introduction to the cultural history of Spanish-speaking countries with emphasis on its literary, artistic, social, economic, and political aspects. PUL=5,1A; RISE=EL02
  • SPAN-S 407 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. A historical survey that covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from the Spanish Middle Ages through the Baroque period of the seventeenth century. Readings include prose works, poetry, and drama. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 408 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. A historical survey of Spanish literature that covers the main current of Spain's literary history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Readings in prose, poetry, and drama by Larra, Perez Galdes, Unamuno, Garcia Lorca, and other representative writers. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 411 Spain: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 363, or consent of instructor. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spain. PUL=5,1A
  • SPAN-S 412 Spanish America: The Cultural Context (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 363, or consent of instructor. A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spanish America. PUL=5,1A
  • SPAN-S 419 Spanish for Law Enforcement (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Specialized vocabulary necessary for law enforcement professionals in the course of their daily work. Sight and written translation of legal documents, court records, and the language of the courtroom and courtroom procedures. Intensive classroom practice and language laboratory exercises focus on use of specialized vocabulary to help prepare students for communicative competence in this terminology. Information on becoming certified court interpreters and review of federal standards for interpreters. PUL=1A,2
  • SPAN-S 421 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 311 and SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Selected grammar review and intensive practice in effective use of the written language. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 423 The Craft of Translation (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 323, or consent of instructor. Basic introductory course in translation. The problems and techniques of Spanish/English and English/Spanish translation using a variety of texts and concentrating on such critical areas as stylistics, tone, rhythms, imagery, nuance, allusion, etc. PUL=2,1A,6;RISE-E
  • SPAN-S 428 Applied Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326, or consent of instructor. General aspects of Spanish phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics as they bear on teaching. PUL=3,1A
  • SPAN-S 429 Medical Interpreting (3 cr.) P: 300-level Spanish and SPAN-S 319, or consent of instructor. Advanced course for native Spanish speakers or advanced-level students who are considering a career in medical interpreting. Focus on reading, interpreting and translation, as well as intensive practice in interpretation from and into English and Spanish in the health care field. PUL=1A,2
  • SPAN-S 430 Legal Spanish (3 cr.) P: 300-level Spanish or consent of instructor. Advanced course for native speakers of Spanish or advanced students in Spanish who are considering careers in the legal professions. Course begins with general knowledge of legal Spanish and focuses on reading, communicative activities, interpreting, and translation. PUL=1A,2
  • SPAN-S 445 Major Dramatists of the Golden Age I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Lectures outlining the development of the theater during the Golden Age. Readings selected from the works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Juan Ruiz de Alarcon, Calderan. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 450 Cervantes’ Don Quixote I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Intensive reading of Don Quixote, with account of the author's life and thought and discussions of the development of the novel to Cervantes' time. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 470 Women and Hispanic Literature (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. The Hispanic woman within her cultural context through literary texts. Topics such as women authors, characters, themes, and feminist criticism. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 471 Spanish-American Literature I (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Introduction to Spanish-American literature. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 472 Spanish-American Literature II (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Introduction to Spanish-American literature. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 477 Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Prose Fiction (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Close readings of representative novelists and short story writers, including established authors (Borges, Asturias, Arreola, Carpentier) and promising young writers. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 487 Capstone Internship in Spanish (3 cr.) P: Senior standing in Spanish, with authorization. Senior-level option for Spanish majors who must complete a capstone course for the B.A. in Spanish. Students apply the skills gained in undergraduate course work in Spanish to an internship in a professional setting where the use of Spanish is required. Students produce a portfolio, a reflective journal, a written project on the internship, and a final oral presentation. PUL=3,1A
  • SPAN-S 493 Internship Program in Spanish (3 cr.) P: Junior standing with authorization. Open to IUPUI students only. Students work in businesses, organizations, or institutions applying their skills in Spanish in order to gain awareness of the uses of Spanish in the workplace. They record and analyze their experiences through logs and meetings with the internship director and write a research paper. PUL=4,2; RISE=EL02
  • SPAN-S 494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, with authorization. May not be taken for graduate credit. Open to IUPUI majors in Spanish only or students in the Certificate in Translation Studies and Interpreting program. Topic to be selected by the student with the consent of the Director. Topic may not duplicate the content of an already existing course. PUL=5,2
  • SPAN-S 495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Topic to be selected by the faculty member offering the course. PUL=2,1A May be taken twice for credit as long as the topic is different.
  • SPAN-S 496 Foreign Study in Spanish (3-6 cr.) P: Authorization of Director. Planning of a research project during the year preceding the summer abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by the end of the semester following foreign study. PUL=1A,5;RISE-I
  • SPAN-S 498 Capstone Seminar in Spanish (3 cr.) P: Senior standing in Spanish with authorization. Senior-level course for Spanish majors that integrates students’ undergraduate study. Students showcase academic progress through a portfolio, a reflective journal, discussions with the faculty capstone director, and a final presentation to students and faculty. PUL=3,2
  • SPAN-S 326 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent. Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles.  The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax.  Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 425 Spanish Phonetics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 or equivalent. Intensive patterned pronunciation drills and exercises in sound discrimination and transcription, based on detailed articulatory description of standard Spanish of Spain and Latin America. Attendance in language laboratory required. PUL=1A,2
  • SPAN-S 427 The Structure of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 326 or consent of instructor. Introduction to Spanish Syntax. Study of the basic principles to express constituency and syntactic dependencies, as well as the mechanism to account for cross-linguistic and cross-dialectal syntactic variation. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 441 The Acquisition of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 313 or equivalent, and SPAN-S 360, or consent of instructor. Examines current topics in the acquisition of Spanish. Provides an introduction to research on the first and/or second language acquisition of Spanish and to the pedagogical applications of these findings. Students develop a background in these fields and have opportunities to link theory and practice. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 318 Writing Spanish for Heritage Speakers (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 204 (passed with a C or better) or transfer equivalent, or placement by testing. Focus on developing the literacy and writing skills of students who need additional practice and accuracy with standard written Spanish. Designed for native speakers and/or heritage speakers of Spanish. "Native" speakers are students who graduated from a high school in a Spanish-speaking country. "Heritage" speakers are students whose fominant language is English but who have had significant expsure to Spanish at home or in a Spanish-speaking country. This course is specifically required for native speakers who wish to earn special credit (SPAN-S 298) in Spanish. PUL=1A,5
  • SPAN-S 440 Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 or equivalent. Topics include sociolinguistic and phonological and syntactic variation, field methods, discourse analysis, language and power, language ideology, language attitudes, languages in contact, language and gender, language and the law, bilingualism, linguistic politeness, and speech act theory. PUL=2,1A
  • SPAN-S 468 Varieties of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics. This course is an advanced descriptive analysis of the varieties of Spanish spoken around the globe. A detailed analysis of the phonetic, lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of such varieties is provided with an aim to define its different macrodialectal areas, including Spanish in the US and Creole languages. PULs 1, 2, 5
  • SPAN-S 330 Studies in Hispanic Cultures (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131, advanced level reading and writing skills in English Introduction to the varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking peoples to English-speaking students, with a main focus on the belief and knowledge systems, the customs and other socio-cultural behaviors, and the artistic and cultural products of the Spanish-speaking peoples of the world. Taught in English. Credit not applicable to the Spanish major or minor. PUL=2,1A
Graduate Courses
  • SPAN-S 507 Foreign Language Institute (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of instructor. Intended primarily for teachers. Intensive interdepartmental course involving language laboratory and audiovisual equipment and techniques, lecture, assignments in contemporary civilization (in the foreign language), and discussion of classroom use of applied linguistics. Taught only in the summer. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • SPAN-S 513 Introduction to Hispanic Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326, or consent of instructor. Examination of the relationship between language and society in the Spanish-speaking world. Survey of a wide range of topics relevant to Spanish: language as communication, the sociology of language, and linguistic variation. The course is conducted in Spanish.
  • SPAN-S 515 The Acquisition of Spanish as a Second Language (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 and SPAN-S 428, or consent of instructor. Introduction to the acquisition of Spanish as a second language. Survey of selected studies exploring topics that range from the development of second language (Spanish) grammars, to second language production and comprehension, input processing, and the acquisition of pragmatic and sociolinguistic competence.
  • SPAN-S 517 Methods of Teaching College Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 428 or consent of instructor. Course on communicative language teaching. Exploration of the body of research on second language development and the base principles and parameters to guide classroom instruction. Full range of topics from grammar and input to spoken and written language.
  • SPAN-S 518 Studies in Latino and Spanish American Culture (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 412 or consent of instructor. Advanced study of cultural phenomena produced in Latin America and among U.S. Hispanics. Focus on belief systems, artistic production, laws, customs, and other socially determined behaviors. Exploration of topics such as colonization, popular culture, communication, art, religious syncretism, and native indigenous cultures.
  • SPAN-S 519 Practicum in the Teaching of Spanish (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 517 or consent of instructor. Practical application of the teaching methodology explored in SPAN-S 517. Students will undertake teaching projects supervised by a graduate faculty member in Spanish and meet with their mentors to assess their teaching objectives, techniques, materials and outcomes.
  • SPAN-S 521 Spanish Grammar and Linguistics for Teachers I (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Themes and issues in Spanish grammar and Hispanic linguistics selected for their relevance to teaching Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 524.
  • SPAN-S 523 Spanish Literature, Art, and Culture for Teachers I (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Authors, artists, themes, and issues in Spanish literature, visual art, and cultural life selected to enrich the teaching of Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 525.
  • SPAN-S 524 Spanish Grammar and Linguistics for Teachers II (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Themes and issues in Spanish grammar and Hispanic linguistics selected for their relevance to teaching Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 521.
  • SPAN-S 525 Spanish Literature, Art, and Culture for Teachers II (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of graduate director. Authors, artists, themes, and issues in Spanish literature, visual art, and cultural life selected to enrich the teaching of Spanish to nonnative speakers. Pedagogical implications and teaching strategies will be discussed. Content is distinct from that of SPAN-S 523.
  • SPAN-S 528 Translation Practice and Evaluation (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Graduate course in the problems and techniques of Spanish/English and English/Spanish translation. Includes the practical aspects of translation from various texts (literary, technical, scientific, commercial, social) and evaluation of professional translations. Translation theory will be studied.
  • SPAN-S 680 Topics in Contemporary Spanish American Literature (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing in Spanish or consent of instructor. Topics include poetry, drama, short story, novel, and essay.
  • SPAN-S 686 M.A.T. Thesis (2-4 cr.) P: Authorization of graduate director. Students identify a research theme and develop it under the guidance of a director (IUPUI professor) and a co-director (University of Salamanca professor). The topic will be related to the teaching of Spanish language or to the teaching of an aspect of Hispanic literature or culture. Repeatable for up to 6 hours.
  • SPAN-S 511 Spanish Syntactic Analysis (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 326 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the analysis of syntactic data. Focus on developing theoretical apparatus required to account for a range of syntactic phenomena in Spanish.
  • SPAN-S 650 Topics in the Teaching of Spanish (3 cr.) P: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor. Seminar in selected topics related to the teaching of Spanish, such as assessment, teaching materials development, the teaching of specific linguistic skills. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
  • SPAN-S 529 Specialized Translation I (Business/Legal/Governmental) (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 528 or Equivalent or Consent of Program. This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of commercial, economic, financial, legal, and governmental documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • SPAN-S 530 Specialized Translation I (Scientific/Technical/Medical) (3 cr.) P: SPAN-S 528 or Equivalent or Consent of Program. This class provides an overview of the methods and terminology resources for the translation of technical,scientific, and medical documents as well as intensive practice in these areas of translation.
  • SPAN-S 508 Varieties of Spanish (3 cr.) This course is an advanced descriptive analysis of the varieties of Spanish spoken around the globe. A detailed analysis of the phonetic, lexical and morphosyntactic aspects of such varieties is provided with an aim to define its different macrodialectal areas, including Spanish in the US and Creole languages.  
  • SPAN-S 527 Graduate Internship in Spanish (3-6 cr.) P: SPAN-S 517 and consent of instructor. A supervised internship on the application of Spanish studies in educational work settings. Each intern will be assigned a project supervised by a graduate faculty member in Spanish. Interns will complete a portfolio of workplace learning and self-evaluation; they will also be visited by a faculty coordinator and evaluated in writing by their on-site supervisors.
  • SPAN-S 627 Individual Readings in Spanish (3-6 cr.) Enables students to work on a reading project that they initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of a department faculty member in Spanish. Credit hours depend on scope of project.
World Langauges and Cultures (WLAC)
  • WLAC-F 100 Immersion Abroad Experience (1-6 cr.) This course designation applies to interdisciplinary immersion experiences outside of the United States, including language study in a formal academic setting, cultural exposition and immersion, guided tours, and international service learning. Credit hours (1 to 6) are awarded on the basis of duration of program and classroom contact hours but do not fulfill language requirements. PUL=5; RISE-I
  • WLAC-F 200 Cross-Cultural Encounters (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. This course develops intercultural awareness and understanding through comparative study of the relationship between selected texts and their specific cultural context. One theme is examined in literature and other media by a team of experts in a variety of literatures from around the world. PUL=5, 2
  • WLAC-F 350 Introduction to Translation Studies and Interpreting (3 cr.) P: 300-level language competence. This course offers an overview in the history and theory of translation studies and interpreting, beginning practice in translation and interpreting. This course is taught in English but is designed for students who have 300-level competence in languages offered in the department. PUL=2,5
  • WLAC-F 450 Computers in Translation (3 cr.) P: 300-level language class. This course is designed to prepare translators in computer technology as it relates to translation: translations in electronic form, accessing electronic dictionaries, researching on the World Wide Web, terminology management, machine translation, and computer-assisted translation. Taught in English, but designed for students who have competence in languages offered in the department. PUL=3,1C
  • WLAC-F 400 Islam, Gender, and Conflicts (3 cr.) This course investigates cultural and religious differences, as well as women's issues in the Muslim world. PUL=2,5
  • WLAC-F 360 Women and Islam (3 cr.) The course examines the status of women in the main Islamic sources and its historical evolution. It adopts a multidisciplinary approach to study women's role in different regions of the world and the main challenges they faced and still encounter in the present time. PUL=1A,5
  • WLAC-F 550 Introduction to Translation Studies (3 cr.) This course introduces the main issues that have dominated Western translation discourse for two millennia, as well as contemporary trends in Translation Studies that call them into;question. Students will learn to evaluate critically the complex dynamics involved in translation and, in turn, apply this theoretical base to their practice. Class is conducted in English.
  • WLAC-F 560 Computer Assisted Translation & Localization (3 cr.) This course introduces students to the use and applications of computer assisted translation tools (CAT tools) such as terminology management and translation memories. It also provides an introduction to internationalization and localization focusing on the adaptation of software and website contents to other linguistic and cultural environments.
  • WLAC-F 693 Internship in Translation (3 cr.) P: Permission of the Program. Students apply the skills learned in the translation coursework in an intensive work program in the target language, through placement in area of specialization supervised by program faculty member. Students must complete a minimum of 60 hours of work or equivalent. Requirements include a translation portfolio based on work products. Internship will be supervised by a faculty member and an internship supervisor.
  • WLAC-F 694 Final Translation Project (3 cr.) P: Permission of the Program. Students apply the translation and writing skills acquired in the translation coursework to the completion of a larger translation project in chosen field of specialization under the supervision of a faculty project director in their language discipline. The source text of the final translation project will be selected by the student in consultation with the project director. Project evaluation will include a second faculty reviewer. The final translation project should be undertaken in the semester prior to program completion.
American Sign Language (ASL)
  • ASL-I 407 Professional Seminar (2 cr.)

    This course provides for advanced level interpreting students to safely discuss practical work experiences, ethical decision making and professional communication.  Students will engage in self-reflection activities and discussions that will lead them to a better understanding of the complex world of ASL/English interpreting. PUL=3

  • ASL-A 131 Intensive Beginning American Sign Language (4 cr.) First course in the introductory sequence of language courses. Emphasis on developing basic conversational skills as well as awareness of Deaf culture. PUL=1A,5
  • ASL-A 132 Intensive Beginning American Sign Language II (4 cr.) P: ASL-A 131 or placement. Second course in the introductory sequence of language courses. Emphasis on developing basic conversational skills as well as awareness of Deaf culture. PUL=1A,5
  • ASL-I 301 Introduction to Interpreting (3 cr.) This course is for ASL/EI Majors and ASL Minors. Provides an overview of the field of ASL/English interpreting. Emphasis is on exploring a progression of philosophical frames in the development of the profession; exploring models of the interpreting process and identifying requisite responsibilities, skills, and aptitudes for interpreters. PUL=6
  • ASL-I 305 Text Analysis (3 cr.) This course provides students with an introduction to cognitive processing, theories of translation, and models of interpretation. Students will engage in a variety of lab activities designed to isolate various cognitive processes in order to increase student's ability to focus, concentrate, and analyze a variety of texts. Components of translation will be discussed and practiced in both English and ASL. Students will learn various models of translation and text analysis in order to prepare them for the upcoming interpreting courses. PUL=2
  • ASL-I 361 Theory and Process of Interpreting I (3 cr.) P: Director’s permission. This is the first course in the professional skills preparation for interpreting. Students begin by analyzing texts for purpose, audience, linguistic features, and discourse structure. Students are taught discourse mapping and retelling texts in the same language. As students learn to analyze, they also learn how to evaluate adequate renditions. PUL=5
  • ASL-I 363 Theory and Process of Interpreting II (3 cr.) P: Director’s permission. This is the second interpreting course that prepares students for the analytical skills needed to interpret. In this course, students continue their practice with inter-lingual mapping exercises. The greatest change is from an unlimited to a limited time for preparation and production of texts. PUL=4; RISE=S
  • ASL-I 365 Theory and Process of Interpreting III (3 cr.) P: Director’s permission. This is the third and final course to prepare student to do simultaneous interpreting. In this course, students continue with mapping exercises, working towards interpreting unfamiliar texts, and evaluating interpretations. The greatest challenge is eliminating pausing. PUL=4;
  • ASL-I 405 Practicum (3 cr.) Students must be registered in ASL/EI Program and have program approval from director. An extensive practicum experience. Students will be placed at sites to experience several interpreting settings during the 15-week course. Students will be required to maintain a journal of their experiences and to meet with onsite practicum mentors and program faculty regularly throughout the course. PUL=3; RISE=S
  • ASL-L 340 Interpreting Discourse: ASL to English (3 cr.) This course focuses on the analysis of language use in different genres of spoken English so that interpreting students become explicitly aware of everyday language. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze features of conversations, lectures, explanations, interviews, descriptions, and other types of speech genres while reading and discussing theoretical notions underlying language use in English. PUL=2
  • ASL-L 342 Interpreting Discourse: English to ASL (3 cr.) This course continues the introduction to discourse analysis, focusing on discourse in American Sign Language (ASL). Topics will include general discourse issues such as approaches to analysis, natural data analysis, technology for research in signed languages, and topics specific to ASL, including transcription in ASL, use of space and spatial mapping, involvement strategies, discourse structures and genres, cohesion and coherence, framing, and interaction strategies. One ongoing issue throughout the course will be the relevance to interpreting. PUL=2
  • ASL-A 211 Second Year American Sign Language I (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 132 or placement. First course in the second year sequence of language courses designed for students who have completed ASL-A131 and ASL-A 132. Emphasis is on expansion of grammar, syntax, sentence structure, and vocabulary development, as well as continuation of Deaf Culture studies. PUL=1A,5
  • ASL-A 212 Second Year American Sign Language II (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 211 or placement. Second course in the second year sequence of language courses designed for students who have completed ASL-A 211. Emphasis is on the narrative, receptive, and expressive skill development and continuation of Deaf Culture studies. PUL=1A,5
  • ASL-A 215 Advanced Fingerspell & Number Use in ASL (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 212 or placement. An advanced class in expressive and receptive fingerspelling and in the numbering systems of American Sign Language. Emphasis is on clarity and accuracy through intensive practice in comprehension and production. PUL=1A
  • ASL-A 219 History and Culture of the American Deaf Community (3 cr.) Students are introduced to American Deaf culture and components of the American Deaf community including history, norms, rules of social interactions, values, traditions, and dynamics. Educational, social and political factors unique to the Deaf community will be explored, as well as community organizations, the impact of technology, and emerging issues/trends. PUL=5
  • ASL-A 311 Third Year American Sign Language I (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 212 or placement. First course in the third year sequence of language courses designed for students who have completed ASL-A 211 and ASL-A 212. Emphasis is on expansion of grammar, syntax, sentence structure, and vocabulary development. PUL=1A,5
  • ASL-A 312 Third Year American Sign Language II (3 cr.) P: ASL-A 311 or placement. Second course in the third year sequence of language courses designed for students who have completed ASL-A 311. Emphasis is on the narrative, receptive, and expressive skill development. PUL=1A,5
  • ASL-A 321 Linguistics of American Sign Language (3 cr.) Students will learn to analyze ASL linguistically, exploring the building blocks of ASL: phonemic analysis, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. The application of these concepts to a visual language will be the focus of the course. PUL=4
  • ASL-I 409 Topics in Interpreting (3 cr.) Focuses on a particular setting or genre, certification preparation, specialized area or discourse in interpreting. Topics may include interpreting medical texts, preparing deaf interpreters, deaf blind interpreting and others. Topics may vary from year to year. PUL=3 May be repeated up to 4 times (12 credit hours) under different topics.
  • ASL-I 425 Independent Study (1-6 cr.) Students must be registered in ASL/EI Program and have program approval from director. Individual projects determined in consultation with instructor. Credit varies with scope of project.   PUL=3
  • ASL-I 250 Introduction to Interpreting (3 cr.) This course is for ASL/EI Majors and ASL Minors. Provides an overview of the field of ASL/English interpreting. Emphasis is on exploring a progression of philosophical frames in the development of the profession; exploring models of the interpreting process and identifying requisite responsibilities, skills, and aptitudes for interpreters. PUL=6
  • ASL-I 370 Interpreting in the Healthcare Setting (3 cr.) P: ASL A212 or equivalent language skills This course will provide specific information on the interpreter's role in the Healthcare setting. Emphasis is on exploring the following: requisite responsibilities, skills, and aptitudes for interpreters in the healthcare setting, as well as cultural issues and laws pertinent to healthcare interpreting. Students will develop a working ASL medical vocabulary, procedures and tests as well as a basic understanding of body systems There is also the possibility that students will be able to experience mock situations in the healthcare setting through collaboration with the School of Nursing and/or potentially observe actual healthcare interpreting with the instructor or other qualified interpreters. PUL=3
  • MSPT-Z 100 Motorsports Studies (3 cr.)
  • MHHS-M 301 Perspectives on Health, Disease, and Healing (3 cr.) The course utilizes the perspectives of the humanities and social science disciplines to provide students with a broader understanding of the many facets of health and disease, suffering and dying, as well as art and science of healing. PUL=3
  • MHHS-M 492 Topics in Medical Humanities and Health Studies (1-3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected issues and problems in Medical Humanities and Health Studies. Topics will ordinarily cut across fields and disciplines. PUL=4 May be repeated once for credit on a different topic.
  • MHHS-M 495 Independent Project/Seminar in Medical Humanities and Health Studies (3 cr.) P: Requires a minimum of 9 credit hours in the minor. A seminar or research project on a subject in Medical Humanities and Health Studies. PUL=4
  • MHHS-M 498 Readings in Medical Humanities and Health Studies (1-3 cr.) Individual readings and research. May be repeated once for credit on a different subject.
  • MHHS-M 504 Introduction to Research Ethics (3 cr.) Introduction to the basic concepts of research ethics. The course covers the historical development of concern with ethics in science as well as practical information needed by students working in science today. Format is lecture and discussion.
  • MHHS-M 592 Graduate Topics in Medical Humanities (3 cr.) Study of topics in Medical Humanities. May be repeated once for credit on a different topic.
  • MHHS-M 598 Graduate Readings in Medical Humanities (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of the Program Director required. Focused readings on selected topics in medical humanities by arrangement with the instructor.
  • MHHS-M 420 The Culture of Mental Illness: Representations of Mental Illness in Literature and Film (3 cr.) This course will consider how mental illness is represented in literature and film by exploring the following: Is there a relationship between the way we understand and perceive mental illness, and the way it is portrayed through pop culture? Have literary and film portrayals of mental illness aided our construction of how we think about mental illness today? How has our understanding of mental illness changed in the last century? We will consider the ways certain understandings of mental illness are constructed, represented and proliferated throughout culture. What are the different representational strategies, in particular the representation of the therapeutic encounter between doctor and patient? PUL=2
  • MHHS-M 501 Medical Humanities & The Illness Experience: Exploring the Human Condition (3 cr.) This course will proceed as an in-depth scrutiny of the philosophy and empiricism of medical science. The nature of Medical Humanities will be explored by debating issues affecting the human condition in general, and the illness experience in particular. These issues include evolutionary biology and the beginning of life; questions of artificial life and intelligence; the nature of consciousness; genetics and cloning; the pain of the nation over abortion and euthanasia; alternative and experimental medical techniques; organ donation and transplantation; redefining mental health; and the art and science involved in caring for the patient.
  • MHHS-M 520 The Culture of Mental Illness (3 cr.) This course explores the ways in which our understanding of mental illness is constructed, represented, and proliferated throughout our culture, by examining text and film. We will consider how we as individuals and as a society are affected by different representations of mental illness, and how this translates into everyday interaction with others.
  • MHHS-M 595 Clinical Practicum in Medical Humanities (3 cr.) The Clinical Practicum will allow students the opportunity to not only gain a better understanding of clinical medicine, but also develop a better understanding of how the humanities can inform and enrich the practice of medicine in particular and healthcare in general. The clinical experience is individualized based on the students' interests. Students will be provided a list of clinical opportunities from which they may design their practicum experience with guidance from the director, Emily Beckman.
  • MHHS-M 201 Introduction to Medical Humanities and Health Studies (3 cr.) This survey course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Medical Humanities & Health Studies examining the contributions of humanities and social science disciplines to health care and medicine.Bio-ethical issues, socio-cultural factors of health, literary and historical perspectives, and examples of current research are covered. PUL = 2
  • MHHS-M 390 A Body of Law: Medicine, Humanities, & Law (3 cr.) P: Student must have at least sophomore status. An introductory course into the intersection of law and medicine as viewed through the lens of the humanities. This course will focus on subtopics of law and medicine, including the legal bases of the doctor-patient relationship, bioethics and law, medical malpractice, and medical professionalization. Its purpose is to introduce students to the way the practice of medicine from both the physician and the patient perspectives is shaped by Constitutional, statutory, and common law. PUL=2, 5, 3
  • MHHS-M 410 Addiction Narratives (3 cr.) This course explores the ways in which, through literature, certain understandings of addiction are constructed, represented, and proliferated throughout our culture. We will explore the ways in which the experience of addiction is represented in various cultural forms and in specific texts. Additionally, we will look closely at the relationship between the idea of addiction and other categories such as gender, sexuality, normalcy, race and creativity. In this course we will compare various literary texts and films to see if some seem more "realistic" than others, and explore, through writing and discussion, the possibilities for why this may be so. We will consider how we as individuals and as a society are affected by various representations of addiction, and how this translates into everyday interaction with others. Are some representations dangerous? Students will explore the possibility that representation plays a significant role in our understanding of the experience of addiction and will be encouraged to think critically about the ways various media (film, popular texts, memoir, poetry, biography) affect the way we live our lives and the relationships we develop with others. PUL=2,3,5
Africana Studies (AFRO)
  • AFRO-A 249 Afro-American Autobiography (3 cr.) A survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in the last two centuries. The course emphasizes how the autobiographers combine the grace of art and the power of argument to urge the creation of genuine freedom in America. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 106 Perspectives from the African American Diaspora (1-3 cr.) This course is a study of selected topics or issues in Afro-American/African Diaspora Studies usually coordinated with symposia and/or conferences sponsored by the AADS Program. This course will expose students to current trends in research techniques, new research, allow them to interact with nationally and internationally known scholars and leaders in the area of AAADS. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 140 Introduction to African American and African Diaspora Studies (3 cr.) Introduction to the theory, method, and content of African American and African Diaspora Studies. Examines the social, political, cultural, and economic experiences of people comprising the African Diaspora. Utilizes an interdisciplinary approach and conceptual, theoretical, and analytical frameworks to illustrate the interconnectedness of black peoples experiences and the importance of studying AAADS as a field of scholarly inquiry. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans (3 cr.) An introduction to the traditions, life, and experiences of Africans in the United States. The course utilizes learning resources from a variety of disciplines, including history, literature, and the social sciences. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 152 Introduction to African Studies (3 cr.) This course provides students with an interdisciplinary, introductory perspective on African continuities and changes. The course will focus on contemporary African societies while considering the lessons learned through the vestiges of slavery, colonization, aparteid and liberation struggles on the continent. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 200 Research in African American and African Diaspora Studies (3 cr.) Introduce students to basic tools, techniques and processes of scholarly research in African American and African Diaspora Studies. Students learn and apply technology as it pertains to research, address ethical issues, gain an understanding of basic statistical techniques in research and gain proficiency in reading, writing, understanding, and critiquing research articles, abstracts, and proposals. PUL=1C
  • AFRO-A 202 The West and the African Diaspora (3 cr.) An introduction to Western Europe's and America's perception of Africa and Africans. Emphasis is on the image of Africans and their New World descendants, as constructed by European and American intellectuals. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 255 The Black Church in America (3 cr.) History of the black church from slavery to the present emphasis on the church's role as a black social institution, its religious attitudes as expressed in songs and sermons, and its political activities as exemplified in the minister-politician. PUL=5
  • AFRO-A 303 Topics in African American and African Diaspora Studies (1-3 cr.) Study of selected topics or issues in Afro-American studies occasionally, but not always, coordinated with symposia and/or conferences sponsored by the AAADS Program. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 306 Globalization, Struggle, and Empowerment in the African Diaspora (3 cr.) Examines the shared cultural, political, social, and intellectual responses to the transoceanic experiences of African diasporic populations. Utilizes interdisciplinary tools and perspectives to understand the impact of colonialism, imperialism, and globalization on African populations of the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and selected Western European nations during the modern era. PUL=5
  • AFRO-A 310 Culture of Africa (3 cr.) History of African American religions from the colonial era to the present. Topics may include the African influences on African American religion, the presence of conjure, black Methodism, black Baptist women's leadership, Islam, and new religious movements. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 315 Men and the Diaspora: Examining Race, Culture, & Education (3 cr.) This course is designed to assist students develop a critical lens and broaden their understanding of the similarities and differences in the lives of African American men. The course introduces, through to film, music, poetry, literature, and reflective writings, the educational and social development experiences of Black males. We will pay particular attention to the experiences of African American male from distinct periods in American history. PUL=2
  • AFRO-A 316 Women of the Diaspora: Race, Culture, and Education (3 cr.) Introduce students to film, music, poetry, literature, and writing dealing with the experiences of women throughout the African Diaspora, with emphasis on Sub Saharan Africa, Central America, North America, and the Caribbean. Students will be required to read four books in addition to short stories, poetry, and scholarly articles on the topic.
  • AFRO-A 319 Business of Black Popular Music (3 cr.) This course explores the evolution of the marketing of black popular music in the 20th century and beyond. It will engage the student in a dialogue that relates the subject to other aspects of the Afro-American experience. The course will utilize audio and video recordings along with the text. PUL=3
  • AFRO-A 323 The Rise of Hip Hop Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) This course examines the historical evolution of hip hop and the cultural, socio-political, and linguistic expressions that it spawned in the 1970's and beyond. It also examines strategies used by hip hop professsionals to become successful entrepreneurs and generate products and services to sell in the capitalist world economy. PUL=2
  • AFRO-A 324 South Africa in the Global Economy (3 cr.) Examines South Africa's movement from apartheid system of government to one that now embraces democracy and political pluralism. Also examines various theoretical frameworks explaining why apartheid developed in South Africa, discussing imperialism and the decolonization processes, the denigration of indigenous ethnic groups and communities, and the establishment of the political order. PUL=3
  • AFRO-A 326 Race, Beauty, and Popular Culture (3 cr.) This course explores and contextualizes the popular cultural meanings and implications of Western beauty standards as they relate to women and/or men of color. Considerations for the course can include discourses involving ideologies of femininity, masculinity, and beauty or attractiveness as they impact issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course addresses questions such as: how are women and/or men of color represented in multimedia, popular culture, and literature? What have been the consequences of applying Western standards of beauty or attractiveness to women and men of color? And how do these standards affect men's and women's attitudes and understandings of how they should look, act, feel, and behave--both past and present? PUL=2
  • AFRO-A 352 Afro-American Art II: Afro-American Artists (3 cr.) A survey of the artistic traditions of the Africans in the New World, from the period of slavery in North and South America through contemporary and expatriate African American artists. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 355 African American History I (3 cr.) A study of the history of African Americans in the United States. Includes the role African-American culture has played in the development of the American nation, Slavery, Abolitionism, Reconstruction and the post-Reconstruction to 1900. PUL=2
  • AFRO-A 356 African American History II (3 cr.) This course will explore each of the major historical events and Black leaders of those times and their influence on the social and political advancement of African Americans from 1900 to the present. PUL=2
  • AFRO-A 369 The African American Experience (3 cr.) This integrator course introduces students to the methodological and analytical tools needed to understand the historical background, contemporary challenges, and current policy debates about issues confronting the African American community, such as credit market discrimination, affirmative action, and reparations. A chief goal of the course is to expose students to broad themes in African American history, while also providing them with the necessary interdisciplinary tool (both qualitative and quantitative) to analyze contemporary economic problems and prospects. PUL=1A
  • AFRO-A 402 Seminar in African American and African Diaspora Studies (3 cr.) Senior capstone course in African American and African Diaspora Studies.  Involves intensive discussion of selected themes/topics related to AAADS.  Students are expected to engage in in-depth library and/or field research to apply diasporic theory concepts and analysis to real life, peoples, events, and/or issues impacting people of African descent. PUL=4
  • AFRO-A 440 History of the Education of Black Americans (3 cr.) This course focuses on the education of Black Americans and its relationship to the Afro-American experience. Trends and patterns in the education of Black Americans as such relate to the notions of education for whom and for what. PUL=4
  • AFRO-A 495 Individual Readings in African American and African Diaspora Studies (1-3 cr.) By arrangement with instructor. Investigation of topics of special interest to students that are not covered in the regular program curriculum or that students wish to pursue in greater detail. May be repeated once for credit. PUL=3
  • AFRO-A 569 The African American Experience (3 cr.) This course introduces graduate students to the methodological and analytical tools needed to understand the historical background, contemporary challenges, and current policy debates about issues confronting the African American community, such as credit market discrimination, affirmative action, and reparations. A chief goal of the course is to expose students to broad themes in African American history, while also providing them with the necessary interdisciplinary tools (both qualitative and quantitative) to analyze contemporary economic problems and prospects.
American Studies
  • AMST-A 301 The Question of American Identity (3 cr.) Is American culture unified or does it consist of a potpourri of more or less distinct cultures? Beginning with the 1600s but emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this course explores classic texts in American culture, seeking to locate the terms of American unity in the midst of obvious diversity. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 302 The Question of American Community (3 cr.) What are the varieties and forms of American social life? This course will explore the manner in which Americans, from Puritan times through the later decades of the twentieth century, have structured and experienced social life in rural, urban, and suburban settings. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 303 Topics in American Studies (1-3 cr.) Interdisciplinary consideration of various American studies topics. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 304 The Transformation of America 1960–1980 (3 cr.) America in the years from John F. Kennedy to Ronald Reagan. An examination of such topics as the myth of Camelot, the civil rights movement and the subsequent black uprising, Vietnam and its aftermath, the rise of counterculture, campus unrest and the student movement, the road to Watergate and the retreat into narcissism, the pervasive influence of television, and the rise of neo-conservatism. Also, consideration of the literature: modernism and fabulism in fiction, social and cultural criticism, and the new journalism in nonfiction. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 499 Senior Tutorial in American Studies (3 cr.) This course provides students with the opportunity to pursue particular interests in American studies on topics of their choices and to work in a tutorial relationship with an American studies faculty member. In this course of directed study, students will be required to produce research projects for filing in the library. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 103 Topics in American Studies (1-3 cr.) Interdisciplinary consideration of various American studies topics sometimes coordinated with symposia and/or conferences sponsored by the IUPUI Center for American Studies. A103 cannot be counted as credit toward an American studies minor. PUL=1A
  • AMST-A 497 Overseas Study, Derby, UK (1-4 cr.) Students participating in the exchange program with the University of Derby, UK, must register for sections of this course to receive credit for their work at the partner institution. The title of the course taken at Derby will appear on the student's transcript under this course number. Consent of instructor required. PUL=5; RISE=I
  • AMST-B 497 Overseas Study, Newcastle, UK (1-5 cr.) Students participating in the exchange program with the Newcastle University, UK, must register for sections of this course to receive credit for their work at the partner institution. The title of the course taken at Newcastle will appear on the student's transcript under this course number. Consent of instructor required. PUL=5; RISE=I
  • AMST-G 753 Independent Study (3 cr.) Authorization required.
  • AMST-A 101 Introduction to American Studies (3 cr.) This course introduces the interdisciplinary methods of American Studies and how they enable better understanding of American cultures and ideas. Questions of race, ethnicity, nation, nationality, class, gender, sexuality, and religion are considered in relation to American identities and communities. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 341 Organizing for Social Action (3 cr.) In this course we will study the social movements of the past and meet the activists who are working for social justice today. We will learn about the history of American protest from pre-Revolutionary days to the present in order to understand how mass organizations are created and how they can be used to realize the American ideals of liberty, equality, justice, peace, and opportunity for all. Emphasis throughout is on bridging the academic perspective of the classroom with the practical concerns of different communities. This will be a traveling seminar, moving between the classroom and the world outside. Our class may meet at the site of a labor, senior, or other community organization, hosted by a representative of that organization. Other weeks, the organizers will come to us. Students have the option of participating in a service-learning project and reflecting on the connections between assigned readings and the practice of organizing. Our central question will be: what can the social-action organizations of the past and present teach us about the possibilities for progressive social change in our world today? PUL=5; RISE=E
  • AMST-A 391 Theories and Methods of American Studies (3 cr.) P: AMST-A 103. The course clarifies the nature of American studies as a field of inquiry and helps students develop skills in cultural interpretation, interdisciplinary inquiry, and clear and effective written communication. The course examines the concept of culture and processes through which cultures form, change, and propagate. The course also considers the ideas of cultural pluralism, subculture, and multiculturalism. The course considers historical and contemporary methods of inquiry in American studies, providing students opportunities to apply these methods in research projects. PUL=5
  • AMST-A 353 Music and Decorative Arts in American Studies (3 cr.) Examines music and the decorative arts in American history from pre-Colonial Times to after World War II.  PUL=5
  • AMST-A 354 Literature of Rock 'N Roll (3 cr.) What constitutes the literature of rock music? Some would say that a three-paragraph review of the latest CD in Rolling Stone is the best and perhaps only example. But what about the countless books, essays, articles and other extended works that have been written about this music? How (and why?) is it possible, for example, to use rock music as the framework for a written discourse on American history (and in such discourse, suggest a logical, relevant connection between Abraham Lincoln and Elvis Presley?) How could an extended review of a rock 'n' roll album transform itself (logically and correctly) into first-rate political and social commentary? All of these questions and many more will be addressed in this course, as we explore the "written word of rock 'n' roll" in all its wonderfully complex and fascinating permutations. PUL = 5
  • AMST-A 355 Beat Generation (3 cr.) Get hip and be cool with "The Beat Generation". Explore a uniquely American literary and cultural movement that sought to defy societal rules in an explosive mixture of music, literature and art. Setting precedents the hippies of the 1960's would later follow, the "Beats" were the original American rebels. Go "on the road" as you take a semester-length virtual road trip across America, a mind-expanding journey into emotion, sensation, music, art and the philosophy of experience. Dig it!  PUL = 5
  • AMST-A 356 American Supernatural (3 cr.)

    Belief in the supernatural has been an important component of American culture since the founding of the country. From the Salem Witch Trials to The Amityville Horror and from the stories of Edgar Allen Poe to the television series Lost, there seems to be no limit to Americans appetite for myths and legends that deal with the fantastic, otherworldly or otherwise unbelievable. This course will examine several aspects of this cultural fascination with the supernatural, from the mystery of "Area 51" to the legends of the delta blues singers. Along the we'll examine larger questions, such as: Why is belief in the supernatural of continuing relevance to American culture? How does the popular and new media (especially the Internet) perpetuate this belief, and is there a danger in doing so? To       what extent are the American character and its definition of identity shaped by the belief in the supernatural?  PUL = 5

  • AMST-A 363 American Cyber Identity (3 cr.)

    This course examines the blurred lines between not just the physical and virtual world, but our physical and virtual selfidentification. It considers challenging questions-and intriguing possibilities-about how we define ourselves when the physical, spatial and temporal limitations of "the real world" are lifted. It will look at the processes or strategies we use to define ourselves as we spend more time online by means of increasingly sophisticated technology, what level of importance are we giving to our sense of American selfidentity in the online world (from a historical, social and cultural perspective)? Is it possible to interpret the Constitution to help adjudicate virtual "property disputes"? Are the rights of avatars "self-evident"? And, when we "jack in" (to borrow a term from Gibson¿s Neuromancer) to the Internet, how much of our American history and culture do we take with us? PUL = 5

  • AMST-A 601 American Studies in Theory (3 cr.) This course examines theoretical approaches to the meaning of ¿America¿ by asking students to master theories in the field of American Studies, including: post-structuralism, queer studies, and post-colonialism as well as race, gender, sexuality, class, and religion. Students will apply them to a particular question or problem of academic interest.
  • AMST-A 602 American Studies in Practice (3 cr.) P: AMST A601 The courses examines case studies in three different contexts local (Indianapolis), national (Detroit), and international (Copenhagen) to illustrate different types of urban development. Students will combine American Studies theories with the practical methods derived from case studies to distinguish characteristics and conditions dependent on geographic and cultural differences.
Anthropology (ANTH, FOLK, MSTD)
Advanced Undergraduate Courses
  • ANTH-A 360 The Development of Anthropological Thought (3 cr.) An overview of the major theoretical developments within anthropology, as the discipline has attempted to produce a universal and unified view of human life based on knowledge of evolution and prehistoric and contemporary cultures. PUL=4
  • ANTH-A 395 Field Experiences in Anthropology (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. A supervised field experience in a selected area of anthropology. PUL=3; RISE=E May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.
  • ANTH-A 401 Cultural Resource Management (3 cr.) The concept of cultural resource management as a theoretical and functional tool to effect the conservation and protection of archaeological resources. Law, project review, site registration, and preservation strategies will be addressed. PUL=2,3,6
  • ANTH-A 412 Anthropology Senior Capstone (3-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Only anthropology seniors may enroll. This is a capstone course required of all anthropology majors that is designed to allow students to reflect back on their training as an anthropologist at IUPUI and to explore the ways in which an anthropological perspective might inform their future careers after graduation. Students will learn how to search and apply for jobs in the public and private sectors that draw on the training and expertise received during their undergraduate careers. PUL=3; RISE=R,E
  • ANTH-A 413 Senior Seminar (1 cr.) This course covers strategies for career development and issues involved in using and applying anthropology following graduation. It is designed to be taken by Anthropology majors following completion of ANTH-A 412. Registration is by instructor authorization. PUL=3
  • ANTH-A 454 Human Ecology (3 cr.) A survey of the biological and cultural means by which humans adapt to their environment. This course emphasizes the unique nature of human adaptation, focusing on specific human groups and on the general processes of adaptation. PUL=5
  • ANTH-A 460 Topics in Anthropology: (variable title) (1-3 cr.) A conceptual examination of selected topics in the field of anthropology. PUL varies with topic. May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.
  • ANTH-A 485 Topics in Applied Anthropology: (variable title) (1-3 cr.) An examination of a selected topic where the concepts, principles, and methods in anthropology are utilized to address a particular community or social issue. May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.
  • ANTH-B 301 Laboratory in Bioanthropology (3 cr.) Laboratory investigations of human skeletal biology, including age and sex determinations, bone pathologies, and forensic identification, human paleontological and primate observations. Variability in living populations, including anthropometry, blood grouping, and dermatogyphics. Emphasis on a biocultural perspective in applying methods and techniques of bioanthropology. PUL=1B,2
  • ANTH-B 370 Human Variation (3 cr.) Variation within and between human populations in morphology, gene frequencies, and behavior. Biological concepts of race, race classification, along with other taxonomic considerations, and evolutionary processes acting on humans in the past, present, and future. PUL=2
  • ANTH-B 371 The Anthropology of Human Nature (3 cr.) An examination of the foundations of human behavior as viewed from the biocultural and evolutionary perspective of anthropology. This course strives to provide the student with a rational middle ground in the nature/nurture debate by demonstrating that human behavior is innately plastic. PUL=2
  • ANTH-B 426 Human Osteology (3 cr.) This course provides an intensive introduction to the human skeleton emphasizing the identification of fragmentary skeletal remains. This knowledge forms the under-pinning for advanced study in forensic anthropology, paleo-anthropology, bio-anthropology and human osteology. Pathological conditions as well as bone growth and development will be studies. This course will consist of three hours of class per week, with both lecture and laboratory time given. You should anticipate at least 20 hours per week of independent laboratory time. There will be a series of practical quizzes, completion of exercises from a lab manual, compilation of an individual osteology notebook that contains class notes and drawings, and a final burial report. PUL=2,3
  • ANTH-B 466 The Primates (3 cr.) The study of our closest living relatives, the prosimians, monkeys, and apes, from the perspective of evolutionary and environmental influences on morphology and complex social behavior. PUL=2,4
  • ANTH-B 480 Human Growth and Development (3 cr.) The study of human growth and development from a biocultural perspective including the physical mechanisms, and social, cultural, and environmental factors that lead to normal growth and development throughout the human life cycle. Causal factors, patterns of expression, and methods of assessment are stressed. Also available for graduate credit. PUL=3
  • ANTH-E 300 Culture Areas and Ethnic Groups: (variable title) (1-3 cr.) An ethnographic survey of a selected culture area or ethnic group. PUL=5 May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.
  • ANTH-E 316 Prehistory of North America (3 cr.) This course will introduce students to the cultural variety and complexity of prehistoric native North Americans. The course focuses on the various environmental adaptations, lifeways, social systems, and material culture that have been revealed through archaeological research. PUL=5,6
  • ANTH-E 320 Indians of North America (3 cr.) An ethnographic survey of native North American culture areas and ethnic groups. PUL=5
  • ANTH-E 335 Ancient Civilizations of Mesoamerica (3 cr.) Historical ethnography of the major pre-Columbian civilizations, especially the Aztec, the Maya, and the Zapotec and Mixtec. Emphasis on the social life, cultural achievements, religion, world view, and political systems to illustrate the diversity and richness of Amerindian life before the Spanish conquest. PUL=5
  • ANTH-E 354 Popular Culture (3 cr.) This course studies how traditional anthropological insight can analyze social and political complexities of contemporary popular cultural phenomena. Focuses on how anthropological subjects such as class, racism, and regionalism lurk within popular cultural phenomena including post-1950 music subcultures, civil religion, and consumer culture. PUL=2,3,5
  • ANTH-P 340 Modern Material Culture (3 cr.) This course examines how contemporary social experience is impacted by material culture ranging from toys to theme parks. Focuses on how consumers perceive themselves and others in modern consumer culture through the medium of commodities and examines systems of inequality that are reproduced and subverted through consumption. PUL=2,4,5
  • ANTH-A 494 Practicum in Applied Anthropology (1-4 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. An arranged experience in applied anthropology, appropriate to individual career goals. The student will work with an approved community group or organization in a specific project that facilitates the integration of previous course work and experience in a practical application. May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.
  • ANTH-E 380 Urban Anthropology (3 cr.) Anthropological perspectives on contemporary American cities. Topics to be covered include (among others): changes in the nature of cities from maufacturing sites to spaces for consumption and tourism; gentrification; racial and ethnic diversity in cities; urban social movements and new models for social services. PUL=5
  • ANTH-A 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology (2-4 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. A supervised, in-depth examination through individual research on a particular topic selected and conducted by the student in consultation with an anthropology faculty member. PUL=3; RISE=R
  • ANTH-E 384 The African Diaspora (3 cr.) This course examines the cultural formation of the African Diaspora in the Americas. The course focuses specifically on the development of the African diasporic populations in the Caribbean, Central America and South America in comparative perspective. Students will develop a critical understanding of the African Diaspora as a geographical displacement, as an assemblage of cultural groups, and as a process of political identification. PUL=2,5
  • ANTH-E 391 Women in Developing Countries (3 cr.) This course explores the nature of women's roles in developing countries. Particular emphasis is placed on examining how development and cultural change have affected the lives of women. PUL=1C
  • ANTH-E 402 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 cr.) This course considers the meaning and social implications of gender in human society. Cultural definitions of "male" and "female" gender categories as well as associated behavioral and structural differentiation of gender roles will be analyzed using current anthropological concepts and theories. PUL=2,5
  • ANTH-E 403 Women of Color in the US (3 cr.) This course examines the concepts of race, and gender as inextricably tied analytical categories, and how they have structured the lives of African American, Latina, Native American and Asian American women, both US born and immigrant. Themes of oppression, identities and activism figure prominently throughout the course. PUL=2,5
  • ANTH-E 404 Field Methods in Ethnography (3 cr.) Introduction to the methods and techniques anthropologists use to study other peoples. Preparation of a research proposal, interviewing, and the use of life histories and case studies. PUL=3; RISE=S
  • ANTH-E 411 Wealth, Exchange, and Power in Anthropological Perspective (3 cr.) This course examines cultural patterns of production, exchange, and consumption, with an emphasis on non-Western societies and how these factors influence economic development in the Third World. PUL=1C
  • ANTH-E 445 Medical Anthropology (3 cr.) A cross-cultural examination of human biocultural adaptation in health and disease, including biocultural epidemiology; ethnomedical systems in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease; and sociocultural change and health. Also available for graduate credit. PUL=3,4,5
  • ANTH-E 455 Anthropology of Religion (3 cr.) Critical evaluation of current approaches to the analysis of religious myth, ritual, and symbolism. Problems in understanding religious beliefs of other cultures. Modern development of anthropology of religion. PUL=2,3,5
  • ANTH-E 457 Ethnic Identity (3 cr.) A cross-cultural analysis of the nature of ethnic groups and identity, including the effects of colonialism and nationalism on ethnic groups, stereotyping groups, ethnic symbols and styles, and persistence and change in ethnicity. PUL=2,5
  • ANTH-L 300 Language and Culture (3 cr.) This course explores the relationships between language and culture, focusing on research methodology and surveying various theoretical frameworks. Topics to be discussed include linguistic relativity (the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis), ethnographies of communication, interview techniques, and methods of data collection and analysis. PUL=3,4,5
  • ANTH-L 401 Language, Power, and Gender (3 cr.) This course investigates sociocultural aspects of language use, focusing on the interaction of power and gender with language. Topics include differences in men's and women's language use, discourse patterns and power relationships, and identity and language use. To what extent does the language we speak sustain the dominance of certain groups in our society? PUL=2,3,5
  • ANTH-P 396 The Rise of Civilization (3 cr.) Covers the development of complex societies in several regions of the world. The material is approached from an anthropological perspective, with emphasis on archaeological methods of data collection and analysis. Early civilizations in Iraq, India, Egypt, Rome, China, Peru, and Central America will be discussed. PUL=2,5
  • ANTH-P 330 Historical Archaeology (3 cr.) We will examine the ways in which historical archaeologists investigate Colonial and American cultures and lifeways in various regions of North America throughout time. Special attention will be given to understanding the long and complex history of Native American/European interactions. North American social systems, interaction with and exploitation of the environment, technologies, and material culture. The theory and methods used by historical archaeologists will also be emphasized. PUL=3,4,5
  • ANTH-P 402 Archaeological Method and Theory (3 cr.) This class is concerned with how archaeologists know what they know about the past. Methods of data collection are reviewed and theoretical interpretations are discussed. The focus of the course is on evaluation of archaeological research and explanation, with special emphasis on critical thinking. PUL=2,4
  • ANTH-P 405 Fieldwork in Archaeology (3-6 cr.) Archaeological work directed toward field techniques: excavation and preservation of materials, surveying, photography, cataloging. One credit hour per full week of fieldwork. PUL=3; RISE=R,E
  • ANTH-A 462 Truth & Reconciliation (3 cr.) This course provides students with the opportunity to review and analyze novel truth and reconciliatory trends from around the world, in particular: apologies and other symbolic gestures; reparations and compensation; memorials and museums; truth commisions; treaties and peach accords; musical, sporting, and artistic performances. PUL=2,5,6
  • ANTH-E 421 The Anthropology of Aging (3 cr.) This course explores age and the aging process cross-culturally by looking at the specific cultural context in which individuals age and by analyzing similarities and differences across cultures. PUL=1C
  • ANTH-B 468 Bioarchaeology (3 cr.) Bioarchaeology introduces students to the interdisciplinary field that asks- what can we learn from the analysis of human skeletal remains from archaeological sites? As such, bioarchaeology is the contextual analysis of human remains. Skeletal and dental tissues are often overlooked as being innate and unchanging, when in fact they respond to the external environment and stressors like soft tissues that exist within and around them. The natural and built environments can have a profound impact on human biological variation. As a result, bioarchaeological research emphasizes biocultural interactions and the impact of culture on the human condition (and vice versa). Topics covered in this class include demography, health, growth and development, diet, infectious and non-infectious diseases, occupational markers of stress, migration, and population affinity. The course starts with a historical survey of the field, moves into a discussion of ethics in bioarchaeological research, and introduces important theoretical considerations that influence practice in the subdiscipline. Two subsequent weeks will be spent reviewing basic human osteology, age and sex estimation, and taphonomic factors that can influence and, ultimately, bias research findings. Weeks 6 through 16 will be spent surveying the core areas of investigation in contemporary bioarchaeological research. The lectures and discussions will be supplemented with time in the laboratory, during which students will have the opportunity to examine, describe, score, and analyze human remains, as well as interpret bioarchaeological data. In addition, students are expected to produce an annotated bibliography on a bioarchaeological topic of their choice. PUL=2
  • ANTH-P 406 LABORATORY MTHD IN ARCHAELOGY (1-6 cr.) Specialized training in laboratory procedures and analysis of archaeological materials. Major categories of material culture to be studied include lithics, ceramics, faunal and floral remains. Emphasis is on processing, sorting, identifying, and analyzing material recovered from the previous Field School in Archaeology (ANTH-P 405). PUL=3
  • ANTH-B 474 Forensic Anthropology (3 cr.) P: junior/senior standing required Forensic Anthropology introduces students to the sub-discipline of Biological Anthropology that addresses human skeletal remains recovered during medico-legal investigations. Forensic Anthropology is an inherently applied field within Anthropology and compliments the focus of IUPUI's Department of Anthropology. Forensic anthropologists are often consulted in investigations when a visual identification of human remains cannot be made by a medical examiner or law enforcement. The goals of a forensic anthropologist's involvement in medico- investigations often includes excavation and recovery (i.e., forensic archaeology), estimation of the post-mortem interval, the construction of a biological profile (e.g., age-at-death, sex, stature, etc.), positive identification, and providing conclusions and an opinion about the cause and manner of death. Practitioners routinely find themselves working in a variety of contexts from local cases of missing persons to mass disasters and international human rights projects involving the exhumation of mass graves. PUL=2
Introductory Undergraduate Courses
  • ANTH-A 103 Human Origins and Prehistory (3 cr.) A survey of human biological and cultural evolution from early pre-Pleistocene hominids through the development of urbanized state societies, with the goal of better understanding our human heritage. (Not open to students who have taken ANTH-A 303.) PUL=2
  • ANTH-A 104 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) A survey of cultural and social processes that influence human behavior, using comparative examples from different ethnic groups around the world, with the goal of better understanding the broad range of human behavioral potentials and those influences that shape the different expressions of these potentials. (Not open to students who have taken ANTH-A 304.) PUL=5
  • ANTH-A 201 Survey of Applied Anthropology (3 cr.) P: ANTH-A 104 or ANTH-A 304, and ANTH-A 103 or ANTH-A 303, or permission of the instructor. A survey of such issues in applied anthropology as cultural resource management, community development, cross-cultural communication, Third World development, museum studies, archaeological ethics, and the impact of human diversity on health care, education, and social programs. PUL=3,6
  • ANTH-A 303 Evolution and Prehistory (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. An advanced survey of human biological and cultural evolution from pre-Pleistocene hominids through the development of urbanized state societies. (Not open to students who have taken ANTH-A 103.) PUL=2
  • ANTH-A 304 Social and Cultural Behavior (3 cr.) P: Junior standing. An advanced survey of cultural and social processes that influence human behavior, with comparative examples from different ethnic groups around the world. (Not open to students who have taken ANTH-A 104.) PUL=5
Graduate Courses
  • ANTH-A 600 Seminar in Anthropology (2-4 cr.)
  • ANTH-A 594 Independent Learning in Applied Anthropology (1-6 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Independent research/training using anthropological perspectives/methods in addressing social issues. The project must be a discrete activity with a concrete product, conducted in conjunction with the student's anthropology advisor and a member of the organization where she or he will be located. May not be repeated for more than 6 credit hours.
  • ANTH-E 606 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) This course provides an introduction to the use of ethnographic field work methods, including participant-observation, semi-structured interviewing, and use of mapping, among others. Every year this course will focus on a community-based research project.
  • ANTH-E 501 Fundamentals of Applied Anthropology (3 cr.) This is a graduate-level introduction to the history and underlying principles of Applied Anthropology. We will examine how understanding a specifically anthropological perspective can provide new insights into the workings of contemporary social policies and programs.
  • ANTH-A 565 Anthropological Thought (3 cr.) This course traces the development of anthropological theory from the early 20th century up to the present. Students will examine what is distinctive about an anthropological perspective and will analyze how anthropological ideas have shifted over the last century in accordance with the emergence of new social and political imperatives.
  • ANTH-B 526 Human Osteology (3 cr.) Descriptive and functional morphology of the human skeleton with emphasis on the identification of fragmentary remains. Determination of age, sex, and stature; craniology; and research methods in skeletal biology. Guided research project in the identification of skeletal material required.
  • ANTH-E 507 Popular Culture (3 cr.) This course studies how traditional anthropological insight can analyze social and political complexities of contemporary popular cultural phenomena. Focuses on how anthropological subjects such as class, racism, and regionalism lurk within popular cultural phenomena including post-1950 music subcultures, civil religion, and consumer culture.
  • ANTH-E 509 Modern Material Culture (3 cr.) This course examines how contemporary social experience is impacted by material culture ranging from toys to theme parks. Focuses on how consumers perceive themselves and others in modern consumer culture through the medium of commodities and examines systems of inequality that are reproduced and subverted through consumption.
  • ANTH-E 521 Indians in North America (3 cr.) Assesses the complexities of the academic study of the Indigenous peoples of North America, emphasizing the diversity of Nativecultures, representations of them by the public and by scholars, and examining cultural adaptations from Pre-Contact to Contemporary.
  • ANTH-P 501 Community Archaeology (3 cr.) Community archaeology implies direct collaboration between a community and archaeologists. Collaboration implies substantial adjustment in archaeological methods and epistemologies incorporating community members in setting research agendas, working on excavations, and interpreting results. This course examines a wide range of issues and looks at both successful and unsuccessful projects to arrive at an assessment of best practices.
  • ANTH-A 699 Master's Project in Applied Anthropology (1-6 cr.) P: Permission of Graduate Advisor. The completion of a scholarly applied project is an essential element of the MA in Applied Anthropology. This project will be carried out and completed under the direction of the students graduate advisor.
Folklore (FOLK)
  • FOLK-F 101 Introduction to Folklore (3 cr.) A view of the main forms and varieties of folklore and folk expression in tales, ballads, gestures, beliefs, games, proverbs, riddles, and traditional arts and crafts. The role of folklore in the life of human beings. PUL=5
Communication Studies (COMM)
Graduate Programs in Communication Studies
  • COMM-C 500 Advanced Communication Theory (3 cr.) Students explore how scholars from various traditions have described and explained the universal human experience of communication. Students develop an understanding of a variety of communication theories to more completely interpret events in more flexible, useful, and discriminating ways.
  • COMM-C 501 Applied Quantitative Research Methods in Communication (3 cr.) The course is designed to offer students an opportunity to examine, assess, and utilize communication research methods as a means to test theory in applied settings and/or as a means to applied ends (i.e., problem-solving, policy, analysis).
  • COMM-C 503 Applied Learning Project (3 cr.) An applied learning project that provides students with a culminating educational experience. The project gives students the opportunity to apply their knowledge of communicative processes to real-life organizational problems, and provides the opportunity to produce a body of work reflecting their abilities.
  • COMM-C 510 Health Provider-Consumer Communication (3 cr.) Designed to teach communication skills and practices related to health care talk by examining transactional communication within health care contexts. Topics covered in this course focus directly upon interpersonal dialogue between health care providers and patients.
  • COMM-C 520 Advanced Public Communication (3 cr.) Critical analysis and employment of rhetorical strategies in forms and types of professional discourses incorporating current technologies.
  • COMM-C 526 Effective Media Strategies (3 cr.) Contemporary communicators in need of mediums of communication in addition to face-to-face interaction require an expanded knowledge of rhetorical strategies. This course will have a special focus on the effective use of media as a means of persuasion.
  • COMM-C 528 Group Communication and Organizations (3 cr.) This seminar-format course examines the ways in which informal groups and communication networks facilitate a variety of organizational processes (i.e., socialization, diffusion of innovation). Emphasis is placed on developing theoretical understanding of informal groups in organizations as well as on methodological issues involved in studying communication networks in organizations.
  • COMM-C 530 Communication Criticism (3 cr.) This course will introduce students to criticism as a method of studying persuasive messages in speeches, fiction, mass media, musical lyrics, political campaign literature, art, and other modes of communication in contemporary culture.
  • COMM-C 531 Media Theory and Criticism (3 cr.) A course organized primarily around theories and critical strategies commonly considered within the broad category of contemporary criticism. The course utilizes primary theoretical texts to introduce students to a variety of methodologies employed in analyzing media messages, and emphasizes the application of theoretical frameworks on the analysis of specific media texts.
  • COMM-C 544 Advanced Relational Communication (3 cr.) Applications of communication theory/ research in such areas as relational culture and relationship development. Includes a scholarly project on a real relationship, and applications of research to areas such as pedagogy and couple/family therapy.
  • COMM-C 580 Advanced Organizational Communication (3 cr.) The course provides a solid foundation of concepts for understanding and discussing human organizations. Students will analyze, evaluate, and apply the theories and practices related to organizational issues. Through case studies, readings, and practical applications, this course combines a theory-based understanding of communication in organizations with real-world applications.
  • COMM-C 582 Advanced Intercultural Communication (3 cr.) An in-depth analysis of how variables such as values, beliefs, traditions, language, background, and experiences are manifested in the verbal and nonverbal meaning of messages communicated by cultures and subcultures throughout our global society.
  • COMM-C 591 Topics/Seminar in Applied Communication (3 cr.) This is a revolving topics course. The changing nature of the topic allows graduate students to explore, synthesize, and integrate knowledge of the field of communication and the particular discipline of applied communication while focusing on a single topic not otherwise addressed in the course of study. May be repeated for credit.
  • COMM-C 592 Advanced Health Communication (3 cr.) A course designed to teach communication skills and practices related to health care by examining health care communication theory. Topics range across communication levels (interpersonal, intrapersonal, group, organization, mass media, and mediated communication) within a variety of health care contexts.
  • COMM-C 593 Advanced Family Communication (3 cr.) Applications of theory and research on the role of communication in creating and maintaining marriages/committed couples and families. Includes a scholarly term paper on a real couple or family's communication.
  • COMM-C 594 Communication and Conflict Management in Organizations (3 cr.) This seminar-format course examines the communication exchanges that facilitate conflict management within organizational contexts. Specific attention is focused on negotiation and mediation; however, the communication of alternative means of conflict and dispute resolution are also discussed. In addition, students will be introduced to methods for assessing conflict interaction in organizations.
  • COMM-C 597 Thesis (3 cr.) Applied communication students who choose the thesis option will identify a research topic and develop it under the guidance of the student's thesis director (IUPUI professor). The thesis topic will be related to the field of applied communication in its foci and method.
  • COMM-C 598 Internship (1-3 cr.) This course integrates applied communication theory and practice in a practice setting. Students will apply theoretical concepts and research tools, conduct projects, and interact with communication professionals in the designated setting. In concert with the student's chosen area of concentration, he or she will address issues of importance to that particular organization.
  • COMM-C 599 Independent Study (1-6 cr.) This course provides students with the opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge acquired through course work and professional experience into a completed research project in applied communication. Students will work independently on a topic/issue of choice under the guidance of graduate faculty.
  • COMM-C 620 Computer-Mediated Communication (3 cr.) An overview of practical and scholarly approaches to computer mediated communication. The readings address mass communication, discourse, community, gender, intercultural understanding, ethics, interpersonal relationships, identity, organizational communication, and education.
  • COMM-C 502 Applied Qualitative Research Methods in Communication (3 cr.) P: 6 credits (at any level) of coursework in Communication Studies. Inductive (data-to-theory)approach to knowledge, and associated sequential and non-sequential methods, for studying communication in applied everyday situations; e.g., friendships and other close personal dyads, families, small groups, organizations, and public, media, historical, computer mediated, or health-related contexts.
  • COMM-C 521 Family Communication in Health Contexts (3 cr.) This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on communication involving families in health care settings, addressing significant issues for graduate and professional students who will work with families, including students in Comm. Studies, Nursing, Psychology, Social Work, Public Health, and Medicine. Topics include communication with families about health care concerns and family-patient-health provider systems.
  • COMM-C 621 Persuasion (3 cr.) Takes a rhetorical/critical approach to persuasion in its broadest sense, how it affects our lives everyday and how we can find evidence of persuasive tactics in unexpected places. We will look broadly at theories of persuasion and their application across contexts and fields. In order to keep our attention to how these theoretical perspectives make their way into practice we will devote considerable attention to specific examples of persuasion and analysis of persuasive phenomena.
  • COMM-C 644 Political Communication (3 cr.) Examines the public communication involved in various political contexts. We will consider the communication involved in political campaigns, advertising, and oratory; social media, technology, and popular culture; the news, framing, and political media; citizenship, public deliberation, and decision making in what some argue is a divided political culture. We will read and discuss state of the art research in political communication and meet individuals who are currently working in a communication capacity in public political campaigns.
  • COMM-C 650 Health Communication in Mediated Contexts (3 cr.) Focus on the effect of media on health behavior. Theories of health behavior change and media effects examined; applications of theory to health campaigns evaluated. Examples of mediated health campaigns and effectiveness discussed. Considerations include: interplay among theory, research, practice; how theory informs practice; how research aids in theory construction/refinement.
  • COMM-C 680 Qualitative Research Methods (3 cr.) An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication studies, with an emphasis on health communication research. Provides an overview of several techniques for gathering and analyzing qualitative data.
  • COMM-C 690 Doctoral Quantitative Methods (3 cr.) Course focuses on the principles and theory of descriptive and inferential statistics within the context of health communication research. Topics include ttest, ANOVA, MANOVA, ANCOVA, correlation, multiple regression, and SEM. Students will gain proficiency using SPSS to analyze novel data sets, and will conduct their own health communication research projects and report the results.
  • COMM-C 695 Seminar in Communication and Healthcare (3 cr.) This seminar offers an interface between learning from practicing providers and experts in medical care specialties and becoming enmeshed in health communication research. The course is structured so that the student gains insights from experts in the medical field while also gaining an overview of research issues through reading and engaging in health communication research.
  • COMM-C 700 Fieldwork/Research (1 - 9 cr.) This course is designed to allow PhD students to complete independent research projects prior to enrollment in the dissertation course. Students can enroll in 1-9 credit hours in any given semester, depending on the nature of the project. The fieldwork/research course is designed to focus the student's research interests and to serve as a spring-board for dissertation work. Students must have ample preparation in some theoretical area and in one or more research methods prior to registration for the course. The course will allow students to initiate or conduct a research study, including the collection and examination of data (broadly defined), to answer a question or to test a hypothesis related to communication theory. May be repeated for credit.
  • COMM-C 810 Dissertation (1 - 12 cr.) This course is eligible for a deferred grade.
  • COMM-C 533 Improvisation for Scientist (1 cr.) Students will learn to communicate effectively and responsively through a series of exercises drawn from the methods of improvisational theater. Students will practice connecting to an audience, paying dynamic attention to others, reading nonverbal cues, and responding appropriately.
  • COMM-C 534 Distilling Your Message (1 cr.) Students learn to communicate clearly and vividly about complex scientific research and why it matters, in terms non-scientists can understand. Students practice finding common ground with lay audiences and adjusting levels of message complexity for different audiences.
  • COMM-C 535 Using Electronic Media (1 cr.) Given the significant gaps in understanding between the public and scientists, this course trains students in the sciences and health professions to format and structure formatted and structured complex, scientific information for a variety of new, electronic communication platforms including social media. Students will collate, synthesize, and translate scientific evidence into information that a non-expert audience can access, understand, and act on.
  • COMM-C 536 Connecting with the Community (1 cr.) Students will theorize and develop techniques for shared meaning-making with community partners. They test methods to develop common ground between experts and community members including the lay public and policy makers. Activities focus on developing trust, open communication, and sharing expertise that values and respects lived experiences of community members.
General Communication
  • COMM-C 104 Voice and Diction (3 cr.) Directed primarily toward the improvement of normal speech patterns, with emphasis on normal production, resonation, and articulation. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 108 Listening (3 cr.) This course will provide a theory-based understanding of the processes of listening, introduce the unique characteristics/challenges of listening within a variety of contexts (i.e., organizational listening, listening in health care, relational listening), and increase proficiency as a listener. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 180 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) The study of human dyadic interaction, including topics such as perception processes, verbal/nonverbal communication, theoretical models of communication, conflict, and interpersonal communication in various relationships. Course covers applications of interpersonal communication theory/research, including communication competence. PUL=5
  • COMM-C 223 Business and Professional Communication (3 cr.) P: R110 or equivalent. Preparation and presentation of interviews, speeches, and oral reports appropriate to business and professional organizations; group discussion and parliamentary procedure. This is an intermediate skills course with survey characteristics. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 228 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.) Theory of and practice in effective participation in and leadership of group, committee, conference, and public discussion; application to information-sharing and problem-solving situations. PUL=1C
  • COMM-C 322 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) P: C180 or permission of instructor. Covers core components of the study of interpersonal communication: perception, systems, exchange theoretical approaches; methods of research in interpersonal communication; content (topic) areas such as intimate relationships and friendships. Includes applications of interpersonal communication theory/research. PUL=5
  • COMM-C 325 Interviewing Principles and Practices (3 cr.) P: COMM-R 110 or equivalent. Emphasizes verbal and nonverbal communication in pre-interview back-ground research preparation, interview schedule design, question construction, and post-interview self-analysis in several interviewing contexts. Course includes significant assignments designed to help the student enhance oral performance competencies. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 328 Advanced Topics in Small Group Communication (3 cr.) P: COMM-C 228 or permission of instructor. Theories of small group communication processes. Explores group communication across cultures, groups in organizations, group decision making, conflict management in groups, and assessing competence in group communication. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 380 Organizational Communication (3 cr.) The application of communication theory and research to the study of communication in various types of organizations. Explores reciprocal influence between communication and organizational structures and between communication and managerial styles. Discusses communication designs, superior/ subordinate communication, conflict, information management, networks; communication vis-a-vis employee motivation, satisfaction, and productivity; and communication effectiveness in organizations. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 392 Health Communication (3 cr.) P: 3 credit hours of communication or consent of instructor. Exploration of the communication competencies needed by health care professionals. Emphasizes interviewing; verbal and nonverbal skills; group interaction; and intercultural, interprofessional, therapeutic, and organizational communication. Analyzes communication problems encountered in health care and the development of coping strategies. PUL=2; RISE=R
  • COMM-C 393 Family Communication (3 cr.) P: COMM-C 180 or permission of instructor. Theory/research on the role of communication in creating and maintaining marriages and families. Topics include communication and family life cycles, different family forms, family race/ethnicity, power, and conflict. Covers applications of family communication theory/research. PUL=2; RISE=R
  • COMM-C 394 Communication and Conflict (3 cr.) Analyzes conflict as a form of interaction. Examines approaches/perspectives to the study of conflict, the nature of power, face saving, and contentious behaviors. Specific contexts include relational, marital, group, and organizational. Special attention to bargaining and mediation. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 401 Speech Communication of Technical Information (3 cr.) P: COMM-R 110 or equivalent. Organization and presentation of information of a practical, technical nature. Emphasis is placed on the study, preparation, and use of audiovisual materials. For nonmajors only. PUL=1C
  • COMM-C 402 Interview and Discussion for Business and Professions (3 cr.) For nonmajors only. Principles of communication as related to the information-gathering interview, the employment interview, and problem-solving discussion; practice in using these principles. PUL=1A
  • COMM-C 481 Current Issues in Organizational Communication (3 cr.) P: COMM-C 380 or permission of instructor. In-depth exploration of topics and issues at the forefront of research and theory in organizational communication. Topics may include gender issues in organizational communication, sexual harassment, crisis management, organizational culture. Seminar format with research papers and class discussion/presentations. PUL=2; RISE=R
  • COMM-C 482 Intercultural Communication (3 cr.) P: COMM-C 180 or permission of instructor. Cognitive, affective, and behavioral learning about intercultural and intracultural communication to increase under-standing of the centrality of communication in the social, psychological, and environmental aspects of culture. PUL=5
  • COMM-C 316 Human Communication and the Internet (3 cr.) P: R110, C180 or equivalent. Required for online certificate in Communication Studies - Human Communication in a Mediated World. Students learn how interpersonal, group, mass, public, and organizational communication modes are mediated in Internet environments. Students practice message preparation in different modes and contexts. PUL=1A, 1E, 2
  • COMM-C 395 Gender and Communication (3 cr.) Examines the meaning of gender in contemporary American culture and its interaction with and relationship to communication. Explores topics such as gender and verbal and nonverbal communication; gender differences in public and private settings; gender and communication in families, schools, organizations, and the media. PUL=5
  • COMM-C 345 Restorative Communication (3 cr.) P: COMM C180 The course focuses on healing communication -- healing individuals and relationships. Specific topics include healing communication basics, family, couple, group (e.g. support groups) and community healing (restorative justice; peace building). There is a strong focus on research theory and practice. Some assignments involve community participation. PUL=1A (major), 2 (moderate), and 6 (minor)
  • COMM-C 400 Health Provider-Consumer Communication (3 cr.) This course is designed to teach communication skills and practices related to health care discourse, by examining transactional communication within health care contexts. Topics covered in this course focus directly upon interpersonal dialogue between health care providers and patients. PUL=4
  • COMM-C 375 Nonverbal Communication (1-3 cr.) Course examines the influences of nonverbal communication cues: interpersonal dynamics, media, environmental dimensions, and rhetorical strategies. Cross-cultural and gender differences in nonverbal codes will also be explored. PUL=2
  • COMM-C 299 Communicating Queer Identity (3 cr.) Discuss queer sexual identity, implications of the controversies surrounding the intersection between LGBT and contextual factors such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, etc. Communicative and behavioral lives of sexual minorities come into focus by employing a critical perspective as we explore self-concept, coming-out, heteronormativity, socio-cultural norms, hate rhetoric, and homophobia PUL=1A, 5, 3
  • COMM-C 382 Dialogue Facilitator Training (3 cr.) P: COMM C290 or permission of the instructor; This course is designed to provide students with both a theoretical and practical foundation in the knowledge, understanding, and skills to effectively facilitate intergroup dialogues. Students will be trained to facilitate intergroup dialogues in a number of campus and community settings. PUL=5
  • COMM-C 282 Experienceing Intergroup Dialogue (3 cr.) In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings across social identity groups. Students will discuss relevant reading material related to social identity, groups, and group discussion and dialogue. Students will participate in exercises that will be explored in class and in weekly journals. Students will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict, and community. Dialogue sessions will take place during class sessions. Under the direction of the faculty, two advanced student facilitators with previous dialogue experience will facilitate the classroom dialogues.  PUL=5,1C
  • COMM-C 383 Women and Leadership Communication (3 cr.) This course is an advanced seminar. In this course you will focus on the theories and research about leadership and women. Seminal and contemporary theories of leadership are surveyed along with research on and about female leadersPUL=1A,3
Communication Studies (COMM)
  • COMM-G 400 Health Provider-Consumer Communication (3 cr.) This course is designed to teach communication skills and practices related to health care discourse, by examining transactional communication within health care contexts. Topics covered in this course focus directly upon interpersonal dialogue between health care providers and patients. PUL=4
  • COMM-G 100 Introduction to Communication Studies (3 cr.) Survey course of history, theory, and practice in each of six major areas: rhetoric and public address, theatre arts, interpersonal/ organizational communication, small group dynamics, public communication, and mass media studies. For each of the areas examined, students will apply theory to practice, thereby learning to become more effective communicators. PUL=1A
  • COMM-G 125 Topics in Communication Studies (1-3 cr.) Select introductory theory and practice in specialized and/or consolidated areas of communication and theatre not directly covered by current curricular offerings. Topics will vary from one semester to another. A student may register for a total of no more than 6 credit hours under this course number. PUL=1A
  • COMM-G 201 Introduction to Communication Theory (3 cr.) A survey of theories in the field of human communication. Consideration is given to theories that explain communication behavior between pairs of people, within groups, in organizations, and in societies. PUL=2
  • COMM-G 310 Introduction to Communication Research (3 cr.) Methodologies and types of data analyses for investigating communication phenomena. Students will acquire knowledge and competencies that will allow them to understand and address the process of communication research and relevant communication research issues. PUL=1B; RISE=R
  • COMM-G 300 Independent Study (1-8 cr.) Research or practical experience in various departmental areas as selected by the student prior to registration, outlined in consultation with the instructor, and approved by the department. If a practicum experience, it must represent a minimum of 45 clock hours of practical application per credit hour. A student shall take no more than a total of 9 credit hours of G300 and G491. PUL=4
  • COMM-G 390 Honors (1-5 cr.) P: Junior standing and departmental approval. Individualized readings and/or project work devised by the student; regular meetings with faculty supervisor. PUL=2
  • COMM-G 391 Advanced Topics in Communicatin Studies (1-6 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Topic announced in prior semester; oriented to current topics in communication and theatre; readings, projects, and papers as indicated by the topic and instructor. May be repeated for a total of 8 credit hours. PUL=3
  • COMM-G 491 Internship (3-6 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. For seniors and majors only. Internship in rhetoric and public address, theatre arts, interpersonal/organizational communication, media studies permitted under the auspices of a qualified cooperating organization. Periodic meetings with faculty advisors and term paper detailing intern's professional activities and reactions. Apply during semester prior to desired internship. Total credit applicable to graduation shall not exceed 9 credit hours of COMM-G 300 and COMM-G 491. PUL=3
  • COMM-G 499 Research Seminar (3 cr.) P: Upper-division standing or permission of instructor. A survey of the methods used by communication researchers for gathering and interpreting information emphasizing the relationship between theory and research, the seminar will explore important issues such as ethics and naturalistic vs. laboratory approaches. PUL=1B
  • COMM-G 480 Senior Capstone in Communication Studies (3 cr.) As your capstone course, this class is designed to help you reflect back on and synthesize your training as a Communication Studies major at IUPUI and to explore ways in which a communication perspective might inform your career after graduation. All Communication Studies majors are required to complete this class, which will address questions such as: What does it mean to approach problems from a communication perspective? What skills and competencies have you acquired through your training as a Communication Studies major? How can you communicate what you have learned and what you can do to future employers? PUL = 3
Media
  • COMM-M 150 Mass Media and Contemporary Society (3 cr.) A critical overview of the role of electronic mass media in contemporary society. Provides an introduction to such issues as industry structure, organization, and economics; regulation, public interest, and media ethics; impact of programming on individuals; media construction of social institutions; media issues in the global village. PUL=2
  • COMM-M 210 Media Message Design (3 cr.) P: W132. Examines the process of message design in the context of institutional media use. Analyses of media messages and communication theory; analyses of the message receiver employ quantitative and qualitative audience research methods. Semester project involves planning and writing of script for use in organizational/institutional media context. PUL=1A
  • COMM-M 215 Media Literacy (3 cr.) Fundamentals and a general understanding of communication technologies are surveyed and discussed in a nontechnical and nonengineering manner. This course will introduce students to basic terminology and to various types of communication technology systems. It will also help students understand new and traditional communication systems and their theories of operation and application (including advantages and limitations). PUL=2
  • COMM-M 220 Electronic Graphic Production (3 cr.) Principles of visual aesthetics and critical visual literacy applied to the production of mediated messages. Basic typographic, graphic, and photographic skills are examined and practical techniques in different media are discussed. Several hands-on projects are used to develop individual competencies. PUL=1C
  • COMM-M 221 Electronic Media Production (3 cr.) Principles of visual and aural aesthetics and critical visual literacy applied to the production of mediated messages. Basic animation, video, and audio skills are examined and practical techniques in different media are discussed. Several hands-on projects are used to develop individual competencies. PUL=1C
  • COMM-M 290 Video Production Workshop (1 cr.) P: or C: COMM-M 221. The practical application of video production techniques. In a production center atmosphere, students are instructed in and practice equipment operation and crew responsibilities creating video productions for outside clients. Students may register for more than one section in one semester. PUL=1C May be repeated to a maximum of 3 credit hours.
  • COMM-M 370 History of Television (3 cr.) The development of television as an industry, technology, and cultural commodity from its roots in other forms of popular culture to the present, paying particular attention to the social and aesthetic contexts within which programs have been viewed. PUL=4
  • COMM-M 373 Film and Video Documentary (3 cr.) P: COMM-M 150, C 190, or permission of instructor. An historical survey of documentary film and video and a consideration of specific problems in documentary theory and practice. PUL=4; RISE=E
  • COMM-M 450 Video Production (3 cr.) For nonmajors only. Television production principles and practices for students in other disciplines. Emphasis on practical studio experiences with special attention to the roles of the writer, producer, and director. No prior knowledge of media required. May not be counted for credit in the media major emphasis. Lab arranged. PUL=1C
  • COMM-M 461 Production Problems in Communication Media (1-3 cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Topic announced during preceding semester. Specialized study and application of advanced production techniques in audio, video, photography, or graphics. Readings, research, papers, and project as indicated by the topic and instructor. PUL=1C May be repeated for different topics.
  • COMM-M 462 Television Aesthetics and Criticism (3 cr.) P: COMM-M 150 or permission of instructor. Aesthetic and critical approaches to modes of television expression. Aesthetics of picture composition, audiovisual relationships, visual narrative, and program content. Analysis of selected television criticism. PUL=4
  • COMM-M 463 Advanced Graphic Technique (3 cr.) P: COMM-M 220 or permission of instructor. Analysis of problems, methods, and technology in graphics. Consideration of advanced techniques in digital image and illustration manipulation including compositing, lighting effects, and different compression formats for video, multimedia, and the World Wide Web. PUL=1C
  • COMM-M 464 Advanced Audio Technique (3 cr.) P: COMM-M 221 or permission of instructor. Analysis of field and studio recording technique with an emphasis on multitrack production. Electronic editing, mixing, and signal processing are considered. Group and individual projects. PUL=1C
  • COMM-M 465 Advanced Video Technique (3 cr.) P: COMM-M 221 or permission of instructor. Analysis of electronic field production and editing with an emphasis in advanced video editing techniques. Both linear and nonlinear editing systems are considered. Individual and/or group projects. PUL=1C
  • COMM-M 466 Television Direction (3 cr.) P: COMM-M 221, COMM-M 290, or permission of instructor. Creative management of production elements to translate a program idea into medium requirements. Advanced course in which the experienced student produced substantive programs combining several formats. Emphasis on design and production from first request by client through program distribution. PUL=1C
Rhetoric
  • COMM-R 224 Parliamentary Procedure (1 cr.) P: reading placement of at least 80, and placement in W131. Modern concepts of parliamentary forms in legislative assemblies and business meetings; practice in the use of parliamentary procedures PUL=2
  • COMM-R 110 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3 cr.) Theory and practice of public speaking; training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content for informative and persuasive situations; application of language and delivery skills to specific audiences. A minimum of six speaking situations. PUL=1A
  • COMM-R 227 Argumentation and Debate (3 cr.) Analysis, evidence, and argument in logical discourse; study of debate forms; practice in argumentative speaking in class, campus, and intercollegiate debate. PUL=2
  • COMM-R 309 Great Speakers: American Public Address (3 cr.) Course introduces students to historical and contemporary public address. Students will study the speechmaking of notable American speakers. The study will include speeches from a wide range of established genres and will include campaign rhetoric, debates, historical celebrations, lectures, legislative speaking, presidential speaking, public meetings, movement, rhetoric, and sermons. PUL=1A
  • COMM-R 310 Rhetoric, Society, and Culture (3 cr.) P: COMM-R 110 or equivalent. Explores the persuasion process by examining the historical development of persuasion theory and practice in the Western world, and by studying and applying rhetorical concepts in contemporary culture to our everyday lives. Students become more critical consumers and practitioners of communication. PUL=5
  • COMM-R 320 Public Communication (3 cr.) P: COMM-R 110 or equivalent. Critical analysis of the public communication efforts of individuals and organizations; emphasis on research, clarity of organization, application of argument strategies, and development and presentation of public communication messages. PUL=5
  • COMM-R 321 Persuasion (3 cr.) P: COMM-R 110 or equivalent. Examines classical and current theories and research related to persuasion and social influence; considers variables affecting implementation of persuasion principles with special emphasis on media and persuasion. Designed to help students become critical consumers and effective, ethical producers and presenters of persuasive messages. PUL=5
  • COMM-R 330 Communication Criticism (3 cr.) P: COMM-G 100 or COMM-R 110 and reading placement of at least 80. Course will introduce students to criticism as a method of studying persuasive messages in speeches, fiction, mass media, music, political campaigns, art, and other modes of communication in contemporary culture. PUL=5
  • COMM-R 350 Women Speak: American Feminist Rhetoric (3 cr.) To understand the ideological development of American feminist rhetoric, we examine: 1) speeches by well known, "Great Women" from the 1600's to the present; 2) non-traditional rhetorical forms of "ordinary women," including diaries, fiction, photography, reading groups; 3) intersections among race, class, ethnicity, sexual preference and gender in public discourse. PUL=1C
  • COMM-R 390 Political Communication (3 cr.) Provides an opportunity to study, understand, and participate in political communication. Topics covered include the rhetoric of politics, campaign discourse, political advertising, the role of the media and public opinion, the impact of new technology, and the place of interpersonal communication. PUL=5
  • COMM-R 478 Persuasion and Media in Social Movements (3 cr.) Social movements require understandings of persuasion and the limitations and opportunities of media for the goals of the movement. This course explores how people mobilize to transform and improve society by applying theories from rhetoric and media studies to social movements both historical and contemporary. PUL=5
Theatre
  • COMM-T 100 Rehearsal and Performance (3-6 cr.) Emphasizes learning through the preparation and performance of plays and nondramatic literature adapted for performance. Various approaches may include but are not limited to performance studies, the study and preparation of a short play, and an original play for young audiences. The various steps and processes involved in the preparation and rehearsal will be based on appropriate theoretical concepts. A student may enroll in no more than 6 credits under this course number. PUL=1A
  • COMM-T 130 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.) An introduction to the study of theatre; the wide range of critical, historical, aesthetic, and practical interests necessary to a well-rounded view; emphasis on theatre as an art form and elements of dramatic construction. PUL=1B
  • COMM-T 133 Introduction to Acting (3 cr.) Acting I, a study of the theories and methods of acting, basic techniques, character analysis, interpretation, and projection. Class scenes. PUL=1A
  • COMM-T 205 Introduction to Oral Interpretation (3 cr.) Basic principles and practice in analysis and reading of selections from prose, poetry, and drama. Public presentation of programs. PUL=1A
  • COMM-T 305 Advanced Oral Interpretation (3 cr.) P: COMM-T 205. C: COMM-C 104. An advanced approach to analysis and oral presentation of literature. Emphasis on group work. Analysis, development, and presentation of readers' theatre or chamber theatre materials. PUL=1A
  • COMM-T 333 Acting II (3 cr.) P: or C: COMM-T 133 or consent of instructor. dvanced scene study. Laboratory in body movement and vocal techniques; participation in laboratory theatre. PUL=1B
  • COMM-T 336 Children’s Theatre (3 cr.) P: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Historical development of children's theatre, with emphasis on scripts appropriate to young audiences: designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, and others in understanding theatre as an art form for children ages 6-12, and in selecting appropriate theatre experiences for various periods of the child's life. PUL=1C
  • COMM-T 337 History of the Theatre I (3 cr.) Significant factors in primary periods of theatre history to the Renaissance and the effect on contemporary theatre; emphasis on trends and developments; review of representative plays of each period to illustrate the theatrical use of dramatic literature. PUL=5
  • COMM-T 338 History of the Theatre II (3 cr.) Continuation of COMM-T 337, beginning with the Renaissance. May be taken separately. PUL=5
  • COMM-T 339 Play Directing (3 cr.) P: COMM-T 130; COMM-T 133 or permission of the instructor. Introduction to theatre, methodology, and techniques: strong emphasis upon play analysis, actor-director communication, stage compositions. Students will direct scenes. PUL=3; RISE=E
  • COMM-T 430 Theatre Management (3 cr.) P: COMM-T 130 or permission of the instructor. This course is based on the concept that theatre is a business and must be operated on sound business principles. Students study the business aspects of operating various types of theatres. The study of the theoretical basis of management is augmented by practical projects. PUL=1B
  • COMM-T 431 Playwriting (3 cr.) Introduction to playwriting theories, methodology, and skills; principles of dramatic structure; practice in writing, culminating in a one-act play manuscript; class evaluation and conferences. Credit not given for both T431 and IUB T453. PUL=3
  • COMM-T 437 Creative Dramatics (3 cr.) Laboratory course in informal dramatics, emphasizing the child rather than the production; includes methods of stimulating the child to imaginative creation of drama with the materials of poetry, stories, choral readings, and music. PUL=3
  • COMM-T 440 The Art and Craft of Puppetry (3 cr.) Theory and practice of puppetry as an art form and as an educational tool. Students will create a wide variety of hand puppets, scripts, and stages as well as master basic techniques of puppet performance. PUL=3; RISE=E
Economics (ECON)
Honors Courses
  • ECON-S 201 Introduction to Microeconomics: Honors (3 cr.) Designed for students of superior ability. Covers the same core materials as E201. PUL=5
  • ECON-S 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics: Honors (3 cr.) Designed for students of superior ability. Covers the same core materials as E202. PUL=5
  • ECON-S 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory in Economics and Business: Honors (3 cr.) P: MATH M118 or MATH M119 or MATH 15900 or C: MATH M119 or MATH 15900 Covers the same core materials as E270 but with more involved applications in economics. PUL=1
Non-Honors Courses
  • ECON-E 447 Economics of the Labor Market (3 cr.) P: E201. Analysis of the functioning of the U.S. labor market. Labor force concepts, unemployment, mobility, wages, and current manpower problems and policies. Analysis of wage determination, wage policy, and their interaction with institutional factors. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 101 Survey of Current Economic Issues and Problems (3 cr.) For nonmajors only. Basic economic principles applied to current social issues and problems. Topics covered will typically include inflation, unemployment, wage and price controls, welfare, social security, national debt, health programs, food prices, pollution, crime, mass transit, revenue sharing, multinationals, population, and energy. Not open to those with previous college-level economics courses. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 111 Topics in the Economic History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) Selected topics in the economic history of Western civilization, including the growth of the market organization, industrialization, institutional growth and change, imperialism, and labor. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 112 Topics in the Economic History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) Selected topics in the economic history of Western civilization, including the growth of the market organization, industrialization, institutional growth and change, imperialism, and labor. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 201 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing. ECON-E 201 is a general introduction to microeconomic analysis. Discussed are the method of economics, scarcity of resources, the interaction of consumers and businesses in the market place in order to determine price, and how the market system places a value on factors of production. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. An introduction to macroeconomics that studies the economy as a whole; the levels of output, prices, and employment; how they are measured and how they can be changed; money and banking; international trade; and economic growth. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 270 Introduction to Statistical Theory in Economics (3 cr.) P: MATH-M 118. Analysis and interpretation of statistical data in business and economics. Discussion of frequency distribution, measures of central tendency and variability, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, and time series. PUL=1
  • ECON-E 303 Survey of International Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Survey of international economics. Basis for and effects of international trade, commercial policy and effects of trade restrictions, balance of payments and exchange rate adjustment, international monetary systems, and fixed vs. flexible exchange rates. Students who have taken ECON-E 430 many not enroll in ECON-E 303 for credit. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 304 Survey of Labor Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. Economics problems of the wage earner in modern society; structure, policies, and problems of labor organizations; employer and governmental labor relationships. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 305 Money and Banking (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Money and banking system of the United States, including problems of money and the price level, proper organization and functioning of commercial banking and Federal Reserve System, monetary standards, and credit control. Recent monetary and banking trends. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 307 Current Economic Issues (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or permission of instructor. Current economic issues, problems, and research methods. Designed to explore in depth an economic issue currently before the public or to examine a particular aspect of the methodology of economics. Examples would be a study of the economic aspects of discrimination, a study of urban economic policy, or a study of simplified models in economics. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 308 Survey of Public Finance (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Analysis of government expenditures and revenue sources, taxation and capital formation, public debt and inflation, growth in government spending, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 321 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202, MATH-M 119. Theory of demand; theory of production; pricing under different market conditions; allocation and pricing of resources; partial and general equilibrium theory; and welfare economics. Analysis of current economic problems and technology changes in firms and industries. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 322 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Theory of income, employment, and price level. Study of countercyclical and other public policy measures. National income accounting. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 323 Urban Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Introduction to basic concepts and techniques of urban economic analysis to facilitate understanding of urban problems; urban growth and structure, poverty, housing, transportation, and public provision of urban services. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 325 Comparative Economic Systems (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Essential economic theories and features of economic systems, including private enterprise, authoritarian socialism, and liberal socialism. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 326 Applied Research in Urban Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202 or permission of instructor. Field research in urban economics. Topics to be selected by students, covering such areas as human resource problems, transportation and housing surveys, demographic shifts, and income distribution issues. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 335 Introduction to Mathematical Methods in Economics (4 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202, MATH-M 118-M119. Introduction to quantitative techniques used in economics, and instruction in the application of these techniques to the analysis of economics problems. PUL=1
  • ECON-E 337 Economic Development (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201, ECON-E 202, and junior standing or consent of instructor. Characteristics of economically underdeveloped countries. Obstacles to sustained growth; planning and other policies for stimulating growth; examination of development problems and experience in particular countries. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 355 Monetary Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 305 or ECON-E 322 or equivalents. Supply and demand functions for money in the context of models of the U.S. economy. Formulation of Federal Reserve policy decisions and effects on interest rates, prices, output, and employment. Current problems in monetary policy and theory. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 363 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Basic theory and policy of such topics as pollution, resource depletion, environmental risk, and resource conservation. Issues covered include limits to growth, quality of life, and the appropriate roles for the private market and federal control. Credit not given for both ECON-E 363 and ECON-E 463. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 380 Law and Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or permission of instructor. The application of economic method to legal institutions and legal issues. Examples would be the optimum use of resources to prevent crime, the economic value of a human life, the economic consequences of regulating the business firm, the economics of property rights, torts, and contracts. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 385 Economics of Industry (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or permission of instructor. A theoretical and empirical analysis of the structure, conduct, and performance of major American industries. Emphasized is the degree of competition in various markets, how markets operate under conditions of competition or monopoly, and competition as a dynamic process over time. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 387 Health Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. This course applies economic theory to the study of policy issues in health economics. Specific issues included are: determinants of demand for medical services and insurance; training and pricing behavior of physicians; pricing behavior and costs of hospitals; market and regulative approaches. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 406 Senior Seminar (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 321 and ECON-E 322 or permission of instructor. Assessment of the current state of economic knowledge and discussion of how economics is applied to study the problems facing modern society. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 408 Undergraduate Readings in Economics (3 cr. maximum cr.) P: Permission of instructor. Individual readings and research. PUL=5,1
  • ECON-E 410 Selected Topics in U.S. Economic History (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Analysis of selected topics, including transportation developments, government intervention, systems of property rights, slavery, economic growth, income distribution, economic stability, technical change, and others. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 414 Economics of the Nonprofit Sector (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. The role of nonprofit organizations (universities, churches, hospitals, orchestras, charities, day care, research, nursing homes) in mixed economics. Public policy controversies such as regulation of fundraising, antitrust against universities, "unfair" competition with for-profit firms, and the tax treatment of donations. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 420 History of Economic Thought (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Examination of main theoretical developments since the beginning of the systematic study of economics. Theoretical propositions and structures of the earlier writers will be interpreted and evaluated in terms of modern economic analysis. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 430 Introduction to International Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. Forces determining international trade, finance, and commercial policy under changing world conditions; theory of international trade; structure of world trade; tariff and trade control policies; the balance of payments problem; evolution of international economic institutions; and monetary relations. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 441 Economics of Labor Markets (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201, ECON-E 321, and ECON-E 270 or equivalent. Analysis of the functioning of labor markets with theoretical, empirical, and policy applications in determination of employment and wages in the U.S. economy. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 450 Business Conditions Analysis and Forecasting (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201-E202. This course examines sources of instability in industrialized economies. Various theories of the business cycle are examined and critiqued. In addition, the empirical determinant of aggregate demand, prices, and interest rates are discussed. Alternative forecasting techniques are considered and the use of these techniques is demonstrated. PUL=1
  • ECON-E 470 Introduction to Econometrics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 270, MATH-M 119. Application of regression analysis to economic and business data. Estimation and hypothesis testing of classical regression model. Heteroscedasticity, collinearity, errors in observation, functional forms, and autoregressive models. Estimation of simultaneous equation models. Credit will not be given for both ECON-E 470 and ECON-E 472. PUL=1
  • ECON-E 485 Economic and Social Control of Industry (Antitrust) (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201 or permission of instructor. This course is a study of the economic reasoning behind and consequences of the application of antitrust laws aimed at altering the structure, conduct, and performance of the American economy. Specific legal cases that have been brought under the Sherman Act, the Clayton Act, as amended, and the Federal Trade Commission Act are analyzed. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 102 Economics of Personal Finance (3 cr.) Shows how the state of the economy, prices, and interest rates should guide personal decisions about spending, saving, credit, investments, and insurance. Intended for non-business students. PUL=5
  • ECON-E 375 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3 cr.)
Graduate Courses
  • ECON-E 541 Labor Market Analysis (3 cr.) P: consent of instructor An analytical approach to the labor market. Theoretical underpinning and statistical testing of issues on demand and supply of labor, household decision making, human capital, contract theories, unionism, minimum wages, and discrimination.
  • ECON-E 585 Industrial Organization and Control (3 cr.) P: consent of instructor Analysis of interrelated structure, behavior, and performance in industrial markets and multimarket corporations; multidimensional nature of competitive processes. Public controls. Topics include patterns of oligopoly, vertical integration, entry barriers, ‘‘cartelized’’ coalescence, limit pricing, price discrimination, long-term contracts, capacity expansion and utilization, resource reallocation, and innovation.
  • ECON-E 551 Monetary Economics II (3 cr.)

    Introduces alternative models of monetary economies; covers topics in monetary economics such as money and growth and optimal money growth. This course takes a unified approach to macroeconomic policy, treating moneytary and fiscal policy as jointly determining macroeconomic equilibria. May include discussion of empirical work on money.

  • ECON-E 667 Nonprofit/Philanthropic Economics I (3 cr.) P: ECON E516, ECON E521, and ECON E573.

    The economic analysis of Altruism, Voluntary Action & Public Goods. Consideration of individual decisions to give, volunteer, or help others including alternative formulations of utility, game structures, determinants of behavior, and consequences for social welfare.

  • ECON-E 668 Nonprofit/Philanthropic Economics II (3 cr.) P: ECON E516, ECON E573, and ECON E611.

    The economic analysis of Nonprofit Organizations. Consideration of organizational behavior and the role of formal philanthropic institutions and organizations in the broader economy. Role of nonprofits, modeling nonprofit behavior, empirical testing of theories [public goods, contract theory, subsidy theories, entrepreneurial sorting, et al], public policy toward nonprofit organizations.

  • ECON-E 765 Seminar/Workshop in Nonprofits/Philanthropic Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON E668.

    Current topics in advanced nonprofit/philanthropic economics. Preparation of a research paper and oral presentation to a seminar.

  • ECON-E 504 Mathematics for Economists (3 cr.) Topics in mathematics that are particularly useful in the application of microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, and econometrics. Topics covered include: matrix algebra, comparative-static analysis, constrained optimization, difference equations in discrete time, game theory, and set theory as applied to general equilibrium analysis.
  • ECON-E 513 Special Topics in Economic History (3 cr.) Explicit methodology and economic analysis applied to major issues in American and European economic history.
  • ECON-E 514 The Nonprofit Economy and Public Policy (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 201. The role of nonprofit organizations (universities, churches, hospitals, orchestras, charities, day care, research, nursing homes) in mixed economies. Public policy controversies such as regulation of fundraising, antitrust against universities, "unfair" competition with for-profit firms, and the tax treatment of donations. (This course may not be taken for credit by anyone who has received credit for ECON-E 414.)
  • ECON-E 519 Regional Economics (3 cr.) Regional economics is the study of economic behavior in space. The course examines the internal and interregional determinants of growth and decline of a region from supply and demand perspectives. Public policies to influence these determinants are considered.
  • ECON-E 521 Theory of Prices and Markets (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 504 or consent of instructor. Pure theory of consumer behavior, competitive exchange, theory of production; resource allocation, Pareto optimum, monopoly and monopsony, imperfect competition, moral hazard, adverse selection, and market signaling.
  • ECON-E 522 Macroeconomic Theory 1 (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 520. Introductory course on macroeconomic dynamics; covers growth models and asset pricing theories, endogenous growth theories, optiomal growth problems, and competitive dynamic equilibrium models. Dynamic programming tools introduced as needed. All models are cast in discrete time setup; presents deterministic and stochastic theories.
  • ECON-E 528 Economic Analysis of Health Care (3 cr.) A graduate introduction to health economics. Applications of economic theory to problems in various areas in health care. Applications of econometric techniques to the same. Topics include how physicians, institutions, and consumers respond to economic incentives and what policies contribute maximally to efficiency and welfare.
  • ECON-E 545 Applied Labor Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 321 or ECON-E 470 or equivalents. Discussion of wage rates and working conditions, searches by workers or firms, investment in training, quits and layoffs, shirking, discrimination, the division of household labor, retirement, and implicit contracts. The course also examines the impact of institutions such as unions and the government on the efficiency of the labor market
  • ECON-E 568 Public Finance I (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 308 and ECON-E 470. Partial equilibrium, microeconomic analysis of how tax and subsidy policies affect various types of individual and firm behavior. Theoretical models are introduced to assess and develop quantitative studies of fiscal policy. Summaries of the empirical impact of policy will be formed for the purpose of becoming an "input" in the complete general equilibrium analysis conducted in Public Finance II.
  • ECON-E 569 Public Finance II (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 568. Empirical examination of the general equilibrium effects of major tax and subsidy programs, such as personal income taxation, corporate profit taxation, income maintenance, social security, and government provision of education. In addition, proposed reforms to these programs will be analyzed using empirically based simulation models.
  • ECON-E 570 Fundamentals of Statistics and Econometrics (3 cr.) Mathematical overview of statistics and econometrics at graduate level. Topics covered include probability and probability distributions, sampling distributions, tests of hypotheses, estimation, simple regression, multiple regression, generalized linear model and its applications, simultaneous equation system.
  • ECON-E 574 Applied Econometrics and Forecasting (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 570. An overview of techniques employed in economic model building, estimation, and usage. Topics covered include single and multi-equation system estimation, limited dependent variable regression techniques, hypothesis testing, policy analysis, and forecasting. Various forecasting techniques are discussed, including smoothing and decomposition methods and time series analysis. A number of projects are assigned throughout the semester in order to give the student hands-on experience with the different techniques.
  • ECON-E 581 Topics in Applied Microeconomics I (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 521. This course is a graduate-level introduction to theoretical and empirical applications in one or more areas of microeconomics. We will demonstrate how economic concepts can be usefully applied to understanding problems in the subdiscipline under study and discuss and apply estimation techniques appropriate for problems in the area.
  • ECON-E 582 Topics in Applied Microeconomics II (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 521 and ECON-E 570 or consent of the instructor. This course is a second graduate-level introduction to theoretical and empirical applications in two areas of microeconomics. We will demonstrate how economic concepts can be usefully applied to understanding problems in the subdiscipline under study, and discuss and apply estimation techniques appropriate for problems in the area.
  • ECON-E 583 Introduction to Applied Macroeconomics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 522 and ECON-E 570 or equivalents and consent of the instructor. This course is a graduate-level introduction to theoretical and empirical applications in two areas of macroeconomics. We will demonstrate how economic theories can be usefully applied to understanding problems in the subdiscipline under study and discuss and apply estimation and calibration techniques appropriate for problems in the area.
  • ECON-E 600 Research in Economics (arr. cr.)
  • ECON-E 808 Thesis (M.A.) (arr. cr.)
  • ECON-E 515 Institutional Setting for Health Economics in the U.S. (3 cr.) P: or C: ECON-E 521 and ECON-E 571. Overview of the structure fo the U.S. health care system including health care financing, health care delivery, and government programs. Private and public financing mechanisms as well as government regulation. Comparison of the U.S. system to the health care systems of other countries.
  • ECON-E 516 Institutional Setting for Nonprofit/Philanthropic Economics (3 cr.) P: or C: ECON-E 521 and ECON-E 571. This course provides a broad overview of nonprofit institutions and philanthropic practices, along with a discussion of available data sources on each. We discuss the size and scope of nonprofit organizations, revenues, goverance, regulation and taxation, intersectoral relations, patterns of philanthorpy, and public policies that affect giving behaviors.
  • ECON-E 520 Optimization Theory in Economic Analysis (3 cr.) P: Calculus and Linear Algebra. Introduction to concepts and techniques of optimization theory applied in modern micro and macroeconomics. Theory and application of Lagrange multipliers, comparative statics analysis, valve functions and envelope theorems. Elements of dynamic programming and other methods of economics dynamics.
  • ECON-E 571 Econometrics I-Statistical Foundations (3 cr.) P: Calculus and Linear Algebra. Introduction to concepts and techniques of optimization theory applied in modern micro and macroeconomics. Theory and application of Lagrange multipliers, comparative statics analysis, valve functions and envelope theorems. Elements of dynamic programming and other methods of economics dynamics.
  • ECON-E 573 Econometrics II (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 571. Estimation and inference in linear regression model, basic asymoptotic theory, heteroskedasticity, measurement error, generalized least squares, instrumental variable model, maximum likelihood estimation, generalized method of moments, qualitative response models.
  • ECON-E 577 Computer Methods and Data Analysis (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 570 or ECON-E 573. Introduction to applied economic research using statistical software and econometric programming. Applications from key micro datasets.
  • ECON-E 578 Advanced Computer Methods and Complex Datasets (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 577. Conducting empirical research with advanced computer methods and complex datasets.
  • ECON-E 611 Information Economics and Theories of Incentives and Contracts (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 521. The course covers topics in the theories of incentives and contracts that study situations in which there are explicit or implicit contractual obligations. It explores the role and influence of asymmetric information in determining outcomes with special emphases on moral hazard and adverse selection.
  • ECON-E 621 Theories of Prices and Market (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 520. Analysis of equilibrium, first- and second-orderconditions; statistical derivation of demand and cost curves; activity analysis; general equilibrium; welfare economics; microeconomics of capital theory; pure oligopoly and gave theory.
  • ECON-E 643 Health Economics I (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 515, ECON-E 573, and ECON-E 611. Production of health, demand for health, determinants of health, health disparities, international comparisons, cost-effectiveness and valuation.
  • ECON-E 644 Health Economics II (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 515, ECON-E 573, and ECON-E 611. Health insurance, moral hazard, adverse selection, demand for health care with health insurance, geographic variations in care, health care disparities, employersponsored insurance and labor markets, provision of health care (physicians, hospitals, managed care), government programs (Medicare and Medicaid), R&D and pharmaceuticals, technological change, costs and cost containment.
  • ECON-E 670 Econometrics 3-System and Panel Econometric Models (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 573 or equivalent. Simultaneous equation models (2SLS, 3SLS), time series concepts for panel data analysis and serial correlation, pooled cross-section methods, linear panel data models [First Differences, Fixed Effects (FE) and Random Effects (RE)], nonlinear panel data models (ML and GMM).]
  • ECON-E 673 Econometrics 4-Microeconometrics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 573 or equivalent. Microeconometrics with applications to labor, health, and public economics. Extensive coverage of limited dependent variable and panel data models. Empirical implementation is an essential component of the course.
  • ECON-E 744 Seminar/Workshop in Health Economics (3 cr.) P: ECON-E 644. Current topics in advanced health economics. Preparation of a research paper and oral presentation to a seminar.
  • ECON-E 800 Research in Economics (arr cr.)
  • ECON-E 809 Thesis (PhD) (arr. cr.)
English (ENG, EAP, FILM, LING)
Concentrations
Creative Writing
  • ENG-W 423 Genre Fiction: Science Fiction and Fantasy (3 cr.) P: ENG W301

    This course in speculative fiction is designed for advanced creative writers.  It examines world building, plot development, and focuses on character development.  At course end, students will have a publishable story with a query letter.  PUL=1A

  • ENG-W 206 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 cr.) An introduction to the techniques and principles of creative writing. Written assignments, independent work, and workshop discussions of the fundamentals of fiction, poetry, and drama. This course may be used as a prerequisite for all 300-level courses in creative writing. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 207 Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.) An introduction to the techniques and principles of fiction writing. Written assignments, workshop discussions of student work in progress, seminar study of classic and contemporary examples of the genre. This course may be used as a prerequisite for ENG W301, ENG W302,or ENG W305.  This course is recommended for English majors pursuing a concentration in creative writing.  PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 208 Introduction to Poetry Writing (3 cr.) ENG-W 208 offers students an introduction to the craft and practice of poetry writing: how to find subjects for writing; how to create images, similes, and metaphors; how to make rhyme sound natural; how to produce both metered and free-verse poetry. Part of the class will be a workshop in which students will learn to revise their poems and those of fellow students. This course can serve as a prerequisite for ENG-W 303 or ENG-W 305. This course is recommended for English majors pursuing a concentration in creative writing. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 280 Literary Editing and Publishing (3 cr.) P: Any literature course; ENG-W 206, ENG-W 207, or ENG-W 208. Offers theory and practice in the development of literary publications. Individual and group exercises and formal assignments will encourage the analysis and evaluation of poetry, fiction, and essays to develop students' personal and professional aesthetics. An issue of IUPUI's student literary magazine "genesis" will be edited during the semester. PUL=2
  • ENG-W 301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 207 or permission of the instructor. An intermediate course in the theory and practice of fiction writing with seminar study of relevant materials and criticism of student work in class and conference. PUL=1A; RISE-Experiential Learning May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 302 Screenwriting (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 207, or permission of instructor. A practical course in basic techniques of writing for film and television. Covers the essentials of dramatic structure, story development, characterization and theme, scene construction, dialogue, and, briefly, the practicalities of working as a screenwriter today. PUL=1A; Rise-Experiential Learning
  • ENG-W 303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 206 or ENG-W 208 or permission of the instructor. An intermediate course in the theory and practice of poetry writing with seminar study of relevant materials and criticism of student work in class and conference. PUL=1A; RISE-Experiential Learning
  • ENG-W 408 Creative Writing for Teachers (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 206, ENG-W 207, or ENG-W 208. Offers current and future teachers insights into the creative writing process, teaches them to think as writers do, suggests strategies for critiquing creative work, and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 305 Writing Creative Nonfiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 206, ENG-W 207, ENG-W 208, or permission of the instructor. An intermediate course in the theory and practice of creative nonfiction prose, with seminar study of relevant materials and workshop discussion of student work in progress. PUL=1A; RISE-Experiential Learning
  • ENG-W 401 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 301. Study and practice in the writing of fiction. Analysis of examples from contemporary literature accompanies class criticism and discussion. PUL=1A; RISE-Experiential Learning May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 403 Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 303. Study and practice in the writing of poetry. Analysis of examples from contemporary poets accompanies class criticism and discussion. PUL=1A; RISE-Experiential Learning
  • ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Individual projects determined in consultation with instructor. Credit varies with scope of project. PUL=1A. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 407 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 305. An advanced workshop in the craft of creative nonfiction, with special attention given to defining the genre and its craft. PUL=1A RISE-Experiential Learning
Film Studies (FILM)
  • FILM-C 292 An Introduction to Film (3 cr.) Nature of film technique and film language; analysis of specific films; major historical, theoretical, and critical developments in film and film study from the beginnings of cinema to the present. PUL=3
  • FILM-C 390 The Film and Society: Topics (3 cr.) Film and politics; race and gender; social influences of the cinema; rise of the film industry. May be repeated once with different topic. PUL=4
  • FILM-C 391 The Film: Theory and Aesthetics (3 cr.) Film form and techniques; aesthetic and critical theories of the cinema; relationships between film movements and literary and artistic movements; relationships of word and image; analysis of significant motion pictures. PUL=4
  • FILM-C 392 Genre Study in Film (3 cr.) Problems of definition; the evolution of film genres such as criminal or social drama, comedy, the western, science fiction, horror, or documentary film; themes, subject matter, conventions, and iconography peculiar to given genres; relationship of film genres to literary genres. Focus on one specific genre each time the course is offered. PUL=3 May be repeated once with different topic.
  • FILM-C 393 History of European and American Films I (3 cr.) FILM-C 393 is a survey of the development of cinema during the period 1895-1926 (the silent film era). PUL=3
  • FILM-C 394 History of European and American Films II (3 cr.) FILM-C 394 is a survey of European and American cinema since 1927. Particular attention paid to representative work of leading filmmakers, emergence of film movements and development of national trends, growth of film industry, and impact of television. PUL=1C
  • FILM-C 491 Authorship and Cinema (3 cr.) Study of the work of one or more film artists. Attention paid to the style, themes, and methods that make the filmmaker's work unique. Filmmakers studied in the contexts of film traditions, ideologies, and industries that informed their work. PUL=4 May be repeated once with a different topic.
  • FILM-C 493 Film Adaptations of Literature (3 cr.) Analysis of the processes and problems involved in turning a literary work (novel, play, or poem) into a screenplay and then into a film. Close study of literary and film techniques and short exercises in adaptation. PUL=2
  • ENG-W 260 Writing of Film Criticism (3 cr.) Viewing and critiquing currently playing films, with emphasis on genre, authorship, and cinematic and narrative values. Attention to cultural, historical, and ideological contexts. Students view contemporary films. This is a writing course, which teaches the writing of film criticism; students produce first drafts, present them to classmates for peer reviewing, and complete a final draft for grading. Essays spanning film history serve as models for review writing. PUL=2
  • FILM-C 350 Film Noir (3 cr.) Private detectives, femmes fatales, dark, shadowy criminal underworlds. But what, really, is Film Noir? A genre? A historical cycle? Film scholars don't agree. Ironic noirs of the 1940's and 1950's lurk here alongside international examples, precursors, and contemporary neo-noirs. PUL=3
  • FILM-C 351 Musicals (3 cr.) A study of the genre from the dawn of "talkies" to the "Glee" era; the film musical in its folk, fairy tale, and show business variants; the "organic" musical; Busby Berkeley; Astaire and Rogers; the Freed Unit at M-G-M; Broadway adaptations; revisionist musicals; revival in the 2000s: All will be covered. PUL=3
  • FILM-C 352 Biopics (3 cr.) We will study one of the richest, but most underappreciated of film genres, the film biography, better known as the biopic. You will learn to discuss biography as a genre; to assess mythmaking in the telling of lives; to analyze the ways that biographical films work cinematically; and to see how, as a dynamic form, the biopic continues to produce portraits of what it means to distinguish oneself in the world. PUL=1C
  • FILM-C 361 Hollywood Studio Era 1930-1949 (3 cr.) This class deals with a vitally important period in film history as related to American history during the Great Depression, World War II, and the immediate postwar years. We will learn the various elements of filmmaking as practiced in a self-contained production system under which each cinematic component--from camerawork to acting to costuming to editing--had a department dedicated to it. We will learn about audiences and moviegoing during a time when movies were the national pastime in America and in many other countries. We will learn how to identify studio style, genre, to analyze the significance of stars and acting codes. We will study the roles of the actor, the writer, the producer, and the director in this system in which talents were signed to long-term contracts and were essentially owned by the companies. In writing, oral discussions, and exams, you should be able to analyze films of the Studio Era on several levels: What do they have to say as products of an American entertainment industry during two turbulent periods in America? What is the "classical cinema" and how does it combine what Richard B. Jewell calls "some standardization" with "a certain amount of freshness, of innovation, of novelty" demanded by the public? How do we recognize house style, individual authorship, and the differences between them? What is genre? And how do we write about and discuss these elements? PUL=4
  • FILM-C 362 Hollywood in the 1950s (3 cr.) This course, the second in a series on the history of the sound film, concerns one of the most critical periods of change both in American life and in the American film as art and entertainment. The late forties and early fifties in America brought the end of two decades of depression and world war and the coming of prosperity, suburbs, the baby boom, the Cold War, television, and the first stirrings of the Civil Rights movement. For Hollywood, the era forced the end of the unified mass audience and with it the breakup of the old powerful studios. Now came the (first) age of the blockbuster, of widescreen and stereophonic sound, of youth films, and Method acting, of a measure of psychological realism, and a new division, however, artificial, between art and entertainment films. The fifties are a fascinating period of reinvention and transition. Television, the blacklist, widescreen, Method acting, psychological realism, the decline of the Production Code, the influence of art cinema; iconic films from "Sunset Blvd." to "Some Like It Hot," "Singin' in the Rain" to "The Searchers," "Rebel Without a Cause" to "On the Waterfront." PUL=1C
  • FILM-C 380 French Cinema (3 cr.) Arguably the world's most fervid and versatile film culture; the first public film showings; the first fantasy/science fiction films; the wide-screen lens; the idea of film noir, the Auteur Theory, the New Wave; philosophy and aesthetics, culture and politics; the cross-pollenation between French and U.S. cinemas. PUL=2.
Language and Linguistics
  • ENG-Z 206 Introduction to Language Use (3 cr.) An introduction to how we use language in our lives. This course explores how and why language varies between different groups and places, as well as the role of context in language meaning and interpretation. Insights are applied to understanding the impact of literature, film, writing, and other disciplines. PUL=4
  • ENG-Z 301 History of the English Language (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. A study of the origins of the English language, focusing on how and why English has changed over time. Topics include: the process of language standardization and its impact on education and literacy, relationships between language and literature, and the changing role of English around the world. PUL=3
  • ENG-Z 302 Understanding Language Structure: Syntax (3 cr.) R: ENG-Z 205 is recommended. An introduction to how language is organized at the sentence level, focusing on what it means to know how to produce and understand grammatical sentences. The acquition of syntax by children learning their first language and non-native speakers learning a second language will be studied. PUL=2
  • ENG-Z 432 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 205. An introduction to a broad range of issues in the field of second language acquisition, providing the student with an overview of the most important approaches to the fundamental questions of how people learn a second language. Provides students with basic knowledge of theories of second language acquisition and an understanding of how theoretical perspectives inform practical application. PUL=2; RISE=Research
  • ENG-Z 441 Materials Preparation for ESL Instruction (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 205. Students learn about materials preparation, syllabus design, and test preparation by applying a variety of theories to books and other ESL (English as a Second Language) teaching devices (e.g., ESL tapes, videotapes, and software programs) in order to evaluate their usefulness. Students will learn to evaluate ESL materials for adequacy. PUL=4; RISE=Experiential Learning
  • ENG-Z 104 Language in our World (3 cr.) This course explores the power and importance of language in our everyday lives and looks at how language unites and separates us culturally, politically, socially, and psychologically. PUL=5
  • ENG-Z 204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage (3 cr.) An introduction to English grammar and usage that studies the rhetorical impact of grammatical structures (such as noun phrases, prepositional phrases, and different sentence patterns). This course considers language trends and issues, the role of correctness in discourse communities, and the relations between writing in context and descriptive and prescriptive grammars and usage guides. PUL=3
  • ENG-Z 205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to how language, and English in particular, is structured, including soundS (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentences (syntax) and meaning (semantics). Discussions focus on examples from everyday language and the application of these basic concepts to real world contexts, including language teaching and learning. PUL=2
  • ENG-Z 310 Language in Context: Sociolinguistics (3 cr.) R: ENG-Z 206 is recommended. This course explores the relationships among language, society, and culture. The interplay between social factors such as age, sex, status, class, and education and language use are discussed within the framework of various theoretical and methodological approaches. Perceptions of several varieties of English are investigated. PUL=4; RISE=Research
  • ENG-Z 434 Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 432 or consent of instructor. The course examines recent theories of teaching English as a second or foreign language. Students will get a chance to examine theories and methods and develop knowledge of linguistic resources available to new and/or practicing teachers. PUL=3; RISE=Experiential Learning
  • ENG-Z 303 Understanding Language Meaning: Semantics (3 cr.) Examines the question of meaning, with a focus on the English language. After introducing various approaches to the study of meaning, the course examines how linguistic semantics analyzes such concepts as entities, events, time, space, possibility, and negation, and how these relate to human culture and cognition. PUL- 2
  • ENG-Z 405 Topics in the Study of Language (3 cr.) This is a variable topics course in the study of the English Language. PUL=2
Literary Study
  • ENG-L 374 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature II (3 cr.) Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature. Topics may vary and include, for example, Freud and literature, responses to revolution, the literature of technology, and literature and colonialism. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 478 Literature and Medicine (3 cr.) This course explores the medical world in literature and the arts, in popular culture, and through the institution of the hospital. (A junior/senior integrator course.) PUL=5
  • ENG-L 105 Appreciation of Literature (3 cr.) Stresses the enjoyment and humane values of literature. It will provide workshop experiences and programmed exercises as well as experience in listening to and studying visual adaptations of poems, novels, and dramas. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 115 Literature for Today (3 cr.) P: W131. Poems, dramas, and narratives pertinent to concerns of our times: e.g., works concerning values of the individual and society, problems of humanism in the modern world, and conflicts of freedom and order. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.) Close analysis of representative texts (poetry, drama, fiction) designed to develop the art of lively, responsible reading through class discussion and writing of papers. Attention to literary design and critical method. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.) Representative significant plays to acquaint students with characteristics of drama as a type of literature. Readings may include plays from several ages and countries. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.) Representative works of fiction; structural technique in the novel, theories and kinds of fiction, and thematic scope of the novel. Readings may include novels and short stories from several ages and countries. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.) Kinds, conventions, and elements of poetry in a selection of poems from several historical periods. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 207 Women and Literature (3 cr.) Issues and approaches to critical study of women writers in British and American literature. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 208 Topics in English and American Literature and Culture (3 cr.) Selected works of English and/or American literature in relation to a single cultural problem or theme. Topics vary from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 213 Literary Masterpieces I (3 cr.) Students in ENG-L 213 study major western literary works from the ancient world to the Renaissance. This course provides students with an opportunity to become familiar with great works that are foundational for modern Western culture. These ancient works still have an up-to-date impact on our lives since our core beliefs are still built, to a larger extent than is often realized, on a foundation established by these ancient, medieval, and Renaissance classics, including works of Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, and others. Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 214 Literary Masterpieces II (3 cr.) ENG-L 214 covers major Western literary works from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Texts are selected from a variety of genres and nations, with an emphasis on works that have been particularly famous and influential. Works by Cervantes, Voltaire, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Mann, Ibsen, Kafka, and others are typically included. Emphasis will be on making the literature accessible and interesting, relating it to historical events and contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills. Non-English works will be read in English translation. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.) Rapid reading of at least a dozen major plays and poems. May not be taken concurrently with L315. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 245 Introduction to Caribbean Literature (3 cr.) Introduces students who have a limited knowledge of the Caribbean region to the basic themes of Caribbean literature. Examines the ways in which Caribbean writers present a colonial past and its effect on Caribbean culture in their attempts to "write back" to imperialist thought. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 301 Critical and Historical Survey of English Literature I (3 cr.) Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from the beginnings to Swift and Pope. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 302 Critical and Historical Survey of English Literature II (3 cr.) Representative selections with emphasis on major writers from the rise of romanticism to the present. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 305 Chaucer (3 cr.) Chaucer's works with special emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.) A close reading of a representative selection of Shakespeare's major plays. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 348 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.) Forms, techniques, and theories of fiction as exemplified by such writers as Scott, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 351 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature I (3 cr.) American writers to 1865: Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and two or three additional major writers. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 352 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature II (3 cr.) American writers, 1865-1914: Twain, Dickinson, James, and two or three additional major writers.
  • ENG-L 354 Critical and Historical Study of American Literature III (3 cr.) Study of modernist and contemporary American writers in various genres, 1914 to the present, including Frost, Stein, Faulkner, O'Connor, Baldwin, Morrison, and others. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 355 American Novel: Cooper to Dreiser (3 cr.) Representative nineteenth-century American novels. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 358 Twentieth-Century American Fiction (3 cr.) Study of major trends in American fiction since 1900, including such topics as experimentalism and the development of minority literatures. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 363 American Drama (3 cr.) Main currents in American drama to the present. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 365 Modern Drama: Continental (3 cr.) Special attention to Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Hauptmann, Pirandello, Brecht, and Sartre and to the theatre of the absurd. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 366 Modern Drama: English, Irish, and American (3 cr.) Twentieth-century drama, from Bernard Shaw and Eugene O'Neill to Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, Marsha Norman, and August Wilson. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 370 Black American Writing (3 cr.) A study of the major black American writers, with special emphasis on recent writing. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 372 Contemporary American Fiction (3 cr.) Examination of representative American fiction since 1955 in its social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics include such issues as the representation of truth in fiction, intertextuality, and the transgressions of genre boundaries. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 373 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature I (3 cr.) Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature. Topics may vary and include, for example, Freud and literature, responses to revolution, the literature of technology, and literature and colonialism. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 376 Literature for Adolescents (3 cr.) An examination of the nature and scope of adolescent literature. Wide reading of contemporary literature, with emphasis on the value of selections for secondary school students and appropriate modes of study. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 378 Studies in Women and Literature (3 cr.) British and American authors such as George Eliot or Gertrude Stein; groups of authors such as the Bronte sisters or recent women poets; or genres and modes such as autobiography, film, or criticism. Topics will vary by semester. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 379 American Ethnic and Minority Literature (3 cr.) Analysis of literature by and about immigrants from diverse cultures as well as ethnic literature about groups such as African Americans, Appalachians, Hispanics, and Native Americans, from a historical and thematic perspective. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 381 Recent Writing (3 cr.) Selected writers of contemporary significance. May include groups and movements (such as black writers, poets of projective verse, new regionalists, parajournalists and other experimenters in pop literature, folk writers, and distinctly ethnic writers); several recent novelists, poets, or critics; or any combination of groups. May be repeated once for credit by special arrangement with the Department of English. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 382 Fiction of the Non-Western World (3 cr.) An in-depth study of selected narratives from the fiction of the non-Western world. Focus and selections vary from year to year. May be repeated once for credit. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 385 Science Fiction (3 cr.) A survey of British and American science fiction from the nineteenth to the twentieth century with an emphasis on the latter. PUL=1C
  • ENG-L 390 Children’s Literature (3 cr.) Historical and modern children's books and selections from books. Designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best in children's literature for each period of the child's life. PUL=2
  • ENG-L 406 Topics in African American Literature (3 cr.) Focuses on a particular genre, time period, or theme in African American literature. Topics may include twentieth-century African American women's novels, black male identity in African American literature, or African American autobiography. May be repeated once for credit with different focus. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 431 Topics in Literary Study (3 cr.) Study of characteristics and development of literary forms or modes (e.g., studies in narrative, studies in romanticism). Topics vary from year to year. PUL=5; RISE=R May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 433 Conversations with Shakespeare (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary and intertextual study of Shakespeare's work and its influence to the present day. Students will compare Shakespeare texts with latter-day novels, plays, poems, and films that allude to or incorporate some aspect of Shakespeare's art. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 440 Senior Seminar in English and American Literature (3 cr.) P: One 200-level and two 300-400-level literature courses. Detailed study of one or more major British and American writers or of one significant theme or form. Subject varies each semester. May be repeated once for credit. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 495 Individual Readings in English (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor and departmental chair. May be repeated once for credit. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 357 Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3 cr.) Survey of modern and postmodern movements in historical context, including Imagism, Objectivism, and Formalism. PUL=4
  • ENG-L 364 Native American Literature (3 cr.) A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian in both native and white literature. PUL=5
  • ENG-L 384 Studies in American Culture (3 cr.) Surveys the American cultural landscape, from topics in popular culture, like comics, to specific eras of literary production, like the Harlem Renaissance. PUL=5\ May be repeated once for credit.
Writing and Literacy
  • ENG-W 210 Literacy and Public Life (3 cr.) An introduction to the uses of literacy in public and civic discourse, with connections made to theories of writing and professional prospects for writers; serves as the required gateway course for the Concentration in Writing and Literacy and as an exploration of this concentration for other English majors and students considering the possibility of an English major. PUL=4
  • ENG-W 260 Film Criticism (3 cr.) Viewing and critiquing current films, with emphasis on the quality of production and direction. Contemporary films viewed; papers serve as a basis for discussion during class. Students will be expected to pay for their movie admissions. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.) A course about writing using linguistic perspectives. Some of the topics discussed are writing systems and their history, a comparison of speaking and writing, the analysis of texts and their structure, the writing process and its development, and orality and literacy. PUL=4; RISE=R
  • ENG-W 313 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose (3 cr.) P: At least one 200-level writing course or excellent performance in ENG-W 131 and/or ENG-W 132 (contact the instructor if you are unsure of your readiness for this course). Students will read and analyze professional and student work as they prepare to practice the art of fact by combining the tools of a researcher with the craft of a novelist. The final portfolio includes a stylistic analysis of the student's and others' nonfiction works as well as two illustrated nonfiction texts based on the student's primary and secondary research. PUL=4; RISE=R
  • ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web (3 cr.) Introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers--hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing--and explores what impact these new forms have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts. PUL=1A; RISE=S
  • ENG-W 331 Business and Administrative Writing (3 cr.) Instruction and practice in writing for business, government, the professions, and the nonprofit sector. The course emphasizes principles that can be applied in a wide variety of documents. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 365 Theories and Practices of Editing (3 cr.) Instruction and practice in the mechanical, stylistic, and substantive editing of English nonfiction prose, from a wide variety of genres and on a wide variety of subjects. PUL=3
  • ENG-W 366 Written Englishes: Living Cultural Realities (3 cr.) Is standard written English fixed and immutable or a living language variety? This course explores the definition, history, and politics of standard written English, the influence of home and community languages, and the uses and representation of linguistic diversity in both fiction and nonfiction texts. PUL=5
  • ENG-W 390 Topics in Writing (3 cr.) Topics will vary each time this course is offered, and the department will specify which area of the concentration in Writing and Literacy each offering will count toward. PUL=3; RISE=E May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-W 400 Issues in Teaching Writing (3 cr.) Focuses on the content of rhetoric and composition and considers fundamental theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of writing. Reviews rhetorical and compositional principles that influence writing instruction, textbook selection, and curriculum development. PUL=3
  • ENG-W 411 Directed Writing (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor and department chair. Individual projects determined in consultation with instructor. Credit varies with scope of project. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 412 Literacy and Technology (3 cr.) Literacy and technology have multifaceted relationships with each other. This course explores the effects of technologies (ranging from clay tablets to the printing press to computers) on literate practices and the teaching of reading and writing. It prepares students to think critically about the possibilities and limitations associated with different technologies and their impact on literacy over time, and to analyze educational uses of technology connected with literacy. PUL=4
  • ENG-W 426 Writing for Popular and Professional Publication (3 cr.) Offers experienced writers near the end of their academic careers the opportunity to apply their skills to the public writing of the workplace. Students work within a set of tasks common to organizational writing, gaining experience with press releases, the basics of grant writing, letters soliciting contributions, and stories appropriate for newsletters and public relations purposes. Application of this "real-life" writing comes when ENG-W 426 students receive assignments from university units such as the University College and the School of Liberal Arts and fulfill them for inclusion in university publications. PUL=3
  • ENG-W 490 Writing Seminar (3 cr.) Emphasizes a single aspect or a selected topic of composition and the writing of nonfiction prose. PUL varies with topic.
  • ENG-W 320 Advanced Writing in the Arts and Sciences (3 cr.) Features scholarly readings on various interdisciplinary topics and examines how writers in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences define problems, investigate these problems, and report their findings. Focuses on the study and practice of knowledge-making in different discourse communities with particular attention to the student's major discipline. PUL=3
  • ENG-W 262 Style and voice for Writers (3 cr.) Voice pulls readers into a writer's world, the "sound" of that writer's voice "speaking" to readers. This course focuses on recognizing, developing, and sharpening your written voice. But how do you recognize that voice? What are its characteristics? How do you challenge yourself to experiment with language? How do you adapt to the plethora of writing you do as a student, in the workplace, or on your own, while maintaining the unique stamp that is your own? This course examines a variety of published authors' works, identifying the stylistic choices that shaped those works, thereby building awareness of the variety of stylistic choices available to you as a writer. You will apply that awareness to your own writing, and examine the decision making processes that equip you to "voice" your ideas in vivid and concise language, "speaking" on the page in your unique voice. PUL=4; RISE=R
  • ENG-W 408 Creative Writing for Teachers (3 cr.) Offers current and future teachers insights into the creative writing process, teaches them to think as writers do, suggests strategies for critiquing creative work, and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 398 Internship in Writing (1-3 cr.)
  • ENG-W 496 Writing Fellows Training Seminar (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 and permission of instructor. Internship in University Writing Center. Focuses on the writing of IUPUI students. Emphasis on questioning, strategies, problem solving, and self-analysis. Apply in spring for fall enrollment. PUL=3; RISE=E
  • ENG-W 318 Finding your E-Voice (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. This course helps students understand and negotiate the creation of a successful e-voice with academic, personal, and professional applications. Reading, exploration, discussions,activities and practice help students transition from an academic to an "e-voice." Designing and producing a multimedia project meets RISE criteria and further refines developing e-voices.
  • ENG-W 312 Writing Biography (3 cr.) Students will learn to write about other peoples' lives, conducting primary and secondary research.& Genres produced may include obituary and profile, and students may have the opportunity to work in archives and write for publication.
  • ENG-W 377 Writing for Social Change (3 cr.) This course examines how writing is used to promote social change, particularly in the United States. Students apply theoretical perspectives learned in the course to analyze the rhetorical nature of texts associated with organizing and social action and to create their own texts, including texts directed to public officials, the media and organizational texts.
Capstone
  • ENG-E 450 Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) This senior capstone integrates students' undergraduate study through writing and reading projects, faculty and student presentations, and creation of capstone portfolios. Students apply linguistic, literary, and rhetorical knowledge in culminating projects and learning portfolios. The course looks back at accomplishments and forward to postgraduation planning. PUL=3; RISE=Research
Internship
  • ENG-E 398 Internship in English (3-6 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. A supervised internship in the use of English in a workplace. Apply during semester before desired internship. PUL=3; RISE=Experiential
Programs
English for Academic Purposes (EAP)
  • ENG-G 9 Intermediate Aural/Oral Skills for ESL Students (2-4 cr.) C: G010 Intensive practice of basic speaking and pronunciation skills, as well as listening comprehension skills, to develop language proficiency required for study at the university level. Students will make extensive use of multimedia language resources. PUL=1C
  • ENG-G 110 Intermediate EAP: Reading, Writing, and Grammar (3 cr.) C: ENG G109 This course introduces and reviews basic English grammatical structures; presents basic reading strategies and vocabulary development; and focuses on functional language use and study skills. PUL=1C 
  • ENG-G 111 Academic English Reading: Perspectives on Culture/Society (3 cr.) In this course, non-native English speaking students will develop their academic reading, (cross)cultural understanding, and critical thinking skills through indepth reading. Students will read academic texts about current socio-cultural issues and explore their meaning in U.S. and global context. The students will learn how to critically analyze, interpret, and synthesize texts they read. They will demonstrate their reading and cultural analysis skills in discussions, oral presentations, and written responses and analyses of academic readings. Vocabulary building for college-level communication is integrated into the instruction.. PUL=1B
  • ENG-G 112 Listening and Speaking Skills for Academic Purposes (3 cr.) This course focuses on developing speaking and listening skills that are essential to academic life, encouraging participation in group discussion, improvement in presentation strategies, and development of questioning and answering skills. It provides community involvement to help students better understand American culture and language use. Reading skills, vocabulary development, oral communication and presentation skills for the academic context are emphasized. PUL=1B
  • ENG-G 513 Academic Writing Graduate Students (3 cr.) Designed to meet the academic writing needs of ESL graduate students from multiple disciplines, this course focuses on a variety of academic writing styles and disciplinary approaches to producing research papers and professional documents. Students practice paraphrasing, summarizing, critiquing discipline-related articles, as well as writing research proposals and a comprehensive research paper.   PUL=1A
  • ENG-G 15 Pronunciation Skills (1 cr.) This course focuses on American English pronunciation and stresses active learner involvement in small groups and self-tutorials. Practice in a contextualized format includes drills and multimedia listening and speaking activities. Classwork emphasizes stress and intonation patterns and vowel and consonant production. Individualized instruction focusing on specific needs is a component of the course. PUL=1C
  • ENG-G 520 Communication Skills for Graduate Students and International Teaching Assistants (3 cr.) Designed for graduate students who are non-native speakers of English, this course provides instruction on oral communication skills, academic presentation skills and basic teaching strategies for the U.S. classroom. The primary focus is on oral language skills necessary to present academic materials in English to an American audience. Language skills, teaching skills, and knowledge about the U.S. classroom culture will be developed through discussions and classroom observations/simulations. Presentations, teaching practice and regular conferences will focus on individual needs. PUL=1C
  • ENG-G 410 Introduction to Legal English (1 cr.) An intensive, integrated academic language skills course addressing the linguistic demands of legal study in the U.S. Focuses on reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. PUL=1A
  • ENG-G 411 Legal English I (3 cr.) An integrated language skills course focusing on (1) grammatical structures, reading strategies, and writing structures required to understand legal texts and material; and (2) listening and speaking skills needed for the law school classroom. PUL=1A
  • ENG-G 412 Legal English II (3 cr.) An integrated language skills course that focuses primarily on the advanced study of academic legal writing, including editing skills. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, and Inquiry (3 cr.) W131 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students' abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students' own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims.  PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (3 cr.) Practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences, with attention to reading/writing connections.  PUL=1A
  • ENG-G 114 EAP Grammar (1 cr.) C: ENG G111 This course introduces and reviews English grammatical structures for EAP students. As a co-requisite of G111 (Academic English Reading), the course provides practice in and clarification of grammatical structures in academic texts at high-intermediate levels of EAP. Students from other EAP courses may be identified as needing additional EAP grammar support based on an instructor-led evaluation and can, therefore, be required to complete the course, as well. The class is conducted as a lab in which students will meet face to face with an instructor part of the time and then complete work on assigned grammar units outside of class. In class additional instruction and practice will be given, and students will complete assessments (quizzes and exams) focused on EAP grammar. PUL=1A
  • ENG-G 101 Special Topics in EAP (3 cr.) Designed for EAP students, this course provides an introduction to English for Academic Purposes. The students will study the grammatical structures of the English language,EAP vocabulary, and their use in EAP speaking, listening, and reading. 
Writing Program
  • ENG-W 130 Principles of Composition (3 cr.) Practice in writing papers for a variety of purposes and audiences, with attention to reading/writing connections. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 131 Reading, Writing, And Inquiry (3 cr.) ENG-W 131 teaches skills of critical reading, thinking, and writing to help students meaningfully engage artifacts, events, and issues in our world. The course builds students' abilities to read written and cultural texts critically; to analyze those texts in ways that engage both students' own experiences and the perspectives of others; and to write about those texts for a range of audiences and purposes as a means of participating in broader conversations. Assignments emphasize the analysis and synthesis of sources in making and developing claims. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 250 Writing in Context (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140 (with a grade of C or higher). Topics vary but course will focus on writing in various civic, cultural, and academic contexts. Course will fulfill second-year writing requirement for some programs. PUL=2
  • ENG-W 140 Elementary Composition/Honors (3 cr.) Offers an introductory writing course for advanced freshman writers. Requirements, including number and type of assignments, are parallel to ENG-W 131. ENG-W 140 offers greater intensity of discussion and response to writing. Evaluation is based on portfolios of the students' work. PUL=1A
  • ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 (with a grade of C or higher). Focuses on expository writing for the student whose career requires preparation of reports, proposals, and analytical papers. Emphasis on clear and direct objective writing and on investigation of an original topic written in report form, including a primary research project. Evaluation is based on student projects. PUL=2; RISE=E
  • ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140 (with a grade of C or higher). Offers instruction and practice in writing argumentative essays about complicated and controversial issues. The course focuses on strategies for identifying issues, assessing claims, locating evidence, deciding on a position, and writing papers with clear assertions and convincing arguments. PUL=2
Graduate
Masters Degree and Certificate Courses
  • LING-T 660 Contrastive Discourse: Readings in Linguistics (3 cr.) This course examines contrastive discourse/intercultural rhetoric and considers the cross-cultural aspects of discourse organization from both the reader’s and the writer’s viewpoints. Comparisons of text organization in different genres and for different audiences will be made, studying the roles of cultural forms and schemata in the interaction between writer and reader.
  • ENG-L 655 American Literature since 1900 (4 cr.) Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from the time of Theodore Dreiser to the present.
  • ENG-L 678 Literature and Medicine (3 cr.) This course explores the medical world in literature and the arts, in popular culture, and through the institution of the hospital.
  • ENG-L 501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (4 cr.) Materials, tools, and methods of research. Includes work with standard bibliographical sources (both traditional and electronic), bibliographical search strategies, scholarly documentation, accessing special collections, and preparing bibliographical descriptions of subject texts. Historical case studies reinforce coverage of professional standards of conduct, verification of sources, and thoroughness of research methodology.
  • ENG-L 590 Internship in English (4-8 cr.) A supervised internship in the uses of language in the workplace. (For prospective teachers, the workplace may be a class.) Each intern will be assigned a problem or new task and will develop the methods for solving the problem or completing the task. Interns will complete a portfolio of workplace writing and self-evaluation; they will also be visited by a faculty coordinator and evaluated in writing by their on-site supervisors.
  • ENG-G 500 Introduction to the English Language (4 cr.) An introduction to English linguistics, the course covers the principal areas of linguistic inquiry into the English language: sounds (phonetics and phonology), words, (morphology), sentences (syntax), and meaning (semantics). G500 is the core linguistics course in the M.A. program.
  • ENG-Z 520 Second-Language Development (3 cr.) Introduction to linguistic, psychological, cognitive, social, and sociocultural approaches to second language development. Explores relationship between second language development and such topics as age, gender, motivation, cognition, and cross-linguistic and sociological influences.
  • ENG-L 506 Introduction to Methods of Criticism and Research (4 cr.) An examination of the importance of the notion of the text for contemporary literary theory. L506 is the core literature course
  • ENG-Z 523 TESOL Methods (3 cr.) This course is designed to help teachers understand, recognize and address the language acquisition challenges of non-native English speakers, both in the U.S. and abroad. The course stresses the development and use of practical techniques and materials to teach ESL based on second-language acquisition principles.
  • ENG-L 553 Studies in Literature (4 cr.) Emphasis on thematic, analytic, and generic study. With consent of instructor, may be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 560 Literary Studies in England and Scotland (4 cr.) Provides on-site opportunities in England and Scotland to explore the literary landscapes of British authors in relation to the English and Scottish school systems. Designed primarily for education majors and continuing certification credits.
  • ENG-Z 545 TESOL Practicum (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 520 and ENG-Z 523. Students will be placed with a supervising teacher in a class for adult learners of English as a second language. Students will observe and assist the teacher, and then have the opportunity to create, teach and assess lessons. 
  • ENG-L 573 Interdisciplinary Approaches to English and American Literature (3 cr.) Social, political, and psychological studies in English and American literature. Topics may vary and include, for example, literature and colonialism, literature and psychoanalysis, or literature and gender. May also include other world literatures.
  • ENG-L 606 Topics in African American Literature (4 cr.) Focuses on a particular genre, time period, or theme of African American literature. Examples: twentieth-century African American women's novels, black male identity in literature, kinship in African American literature, and African American autobiography. May be repeated twice for credit with different focuses.
  • ENG-Z 541 English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and Materials Development (3 cr.) P: ENG-Z 523 or instructor's permission. English for Specific Purposes (ESP) focuses on the analysis and teaching of English, including the development of appropriate materials, that meet specific language needs of non-native speakers in specific contexts for specific purposes. This course explores and applies the theoretical principles for identifying the needs, developing curricula and preparing teaching materials for ESP contexts.
  • ENG-L 625 Shakespeare (4 cr.) Critical analysis of selected tragedies, comedies, history plays, and poetry.
  • ENG-G 625 Discourse Analysis and Introduction to Research (4 cr.) This course introduces students to current approaches to text and discourse coherence, including recent theories of cognitive and interactional text modeling.
  • ENG-L 645 English Fiction, 1800-1900 (4 cr.) Intensive historical and critical study of nineteenth-century prose fiction, especially the novel.
  • ENG-G 652 English Language Sociolinguistics (4 cr.) This course investigates sociocultural aspects of language use and explores the relationships between language and society. The course provides background in various theoretical and methodological approaches to sociolinguistics. Other topics to be covered include gender and language, ethnicity and language, social factors in language acquisition, and bilingualism. Familiarity with basic issues and concepts in linguistics would be useful.
  • ENG-Z 600 Seminar in TESOL (3 cr.) Topics in this course will vary, but will focus on current issues in TESOL and applied linguistics. May be taken more than once with different topics. Up to 9 credit hours.
  • ENG-Z 690 Advanced Readings in TESOL (1-4 cr.) P: Approval of Instuctor. Directed reading on a focused topic in TESOL and applied linguistics that students initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of an English department faculty member. Credit hours depend on scope of project. May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.
  • ENG-L 680 Special Topics in Literary Study and Theory (4 cr.) Reading in sociological, political, psychological, and other approaches to literature.
  • ENG-W 509 Introduction to Writing and Literacy Studies (4 cr.) This is the core course in the writing and literacy track of the English master's program. Students will read, analyze, discuss, and write about key issues in writing and literacy, laying a foundation for further study. Special emphasis will be placed on research methods in this field.
  • ENG-L 681 Genre Studies (4 cr.) A variable-title course, Genre Studies examines the specific characteristics of individual genres. May be repeated once for credit.
  • ENG-L 695 Individual Readings in English (1-4 cr.) Enables students to work on a reading project that they initiate, plan, and complete under the direction of an English department faculty member. Credit hours depend on scope of project.
  • ENG-L 699 M.A. Thesis (4 cr.) M.A. Thesis.
  • ENG-W 511 Writing Fiction (4 cr.) A graduate-level fiction writing workshop. Seminar study of advanced techniques in the writing of fiction, both short stories and the novel. Workshop discussion of advanced student work in progress.
  • ENG-W 513 Writing Poetry (4 cr.) ENG-W 513 offers graduate students an intensive experience in reading and writing poetry. Part workshop and part seminar in poetic practice and technique, ENG-W 513 provides an opportunity for graduate students to expand their poetic range and hone their craft.
  • ENG-W 532 Managing Document Quality (4 cr.) This course will examine and apply principles of planning, researching audience and content, designing publications, drafting, obtaining reviews, conducting user testing, and negotiating within organizational cultures in order to produce effective technical and professional documents.
  • ENG-W 600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (1-4 cr.) Topics will vary each time this course is offered. A four credit course would meet 3.5 hours per week and involve significant reading over the course fo the semester (4 books and 10 articles). Students would ordinarily be expected to produce a significant researched project (20-25 pages) at the end of the semester in addition to some shorter informal writing during the semester. A one credit course would meet for 2 hours every other week. Students would be expected to complete significant reading (perhaps 2 books and 7-10 articles over the course of the semester). Writing requirements for a one credit course would be less than a four credit offering; students might keep a regular reading response journal (up to 10 pages/month, informal writing)and produce a shorter researched project at the end of the course (10 pages).
  • ENG-W 609 Directed Writing Projects (1-4 cr.) Individual creative or critical writing projects negociated with the professor who agrees to offer tutorial assistance. Credit hours will vary according to the scope of the project.
  • ENG-W 697 Independent Study in Writing 1 (3 cr.)
  • ENG-W 500 Teaching Writing: Issues and Approaches (4 cr.) This course looks at one of the mainstays of teaching writing--the process of writing--and the issues that arise in writing classrooms as well as the approaches that have been used to resolve such issues.
  • ENG-W 508 Creative Writing for Teachers (4 cr.) Giving students a deeper understanding of the creative process and teaching them to think and talk about writing as writers do, this course offers strategies for critiquing creative work and provides guidance in developing creative writing curriculum suited to their classroom needs.
  • ENG-W 510 Computers and Composition (4 cr.)

    This course explores the technological theories that shape writing instruction at the secondary and post-secondary level.

  • ENG-W 525 Research Approaches for Technical and Professional Writing (4 cr.) Students focus on how to learn about content, audiences in their situations, and document design in order to produce high quality publications.
  • ENG-W 531 Designing and Editing Visual Technical Communication (4 cr.) Students learn principles of designing publications that communicate both visually and verbally.
  • ENG-W 590 Teaching Writing: Theories and Applications (4 cr.) Drawing on current scholarship and relevant statements from the rhetorical tradition, this course examines theoretical assumptions in the design of classroom practices.
  • ENG-W 605 Writing Project Summer Institute (3-6 cr.) Invites teachers from K-university to consider major issues involved in the teaching of writing and to explore the pedagogical approaches inherent in these issues. Follows the National Writing Project philosophy, which believes that teachers of writing must be writers themselves.
  • ENG-W 615 Graduate Creative Nonfiction Writing (4 cr.) An advanced course in the theory and practice of creative nonfiction writing with particular emphasis on the familiar or personal essay.
  • ENG-L 503 Teaching of Lit in College (2-4 cr.) This course introduces graduate students to the practical and theoretical issues involved in teaching literature at the college level. We will learn to set teaching objectives, organize a course, and construct a syllabus. We will review theories on how readers make sense of texts and how reading literature differs from other kinds of reading. We will explore several different approaches to teaching literature, including lecture, discussion, workshop, and online teaching. Recognizing that each genre presents its own pedagogical challenges, we will discuss strategies appropriate to teaching fiction, poetry, and drama. Although the course focuses on teaching literature at the college level, many of the strategies we will discuss are applicable to high-school teaching.
  • ENG-L 508 Practicum on Teaching Literature in College (2-4 cr.)

    Topics include syllabus construction, lecture and discussion techniques, use and evaluation of written work. Offered in two formats: as a practicum in course and syllabus design for a future undergraduate course; or as a practicum for AIs running concurrently with the related undergraduate course. 

  • ENG-L 641 English Literature 1790-1900 (4 cr.) The course will explore the nexus between English literature, history, and print culture from the late sixteenth- to the early seventeenth century, using as our starting point England's unexpected (yet, perhaps, divinely inspired!) victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588 - the event that established England as a naval, military, and commercial power on par with continental Europe. From this triumphant moment, we will follow the nation through several succession crises, religious controversies, economic turmoil, struggles over theatrical and print censorship, and violently contested debates about the nature of Kingship itself, all of which led to a Civil War, the closing of the public theaters, the beheading of Charles I, and the eventual Restoration of the monarchy after an uncomfortable period of Parliamentarian and Protectorate rule.
  • ENG-L 643 Readings in Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures (4 cr.) Study of literature within the historical, cultural and political context of European colonialism and anti- or post-colonial resistance. Topics might include the role of literature in the formation of nations and national consciousness, literatures of particular nations, or postcolonial theory.
  • ENG-L 657 Readings in Literature and Critical Thinking (4 cr.) Study of major movements, figures, or topics in literary and/or critical theory.
  • ENG-L 666 Survey of Children's Literature (3-4 cr.) In this course, we will address the question of how transhistorical trends in children's literature reflect changing cultural views on children as intellectuals and consumers. We will work toward answering this question by first studying a variety of theoretical approaches to defining the child as a subject, and also by reading Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland" and J.M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" in order to establish a baseline for the historical treatment of the child as reader and subject. In light of critical debates stemming from these cornerstones of children's literature, we will then move on to a study of contemporary authors who adapt traditional themes and storytelling structures in order to re-present issues such as freedom of speech, immigration, racial and gender politics, and environmentalism to child readers.
  • ENG-Z 536 Pedigogical Grammar (3 cr.) The focus of this course is on understanding the functions that grammar fulfills in oral and written communication, analyzing those aspects of grammar most problematic for English language learners, and exploring approaches to helping learners understand and use those structures in meaningful communicative contexts. The course combines theoretical discussion about various aspects of grammar with consideration of how to prepare effective lessons for teaching grammar to learners of different ages, proficiency levels and needs.
  • ENG-Z 570 Second Language Writing (3 cr.) This course explores theories and practices in the teaching and evaluation of second language writing (SLW) as well as connections between first and second language writing, literacy, and culture. Students learn how to identify writing needs, design tasks, and assess writing, and form a philosophy of teaching SLW.
  • ENG-Z 575 Second Language Learning and Technology (3 cr.) Explores the theory, use, and issues of using technology in second language instruction, focusing specifically on the acquisition of intercultural competence, culture, and pragmatics.
  • ENG-Z 598 TESOL Internship (3 cr.) P: Completion of ENG-Z 520 and ENG-Z 523, or instructor's approval, and placement by TESOL Program into an approved internship site. The TESOL Internship is designed to provide students with a supervised internship experience in a professional ESL or EFL context. Interns will gain practical, hands-on experience in TESOL, including teaching, research, and/or program administration.
  • ENG-Z 699 MA Thesis - TESOL (3 cr.) P: Approval of instructor. MA thesis on an issue in TESOL/applied linguistics.
  • ENG-W 533 Science Writing for Public Readers (1 cr.) C: COMM-C 533; COMM-C 534. With an emphasis on shorter forms of writing, students discover voices, messages, and forms appropriate for bringing scientific expertise to non-science readers. They practice processes of response, revision, and editing to shape presentations for various readers, contexts, and paths of publication.
  • ENG-W 535 Advanced Science Writing for Public Readers (1 cr.) Each student identifies a complex project that includes long-forms and/or multi-genres of writing to deliver scientific expertise to non-science readers in a specific community or context. Collaborating through peer-critique and role-playing relevant readerships, students adjust their messages and modes of delivery.
Geography (GEOG)
Lower-Division Courses
  • GEOG-G 107 Physical Systems of the Environment (3 cr.) Physical environment as the home of humans, emphasizing the distribution and interaction of environmental variables (landforms, vegetation, soils, weather, and climate). PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 108 Physical Systems of the Environment: Laboratory (2 cr.) P: or C: GEOG-G107. Practical and applied aspects of meteorology, climatology, vegetation, soils, and landforms. This laboratory session is optional for students enrolling in GEOG-G 107. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 110 Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr.) An introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of analysis used in the study of human geographic systems. Examines geographic perspectives on contemporary world problems such as population growth, globalization of the economy, and human-environmental relations. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 111 Hurricanes (1 cr.) Introduction to processes involved in the initiation and development of hurricanes, forecasting and modeling tools used to predict their effects, and impacts on the natural environment and humans. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 112 Thunderstorms and Tornadoes (1 cr.) Introduction to the processes involved in the initiation and development of thunderstorms and tornadoes, forecasting and modeling tools to predict their spatial pattern and effects, and impacts on the natural environment and humans. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 113 The Ozone “Hole” (1 cr.) Introduction to the role and significance of the stratospheric ozone layer and the nature and extent of its depletion. Attention will focus on the development of our understanding, human intervention, and major points of controversy. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 114 The Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming (1 cr.) Introduction to the greenhouse effect and global carbon cycle. Attention will be directed to how, when, and where humans have altered this cycle and the implications for future climates. Methods for monitoring climate change will be studied and areas of greatest uncertainty identified. Particular attention will be directed to the spatial pattern of projected effects produced by global climate models. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 123 Soil Survey (1 cr.) An introduction to soil geography. Soil development processes, USDA soil survey map interpretation, physical and mechanical soil properties, and land use analysis. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 130 World Geography (1 cr.) An analysis of the existing and emerging geographic patterns in the world and of the processes and trends producing such patterns. An examination of the global scale of human activities and interaction with the environment and the linkages tying the various regions of the world into a single, global system. PUL=5
Upper-Division Courses
  • GEOG-G 303 Weather and Climate (3 cr.) Systematic study of atmospheric processes and interrelationships, with a focus on understanding the physical basis of weather and climate. Emphasis on components of radiation and energy balances, atmospheric circulation, global weather systems, human effects on climate, and climate change. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 305 Environmental Change: Nature and Impact (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 107 or consent of instructor. An integrated study of the causes and effects of environmental change. Areas covered include: climate variability (short and long term), environmental chemistry (ozone layer, greenhouse gases, and pollution), and anthropogenic impact that leads to environmental change. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 307 Biogeography: The Distribution of Life (3 cr.) A survey of the present and past distributions of the world's plants and animals, emphasizing ecological explanation of species distributions. Topics include evolution and distribution of major plant and animal groups, world vegetation, plant and animal domestication, introduction of plant and animal pests, destruction of natural communities, and extinction. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 309 Frontiers in Geographic Thought (3 cr.) Provides a survey of the development of philosophical frameworks and theories used in physical and human geography. PUL=1
  • GEOG-G 310 Human Impact on Environment (3 cr.) A systematic examination of how people have altered patterns of climate, hydrology, land forms, soils, and biota. Course emphasizes that understanding human impacts requires knowledge of both the sociocultural forces that drive human activity and the natural processes that determine environmental patterns. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 311 Introduction to Research Methods in Geography (3 cr.) Introduction to geographic research questions and methodologies. Focus on special characteristics of geographic problems in the realms of both physical and human geography. Study of scientific versus nonscientific methods, the nature of geographic data, methods of data analysis, interpretation, and presentation. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 314 Urban Geography (3 cr.) Study and interpretation of urban spatial structures, design, policies, and problems with an emphasis on the geographic perspective. Topics include urban housing markets, racial segregation, homelessness, and urban crime. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 315 Environmental Conservation (3 cr.) Conservation of natural resources including soil, water, wildlife, and forests as interrelated components of environmental quality. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 321 Geography of Europe (3 cr.) Geographical analysis of the physical features of the European environment and the spatial patterns and inter-relationships of the cultural, economic, and political landscapes. Emphasis placed on human impact on the environment through long-term occupancy. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 323 Geography of Latin America (3 cr.) National and regional variations in terrain, climate, natural resources, and economic and social life in Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South America. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 324 Geography of the Caribbean (3 cr.) Geographic introduction to the Caribbean, stressing global and regional political and economic relation-ships, physical, and natural environments, human activities and human-environmental relationships which give coherence and identity to the diversity of Caribbean landscapes, peoples, and cultures. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 326 Geography of North America (3 cr.) Continental and regional variations in terrain, climate, and economic and social life of the United States and Canada, with emphasis on geographical principles, sources of data, and techniques of investigation. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 327 Geography of Indiana (3 cr.) A geographical analysis of the state of Indiana. Emphasis placed on the interrelationship of the state's physical and human geography. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 328 Rural Landscapes of North America (3 cr.) Rural geography of the United States and Canada, focusing on rural settlements, culture, economic activities, and land subdivision. The spatial impacts of economic and technological changes on land use are considered through an examination of relict structures and urban expansion into rural areas. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 330 North American House Types (3 cr.) Houses are a visible semipermanent record of human values, political ideas, historical settlement, and community development. This record is reflected in the types of houses built during a particular time period, by certain groups of people, or in a certain area of the country. This course examines house types for the purpose of identifying and analyzing geographic patterns that occur in North America. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 331 Economic Geography (3 cr.) An examination of the spatial dynamics and location patterns of economic activities, behavior, and systems. The study of the spatial organization of resource utilization, agricultural production, manufacturing, business, transportation, and trade. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 334 Field Geography of North America (3 cr.) A field course examining some geographic theme or region in North America. Includes preliminary classroom lecture and a field excursion of 1-2 weeks. Normally taught in summer. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 336 Introduction to Remote Sensing and Air Photo Interpretation (3 cr.) Nature and interpretation of remotely sensed data collected from field, airborne, and space-borne sensors. Data from the visible, infrared, and microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum are discussed and analyzed from a geographic applications perspective. Visual, photogrammetric, digital image processing, and GIS interpretation approaches are presented. Lecture and laboratory. PUL=1C
  • GEOG-G 337 Computer Cartography and Graphics (3 cr.) Compilation, design, production, and evaluation of maps and related graphic materials. Includes cartometric procedures, symbolization, color use guidelines, map typography, photographic manipulations, computer animation, and geographic visualization techniques. Hardcopy and internet-based outputs. Lecture and laboratory. PUL=1C
  • GEOG-G 338 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.) Overview of the principles and practices of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will deal with issues of spatial data models, database design, introductory and intermediate GIS operations, and case studies of real-world GIS applications. Laboratory exercises will provide significant hands-on experience. Lecture and laboratory. PUL=1C
  • GEOG-G 345 Field Study in Geography (3 cr.) P: 12 credit hours in geography and consent of instructor. Faculty-supervised fieldwork in selected areas of geography. PUL=5 May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • GEOG-G 355 Political Geography (3 cr.) An examination of the spatial organization of political systems and the interaction of geographical area and political processes. Emphasis on the geographical characteristics of states and the geographical dimensions of international relations. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 360 Geography of Wine (3 cr.) An introduction to the spatial distribution and patterns of viniculture in the world. Emphasis is placed on understanding the complex and often subtle relationships that exists between environmental variables, such as climate, soils, and landforms, and human factors, such as viticultural practices and vinification techniques, in producing different types of wines and variations in their qualities. The geographic origins and diffusion of viniculture are examined along with an analysis of the locations, development, and characteristics of the main wine regions or landscapes of the world. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 390 Topics in Geography (1-3 cr.) An examination of selected problems and issues in geography or from a geographic perspective. Topics vary from semester to semester. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 404 Soils Geography (3 cr.) Soil genesis, morphology, and classification; soil's physical, chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. Soil maps and related data in land use analysis and the planning process. PUL=4
  • GEOG G421 Environments of Tropical Lands (3 cr.) A geographical analysis concerned with developing countries and focusing on issues related to development and the environmental consequences. Concern for the natural environment is expressed with regard to how it is affected by population pressures, economic advancement, and urbanization. An understanding of Third World people and their cultures is presented. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 436 Advanced Remote Sensing: Digital Image Processing (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 336 or consent of instructor. Advanced remote sensing theory and digital image processing techniques with an emphasis on environmental applications. Hands-on computer exercises provide significant experience in introductory digital image processing for extraction of qualitative and quantitative information about Earth's terrestrial environments. Lecture and laboratory. PUL=1C
  • GEOG-G 438 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 338 or consent of instructor. Intermediate and advanced topics in geographic information science and spatial analysis techniques using GIS software. This advanced course is for upper-division undergraduates and graduates who seek a greater understanding of this rapidly developing field and to learn how to construct, manage, and analyze their own GIS data and models. Lecture and laboratory. PUL=1C
  • GEOG-G 439 Seminar in Geographic Information Science (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 336, GEOG-G 338, and GEOG-G 436 or GEOG-G 438. Applications of geographic information science principles in the collection and analysis of spatial data. Integration of GIS, remote sensing, and/or GPS technologies. Review of current literature on techniques, theory, technology, and applications with an emphasis on environmental issues. Discussions, laboratory, and research project. May substitute for the GEOG-G 491 capstone course. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 446 Cultural Biogeography (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 307. Examines human alteration of natural plant and animal distributions. Topics include deforestation, extinction, plant and animal domestication, and introduction of alien organisms. Seminar format. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 450 Undergraduate Readings and Research in Geography (1-3 cr.) Research in selected problems: papers are ordinarily required. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 460 Geography Internship (1-6 cr.) P: 12 credit hours of geography and departmental approval. Supervised field experience in geography, normally in conjunction with approved work at a government agency or private firm. Requires 40 hours of work per 1 hour of credit. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 475 Climate Change (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 303. Advanced course on the evidence for and theories of climate change over a range of time scales, focusing on the period before the instrumental record. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 488 Applied Spatial Statistics (3 cr.) P: 6 credits in geography or consent of instructor. Extension of traditional statistical analysis to spatial data. Spatial means and spatial variances, the examination of differences in samples over space, spatial autocorrelation, nearest neighbor analysis, map comparison techniques, emphasis on practical applications. PUL=1C
  • GEOG-G 491 Capstone Experience in Geography (1 cr.) An independent project for senior-level students, applying geographic theory and techniques to a topic of geographic interest beyond the limits of the regular curriculum. Open to majors or non-majors with appropriate preparation, including GEOG-G 309 and GEOG-G 311. May be taken alone or concurrently with another course. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 302 Introduction to Transportation Analysis (3 cr.) Examination of movement of people, goods, and information over space using spatial analysis and planning techniques. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 418 Historical Geography (3 cr.) Migration and diffusion, rural and urban settlement, industrialization, and transport development as spatial processes shaping the landscapes and geopolitical relationships of past places and peoples. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 424 Geography of Africa (3 cr.) Geographical analysis of the physical features of the African environment and the spatial patterns and interrelationships of the cultural, economic, and political landscapes. PUL=5
  • GEOG-G 363 Landscapes and Cultures of the Caribbean (3 cr.) Field courses are taught during summer. Includes two weeks of preliminary lectures at IUPUI followed by approximately two weeks of intensive field study in the Caribbean. Destinations vary from year to year; consult class schedule for more information. PUL=3
  • GEOG-G 478 GLOBAL CHANGE, FOOD, AND FARMING SYSTEMS (3 cr.) P: Junior or Senior Status; Consent of the instructor. Introduction to food production and consumption systems, emphasizing linkages to land use and social change on food/farming system sustainability. Topics include urbanization population growth and economic liberalization; farming livelihoods, gender and poverty; biotechnology; agroecology, global health.
Graduate Courses
  • GEOG G535 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3 cr.) Nature and interpretation of remotely sensed data collected from field, airborne, and space-borne sensors. Data from the visible, infrared, and microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum are discussed and analyzed from a geographic applications perspective. Visual, photogrammetric, digital image processing, and GIS interpretation approaches are presented. Lecture and laboratory.
  • GEOG-G 536 Advanced Remote Sensing (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 535 or consent of instructor. Advanced remote sensing theory and digital image processing techniques with an emphasis on environmental applications. Hands-on computer exercises provide significant experience in introductory digital image processing for extraction of qualitative and quantitative information about the Earth's terrestrial environments. Lecture and laboratory.
  • GEOG-G 537 Cartography and Graphics (3 cr.) Compilation, design, production, and evaluation of maps and related graphic materials. Includes cartometric procedures, symbolization, color use guidelines, map typography, photographic manipulations, computer animation, and geographic visualization techniques. Hardcopy and Internet-based outputs. Lecture and laboratory.
  • GEOG-G 538 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.) Overview of the principles and practices of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course will deal with issues of spatial data models, database design, introductory and intermediate GIS operations, and case studies of real-world GIS. Laboratory exercises will provide significant hands-on experience. Lecture and laboratory.
  • GEOG-G 539 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 538 or consent of instructor. Intermediate and advanced topics in geographic information science and spatial analysis techniques using GIS software. This advanced course is for upper-division undergraduates and graduates who seek a greater understanding of this rapidly developing field and to learn how to construct, manage, and analyze their own GIS data and models. Lecture and laboratory.
  • GEOG-G 588 Applied Spatial Statistics (3 cr.) P: 6 credits in geography or consent of instructor. Extension of traditional statistical analysis to spatial data. Spatial means and spatial variances, the examination of differences in samples over space, spatial autocorrelation, nearest neighbor analysis, map comparison techniques, emphasis on practical applications.
  • GEOG-G 602 Graduate Seminar in Physical Geography (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Distribution, morphology, and human significance of selected phenomena of the physical environment.
  • GEOG-G 639 Seminar in Geographic Information Science (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 535, GEOG-G 538, and GEOG-G 536 or GEOG-G 539. Applications of geographic information science principles in the collection and analysis of spatial data. Integration of GIS, remote sensing, and/or GPS technologies. Review of current literature on techniques, theory, technology, and applications with an emphasis on environmental issues. Discussions, laboratory, and research project.
  • GEOG-G 704 Soils Geography (3 cr.) P: GEOG-G 538. Examines the spatial aspects of soils from a global and local perspective, including soil genesis, morphology, and classification; physical, chemical, mechanical and biological properties of soil; and land use mapping, analysis, planning, and management.
  • GEOG-G 830 Readings in Geography (12 cr. max. cr.) P: Advanced course in geography or closely related field. Supervised readings on selected topics.
  • GEOG-G 502 Introduction to Transportation Analysis (3 cr.) An examination of movement of people, goods, and information over space using spatial analysis and planning techniques.
  • GEOG-G 560 Internship in Geographic Analysis (1-4 cr.) P: Admission to MS GIS program and permission of major advisor. Faculty-directed study of geographical problems based on internship experience. Area of placement must be related to field of Geographic Information Science. Student may complete more than one internship, but total credit hours cannot exceed four.
  • GEOG-G 850 Masters Thesis (3-6 cr.) Directed research and writing under the supervision of a faculty committee.
  • GEOG-G 845 Research Papers in Geography (3 cr.) P: Admission to MS GIS Program and permission of major advisor. Research papers under the supervision of a faculty committee. Graduate students in the MS in Geographic Information Science program who choose the research papers option (as opposed to the thesis) will develop two research papers under supervision of their major advisor and two additional faculty members.
History (HIST)
Undergraduate Courses
  • HIST-D 428 Eastern Europe: 1914 to Present (3 cr.) World War I; the peace settlements in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, Romania, and Turkey. Parliamentary democracy vs. military dictatorship; irredentism; economic transformation; Nazi domination; Munich; Soviet seizure of power. National communism of Tito, Gromulka, Kadar, Ceausescu, Dubcek, and Hoxha. Soviet and Western rivalry in Eastern Europe. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 432 Popular Cultures and African Cities (3 cr.) Focuses on the interdependence between the development of the colonial and postcolonial city and the emergence of popular cultures in Africa. Cultures such as music, fashion, and sports will be studied in their recreational aspects as well as for their social and political implications. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 227 African Civilization (3 cr.) Survey of African history from the beginning of civilization in Egypt to the emergence of modern Africa. Using both broad themes (e.g., Islam, colonial changes) and specific cases studies (e.g., empire of Mali), the course focuses on the continuities and changes that shaped African society. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 341 History of Spain and Portugal (3 cr.) The Iberian, Roman, and Moorish backgrounds, with emphasis on the medieval Christian thought and institutions of the peninsula during the Reconquest; the political and cultural unity of Spain and of Portugal from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment; the nineteenth- and twentieth-century attempts to achieve political stability and economic progress. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 346 American Diplomatic History II (3 cr.) I. American diplomacy from 1775 to 1823; diplomacy of American continental expansion to 1898. II. America as a world power. Involvement in Far Eastern affairs after 1898, diplomacy of World Wars I and II, developments to present. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 360 Europe—Napoleon to First World War II (3 cr.) I: Post-Napoleonic reaction; revitalized revolutionary forces, 1848; reform in England and Russia; bourgeois monarchy and Second Empire in France; unification movements in Italy and Germany; middle-class nationalism, romanticism, and realism. II: Bismarckian and Wilhelmian Germany; Gladstone, Disraeli, and modern Britain; the French Third Republic and the last days of Tsarist Russia; disintegration of the Ottoman Empire; the Austro-Hungarian Empire in decline; European society and culture on the eve of World War I. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 322 History of American Thought II (3 cr.) Ideas that have influenced American history. I. Image of New World to challenge of Jacksonian democracy. II. Transcendentalism to New Conservatism. Term papers and reports. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 345 American Diplomatic History I (3 cr.) I. American diplomacy from 1775 to 1823; diplomacy of American continental expansion to 1898. II. America as a world power. Involvement in Far Eastern affairs after 1898, diplomacy of World Wars I and II, developments to present. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 390 Representative Americans (3 cr.) Explorations of the lives and works of selected American men and women for the purpose of better understanding the ideological and social forces at work in American history. The course will serve as both an introduction to the biographical literature of American history and as an exercise in the relevance of biography to history. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 359 Europe—Napoleon to First World War I (3 cr.) I: Post-Napoleonic reaction; revitalized revolutionary forces, 1848; reform in England and Russia; bourgeois monarchy and Second Empire in France; unification movements in Italy and Germany; middle-class nationalism, romanticism, and realism. II: Bismarckian and Wilhelmian Germany; Gladstone, Disraeli, and modern Britain; the French Third Republic and the last days of Tsarist Russia; disintegration of the Ottoman Empire; the Austro-Hungarian Empire in decline; European society and culture on the eve of World War I. PUL=5
  • HIST-G 468 History of Japan II (3 cr.) From prehistoric times to present. Land and people, principal classes; Shintoism and divine emperor; feudalism; Tokugawa Shogunate; modern state and military expansion; population, agrarian, and industrialization problems; occupation and treaty. Students may not receive credit for G467 and G357 or for G468 and G358. PUL=5
  • HIST-G 467 History of Japan I (3 cr.) From prehistoric times to present. Land and people, principal classes; Shintoism and divine emperor; feudalism; Tokugawa Shogunate; modern state and military expansion; population, agrarian, and industrialization problems; occupation and treaty. Students may not receive credit for G467 and G357 or for G468 and G358. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 312 The North and South at Peace and War (3 cr.) Examines the social, economic, and political landscapes of two communities—one in the North and one in the South—before, during, and after the American Civil War. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 480 Comparative Native American History (3 cr.) Course examines history of native peoples in North America during both the colonial and republican periods through a comparative perspective of the Spanish/French/British empires and then the post-colonial periods of US and Mexican history. PUL=5, 1a
  • HIST-A 335 The Gilded Age (3 cr.) This course will study the response of the American people and their institutions to the opportunities and problems of the late nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to: the rise of Big Business; labor organization; immigration; regular, reform, and radical politics; disappearance of the frontier; the farm crisis; and the rise of imperialism. An important feature of this course will be the introduction to the class of important issues in the historical interpretation of the late nineteenth century.  PUL=5
  • HIST-H 105 American History I (3 cr.) I. Colonial period, Revolution, Confederation and Constitution, national period to 1865. II. 1865 to present. Political history forms framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 106 American History II (3 cr.) I. Colonial period, Revolution, Confederation and Constitution, national period to 1865. II. 1865 to present. Political history forms framework, with economic, social, cultural, and intellectual history interwoven. Introduction to historical literature, source material, and criticism. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 108 Perspectives on the World to 1800 (3 cr.) Emergence of civilizations in the Near East, sub-Saharan Africa, pre-Columbian America. Role of revolutions, i.e., geographic, scientific, industrial, social, and political (American and French) in establishment of European hegemony in Asia and the Western Hemisphere. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 109 Perspectives on the World since 1800 (3 cr.) Rise and fall of European imperial rule in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Special focus on impact of World War I, Chinese, Mexican, Russian revolutions. Independence movement in India, World War II, Cold War, new nations in Asia and Africa, struggle for solidarity in Latin America. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 113 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) I. Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval church; feudalism, national monarchies. II. Rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions, liberalism, political democracy; industrial revolution, capitalism, and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, international rivalries, world wars. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 114 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) I. Rise and fall of ancient civilizations; barbarian invasions; rise, flowering, and disruption of medieval church; feudalism, national monarchies. II. Rise of middle class; parliamentary institutions, liberalism, political democracy; industrial revolution, capitalism, and socialist movements; nationalism, imperialism, international rivalries, world wars. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 217 The Nature of History (3 cr.) An introductory examination of (1) what history is, (2) types of historical interpretation, (3) common problems of historians, and (4) the uses of history. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 220 American Military History (3 cr.) From settlement of colonies to present. European background, colonial militia. Principal foreign wars and their strategic objectives. Technological changes and effect of military on American society. Army is emphasized with some attention to other armed forces. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 221 Studies in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected themes, topics, or problems in the history of Africa, Asia, or Latin America. The course will emphasize general and/or broad themes or topics; the themes or topics will vary from one semester to another. PUL=5 This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.
  • HIST-A 301 Colonial and Revolutionary America I (3 cr.) European background of American history; discovery and exploration of New World by Spain, France, and England. Colonization: motives, causes, types. Social and intellectual developments in English colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Birth of Republic, 1763-1789. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 302 Colonial and Revolutionary America II (3 cr.) European background of American history; discovery and exploration of New World by Spain, France, and England. Colonization: motives, causes, types. Social and intellectual developments in English colonies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Birth of Republic, 1763-1789. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 303 United States, 1789–1865 I (3 cr.) Political, economic, and social development of United States from Washington's presidency through the Civil War. Growth of political, religious, educational, and other social institutions, and contributions of Hamilton, Jefferson, Jackson, Webster, Marshall, Lincoln. Agriculture, manufacturing, commerce, labor. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 304 United States, 1789–1865 II (3 cr.) Political, economic, and social development of United States from Washington's presidency through the Civil War. Growth of political, religious, educational, and other social institutions, and contributions of Hamilton, Jefferson, Jackson, Webster, Marshall, Lincoln. Agriculture, manufacturing, commerce, labor. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 313 Origins of Modern America, 1865–1917 (3 cr.) Social, economic, cultural, and political ways in which Americans accommodated and resisted changes introduced by large-scale industrialization. Populism and progressivism receive special attention. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 314 United States History, 1917–1945 (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformations of 1917–1945; World War I, the twenties, the Great Depression, New Deal, World War II. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 315 United States History since World War II (3 cr.) Political, demographic, economic, and intellectual transformations of 1945 to present: Cold War, problems of contemporary America. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 317 American Social History, 1865 to Present (3 cr.) Development of modern American intellectual and social patterns since the Civil War. Social thought, literature, science, the arts, religion, morals, education. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 321 History of American Thought I (3 cr.) Ideas that have influenced American history. I. Image of New World to challenge of Jacksonian democracy. II. Transcendentalism to New Conservatism. Term papers and reports. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 325 American Constitutional History I (3 cr.) I: 1607-1865. II: 1865-present. Changing constitutional system from seventeenth-century colonies to contemporary nations. Structure of government: federalism, division of powers, political institutions. Relationship of government to society and economy. Civil liberties and democracy. Constitutional law and politics. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 326 American Constitutional History II (3 cr.) I: 1607-1865. II: 1865-present. Changing constitutional system from seventeenth-century colonies to contemporary nations. Structure of government: federalism, division of powers, political institutions. Relationship of government to society and economy. Civil liberties and democracy. Constitutional law and politics. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 327 American Legal History I (3 cr.) Examines the development of United States law from English antecedents through the American Civil War. Course imparts substantial knowledge of American legal history and understanding of methods of historical and legal inquiry. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 328 History of Work in America (3 cr.) Examines the major transformations in the lives of American working people from the colonial era to modern times. The course explores shifting patterns of work, working class life and community, organized labor movements, and the relationship of workers and unions to the state. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 337 American Frontier I (3 cr.) I. Spanish penetration into Greater Southwest; developments in Louisiana Territory and Oregon Country prior to 1850. II. Economic, political, and social developments in trans-Mississippi West, 1850 to present. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 338 American Frontier II (3 cr.) I. Spanish penetration into Greater Southwest; developments in Louisiana Territory and Oregon Country prior to 1850. II. Economic, political, and social developments in trans-Mississippi West, 1850 to present. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.) Evolution of cities and urban life in the United States from colonial times to the present. Rise of cities (New York, Chicago, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Miami, and others). Creation of modern urban districts (ghettos, suburbia), city planning, political and economic power structures, ethnic and race relations, law and order (crime, police, prisons). PUL=5
  • HIST-A 348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) The era of the Civil War and its aftermath. Military, political, economic, and social aspects of the coming of the war, the war years, and the "reconstruction" era following the conflict. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.) Examines twentieth century history of immigration to the United States from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Central America. Compares causes of immigration and contrasts experiences of Latino immigrants in the United States. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 355 African-American History I (3 cr.) I. History of Africans in the United States from the colonial era to the Emancipation Proclamation. II. History of African Americans from the era of the Civil War to the present. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 356 African-American History II (3 cr.) I. History of Africans in the United States from the colonial era to the Emancipation Proclamation. II. History of African Americans from the era of the Civil War to the present. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 363 Survey of Indiana History (3 cr.) Examination of Indiana history that focuses on significant persons, topics, and events from the earliest exploration and settlement of the state to the present day. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 364 History of Black Americans (3 cr.) A survey of black life in America: the Atlantic slave trade, slavery, Afro-American culture, racism, Civil War and Reconstruction, peonage, segregation, northern migration, urban ghettos, discrimination, Harlem Renaissance, black nationalism, civil rights, black revolt, contemporary setting. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 371 History of Indiana I (3 cr.) I: The course deals with the development of a midwestern state, with emphasis on the French and British periods, the West in the American Revolution, the transition from territory to state, political, economic, and cultural patterns, and the sectional crisis. II: The period since 1865, tracing the development of a modern industrial commonwealth--agriculture, industry, politics, society, education, and the arts. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 372 History of Indiana II (3 cr.) I: The course deals with the development of a midwestern state, with emphasis on the French and British periods, the West in the American Revolution, the transition from territory to state, political, economic, and cultural patterns, and the sectional crisis. II: The period since 1865, tracing the development of a modern industrial commonwealth--agriculture, industry, politics, society, education, and the arts. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 402 Readings in American Environmental History (3 cr.) The roots of modern attitudes and actions toward the environment, focusing on major works in American environmental history and its European antecedents. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 410 American Environmental History (3 cr.) An examination of the environmental context for American history by analyzing the diverse and changing interaction between Americans and the environment in which they have lived. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 421 Topics in United States History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and/or problems in United States history. Topics will vary by semester. PUL=5 This course may be repeated three (3) times for credit under differing topics.
  • HIST-B 309 Britain I (3 cr.) I: Britain before 1688. Development of Britain and its institutions from Roman times to the Glorious Revolution, with special emphasis on political and constitutional change. II: Britain since 1688. Examines important modern political, economic, social, and cultural developments, including industrialization and imperialism and the emergence of ideologies like liberalism and socialism. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 310 Britain II (3 cr.) I: Britain before 1688. Development of Britain and its institutions from Roman times to the Glorious Revolution, with special emphasis on political and constitutional change. II: Britain since 1688. Examines important modern political, economic, social, and cultural developments, including industrialization and imperialism and the emergence of ideologies like liberalism and socialism. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 351 Barbarian Europe 200-1000 (3 cr.) The collapse of Roman authority in the West; the Germanic monarchies; the growth of the Western church and the development of German, Greek, and Moslem empires; the Viking invasions; feudalism and manorialism. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 352 The Age of Chivalry 1000-1500 (3 cr.) The revival of urban life in the West; the Crusading movement and the development of feudal states; the struggle between church and state; and the decay of feudal institutions. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 353 The Renaissance (3 cr.) Italian Renaissance as a political and cultural phase in the history of Western civilization. Its roots in antiquity and the Middle Ages; its characteristic expression in literature, art, learning, social transformation, manners, and customs. Expansion of Renaissance into France, Germany, and England. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 354 The Reformation (3 cr.) Economic, political, social, and religious background of Protestant Reformation; Lutheran, Reformed, Anglican, and Anabaptist movements, with reference to their political and theological trends; Catholic Reformation. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 355 Europe: Louis XIV to French Revolution (3 cr.) Absolutism to enlightened despotism; the European state and its authority in fiscal, judicial, and military affairs; sources, content, diffusion of the Enlightenment; agriculture, commerce, and industry in preindustrial economies; Old Regime France. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 356 French Revolution and Napoleon (3 cr.) P: H114 or consent of instructor. Crisis of Old Regime; middle-class and popular revolt; from constitutional monarchy to Jacobin commonwealth; the terror and revolutionary government; expansion of revolution in Europe; rise and fall of Napoleonic Empire. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 357 Modern France (3 cr.) A social, political, and cultural survey of France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 361 Europe in the Twentieth Century I (3 cr.) Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 362 Europe in the Twentieth Century II (3 cr.) Diplomatic, economic, intellectual, military, political, and social developments within Europe from World War I to present; changing relationships between Europe and other parts of the world. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 383 European Intellectual History I (3 cr.) Critical examination and analysis of the historical, psychological, social, and scientific roots of the thought of leading European thinkers from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. Thematic developments, as well as individual thinkers and particular problems, are emphasized. I. Sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. II. Nineteenth through twentieth centuries. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 384 European Intellectual History II (3 cr.) Critical examination and analysis of the historical, psychological, social, and scientific roots of the thought of leading European thinkers from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. Thematic developments, as well as individual thinkers and particular problems, are emphasized. I. Sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. II. Nineteenth through twentieth centuries. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 393 German History: From Bismarck to Hitler (3 cr.) This course seeks to acquaint the student with the social, political, and cultural developments in Germany from the middle nineteenth through the middle twentieth century. Its basic theme is the tragic efforts made by liberalism and democracy to assert themselves against the opposing forces of militarism and nationalism. Not open to students who have had HIST-B 377-B378. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 421 Topics in European History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical themes and/or problems in European history. Topics will vary from semester to semester. PUL=5 This course may be repeated three (3) times for credit under differing topics.
  • HIST-B 425 The Second World War (3 cr.) Beginning with its origins in the peace settlement of 1919, this course examines the social, cultural, and economic impact of the Second World War, as well as the war aims and strategies of the major combatants. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 426 Genocide and Its Origins (3 cr.) Beginning with the sixteenth-century discovery of the "New World" and ending with "ethnic cleansing" in the twenty-first century, this course will examine the intellectual, political, economic, social, and ideological dynamics driving the rise of mass murder as an instrument of state policy. PUL=5
  • HIST-C 386 Greek History (3 cr.) Political, social, and economic developments in the Greek world from the age of Mycenae and Troy until the Roman conquest (167 B.C.). Greek colonial world, Athens and Sparta, career and legend of Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic age. Archaeology as a source of political and social history. PUL=5
  • HIST-C 388 Roman History (3 cr.) The creation, organization, and government of the Roman Republic and Empire; literature and manners; the careers of Hannibal, Cato the Censor, Augustus, Seneca, Nero, and others; the growth of Christianity to the reign of Constantine. PUL=5
  • HIST-D 313 Russian Social and Cultural History, 1801-1917 (3 cr.) A topical examination of different social groups within Russia and their alteration over time as a result of industrialization, emancipation, and the urbanization of Russia. Among the groups covered will be the peasantry, the bureaucracy, the intelligentsia, the nobility, and the military. Changes in culture will also be reviewed. PUL=5
  • HIST-D 314 Soviet Social and Cultural History (3 cr.) Study of the history and dynamics of Soviet society and culture, their interaction, and their influence on Soviet politics. Among the specific topics covered will be the Party, women, dissidents, the Jews and other minorities, literature, and art. PUL=5
  • HIST-E 432 History of Africa II (3 cr.) 1750 to present. Slave trade, European imperialism, impact of Islam and Christianity, new state formation, reassertion of African culture and identity. Credit awarded for only one of HIST-E 432 and HIST-E 332. PUL=5
  • HIST-F 341 Latin America: Conquest and Empire (3 cr.) The colonial period: Spanish, Portuguese, Indian, and African backgrounds; discovery, conquest, and settlement; economic, social, political, religious, and cultural life; the movement toward independence. PUL=5
  • HIST-F 342 Latin America: Evolution and Revolution since Independence (3 cr.) National period: the struggle for independence; the nineteenth-century attempts to achieve political stability and economic progress; the efforts to attain social justice in the twentieth century, with emphasis on common problems. PUL=5
  • HIST-F 346 Modern Mexico (3 cr.) Survey of Mexican history from the late 1800s to the present. Focuses on causes for and long-term consequences of Mexico's 1910 revolution. PUL=5
  • HIST-F 347 History of United States–Latin American Relations (3 cr.) This course examines the history of diplomatic, economic, and cultural relations between the United States and Latin America from the late 1700s to the present. PUL=5
  • HIST-G 451 Traditional Asia (3 cr.) This course offers a brief survey of the early civilization of Asia, which includes China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, and India, in the traditional period. PUL=5
  • HIST-G 452 Modern Asia (3 cr.) This course offers a brief survey of the civilization of Asia that includes selected topics related to China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea, and/or India in modern times. PUL=5
  • HIST-G 485 Modern China (3 cr.) China from the Ch'ing period to the present. Social, political, and economic change in a largely agrarian society. International and intercultural relations as well as rebellion, war, and revolution during the unstable nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students may receive credit for only one of HIST-G 485 and HIST-G 385. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 306 Sex Roles and Society in American History (3 cr.) What has it meant to be female or male in America? Examination of sex/gender roles, stereotypes, housewifery, family life, sexual mores, work patterns, popular culture, demographic change, politics, and violence. Special emphasis on utopias, frontiers, and wars. Readings in original sources and scholarly interpretations. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 364 History of Medicine and Public Health (3 cr.) History of medicine and public health in Europe and America, including ancient and medieval background, with focus on the development of modern health sciences since 1800. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 373 History of Science and Technology I (3 cr.) I. Study of the development of pure and applied science from prehistoric times to the Scientific Revolution, with emphasis on principles, technical aspects, relationships between the sciences; the evolution of major scientific disciplines and the effects on other institutions and world views. II. An in-depth study of scientific and technological developments from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Special emphasis on transportation, communication, military and medical technology, physics, biology, and astronomy and on the figures involved in key breakthroughs. Consideration of governmental involvement in science. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 374 History of Science and Technology II (3 cr.) I. Study of the development of pure and applied science from prehistoric times to the Scientific Revolution, with emphasis on principles, technical aspects, relationships between the sciences; the evolution of major scientific disciplines and the effects on other institutions and world views. II. An in-depth study of scientific and technological developments from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Special emphasis on transportation, communication, military and medical technology, physics, biology, and astronomy and on the figures involved in key breakthroughs. Consideration of governmental involvement in science. PUL=5  
  • HIST-H 375 Machines and the Age of Invention (3 cr.) The history of invention and the industrialization of Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with the economic, social, demographic, and intellectual changes that resulted. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 409 Women in History (3 cr.) P: Junior or senior standing. Women in their historical and contemporary situation in Western culture; survey of prehistoric and historic myths about women; status of women during the major eras of Western c'ivilization; exceptional women and their influence; demands for the achievement of women's rights in modern times. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 410 Introduction to Archival Practice (3 cr.) Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of archival work, with intensive study and analysis of the principal issues in the preservation and use of historical records. Particular focus is on the issues relating to the historical records of organizations and individuals engaged in philanthropic work. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 411 Historical Editing (3 cr.) Introduction to the history, theory, and practice of historical editing, with emphasis on the processes of editing historical documents and the publications of history-related organizations. Attention given to technical skills (copyediting, proofreading) as well as broader professional issues (ethics, the editor-author relationship, evolution of editorial standards). PUL=5
  • HIST-H 412 Historic Preservation (3 cr.) Introduction to the history, theory, and legal and ethical bases for preservation of the built environment. Attention will be given to architectural history, methodology (site-specific research, contextual research) as well as professional issues such as who preserves, what should be preserved, and the role of the historian in making choices. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 415 Philanthropy in the West (3 cr.) The history of the social act of philanthropy from the beginnings of the Christian era to modern times. "Philanthropy" is construed broadly to include ethical injunctions to benevolence, charitable acts of individuals and corporate bodies, high art patronage, urban planning, and state action to improve living conditions through schooling, health care, prisons, and police. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 421 Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and/or problems in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester. PUL=5 This course may be taken a total of three (3) times for credit under different topics.
  • HIST-H 425 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods.  PUL=5 This course may be taken a total of four (4) times for credit under different topics.
  • HIST-H 477 British Imperialism, 1485–Present (3 cr.) Comparative course focusing on the various geographical regions absorbed into the British empire between 1485 and the present. It explores the experience of empire in the Americas, the Pacific, India, Africa, and the Middle East through a variety of primary and secondary materials. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 341 United States Women's History I (3 cr.) The social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political, and demographic history of women in the United States from the period before European settlement to the present. Topics include the variety in women's experiences; the worlds in which women lived; the relationship between the private and public realms; and changes and continuities over time. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 342 United States Women's History II (3 cr.) The social, economic, cultural, intellectual, political, and demographic history of women in the United States from the period before European settlement to the present. Topics include the variety in women's experiences; the worlds in which women lived; the relationship between the private and public realms; and changes and continuities over time. PUL=5
  • HIST-B 323 History of the Holocuast (3 cr.)
  • HIST-H 207 Modern East Asian Civilization (3 cr.)
  • HIST-A 329 American Dissent (3 cr.) This course will examine popular movements for social, economic, and political change in U.S. history. Emphasis will be on: evaluating different approaches to the study of collective action; understanding the social, political, and cultural contexts from which protest developed; and uncovering what protest movements reveal about the nature of American society and politics.
  • HIST-A 332 The American Ethnic Experience (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the central issues and methods of inquiry in the historical study of ethnic communities in the United States. The focus of the course's lectures, discussions, readings, and assignments will be on the similarities and contrasts in the experiences of America's various "ethnic" groups.
  • HIST-E 340 African Popular Culture (3 cr.) African popular culture (music, sports, fashion) is the lens used to explore how Africans responded to and shaped life under colonial rule and after independence. We consider questions like: What is the relationship between popular culture and politics? How does popular culture change how we think about colonialism and independence?
  • HIST-G 461 Imperial China (3 cr.) This course offers a brief survey of the civilization of traditional China. The emphasis of the lectures is on the development of the social structure, the political system, and Confucian culture.
  • HIST-A 343 Lincoln: The Man and the Myth (3 cr.) This class will explore the life and the myth of Abraham Lincoln. Students will read scholarly and popular works about Lincoln's life, view films about Lincoln, and study how museums, historic sites, and art interpret/portray his life. PUL=5, 1a
  • HIST-H 418 History of International Humanitarian Assistance (3 cr.) This course covers the history of international humanitarian assistance during the 19th and 20th centuries. Its focus is on the movements and activities that developed in wealthier countries (Europe and the U.S.) which attempted to help those in other lands in need of assistance (e.g., food, shelter, medical care), as a result of a variety of causes, both natural and man-made, such as famine, flood, epidemics, earthquakes and volcanoes as well as wars and government oppression. The responses took many forms, governmental and nongovernmental, in a world that underwent very dramatic changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. PUL=5, 2, 3
  • HIST-A 344 The Gilded Age (3 cr.) This course will study the response of the American people and their institutions to the opportunities and problems of the late nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to: the rise of Big Business; labor organization; immigration; regular, reform, and radical politics; disappearance of the frontier; the farm crisis; and the rise of imperialism. An important feature of this course will be the introduction to the class of important issues in the historical interpretation of the late nineteenth century. PUL=5, 1a, 6
  • HIST-A 431 Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (3 cr.) This course will examine the private life as well as the public career of 19th-century African American Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). This course will focus on assessing Douglass's historical significance as a slave, abolitionist, Civil War recruiter, politician, civil rights leader, and diplomat. It also will consider the degree that Douglass's individual experiences shed light on the problem of race in American history. PUL=5, 1a
  • HIST-H 480 Comparative Native American History (3 cr.) Course examines history of native peoples in North America during both the colonial and republican periods through a comparative perspective of the Spanish/French/British empires and then the post-colonial periods of US and Mexican history. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 207 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY (3 cr.) This introductory course surveys the history of Native peoples of North America from the earliest times to the present. It seeks to provide students with a broad understanding of Native American history, prepare students for more advanced course work in Native studies, and enhance students' understanding of colonialism and American history. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 300 Topics in History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods. PUL=5 May be repeated with different topic for a maximum of 9 credit hours.
  • HIST-A 200 Isuues in United States Hist (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of general import. Topics will vary from semester to semester but will usually be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions,a nd periods. PUL=5
  • HIST-A 300 Isuues in United States History (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected issues and problems of limited scope. Topics will vary, but usually cut across fields, regions, and periods. PUL=5 May be repeated twice for credit under different topics.
  • HIST-A 376 Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (3 cr.) This course will examine the private life as well as the public career of 19th-century African American Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). This course will focus on assessing Douglass's historical significance as a slave, abolitionist, Civil War recruiter, politician, civil rights leader, and diplomat. It also will consider the degree that Douglass's individual experiences shed light on the problem of race in American history. PUL=5
  • HIST-H 195 Introduction to Digital Humanities (3 cr.) Introduction to Digital Humanities introduces students to the study of digital humanities emphasizing the major issues in the computational study of humanities fields and highlights how the digital and the humanities intersect. PUL=2
Special Purpose Courses
  • HIST-J 495 Proseminar for History Majors (3 cr.) Selected topics in history. Closed to freshmen and sophomores. PUL=5
  • HIST-K 493 Reading for Honors (1-3 cr.) P: Approval of department honors committee prior to registration. Individual readings on selected topics. PUL=5
  • HIST-K 495 Readings in History (1-3 cr.) By arrangement with instructor. Permission of departmental chairperson required. PUL=5
Graduate Courses
General and Professional Skills
  • HIST-H 515 History of Philanthropy (3 cr.) This course examines traditions of giving and receiving charity and philanthropy in the modern era. It takes a comparative approach to giving including different historical contexts and traditions. Among the topics covered will be donor motivations, definitions of need, identity formation, and philanthropy, politics and social change.
  • HIST-G 585 Modern China (3 cr.) China from the Ch'ing period to the present. Social, political, and economic change in a largely agrarian society. International and intercultural relations as well as rebellion, war, and revolution during the unstable nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  • HIST-H 500 History of Historical Thought (4 cr.) Approaches to the historian's craft and reflections on history as a type of scholarly thinking. Recommended for new graduate students and others interested in history as a branch of knowledge. With the consent of the director of graduate studies, may be repeated for credit when the instructor differs.
  • HIST-H 501 Historical Methodology (4 cr.) Discussion and application of the various methods and strategies used in historical research.
  • HIST-H 509 Special Topics in European History (3 cr.) Study of topics in European history. May be repeated with a different topic.
  • HIST-H 511 Special Topics in American History (3 cr.) Study of topics in American history. May be repeated with a different topic.
  • HIST-H 516 History of Philanthropy in the United States (3 cr.) Approaches philanthropy as a social relation between various groups and looks at issues ranging from the relationship between government and the economy to African-American activism to women's roles. Explores past and current debates about such issues in order to analyze the past, understand the present, and shape the future.
  • HIST-H 521 Special Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., traditional Asia, modern Asia. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.
  • HIST-H 542 Public History (4 cr.) The application of history to public needs and public programs. Historic preservation, archival management, oral history, editing, public humanities programming, historical societies, etc.
  • HIST-H 543 Practicum in Public History (1-4 cr.) P: or C: HIST-H 542. Internships in public history programs, fieldwork, or research in the historical antecedents of contemporary problems.
  • HIST-H 546 Special Topics in History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (3 cr.) Study of topics in the history of science, medicine, and technology. May be repeated for credit with permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.
  • HIST-H 547 Special Topics in Public History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in public history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., historic preservation, archival practice, material history, local and community history, digital humanities, and historical editing. May be repeated once for credit.
  • HIST-H 548 Historical Administration (3 cr.) This course presents an overview of issues faced by administrators and mid-level managers who work in museums, historical societies, archives, special collection libraries, and other cultural resource agencies. Topics, speakers, and readings focus on issues that are unique to agencies that collect, preserve, and interpret historical resources.
  • HIST-H 575 Graduate Readings in History (1-5 cr.) Only three (3) credit hours will count toward the Ph.D. Minor in History. May be repeated with different readings.
  • HIST-H 518 History of International Humanitarian Assistance (3 cr.) This course covers the history of international humanitarian assistance during the 19th and 20th centuries. Its focus is on the movements and activities that developed in wealthier countries (Europe and the U.S.) which attempted to help those in other lands in need of assistance (e.g., food, shelter, medical care), as a result of a variety of causes, both natural and man-made, such as famine, flood, epidemics, earthquakes and volcanoes as well as wars and government oppression. The responses took many forms, governmental and nongovernmental, in a world that underwent very dramatic changes during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Colloquia
  • HIST-H 640 Colloquium: Russian History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 615 Colloquium: Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 665 Colloquium: Latin American History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 630 Colloquium: British and British Imperial History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 620 Colloquium: Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 650 Colloquium: United States History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 699 Colloquium: Comparative History (4 cr.)
Seminars
  • HIST-H 715 Seminar: Early Modern European History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 730 Seminar in British and British Imperial History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 720 Seminar: Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
  • HIST-H 750 Seminar in United States History (4 cr.)
Thesis
  • HIST-H 898 M.A. Thesis (1-6 cr.)
Individualized Major Program (IMP)
  • SLA-I 360 Individualized Major Program (1 cr.) P: Approval by advisor. A tutorial in which a student develops a plan for an individualized major. Upon approval of this plan, the student is admitted to the Individualized Major Program. PUL=3,4
  • SLA-I 460 Individualized Major Senior Project (3-6 cr.) P: SLA I360 (i.e. admission to the Individualized Major Program) and approval by advisor. A variable-credit tutorial devoted to a capstone project that culminates and integrates the individualized major. Preferably taken in the senior year as a two-semester, 6-credit course. PUL=3,4
International Studies (INTL)
  • INTL-I 100 Introduction to International Studies (3 cr.) This is the required introductory course for the Global and International Studies major and minor. In contrast to international relations (a subfield of political science), with which it is often confused, Global and International Studies is an interdisciplinary field. This course provides you with an interdisciplinary sample of international studies scholarship from a variety of academic disciplines. PUL=5
  • INTL-I 400 International Studies Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) This is the required senior seminar capstone course for the Global and International Studies major. It provides an integrative capstone experience which reinforces the interdisciplinary nature of Global and International Studies. PUL=2,4
  • INTL-I 415 Individual Readings in International Studies (3 cr.) This course allows students to pursue independent study projects or to take advantage of opportunities to collaborate with faculty on research projects in Global and International Studies. PUL=3
Museum Studies (MSTD)
Undergraduate Courses
  • HIST-H 217 The Nature of History (3 cr.) An introductory examination of (1) what history is, (2) types of historical interpretation, (3) common problems in history, and (4) the uses of history. PUL=5
  • MSTD-A 414 Museums and Technology (3 cr.) This course surveys the growing use of technology in museums. It examines applications for information management in collections, conservation science, and archives. It examines critically the use of technology in the service of education both in exhibit contexts and in the variety of educational programs and Web-based dissemination of knowledge. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Museum Theatre and Interpretation Methods (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth look at the use of museum theatre and live interpretation in museum settings to advance the educational mission and nature of museums. The class examines theatrical techniques, program development and management, and interpretation approaches for a wide variety of museum exhibits and audiences. Students will observe, develop, and implement original museum theatre and interpretation projects as a synthesis and practical application of the knowledge gained. The course will include field visits and observations of various techniques in museum theatre and live interpretation.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Exhibit Design and Planning Studio: (Applied learning with community client/partners) (3 cr.) This class is an applied learning course based on a professional design studio model. Work completed in this course is experiential, client-based work with specific outcomes and deliverables. The course builds on the basic skills and applications learned in Exhibit Design and Planning 1, with an emphasis on refining and developing the storytelling and interpretive capacity of exhibition design and its relationship to visual and three-dimensional form, light, and materials. Students will engage an exploration of three- dimensional structure and form in relation to constructing meaning, as well as developing an understanding of a vocabulary of materials to add to the existing methods of exhibition design and planning engaged in the first-level course.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Museum Ethics (3 cr.) This course introduces current ethical concerns relevant to museums and the various audiences they serve. It focuses on the philosophical and practical dilemmas faced by exhibiting institutions in their efforts to formulate and fulfill their missions. It pays particular attention to the relationships between the governing bodies of these institutions and their staff, their intended audiences, and the source communities which they represent. The course also provides an historical framework tracing the development of these issues in order to contextualize the present situation.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Issues in Native American Representation (3 cr.) From sports mascots, tourist “junk,” and New Age paraphernalia to superb films and museum exhibits, the images of Indians presented to the public and Indians themselves become confusing and often are stereotypical. Through readings, videos, online materials, and hands-on projects using exhibits in the Eiteljorg Museum, the course will consider a wide range of issues including economics, ethics, authenticity, stereotyping, and sovereignty. Because the subject matter cross-cuts the realm of indigenous issues, the class and readings will necessarily touch upon similar issues in non–Native American indigenous cultures.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: American Indians in Film (3 cr.) No medium has done more to create and confound images of American Indians than film. Ranging from simplistic, warlike savages to ennobled, ecological mystics, these images tend to mirror the complexities of the dominant society and are mostly created by them. What are the impacts of these images on both Indian people and the dominant society? How are the images created? What are the cultural contexts of the medium itself? These and a range of other subjects will be examined in the course.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Curatorial Practices (3 cr.) This course explores the possibilities for, and consequences of, curating in the museum. By critically examining the creative process of producing exhibitions that convey critical narratives and by applying the practices and methodologies of curators. It explores briefly the history of curating, but will emphasize the contemporary concerns within the field. While inclusive in its disciplinary perspectives, the course in any particular semester may focus on art, anthropological, or historical topics and projects.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Critical Approaches to Museum Education (3 cr.) As informal learning environments, museums are community resources that present content through a variety of formats. As museums grapple with their changing role within communities, the format and orientation of education programs and exhibitions is changing. This course examines the potential of applying critical pedagogy methods to museum education and exhibition development as a way to create meaningful audience involvement and stronger civic engagement of museums.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: : Interpreting Sustainable Landscapes and Live Collections (3 cr.) The course will examine the construction of nature as a cultural expression, ideas of sustainability, environment and landscape and their value as cultural spaces. We will examine how they are selected, cared for, interpreted and engaged by the public. Local live collections of plants, animals and landscapes will be visited and examined; including visits to public and community gardens, zoos and agricultural sites and park lands. An opportunity for interpretive planning exists at several locations within Indianapolis.
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: : Collections Research and Survey (3 cr.)

    Privileging the collection and facilities of The Madame Walker Theatre Center, students will survey the contents of the building and create accurate records of historic and artistic objects with full descriptions, condition assessments, and high-resolution photographs.  This material will be assembled  into a newly-created electronic database.  At the same time, students will conduct in-depth research about individual items and share this information with the Walker’s blog, and other online venues.

  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: : Display: Theories, Issues, Practices (3 cr.)

    Through the examination of both onsite and virtual exhibitions this course will explore different display methodologies and their respective benefits and issues. Students will learn to identify organizational missions and determine if exhibitions successfully meet established criteria. Exhibitions will be discussed in the context of meeting educational, marketing and fiscal goals for organizations among other standards. 

  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics: Cultural Heritage (3 cr.) This course explores a variety of issues related the stewardship of cultural property on a local and global scale. Through readings, case studies, discussion, and a semester-long project, students will explore ethical, economic, legal, political, and pragmatic issues related to tangible and intangible heritage and will increase their understanding of the practices and processes of cultural heritage management.
  • MSTD-A 403 Introduction to Museum Studies (3 cr.) This survey of museology introduces students to the history of museums and to debates on the philosophical nature of museums and their roles in society. The course covers the types and definitions of museums, traces the history of museums, discusses contemporary museum practice, and examines current issues in the museum profession. PUL=5
  • MSTD-A 405 Museum Methods (3 cr.) This survey of museum practice introduces students to methods, skills, and resources in three areas of museum work: artifacts, interpretation, and organizational administration, as well as to the ethical ramifications of these methods. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 408 Museum Internship (1-6 cr.) P: MSTD-A 403 and MSTD-A 405, or consent of instructor; anthropology majors may register for MSTD-A 412 in lieu of this requirement. Authorization of the instructor required. An arranged learning experience in museum work appropriate to individual career goals focusing on an aspect of museum practice and working with a museum mentor. PUL=3 May be repeated.
  • MSTD-A 410 Museum Education (3 cr.) This survey of museum education introduces students to a variety of professional skills through exercises, projects, museum visitor observation, and in-museum classes. It covers education theory most central to museum practice, the duties of museum educators, and current issues in museum education. PUL=4
  • MSTD-A 412 Exhibit Planning and Design (3 cr.) This course offers a survey of museum exhibit planning and design through an integration of theory and practice. The class introduces students to exhibit development, including exhibit administration, design, and evaluation, and to a variety of professional skills through hands-on exercises, exhibit critiques, museum observations, and in-museum classes. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 416 Collections Care and Management (3 cr.) A survey of techniques for the management and care of collections in museums. It covers documentation, management of collections, processes, administrative functions, risk management, and ethical and legal issues. The course also covers the physical care and conservation of objects. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 460 Current Topics in Museum Studies (3 cr.) Study and analysis of selected topics in museum studies. Topics will vary from semester to semester. PUL=4 May be repeated for credit.
  • MSTD-A 494 Independent Learning in Museum Studies (1-6 cr.) A supervised, in-depth examination through individual reading and research on a particular museum studies topic selected and conducted by the student in consultation with a faculty member. PUL=2 May be repeated for no more than 6 credit hours total.
  • MSTD-A 418 Museums and Audiences (3 cr.) This course examines the ways museums seek to better understand their audiences, serve them more effectively, and strive to reach new audiences. The course looks at a broad range of visitor studies and the ways in which museums and audiences interact. PUL=
  • MSTD-A 101 Understanding Museums (3 cr.) Museums are among the most complex, but trusted, sources for education, entertainment, and lifelong learning. This course surveys museum types, missions, and histories, then introduces the skills needed to read objects and exhibitions competently and critically as well as to draw upon a museum's holdings and services purposefully and independently. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 413 Curatorial Practices (3 cr.) This seminar will examine current and historical curatorial practices in museums and other exhibition contexts. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 417 Preventative Conservation (3 cr.) P: MSTD-A 416. This course offers a theoretical and practical investigation of preventative conservation of artifacts which aims to eliminate or modify conditions that encourage deterioration. PUL=3
  • MSTD-A 421 Museums Theatre and Live Interpretation (3 cr.) P: MSTD-A 403 or MSTD-A 410. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth look at the use of museum theatre and live interpretation in museum settings to advance the educational mission and nature of museums theatrical techniques, program development and management, and interpretation approaches for a wide variety of museum exhibits and audiences. Students will observe, develop, and implement original museum theatre and interpretation projects as a synthesis and practical application of the knowledge gained. The course will include field visits and observations of various techniques in museum theatre and live interpretation.
  • MSTD-A 440 Cultural Heritage (3 cr.) This course explores a variety of issues related to the stewardship of cultural property on a local, national, and global scale. Through readings, case studies, discussion, and a semester-long project, students will explore ethical, economic, legal, political, and pragmatic issues related to tangible and intangible heritage and will increase their understanding of the practices and processes of cultural heritage management.
Graduate Courses
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Curatorial Practices (3 cr.) This course explores the possibilities for, and consequences of, curating in the museum. By critically examining the creative process of producing exhibitions that convey critical narratives and by applying the practices and methodologies of curators. It explores briefly the history of curating, but will emphasize the contemporary concerns within the field. While inclusive in its disciplinary perspectives, the course in any particular semester may focus on art, anthropological, or historical topics and projects.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Exhibit Design and Planning Studio: (Applied learning with community client/partners) (3 cr.) This class is an applied learning course based on a professional design studio model. Work completed in this course is experiential, client-based work with specific outcomes and deliverables. The course builds on the basic skills and applications learned in Exhibit Design and Planning 1, with an emphasis on refining and developing the storytelling and interpretive capacity of exhibition design and its relationship to visual and three-dimensional form, light, and materials. Students will engage an exploration of three- dimensional structure and form in relation to constructing meaning, as well as developing an understanding of a vocabulary of materials to add to the existing methods of exhibition design and planning engaged in the first-level course.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Issues in Native American Representation (3 cr.) From sports mascots, tourist “junk,” and New Age paraphernalia to superb films and museum exhibits, the images of Indians presented to the public and Indians themselves become confusing and often are stereotypical. Through readings, videos, online materials, and hands-on projects using exhibits in the Eiteljorg Museum, the course will consider a wide range of issues including economics, ethics, authenticity, stereotyping, and sovereignty. Because the subject matter cross-cuts the realm of indigenous issues, the class and readings will necessarily touch upon similar issues in non–Native American indigenous cultures.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: American Indians in Film (3 cr.) No medium has done more to create and confound images of American Indians than film. Ranging from simplistic, warlike savages to ennobled, ecological mystics, these images tend to mirror the complexities of the dominant society and are mostly created by them. What are the impacts of these images on both Indian people and the dominant society? How are the images created? What are the cultural contexts of the medium itself? These and a range of other subjects will be examined in the course.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Museum Theatre and Interpretation Methods (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth look at the use of museum theatre and live interpretation in museum settings to advance the educational mission and nature of museums. The class examines theatrical techniques, program development and management, and interpretation approaches for a wide variety of museum exhibits and audiences. Students will observe, develop, and implement original museum theatre and interpretation projects as a synthesis and practical application of the knowledge gained. The course will include field visits and observations of various techniques in museum theatre and live interpretation.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Critical Approaches to Museum Education (3 cr.) As informal learning environments, museums are community resources that present content through a variety of formats. As museums grapple with their changing role within communities, the format and orientation of education programs and exhibitions is changing. This course examines the potential of applying critical pedagogy methods to museum education and exhibition development as a way to create meaningful audience involvement and stronger civic engagement of museums.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Museum Ethics (3 cr.) This course introduces current ethical concerns relevant to museums and the various audiences they serve. It focuses on the philosophical and practical dilemmas faced by exhibiting institutions in their efforts to formulate and fulfill their missions. It pays particular attention to the relationships between the governing bodies of these institutions and their staff, their intended audiences, and the source communities which they represent. The course also provides an historical framework tracing the development of these issues in order to contextualize the present situation.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Indigenous Peoples of North America (3 cr.)

    Examines the ways in which academic disciplines have examined American Indian and Native cultures, traditions and histories. The viewpoints primarily will emphasize ideas that affect the representation of Indigenous people in museums, but perspectives also will come from anthropology literature, history, law, political science, and a range of other disciplines.

  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Museum Research Methods in Education and Visitor Experience (3 cr.)

    This course is an overview on the theoretical foundations of educational research and practical application of those methods in a museum setting.  It incorporates an overview of techniques in museum education and visitor studies research, and emphasizes the utility of research in museum education practices. Students will participate in project-based activities with museum professionals and researchers, as well as become active consumers, reviewers, and advocates of research in the museum field.

  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Cultural Heritage (3 cr.) This course explores a variety of issues related the stewardship of cultural property on a local and global scale. Through readings, case studies, discussion, and a semester-long project, students will explore ethical, economic, legal, political, and pragmatic issues related to tangible and intangible heritage and will increase their understanding of the practices and processes of cultural heritage management.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: Museum Theatre and Interpretation Methods (3 cr.) The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth look at the use of museum theatre and live interpretation in museum settings to advance the educational mission and nature of museums. The class examines theatrical techniques, program development and management, and interpretation approaches for a wide variety of museum exhibits and audiences. Students will observe, develop, and implement original museum theatre and interpretation projects as a synthesis and practical application of the knowledge gained. The course will include field visits and observations of various techniques in museum theatre and live interpretation.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: : Collections Research and Survey (3 cr.)

    Privileging the collection and facilities of The Madame Walker Theatre Center, students will survey the contents of the building and create accurate records of historic and artistic objects with full descriptions, condition assessments, and high-resolution photographs.  This material will be assembled  into a newly-created electronic database.  At the same time, students will conduct in-depth research about individual items and share this information with the Walker’s blog, and other online venues.

  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: : Interpreting Sustainable Landscapes and Live Collections (3 cr.) The course will examine the construction of nature as a cultural expression, ideas of sustainability, environment and landscape and their value as cultural spaces. We will examine how they are selected, cared for, interpreted and engaged by the public. Local live collections of plants, animals and landscapes will be visited and examined; including visits to public and community gardens, zoos and agricultural sites and park lands. An opportunity for interpretive planning exists at several locations within Indianapolis.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics: : Display: Theories, Issues, Practices (3 cr.)

    Through the examination of both onsite and virtual exhibitions this course will explore different display methodologies and their respective benefits and issues. Students will learn to identify organizational missions and determine if exhibitions successfully meet established criteria. Exhibitions will be discussed in the context of meeting educational, marketing and fiscal goals for organizations among other standards. 

  • MSTD-A 503 Introduction to Museum Studies (3 cr.) Core course. This survey of museology introduces students to the history of museums and to debates on the philosophical nature of museums and their roles in society. The course covers the types and definitions of museums, traces the history of museums, discusses contemporary museum practice, and examines current issues in the museum profession.
  • MSTD-A 505 Museum Methods (3 cr.) Course counts toward the Graduate Certificate but not toward the Master's Degree. This survey of museum practice introduces students to methods, skills, and resources in three areas of museum work: artifacts, interpretation, and organizational administration, as well as to the ethical ramifications of these methods.
  • MSTD-A 508 Museum Internship (1-6 cr.) P: MSTD-A 503 and two other museum studies courses or consent of the instructor. An arranged learning experience in museum work appropriate to individual career goals focusing on an aspect of museum practice and working with a museum mentor. May be repeated for credit.
  • MSTD-A 510 Museum Education (3 cr.) Core course. P: MSTD-A 503 or consent of the instructor. This survey of museum education introduces students to a variety of professional skills through exercises, projects, museum visitor observation, and in-museum classes. It covers education theory most central to museum practice, the duties of museum educators, and current issues in museum education.
  • MSTD-A 512 Exhibit Planning and Design (3 cr.) Core course. P: MSTD-A 503 or consent of the instructor. This course offers a survey of museum exhibit planning and design through an integration of theory and practice. The class introduces students to exhibit development, including exhibit administration, design, and evaluation, and to a variety of professional skills through hands-on exercises, exhibit critiques, museum observations, and in-museum classes.
  • MSTD-A 514 Museums and Technology (3 cr.) Elective. P: MSTD-A 503 or consent of the instructor. This course surveys the growing use of technology in museums. It examines applications for information management in collections, conservation science, and archives. It examines critically the use of technology in the service of education both in exhibit contexts and in the variety of educational programs and Web-based dissemination of knowledge.
  • MSTD-A 530 Museum Colloquium (3 cr.) This course provides graduate students with the tools and knowledge necessary to assess, understand, and utilize the links among their education, goals, and career opportunities. It supports graduate students approaching the end of their degree program in 1) exploring the connections between the museum knowledge they have mastered and the skills they have developed, 2) framing and articulating their knowledge and skills as well as their vocational goals to others, including prospective employers, 3) developing critical competencies for community-focused museum work, and 4) creating professional plans as they transition into or advance in the work force or pursue further education.
  • MSTD-A 560 Current Topics in Museum Studies (3 cr.) Elective. Intensive graduate-level study and analysis of selected topics in museum studies. Topics will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.
  • MSTD-A 595 Independent Learning in Museum Studies (1-6 cr.) A supervised, in-depth examination through individual reading and research on a particular museum studies topic selected and conducted by the student in consultation with a faculty member. May be repeated for no more than 6 credit hours total.
  • MSTD-A 516 Collections Care and Managements (3 cr.) Core course. P: MSTD-A 503 or consent of the instructor. A survey of techniques for the management and care of collections in museums. It covers documentation, management of collections, processes, administrative functions, risk management, and ethical and legal issues. The course also covers the physical care and conservation of collections.
  • MSTD-A 518 Museums and Audiences (3 cr.) Elective. This course examines the ways museums seek to better understand their audiences, serve them more effectively, and strive to reach new audiences. The course looks at a broad range of visitor studies and the ways in which museums and audiences interact.
  • MSTD-A 548 Museum Administration (3 cr.) Core course. This course presents an overview of issues faced by administrators and mid-level managers who work in museums, historical societies, archives, special collection libraries, and other cultured resource agencies. Topics, speakers, and readings are focused on issues that are unique to agencies that collect, preserve, and interpret historical resources.
  • MSTD-A 509 Applied Research in Museums (1-6 cr.) Elective. P: MSTD-A 503 or consent of the instructor. An interdisciplinary research practicum conducted in collaboration with museum studies students, faculty and museum partners. The course provides students with an opportunity to work in conjunction with museum professionals to conduct research and carry out public projects in museum settings. The course may focus on exhibition planning, public programs and symposia, curatorial projects, and national collaborations. May be repeated for credit.
  • MSTD-A 513 Curatorial Practices (3 cr.) This seminar course will examine current and historical curatorial practices in museums and other exhibition contexts.Case studies will introduce a range fo approaches to the storytelling practices involved in curatorial work. Over the course of the semester students will also develop and execute their own curatorial project.
  • MSTD-A 511 Museum Education (3 cr.) Elective. The class will examine the multiple ways that people learn from and with objects in museums using a range of disciplines including education, history, semiotics, material culture, anthropology, and psychology.
  • MSTD-A 517 Preventative Conservation (3 cr.) This course offers a theoretical and practical investigation of preventive conservation of artifacts which aims to eliminate or modify conditions that encourage deterioration. Preventative Conservation is the broadcast technique by which preservation of museum objects and collections is acheived. Emphasis is placed on measures that prevent or reduce the potential for damage and loss. Central to preventative conservation methodology, topics include handling procedures, proper storage, and environmental management, agents or deterioration, risk and analysis, emergency preparedness, and planning.
  • MSTD-A 521 Museum Theatre and Live Interpretation (3 cr.) Elective. The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth look at the use of museum theatre and live interpretation in museum settings to advance the educational mission and nature of museums. The class examines theatrical techniques, program development and management, and interpretation approaches for a wide variety of museum exhibits and audiences. Students will observe, develop, and implement original museum theatre and interpretation projects as a synthesis and practical application of the knowledge gained. The course will include field visits and observations of various techniques in museum theatre and live interpretation.
  • MSTD-A 531 Critical Approaches to Museums (3 cr.) Elective. P: MSTD-A 503 or consent of the instructor. This class examines the potential of applying critical pedagogical methods to curatorial practices, interpretation, museum education, and exhibition development as a way to focus on engaging the visitor with artifacts, opening up civic discourse, and promoting deeper connection to community.
  • MSTD-A 540 Cultural Heritage (3 cr.) Elective. This course explores a variety of issues related the stewardship of cultural property on a local, national, and global scale. Through readings, case studies, discussion, and a semester-long project, students will explore ethical, economic, legal, political, and pragmatic issues related to tangible and intangible heritage and will increase their understanding of the practices and processes of cultural heritage management.
Paralegal Studies
  • POLS-Y 211 Introduction to Law (3 cr.) An introduction to law as an aspect of government and politics, and as a means for dealing with major social problems. Students will study legal reasoning, procedures, and materials, and may compare other nations’ legal systems. The course usually includes a moot court or other forms of simulation. PUL=2
  • POLS-Y 221 Legal Research and Writing for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211. Development of research and communication skills special to the area of law. Includes methods of organizing and conducting legal research, resources available for legal research, presentation of findings in memoranda and briefs, other forms of legal writing. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 222 Litigation for Paralegal Studies I (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course examines the processing of a case from initial client interviews to final disposition. It includes drafting of complaints, answers, counterclaims, interrogatories and other discovery tools, gathering of evidence, and motions and judgments. Both Indiana and federal rules of evidence are emphasized. PUL=4
  • POLS-Y 223 Litigation for Paralegal Studies II (3 cr.) P: Y211, Y221, and Y222. This elective course in advanced litigation focuses primarily on aspects of trial preparation not covered in depth in Y222. Topics may include jury selection, witness preparation and examination, preparation of evidence for use at trial, jury instructions, post-judgment relief. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 324 Property Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course examines the legal rules governing various types of property and the ways in which human beings relate to property. Types of property include real and personal; relationships to property include both ownership and interest. Emphasis is placed on forms and procedures used in Indiana. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 325 Contract Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course includes the basic elements and principles involved in the drafting, interpretation, and enforcement of contracts, including current trends in contract law in Indiana. Includes Uniform Commercial Code. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 326 Tort Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course reviews current law and recent trends in negligence and liability. Different dimensions of liability are covered. Emphasis on conduct of a tort case from initiation through relief, and on the responsibilities of legal assistants therein. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 327 Criminal Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This in-depth review of criminal law in Indiana covers the Indiana Criminal Code—infractions, misdemeanors, and felonies. The course emphasizes real situations that legal professionals encounter throughout the process. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 328 Family Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course examines legal rules and procedures concerning domestic relations. Topics covered include separation and divorce, adoption, child custody and support, and other areas of domestic relations in Indiana. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 329 Estate Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course reviews legal rules and procedures concerning the transfer of property upon the owner’s demise. Provides a practical approach to the language, procedures, forms, interpretation, and administration of wills and trusts. Emphasis on current trends in Indiana and federal law. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 330 Bankruptcy Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. Examines the legal rules relating to bankruptcy. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 431 Advanced Legal Writing for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. Builds on Y221 by giving students the opportunity for advanced study of research and communication skills needed for paralegals. PUL=1A
  • POLS-Y 232 Professional Responsibility for Paralegals (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221. This course is a concentrated study of legal ethics from the perspective of the paralegal. It covers the study of ethical situations, rules and model codes of the paralegal profession, conflict of interest, client confidentiality, and other ethical dilemmas. The course presents a concrete, practical approach to the ethical challenges for paralegals. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 333 Business Associations for Paralegals (3 cr.) P: Y211 and Y221.Introduction to various business entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and other entities. Drafting partnership agreements and incorporation documents. Introduction to tax considerations and the Securities and Exchange Commission. PUL=4
  • POLS-Y 485 Field Experience in Paralegal Studies (1-5 cr.) A course that allows paralegal stduents to ernoll in a legal intesnhip for credit. Students will work with various employers and agencies. PUL=3
Philsophy (PHIL)
Honors Courses
  • PHIL-S 110 Introduction to Philosophy—Honors (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to key philosophical concepts and issues as well as major thinkers and historical periods. PUL=4
  • PHIL-S 120 Ethics—Honors (3 cr.) A study of ethical values in relation to such problems as personal and societal decision making, selection and justification of lifestyle, goal orientation, conflict resolution, freedom and creativity, commitment and responsibility. PUL=6
  • PHIL-S 314 Philosophy and Modern Times—Honors (3 cr.) A study of one or more philosophical concepts, themes, or developments characteristic of the modern period. PUL=4
Regular Courses
  • PHIL-P 282 Women in Philosophical Thought (3 cr.)

    Analysis of historical and contemporary philosophical writings that incorporate beliefs about the nature of women, their social roles, and status. PUL=5

  • PHIL-P 433 Social Origins of Philosophy (3 cr.) An interpretation of Western philosophy as originating in, and/or legitimizing, features and conditions of the social order. Typically gives attention to indigenous and feminist perspectives and to early mythological, literary, and philosophical documents. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.) An introduction to the methods and problems of philosophy and to important figures in the history of philosophy. Concerns such topics as the nature of reality, the meaning of life, and the existence of God. Readings from classical and contemporary sources, e.g., Plato, Descartes, Nietzsche, and Sartre. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 120 Ethics (3 cr.) An introductory course in ethics. Typically examines virtues, vices, and character; theories of right and wrong; visions of the good life; and contemporary moral issues. PUL=6
  • PHIL-P 162 Logic (3 cr.) A study of the principles of logic. The course covers a variety of traditional topics, selected for their practical value, within formal and informal logic. Among the topics typically covered are fallacies, syllogisms, causal hypotheses, logic diagrams, argument analysis, and truth-functional reasoning. PUL=1B
  • PHIL-P 237 Environmental Ethics (3 cr.) Addresses moral issues concerning the relation between humans and the environment. Covers such topics as resource depletion, population growth, endangered ecosystems, deep ecology, and the land ethic. PUL=6
  • PHIL-P 265 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (3 cr.) A study of the most important and widely applicable parts of modern symbolic logic: propositional logic and predicate logic. PUL=1B
  • PHIL-P 280 Philosophical Problems: (variable title) (3 cr.) Concentrated treatment of an important philosophical problem. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. PUL varies with topic.
  • PHIL-P 307 Classical Philosophy (3 cr.) A study of the significant texts of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, including the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Thinkers. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 314 Modern Philosophy (3 cr.) A study of Western philosophy from the rise of modern science through the Enlightenment. Covers such philosophers as Bacon, Descartes, Berkeley, Hume, Leibniz, and Kant. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 316 Twentieth-Century Philosophy: (variable title) (3 cr.) A study of one or more twentieth-century approaches to philosophy, e.g., pragmatism, analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism, postmodernism, and neo-Marxism. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 317 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.) A historical survey of philosophy in the nineteenth century from Hegel to Nietzsche, including utilitarianism, positivism, and philosophies of evolution. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 322 Philosophy of Human Nature (3 cr.) Theories of human nature and their philosophical implications. PUL=2
  • PHIL-P 323 Society and State in the Modern World (3 cr.) Topics, issues, and key figures in modern political philosophy, e.g., distributive justice, state authority, and the political thought of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, and Rawls. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 325 Social Philosophy: (variable title) (3 cr.) Concentrated study of one or more topics in social philosophy, e.g., human rights, political violence, civil disobedience, and legal paternalism. PUL=5 May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 326 Ethical Theory (3 cr.) A variable title course. Advanced consideration of one or more ethical theories or theoretical issues about the nature and status of ethics. PUL=2
  • PHIL-P 328 Philosophies of India (3 cr.) Historical and critical-analytic survey of the major traditions of Indian philosophy. Attention to early philosophizing and the emergence of classical schools in Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain traditions. Attention also to contemporary thought in India and its influence on the West. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 331 Philosophy of Science (3 cr.) An introductory study of theories with regard to the nature, purpose, and limitations of science. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 334 Buddhist Philosophy (3 cr.) An examination of the basic philosophical concepts of early Buddhism and their subsequent development in India, Japan, and Tibet. Implications of the Buddhist view of reality for knowledge, the self, and ethical responsibility will be explored. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 348 Philosophy and Literature (3 cr.) A study of philosophical issues raised by and in literature. Special emphasis on reading works of literature as texts of philosophical interest. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 349 Philosophies of China (3 cr.) A study of Chinese philosophical traditions, typically including Confucianism, Taoism, Legalism, and Chinese Buddhism. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 365 Intermediate Symbolic Logic (3 cr.) P: PHIL-P 265. Topics in metalogic, set theory, and modal logic. PUL 1B
  • PHIL-P 367 Philosophy of Art (3 cr.) A study of fundamental concepts and theories of aesthetics and a philosophical exploration of major artistic movements and genres. PUL=6
  • PHIL-P 368 Philosophy of Language (3 cr.) Philosophical study of the nature and functions of language. Covers such topics as meaning and truth, theories of reference, linguistic relativity, and speech acts. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 369 Epistemology (3 cr.) Knowledge and justified belief: their nature, structure, sources, and limits. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 382 Philosophy of History (3 cr.) An analysis of some of the philosophical problems implicit in the study of history, such as the possibility of historical objectivity, and a survey of influential interpretations of history from Augustine to Heidegger. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 383 Topics in Philosophy: (variable title) (3 cr.) Advanced treatment of a special topic. PUL will vary with topic. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 385 Metaphysics (3 cr.) A study of several of the principal problems of metaphysics, such as identity through time, the self, the mind-body problem, freedom and determinism, fate, causation, the problem of universals, and the existence of God. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.) A philosophical consideration of ethical problems that arise in current biomedical practice, e.g., with regard to abortion, euthanasia, determination of death, consent to treatment, and professional responsibilities in connection with research, experimentation, and health care delivery. PUL=6
  • PHIL-P 394 Feminist Philosophy (3 cr.) A study of one or more philosophical topics in feminist thought. Examples: feminist ethics; feminist critiques of science; and feminist perspectives on motherhood, sexuality, and reproductive technology. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 414 Philosophy and Culture (3 cr.) In-depth consideration of a topic involving the interrelationship between philosophy and culture. PUL=5 May be repeated for credit.
  • PHIL-P 418 Seminar in the History of Philosophy: (variable title) (3 cr.) Intensive study of a philosopher or philosophical school of enduring importance. PUL=4 May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 448 Seminar in American Philosophy (3 cr.) An intensive study of a major American thinker, such as Edwards, Royce, James, Peirce, Dewey, Whitehead or Santayana, or of a leading theme, such as community, experience, or education. PUL=4 May be repeated for credit.
  • PHIL-P 458 American Philosophy (3 cr.) A study of the philosophical tradition in the United States, emphasizing major thinkers such as Emerson, Peirce, James, Royce, Dewey, Santayana, and C. I. Lewis. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 468 Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.) An in-depth study of some particular problem of current concern in the philosophy of mind. PUL=3 May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 488 Research in Philosophy I (1-4 cr.) P: 9 credit hours of philosophy and consent of instructor. Independent research in philosophical theory approved by and reported to any member of the department. PUL=4 May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 credit hours may be counted toward the major.
  • PHIL-P 489 Research in Philosophy II (1-4 cr.) P: 9 credit hours of philosophy and consent of instructor. Independent research in applied philosophy approved by and reported to any member of the department. PUL=4 May be repeated for credit, but no more than 3 credit hours may be counted toward the major.
  • PHIL-P 355 Philosophy of Film (3 cr.) Philosophic topics, themes, and issues raised by and in film. Special emphasis on viewing film as a visual text with philosophical import. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 356 American Indian Philosophies (3 cr.) An examination of the philosophical views, themes, and implications of North American Indian traditions, with applications to variety of cross-cultural and philosophical issues. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 329 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.) Philosophical views regarding such topics as the meaning and purpose of religion, religious experience, religious knowledge, and the existence and nature of God. PUL=2
  • PHIL-P 335 Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.) Selective survey of central themes in phenomenology and existentialism. Readings from such philosophers as Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, Beauvoir, and Sartre. PUL=4
  • PHIL-P 371 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.) Philosophical views regarding such topics as the meaning and purpose of religion, religious experience, religious knowledge, and the existence and nature of God. PUL=2
  • PHIL-P 374 Early Chinese Philosophy (3 cr.) Origins of Chinese philosophical traditions in the classical schools of Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, and Legalism. Explores contrasting agendas of early Chinese and Western traditions. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 375 Philosophy of Law (3 cr.) Selective survey of philosophical problems concerning law and the legal system. Includes such topics as the nature and validity of law, morality and law, legal obligation, judicial decision, rights, justice, responsibility, and punishment. PUL=5
  • PHIL-P 381 Religion and Human Experience (3 cr.) An attempt to understand religious experience in light of interpretations and insights from various fields, e.g., anthropology, psychology, value theory, and sociology of knowledge. PUL=4
Graduate Courses
  • PHIL-P 730 Seminar: Contemporary Philosophy (4 cr.) Selected topics on the works of twentieth-century philosophers.  May be repeated for credit if topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 503 The Semiotics of C. S. Peirce (3 cr.) A rigorous initiation to Peirce's logic of signs, including his theory of knowledge, his categoriology, his definitions and classifications of signs, the three branches of semiotics, with an applied research component.
  • PHIL-P 507 American Philosophy and the Analytic Tradition (3 cr.) An overview of the development of American philosophy during the twentieth century with a special focus on its contribution to and influence on the American analytic tradition. This course will discuss the views of people like Lewis, Morris, Carnap, Quine, Davidson, Rorty, Putnam, and Haack.
  • PHIL-P 514 Pragmatism (3 cr.) This course will examine what pragmatism stood for in its formative years and what it has become; then after studying some conflicting views of well-known pragmatists we will consider what pragmatism might become. Part of the course is devoted to the contributions of pragmatism to different areas within philosophy.
  • PHIL-P 520 Philosophy of Language (3 cr.) Advanced study of selected topics.
  • PHIL-P 522 Topics in the History of Modern Philosophy (3-9 cr.) A variable-title course. Selected topics from key movements, figures, or controversies in modern (17th/18th century) Western philosophy. 2
  • PHIL-P 525 Topics in the History of Philosophy (3 cr.) An advanced study of important themes or major figures in the history of philosophy. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 540 Contemporary Ethical Theories (3 cr.) Fundamental problems of ethics in contemporary analytic philosophy from G. E. Moore's "Principia Ethica" to present.
  • PHIL-P 542 The Ethics and Values of Philanthropy (3 cr.) An inquiry into the ethics and values of philanthropy rooted in a general understanding of philanthropy, as voluntary action for the public good, as an ethical ideal. A consideration of philanthropic activity in light of this ideal.
  • PHIL-P 543 Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.) Advanced study of central issues, theories, and topics in social/political philosophy, such as property rights, distributive justice, political liberty, and the limits and foundations of state authority.
  • PHIL-P 547 Foundations of Bioethics (3 cr.) A rigorous examination of bioethical theory and practice. Stress is placed on moral and conceptual issues embedded in biomedical research, clinical practice, and social policy relating to the organization and delivery of health care.
  • PHIL-P 548 Clinical Ethics Practicum (3 cr.) This course provides learning experiences in a clinical setting, enabling students fully to appreciate ethical issues that face health care professionals. The course is administered through the Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics at IU Health.
  • PHIL-P 549 Bioethics and Pragmatism (3 cr.) This course provides a critical examination of recent contributions by American philosophers to bioethics. The course will have a strong focus on a growing group of thinkers who seek their inspiration in Dewey, James, Peirce, Royce, and Mead, while dealing with contemporary issues in medical ethics.
  • PHIL-P 553 Philosophy of Science (3 cr.) A study of theories with regard to the nature, purpose, and limitations of science. Attention will be given to the cognitive significance of theories, the scientific method (hypothesis formation, theory construction, and testing), research paradigms, reductionism, and social epistemology.
  • PHIL-P 555 Ethical and Policy Issues in International Research (3 cr.) This course examines ethical and policy issues in the design and conduct of transnational research involving human participants. Topics discussed include: economic and political factors; study design; the role of ethics review committees; individual and group recruitment/informed consent; end-of-study responsibilities; national and international guidelines.
  • PHIL-P 558 American Philosophy (3 cr.) A general overview of the most significant contributions of American philosophers, such as Emerson, Thoreau, Peirce, James, Dewey, Santayana, Mead, Jane Addams, Alain Locke.
  • PHIL-P 560 Metaphysics (3 cr.) In-depth discussion of representative contemporary theories.
  • PHIL-P 562 Theory of Knowledge (3 cr.) Advanced study of selected topics.
  • PHIL-P 590 Intensive Reading (1-4 cr.) A tutorial course involving in-depth consideration of a specific philosophical area or problem or author. May be repeated for credit.
  • PHIL-P 600 Topics in Philosophy (3 cr.) A detailed examination of a specific topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 650 Topics in Semiotic Philosophy (3 cr.) An examination of various historical and theoretical issues arising from the philosophical study of semiosis--the general phenomenon of representation, objectification, signification, and interpretation--through the work of mostly American philosophers from the late nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the impact of Peirce's semiotic philosophy.
  • PHIL-P 696 Topics in Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.) Selected topics in bioethics, such as international research ethics; ethical issues in pediatrics; ethical issues in genetics. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 701 Peirce Seminar (3 cr.) This seminar is devoted to a critical examination of the general structure and development of Peirce's systematic philosophy with a special emphasis on those tensions in the development of his thought that led to modifications in his philosophy, and on the nature and significance of those changes.
  • PHIL-P 748 Seminar in American Philosophy (3 cr.) Advanced study of a principal philosopher or a set of selected topics in classical American philosophy. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.
  • PHIL-P 803 Master’s Thesis in Philosophy (6 cr.)
  • PHIL-P 554 Practicum in International Research in Ethics (3 cr.) The Practicum in International Research Ethics involves a combination of observation and discussion with mentors while conducting an individual research project that will serve as the capstone for the student's master's degree.
  • PHIL-P 545 Legal Philosophy (3 cr.) An introduction to major legal philosophers and fundamental legal philosophical questions.
  • PHIL-P 515 Medieval Philosophy (3 cr.) Selected study of key medieval philosophers, including Augustine and/or Aquinas.
  • PHIL-P 536 Topics in the Contemporary Philosophy (3 cr.) A study of one or more contemporary (mainly 20th-century) schools of Western philosophy (e.g., analytic philosophy, phenomenology, existentialism) or a selection of influential thinkers related to a specific contemporary topic.
  • PHIL-P 561 Philosophy of Mind (3 cr.) In-depth treatment of central issues, problems, and theories (both classical and contemporary) in philosophy of mind, such as mental causation, the nature of consciousness, and dualism.
Political Science (POLS)
  • POLS-Y 580 Research Methods in Political Science (3 cr.) Foundations of political research; alternate research strategies; problems of measuring political variables; design of research to test hypotheses.
  • POLS-Y 642 Comparative Federalism (3 cr.) A course that places federalism in its comparative context. Assessing theories and models of federalism in North America, Europe, Asia, and other parts of the world.
  • POLS-Y 630 State Executive Politics (3 cr.) A course that examines the role of governors in state politics. Includes the study of leadership and the relationship between the executive and other elements of government at the sub-national level.
  • POLS-Y 640 State Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.) An examination of political parties and interest groups, their roles in government, and their structure and organization.
  • POLS-Y 880 Thesis M.A. (1-4 cr.) Credit hours for thesis research and writing.
  • POLS-Y 620 State Politics (3 cr.) An examination of the institutions and processes by which state governments carry out their responsibilities. Includes the study of executives, legislatures, parties, and elections at the state level.
  • POLS-Y 622 Urban Politics (3 cr.) An examination of the structure of—and the problems and challenges faced by—the governments of cities and metropolitan areas. Includes study of leadership, citizen participation, intergovernmental relations, and urban policy.
  • POLS-Y 624 Indiana Politics (3 cr.) This seminar reviews contemporary scholarship on the development context, structure, and operation of Indiana government and politics. It places Indiana politics into both a historical and comparative perspective to see how Indiana politics have changed over time and how they compare to politics in other states.
  • POLS-Y 881 Internship in Political Science (3 cr.) A course in which students complete an internship for credit with a government (or related) institution. RISE=E
  • POLS-Y 570 Introduction to the Study of Politics (3 cr.) Problems of graduate study and professional scholarship; central organizing concepts and the use of theory in political science and related disciplines; specialized areas of research and scholarship in political science; conditions of scientific inquiry and methodological problems in the study of political phenomena; central importance of theory in explanation.
  • POLS-Y 575 Political Data Analysis I (3 cr.) Basic quantitative analysis techniques applied to political science data: principles of measurement, tables, graphs, probability distributions, nonparametric statistics, matrix algebra, Markov chains, correlations and simple regression, tests of significance. Computer processing of data and applications of bivariate statistics to problems in political science emphasized.
  • POLS-Y 336 Southeast Asian Politics (3 cr.) Covers the governmental organization, and the political behavior and traditions, of countries in the Southeast Asian region. Addresses regional issues of political and economic development, and international issues regarding the relationship of the region to the rest of the world. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 661 American Politics (3 cr.) Illustrative topics: the presidency, legislative process, political behavior, political parties and representation, political socialization, comparative state politics, urban politics, interest group politics.
  • POLS-Y 680 Readings in Political Science (1-4 cr.) Individual readings and research.
  • POLS-Y 644 Political Communication (3 cr.) Our course will examine the public communication involved in various political contexts. We will consider the communication involved in political campaigns, advertising, and oratory; social media, technology, and popular culture; the news, framing, and political media; citizenship, public deliberation, and decision making in what some argue is a divided political culture. We will read and discuss state of the art research in political communication and meet individuals who are currently working in a communication capacity in public political campaigns.
  • POLS-Y 657 Comparative Politics (3 cr.) (The focus may be on one or more political systems within regions indicated.) Illustrative topics: political elites and social stratification, comparative administration and public policy, cross-national analysis, West Europe, East Europe, comparative Communist systems, Russia, Africa, Middle East, Latin America, East Asia, comparative development strategies.
  • POLS-Y 101 Introduction to Political Science (3 cr.) For any student interested in better understanding the political world in which we live. The course explains some fundamental political concepts such as power, conflict, authority, and governments. It may also include an overview of the major subfields of political science: comparative politics, international relations, political theory, and public policy. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics (3 cr.) Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system and its political party base. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 205 Elements of Political Analysis (3 cr.) An introduction to techniques used by people interested in the systematic study of political science. The course includes an introduction to the quantitative analysis of political data. PUL=1B
  • POLS-Y 211 Introduction to Law (3 cr.) An introduction to law as an aspect of government and politics, and as a means for dealing with major social problems. Students will study legal reasoning, procedures, and materials, and may compare other nations legal systems. The course usually includes a moot court or other forms of simulation. PUL=2
  • POLS-Y 213 Introduction to Public Policy (3 cr.) Studies the processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy with particular reference to the United States. The course will identify key policy actors, analyze the process of policy making, and critically assess selected policy issues (such as foreign, defense, economic, welfare, and environmental policy). PUL=2
  • POLS-Y 215 Introduction to Political Theory (3 cr.) An introduction to major ideas and theories in Western political thought, including theories of democracy and the analysis of conflict and cooperation. The course also addresses the attempts made by prominent political philosophers--from Aristotle and Plato to Locke, Marx, and Rawls--to understand and describe the nature of politics. PUL=6
  • POLS-Y 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 cr.) A course that introduces students to the major political systems of the world. Students will look at different system types; examine in depth particular countries as case studies such as Britain, Russia, and Mexico; and compare executives, legislatures, elections, political parties, interest groups, and key areas of public policy. PUL=5
  • POLS-Y 219 Introduction to International Relations (3 cr.) An introduction to the global political system and issues that shape relations among countries. The course looks at problems of conflict resolution, the role of international law and organizations, the challenges of poverty and development, and the other major policy issues over which nations cooperate, argue, or go to war. PUL=5
  • POLS-Y 301 Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.) Theories of American party activity; behavior of political parties, interest groups, and social movements; membership in groups; organization and structure; evaluation and relationship to the process of representation. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 303 Policy-Making in the US (3 cr.) Processes and institutions involved in the formation of public policy in American society. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 304 Constitutional Law (3 cr.) Nature and function of law and judicial process; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the American constitutional system. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 305 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (3 cr.) Nature and function of law and judicial process; selected Supreme Court decisions interpreting the American constitutional system. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 306 State Politics in the United States (3 cr.) Comparative study of politics in the American states. Special emphasis on the impact of political culture, party systems, legislatures, and bureaucracies on public policies. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 307 Indiana State Government and Politics (3 cr.) Constitutional foundations, political development, organizational and functional process and growth, and current problems of Indiana government. Readings, case studies, problems. PUL=3; RISE=S
  • POLS-Y 308 Urban Politics (3 cr.) Political behavior in modern American communities; emphasizes the impact of municipal organization, city officials and bureaucracies, social and economic notables, political parties, interest groups, the general public, and protest organizations on urban policy outcomes. PUL=2
  • POLS-Y 309 American Politics through Film and Fiction (3 cr.) Recurrent themes of politics are explored in depth by means of novels, short stories, and films. Subject matter varies by semester--check class schedule for current semester. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 310 Political Behavior (3 cr.) A research course in which students design and execute their own investigations into political phenomena. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 313 Environmental Policy (3 cr.) Examines the causes of environmental problems and the political, economic, social, and institutional questions raised by designing and implementing effective policy responses to these problems. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 317 Voting, Elections, and Public Opinion (3 cr.) Determinants of voting behavior in elections. The nature of public opinion regarding major domestic and foreign policy issues; development of political ideology; other influences on the voting choices of individuals and the outcomes of elections; relationships among public opinion, elections, and the development of public policy. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 318 The American Presidency (3 cr.) This course examines the evolution of the presidency and its impact on the rest of the American political system. Students will study presidential selection, succession, and powers, the president's relationship to the rest of the government, and the legacy of presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 319 The United States Congress (3 cr.) This course offers students the opportunity to study the legislative branch of American national government. It includes the structure and processes of the Senate and House of Representatives; the role of parties, interest groups, and lobbyists; the legislative process; and the relations of Congress with the other branches of government. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 320 Judicial Politics (3 cr.) Examines the American judicial system in the contemporary context. Analysis of the trial and appellate courts with a focus on the United States Supreme Court. Topics include analyses of the structure of the judicial system, the participants in the system, and the policy-making processes and capabilities of the legal system. The course concludes with an assessment of the role of courts in a majoritarian democracy. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 321 The Media and Politics (3 cr.) Examines the contemporary relationship between the media and politics, including politicians' use of the media, media coverage of governmental activities, and media coverage of campaigns and elections. Course focuses primarily on the United States, but includes comparative perspectives. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 324 Women and Politics (3 cr.) Analysis of women in contemporary political systems, domestic or foreign, with emphasis on political roles, participation, and public policy. Normative or empirical examination of how political systems affect women and the impact women have on the system(s). PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 332 Russian Politics (3 cr.) Political process and government structure in the Russian state. Political institutions inherited from tsarist empire and the Soviet state (1917-1991), history of subsequent political reform. Political problems of ethnic conflict, creating democratic institutions, and transition from socialism to market economy. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 335 West European Politics (3 cr.) Development, structure, and functioning of political systems, primarily in Britain, France, Italy, and Germany. Political dynamics of European integration. PUL=5
  • POLS-Y 337 Latin American Politics (3 cr.) Comparative analysis of political change in major Latin American countries, emphasizing alternative explanations of national and international developments; examination of impact of political parties, the military, labor and peasant movements, Catholic church, multinational corporations, regional organizations, and United States on politics; public policy processes in democratic and authoritarian regimes. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 338 African Politics (3 cr.) Politics in contemporary sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include processes of nation building, dependency and underdevelopment; role of political parties, leadership, ideology, and military rule; continuing relevance of colonial heritage and traditional culture and network of international relations. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 339 Middle Eastern Politics (3 cr.) Political culture and change in selected Middle Eastern and North African countries. Topics include political elites, traditional cultures, modern political ideology, institutions of political control, conflict management, and social reform policies.  PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 351 Political Simulations (1-3 cr.) A course tied to simulations of political organizations such as the European Union, the United Nations, or the Organization of American States. May be taken alone or in conjunction with related political science courses. PUL=3; RISE=E May be repeated for credit.
  • POLS-Y 360 U.S. Foreign Policy (3 cr.) Analysis of institutions and processes involved in the formation and implementation of American foreign policy. Emphasis is on post-World War II policies. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 373 The Politics of Terrorism (3 cr.) Examines the definition, history, logic, and political implications of terrorism. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 375 War and International Conflict (3 cr.) This course examines the causes and effects of war and international conflict, historically and comparatively. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 377 Globalization (3 cr.) A course that investigates the economic, environmental, financial, political, security, and technological aspects of globalization. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 380 Selected Topics in Democratic Government: (variable title) (3 cr.) An examination of basic problems and issues in the theory and practice of democratic government. Specific topics vary by semester. PUL=3 May be repeated once for credit.
  • POLS-Y 381 Classical Political Thought (3 cr.) An exposition and critical analysis of the major political philosophers and philosophical schools from Plato to Machiavelli. PUL=6
  • POLS-Y 382 Modern Political Thought (3 cr.) An exposition and critical analysis of the major philosophers and philosophical schools from Machiavelli to the present. PUL=6
  • POLS-Y 383 Foundations of American Political Thought (3 cr.) American political ideas from the founding period to the Civil War. PUL=6
  • POLS-Y 384 Development of American Political Thought (3 cr.) American political ideas from the Civil War to the present. PUL=6
  • POLS-Y 480 Undergraduate Readings in Political Science (1-6 cr.) Individual readings and research. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 481 Field Experience in Political Science (3-6 cr.) Faculty-directed study of aspects of the political process based on field experience. Directed readings, field research, research papers. PUL=3; RISE=E
  • POLS-Y 490 Senior Seminar (3 cr.) Open only to senior majors. Research paper required. Seminar sessions arranged to present papers for evaluation and criticism by fellow students. Subject matter varies by semester. PUL=4
  • POLS-Y 498 Readings for Honors (1-6 cr.) P: Open only to senior majors in the department who have at least a 3.3 grade point average within the major; approval of department is required.  Course involves an intensive individual program of reading and/or research. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 390 Political Communication (3 cr.) Provides an opportunity to studey, understand, and participate in political communication. Topics covered include the rhetoric of politics, campaign discourse, political advertising, the role of the media in public opinion, the impact of new technology, and the place of interpersonal communication. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 392 Problems in Contemporary Political Philosophy (3 cr.) An extensive study of one or more great philosophical thinkers, movements, or problems. Subject will vary. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 371 Workshop in International Topics (3 cr.) Variable topics course in International Politics.  Recent topics included human rights, the Isreali-Palestine conflict, and political idealogies in the modern world. PUL=3 May be repeated once for credit.
  • POLS-Y 325 African American Politics (3 cr.) Examines the African American political condition, with special emphasis on political thought and behavior. Analyzes not only how the political system affects African Americans, but also the impact African Americans have on it. Themes for this course may vary. PUL=2
  • POLS-Y 350 Politics of the European Union (3 cr.) Study of the politics of the European Union (EU). Assesses past and present dynamics of economic and political integration in Europe, the structure and work of EU institutions, and EU public policies such as the Single Market, the common currency, common foreign and security policy, and trade. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 367 International Law (3 cr.) Sources and consequences of international law; relationship to international organizations and world order; issues of national sovereignty, human rights, conflict resolution, international property rights, world trade, environmental change, and other topics. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 370 The Politics of Isalm (3 cr.) This course will examine the principles of the politics of Islam, its impact on contemporary world politics, and its impact on selected national and regional politics around the world. PUL =5
  • POLS-Y 388 Marxist Theory (3 cr.) Origin, content, and development of Marxist system of thought, with particular reference to philosophical and political aspects of Russian Marxism. PUL=3
  • POLS-Y 394 Public Policy Analysis (3 cr.) Place of theory and method in examining public policies in relation to programs, institutional arrangements and constitutional problems with particular reference to American political experience. PUL =3
  • POLS-Y 406 Problems in Political Philosophy (3 cr.) Centers on conflicting interpretations of justice, liberty, and equality, as well as certain problems of democracy, including the tension between majority rules and minority rights, and the correlation of rights and duties. Topics vary. PUL = 2 May be taken for a total of 6 creidt hours under different topics.
Religious Studies (REL)
  • REL-R 223 Religion and Imagination (3 cr.) Introductory studies of the nature, function, and significance of myths, symbols, and images in religious and cultural systems, with examples drawn from various traditions and with special attention devoted to their relationships to the contemporary imagination. PUL=5
  • REL-R 309 Contemporary Middle East (3 cr.) An interdisciplinary introduction to the contemporary Middle East, taught in Amman, Jordan, during summer study abroad. In addition to readings and lectures, students learn from speaking with Jordanian activists, politicians, religious leaders, educators, restaurant owners, journalists, refugees, students, and cabdrivers, among others. Field trips to mosques, markets, and more. PUL=5
  • REL-R 313 Religion and American Ideas (3 cr.) Studies of the major figures and works of the American literary and theological traditions, with a focus on the ways the literary imagination has variously expressed, explored, and challenged the religious meanings of the American experience. PUL=5
  • REL-R 326 Studies in Biblical Religion (3 cr.) Examination of selected major topics in the religious traditions contained in the biblical materials. Topics such as the following will be treated: early Hebrew traditions and heroes, the kings of Israel, the development of apocalyptic literature, the period between the testaments, the development of Christology, the Johannine School, and others. May be taken twice for credit under different topics. PUL=5
  • REL-R 310 Prophecy in Ancient Israel (3 cr.) The prophetic movement and its relationship to religious, social, and political traditions and institutions in the ancient Near East. The thought of major prophetic figures in Israel, such as Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. PUL=5
  • REL-R 167 Introduction to Tribal Religions (3 cr.) Introduction to Tribal Religions is a Lower Division course designed to acquaint students with tribal religions of the world with a focus on the earliest religious traditions. PUL=5
  • REL-R 100 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) Select introductory issues in religion. Interdisciplinary in emphasis. PUL=5 May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours under different titles.
  • REL-R 111 The Bible (3 cr.) A critical introduction to the major periods, persons, events, and literatures that constitute the Bible; designed to provide general humanities-level instruction on this important text. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 120 Images of Jesus (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce students to the variety of traditions about the figure of Jesus. It will acquaint students with the wide array of images of the Jesus character through a historical analysis of these images portrayed in texts, art, music, film, and TV. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 133 Introduction to Religion (3 cr.) Introduction to the diversity of traditions, values, and histories through which religion interacts with culture. Emphasis on understanding the ways the various dimensions of religion influence people's lives. Fulfills Arts and Humanities General Education Core requirement. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 173 American Religion (3 cr.) A consideration of American religion, with particular emphasis on the development of religious diversity and religious freedom in the context of the American social, political, and economic experience. Fulfills Arts and Humanities General Education Core requirements. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 180 Introduction to Christianity (3 cr.) Survey of beliefs, rituals, and practices of the Christian community with a focus on the varieties of scriptural interpretation, historical experience, doctrine, and behavior. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 200 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) Select intermediate studies in religion. Interdisciplinary studies emphasized. PUL=5 May be taken for up to 9 credit hours under different titles.
  • REL-R 212 Comparative Religions (3 cr.) Approaches to the comparison of recurrent themes, religious attitudes, and practices found in selected Eastern and Western traditions. Fulfills Arts and Humanities General Education Core requirements. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 243 Introduction to the New Testament (3 cr.) An introduction to the modern critical study of the New Testament from primarily a historical perspective. The goal is to learn to view these diverse Christian writings within the context of their historical and social settings. Fullfills Arts and Humanities General Education Core requirements. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 257 Introduction to Islam (3 cr.) Introduction to the emergence and spread of Islamic religious traditions, including the Qur'an, Islamic law and ethics, and Islamic mysticism before 1500CE. Special emphasis on the creation in the middle ages of an international Islamic civilization--stretching from Mali to Indonesia--linked by trade, learning, and pilgrimage. Fulfills General Education Core requirements. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 300 Studies in Religion (3 cr.) Selected topics and movements in religion, seen from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. PUL=5 May be taken for up to 9 credit hours under different titles.
  • REL-R 301 Women and Religion (3 cr.) A critical examination of the roles of women in religion, looking at a range of periods and cultures in order to illustrate the patterns that characterize women's participation in religious communities and practices. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 304 Islamic Beginnings (3 cr.) An in-depth examination of the classical period of Islamic history, including coverage of the Prophet Muhammad, the development of Islamic religious literature and institutions, and the creation of international Muslim networks of trade, pilgrimage, and law. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 312 Prophets, Captives, and Converts: Autobiographies in American Religion (3 cr.) This course uses religious autobiography as a way to explore American religious history. We will read autobiographies from a wide range of Americans, both well known and relatively obscure. Autobiographies allow a unique and intimate view of religion in America. Through these texts we will explore such questions as the role of religion in colonial encounters of Europeans and Indians, the intersection of race and religion in the formation of American identities, the development of new religious traditions, and the forms and practices of religion in America. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 314 Religion and Racism (3 cr.) Explores the interaction of religion and racism. Selected case studies may include the Bible and racism, racial reconciliation among evangelical Christians, the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana, and Islamophobia. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 315 Hebrew Bible (3 cr.) A critical examination of the literary, political, and religious history of Israel from the period of the Patriarchs to the Restoration, with emphasis on the growth and formation of the major traditions contained in the Hebrew Bible. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 323 Yuppie Yogis and Global Gurus (3 cr.) This course will trace the history of encounters and dialogues between Asian religious figures and products and American culture beginning with the eighteenth and nineteenth century missionary ventures to Asia by Americans and ending with present-day emergent religious movements. The course material is weighted toward the late twentieth century to the present. We will explore the moments of discovery and renewal as well as those of domination and exclusion in the encounters between American culture and Asian religious figures and products. A central concern throughout the course will be identifying how encounters and dialogues permanently affected and continue to affect the religious landscape in the United States. The course will focus on Hindu, Buddhist, and Sikh traditions in their encounters and dialogues with American culture. Both missionaries to Asia and missionary gurus from Asia will be subjects of analysis along with Asian immigrant communities and new religious movements. In addition to looking at important figures such as Emerson, Vivekananda, The Beatles, and Bikram Choudhury, we will also evaluate certain religious institutions and movements, such as ISKCON and postural yoga. We will ask: how have Asian religious gurus and products, such as yoga, transformed American religious consciousness and practice? To what extent are Asian religious products constructed anew in the context of globalization? How have religious products been re-defined and re-interpreted as a consequence of global encounters? When have there been moments of violence, intolerance, and discrimination against practitioners of Asian religions in the United States? PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 325 Paul and His Influence in Early Christianity (3 cr.) Life and thought of Paul, in the context of first-century Christian and non-Christian movements. Development of radical Paulinism and anti-Paulinism in the second century; their influence on the formation of Christianity. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 329 Early Christianity (3 cr.) This course introduces the religious world of early Christianity by examining its formation and development. The course emphasizes intellectual history while placing religious ideas in historical, cultural, social, and economic contexts. It underscores diversity and explores how ideas shape religious faith, how religious practice guides religious thinking, and how culture and religion interact. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 339 Varieties of American Religion (3 cr.) Approaches to the diversity and complexity of that part of American religion that has existed outside of the mainstream of U.S. church life. Emphasis on the origin, history, organizational structures, beliefs, and devotional practices of such groups as the Quakers, Shakers, Millerites and other millenarian sects, Mormons, Christian Scientists, and Pentecostals, as well as groups whose orientation is Eastern rather than Western. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 343 Religion and Contemporary Thought (3 cr.) Contemporary religious and anti-religious thinkers, with emphasis on those whose writings have significantly influenced modern thinking about human beings, God, society, history, and ethics. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 344 Reformations of the Sixteenth Century (3 cr.) This course introduces students to the religious reformations of sixteenth-century Europe. It examines the historical background to the Reformation and surveys a number of reformation movements. While intellectual history is emphasized, the ideas of religious thinkers are placed in broad historical, cultural, social, and economic contexts. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 348 Religion and Its Monsters (3 cr.) What can we learn about religion when we approach it through its monsters? What do monstrous stories--whether myth, legend, or fiction--reveal about the sacred? In what ways is a monster sacred and the sacred monstrous? This class explores the monster as the apotheosis of the horror of human existence. Our emphasis will be upon Western religious traditions (Judaism and Christianity), but the course will cover a very diverse range of imaginative expressions, including ancient myths of chaos gods, Greek myth and Latin tragedy, Jewish legends, medieval Christian epic poetry, 19th c. Gothic novels, as well as paintings, sculpture, architecture, music, and modern film. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 353 Judaism (3 cr.) Examination of the history of Judaism and its relationship to the Jewish special claim to chosenness. Primary emphasis placed on modern Judaism. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 361 Hinduism and Buddhism (3 cr.) Examination of the origins and cultural developments of classical Hinduism and Buddhism through studies of selected lives and writings, religious practices, and symbolism in the arts through explorations of these two worldviews as reflected in historical, literary, and ritual forms. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 363 African-American Religions (3 cr.) History of African American religions from the colonial era to the present. Topics may include the African influences on African American Black Methodism, Black Baptist Women's leadership, Islam, and new religious movements. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 370 Islam in America (3 cr.) Explores the history and life of Islam and Muslims in the United States, including the ethnic and religious diversity of American Muslims, conflicts about gender relations and women's issues, debates about Islam's role in politics, and the spirituality of American Muslims. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 379 Religion and Philanthropy (3 cr.) This course explores relationships between religious traditions and philanthropic ideas and activities. Selections from important traditional texts and biographical examples and similarities of a variety of religious worldviews regarding their ways of sharing goods and performing acts of service. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 381 Religion and Violence (3 cr.) Examines the relationship between religion, violence, and society in light of recent global events, drawing on a range of classical and modern texts concerning religious justifications for non-ritualistic bloodshed. Focusing on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, themes addressed include otherness, transgression, revenge, torture, retribution, with special attention paid to religious terrorism. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 383 Religions, Ethics, U.S. Society (3 cr.) An examination of current ethical debates about war, medicine, discrimination, welfare, marriage, sexuality, etc. The focus will be how diverse traditions of moral reasoning have been developed and practiced within Catholicism, Protestantism, and Judaism. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 384 Religions, Ethics, and Health (3 cr.) The positions of religious ethical traditions on issues such as the control of reproduction, experimentation with human subjects, care of the dying, delivery of health care, physical and social environments, and heredity. PUL=5; C/T May be repeated once for credit under different focus.
  • REL-R 386 Consumption, Ethics, and the Good Life (3 cr.) What is the good life? Do consumers have moral responsibilities for a sustainable environment, worker justice and good societies? This course draws from religious and philosophical ethics, economics, public policy, social criticism and cultural studies to explore how people can lead good lives and build healthy communities through consumer choices and social advocacy. PUL=6,5,3; C/T
  • REL-R 393 Comparative Religious Ethics (3 cr.) Comparisons of ethical traditions and moral lives in the world's religions. The focus will be how formative stories, exemplary figures, central virtues, ritual practices, etc., clarify different traditions' understandings of key moral issues, rights, and roles. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 400 Studies in Religion (1-3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Specialized and intensive studies in religion with an interdisciplinary emphasis. PUL=5 May be repeated twice under different titles.
  • REL-R 433 Theories of Religion (3 cr.) Theorists of religion explore the what, why, and how of religions. What is religion? Why are people religious? How do religions shape meaning in people's lives, cultures, and societies? This advanced seminar examines classical to contemporary theories. Fulfills Religious Studies senior capstone. Offered fall semesters only. PUL=5; Rise=R; C/T
  • REL-R 533 Theories of Religion (3 cr.) Graduate seminar. See REL-R 433 for course description.
  • REL-R 590 Directed Readings in Religious Studies (3 cr.) P: Consent of the instructor. Specialized Graduate Studies in Religion.
  • REL-R 328 Afro-Diasporic Religions (3 cr.) Surveys the origin, history, organizational structures, beliefs, and devotional practices of the religions that developed among African slaves and their descendants in the new world (including Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and the United States). PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 305 Islam and Modernity (3 cr.) Traditions This course examines the issues and events that have shaped Muslims' understanding of the place of Islam in the modern world. It focuses on the way Muslim thinkers have defined the challenge of modernity-politically, technologically, socially and religiously-and the responses that they have advocated. PUL=5
  • REL-R 367 American Indian Religions (3 cr.) American Indian Religions is a course designed to explore the religious traditions of the Indian tribes of the Americas with a focus on the tribes of North America and specifically Indiana. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 398 Women in American Indian Religions (3 cr.) Women in American Indian Religions is a course designed to examine the roles of women in American Indian Religions and practice and the expressions of the feminine aspects in their world views. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 539 Religion and Philanthropy (3 cr.) This course explores relationships between religious traditions and philanthropic ideas and activities. Selections from important traditional texts and biographical examples and similarities of a variety of religious worldviews regarding their ways of sharing goods and performing acts of service.
  • REL-R 394 Militant Religion (3 cr.) Examines the various ways Jewish, Christian, and Muslim apocalyptic literature has shaped, fostered, and contributed to the current rise in global militant religion. Themes include cosmic warfare, just war traditions, jihad, ancient and modern apocalypticism, messianism, millennialism, and the new wars of religion. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 204 Religions in Africa (3 cr.) Traditions Introduces students to the diversity of religious traditions in Africa. Focusing on the historical development of Africa's triple religious heritage, we examine African traditional religions, Christianity, and Islam. Special emphasis will be placed on African religious heritage in the modern era. PUL=5
  • REL-R 396 Religion and Fantasy (3 cr.) This course will examine fantasy materials (texts, movies, TV shows) through the lens of the following dimensions of religion: experience, myth, ritual, doctrine, ethics, and social construction. In addition, the course will examine the construction of worldviews. Just as religions create worldviews, so, too, can literary texts, dramatic expression, and the arts. PUL=5 C/T
  • REL-R 397 Mormonism and American Culture (3 cr.) Introduction to the history, beliefs, and practices of the Latter-day Saints (Mormons); exploration of the Book of Mormon and other LDS scriptures; exploration of Mormonism's relationship to American culture. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 101 Religion and Culture (3 cr.) An introduction to the diversity of human cultures from the perspective of religious studies. The course uses a case study approach to understand how religion shapes, and is shaped by, culture and society. Fulfills Cultural Understanding General Education Core requirements. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 368 Religion and Healing (3 cr.) This course explores how different religions and cultures understand illness and healing. Attention will be given to the diverse understandings of selfhood, health, wellbeing, and illness present in different cultures as well as the various practices these cultures have developed to address the root causes of illness. Although we will talk about biomedicine, the primary healing system of the West, the focus is on nonwestern cultures, and may include units on East Asian, South Asian, Native American, Latin American, and African traditions of healing. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 372 Inter-Religious Cooperation (3 cr.) How do you cooperate with people from different religious backgrounds? This course examines inter-religious cooperation among professionals, social activists, political adversaries, and others. Topics may include religious freedom in the workplace, the interfaith youth movement, and inter-religious peacemaking in conflict zones. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 307 Religion in the Professions (3 cr.) Religious diversity is now a fact of American professional life. How do you serve clients, form partnerships, and work with people whose religious traditions are both similar to and different from their own? This course explores how to make religious diversity a source of strength and vitality in professional life. PUL=5; C/T
  • REL-R 103 The Bible and Culture (3 cr.) C/T A cultural introduction to this central text of Western civilization. Explores some of the Bible's major themes and literatures in their original context. Examines how the Bible's Jewish and Christian parts relate to each other and how biblical stories, concepts, and ethics have been interpreted and have influenced later culture. PUL=5
  • REL-R 373 Pilgrimage in World Religions (3 cr.) Pilgrimage is one of the most ancient practices of humankind and is associated with a great variety of religious and spiritual traditions. This class explores all aspects of the practice of pilgrimage or sacred journeying, from its nationalistic aspects, as with Medjugorje in Croatia, to its economic development aspects, the impact of the internet and globalization, pilgrimage an protest (as with Gandhi's famous salt march), and so on. The similarities and differences in the practice of pilgrimage in Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, and other religions and spiritual traditions, all the way to Graceland can be considered. What are the points of commonality? The reasons for pilgrimage vary greatly and were most famously described by Chaucer in his classic book The Canterbury Tales. Our class will explore the many dimensions of sacred travels. PUL=5,6,3; C/T
  • REL-R 375 Religion Behind Bars (3 cr.) This course will explore punishment, prison, and the prison industrial complex's relationship to religion. The course will examine the development of the prison in the Western world, specifically the United States, and its relationship to religious norms, values, and institutions. In addition to the historical evolution of prison and the prison industrial complex, this course will also address the current prison system and the role of religion in the contemporary moment. Finally, this course will look at how religion is shaped in and by the prison system and the prison industrial complex. PUL=5,6; C/T
  • REL-R 378 Religion and Revolution (3 cr.) From the founding of the United States to the current uprisings identified as the Arab Spring, religion and political and social revolution often seem to be curious yet common travel partners. This course will ask why and how religion and political revolution travel together. How do religious language, symbols, and identities shape writing and other forms of discourse? How has religion or a critique of religion informed many of the larger social movements of the modern era (slave resistance, black power, feminism, workers' rights, democratic participation and citizenship)? This course will focus on works that foreground the interaction between religion and revolutionary movements throughout the modern era. PUL=2,5,6; C/T
  • REL-R 304 Islamic Beginnings (3 cr.) An in-depth examination of the classical period of Islamic history, including coverage of the Prophet Muhammad, the development of Islamic religious literature and institutions, and the creation of international Muslim networks of trade, pilgrimage, and law. PUL=5; T
  • REL-R 369 Love, Sex, and Justice (3 cr.) Do we owe anything to anyone? Is life worth living without love or justice, or both? Are they not fundamental virtues of human relations, unconditionally necessary for us to live well? If justice must be blind, is there room for compassion or desire? Is justice truly "love gone public?" What happens when there is one without the other, or when they appear to be in conflict? What are their limits? This course seeks to address these questions by examining some of the foremost contributors to how we have come to think about love, sex, and justice in American culture in light of certain contemporary public disputes. PUL=5,2,3; C/T
Sociology (SOC)
Undergraduate Courses
  • SOC-R 356 Foundations of Social Theory (3 cr.) P: R100 or consent of instructor. This course covers several traditions of classical, contemporary, and post-modern social thought (e.g., social Darwinism, conflict theory, functionalism, symbolic interactionism, critical theory, and feminist theory). The social context, construction, and application theories are included. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 357 Contemporary Sociological Theory (3 cr.) P: R100 or consent of instructor. This course covers several traditions of classical, contemporary, and post-modern social thought (e.g., social Darwinism, conflict theory, functionalism, symbolic interactionism, critical theory, and feminist theory). The social context, construction, and application theories are included. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 100 Introduction to Sociology (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or consent of instructor. Consideration of basic sociological concepts, including some of the substantive concerns and findings of sociology, sources of data, and the nature of the sociological perspective. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 121 Social Problems (3 cr.) Selected current "problems" of American society are analyzed through the use of basic sociological data and the application of major sociological frameworks. Policy implications are discussed in light of value choices involved in various solutions. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 234 Social Psychology (3 cr.) Sociological approach to human character, with emphasis on the psychology of the individual in social situations. Topics include socialization and the self, language and communication, interpersonal relations, attitude formation, conformity and social influence, and group processes. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 240 Deviance and Social Control (3 cr.) An introduction to major sociological theories of deviance and social control. Analyzes empirical work done in such areas as drug use, unconventional sexual behavior, family violence, and mental illness. Explores both "lay" and official responses to deviance, as well as cultural variability in responses to deviance. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 295 Topics in Sociology (3 cr.) Exploration of a topic in sociology not covered by the regular curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular semester. Topics to be announced. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 305 Population (3 cr.) Focus on study of people in terms of relative numbers, geographic distribution, and factors influencing change. Included are considerations of population theory, values related to population questions, an overview of basic techniques of analysis, and mortality, fertility, migration, and growth trends. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 314 Families and Society (3 cr.) The family is a major social institution, occupying a central place in people's lives. This course explores formation and dissolution of marriages, partnerships, families; challenges family members face, including communication and childrearing; reasons for and consequences of change in American families; and how family patterns vary across and within social groups. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 315 Political Sociology (3 cr.) Analysis of the nature and basis of political power on the macro level--the community, the national, and the international arenas. Study of formal and informal power structures and of the institutionalized and non-institutionalized mechanisms of access to power. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 316 Society and Public Opinion (3 cr.) Analysis of the formulation and operation of public opinion. Although the course may focus on all aspects of opinion and behavior (including marketing research, advertising, etc.), most semesters the course focuses on political opinion and behavior. Special attention will be given to two aspects of opinion in our society: its measurement through public opinion polls and the role of mass communication in manipulating public opinion. The distortions in the popular press's reports of the results of survey research are considered in depth. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 317 Sociology of Work (3 cr.) Analysis of the meaning of work, the dynamic social processes within work organizations, and environmental constraints on organizational behavior. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 320 Sexuality and Society (3 cr.) Provides a basic conceptual scheme for dealing with human sexuality in a sociological manner. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 321 Women and Health (3 cr.) A review of the relationships among cultural values, social structure, disease, and wellness, with special attention focused on the impact of gender role on symptomatology and access to health care. Selected contemporary health problem areas will be examined in depth. Alternative models of health care delivery will be identified and discussed. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 325 Gender and Society (3 cr.) A sociological examination of the roles of women and men in society, analysis of the determinants and consequences of these roles, and assessment of forces likely to bring about future change in these roles. Although focus will be on contemporary American society, cross-cultural variations in gender roles will also be noted. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 327 Sociology of Death and Dying (3 cr.) This course examines inevitable and salient features of the human condition. Historical evaluation of images and attitudes toward death, the medicalization of death, the human consequences of high-tech dying, the role of the family in caring for dying loved ones, the emergence and role of hospices, the social roles of funerals, grief and bereavement, euthanasia and suicide, the worlds of dying children and grieving parents, and genocide are major issues that are addressed. Two of the major themes of the course revolve around the idea that the way we die is a reflection of the way we live; and, that the study of dying and death is an important way of studying and affirming the value of life. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 329 Urban Sociology (3 cr.) The social dynamics of urbanization, urban social structure, and urban ecology. Theories of urban development; the city as a form of social organization; macroprocesses of urbanization both in the United States and other countries. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 330 Community (3 cr.) Social, psychological, and structural features of community life. Topics include microphenomena such as the neighborhood, networks of friendship and oppositions, social participation, community power structure, and institutional frameworks. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 335 Sociological Perspectives on the Life Course (3 cr.) Focuses on the human life course as a product of social structure, culture, and history. Attention is given to life course contexts, transitions, and trajectories from youth to old age; work, family, and school influences; self-concept development, occupational attainment, and role acquisition over the life course. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 338 Comparative Social Systems (3 cr.) History and general theories of comparative sociology. Major focus on comparative analyses of social structure, kinship, policy and bureaucracy, economics and stratification, and institutionalized belief systems. Some attention is given to culture and personality and to cross-cultural methodology. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 344 Juvenile Delinquency and Society (3 cr.) Legal definition of delinquency, measurement and distribution of delinquency. Causal theories considered for empirical adequacy and policy implications. Procedures for processing juvenile offenders by police, courts, and prisons are examined. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 345 Crime and Society (3 cr.) Examination of the creation, selection, and disposition of persons labeled criminal. Emphasis on crime as an expression of group conflict and interest. Critique of academic and popular theories of crime and punishment. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 346 Control of Crime (3 cr.) History, objectives, and operation of the crime control system in relation to its sociopolitical context. Critical examination of philosophies of punishment and programs of rehabilitation. PUL=3
  • SOC-R 349 Practicum in Victimology (3 cr.) The role of the victim in the criminal justice system is examined through both course work and practical experience as a volunteer with the Marion County Prosecutor's Witness-Victim Assistance Program. Recommended for students with interest in deviance, criminology, law, criminal justice, and social service. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 351 Social Science Research Methods (3 cr.) A survey of methods and techniques used by sociologists and other social scientists for gathering and interpreting information about human social behavior.
  • SOC-R 355 Social Theory (3 cr.) This course covers several traditions of classical, contemporary, and post-modern social thought (e.g., social Darwinism, conflict theory, functionalism, symbolic interactionism, critical theory, and feminist theory). The social context, construction, and application theories are included. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 359 Introduction to Sociological Statistics (3 cr.) Measures of central tendency, dispersion, standardizing and normalizing procedures, and simple index numbers. Simple notions of probability as related to statistical inference (means, proportions, binomial distribution, chi-square, simple regression).
  • SOC-R 381 Social Factors in Health and Illness (3 cr.) Examines the social aspects of health and illness, including variations in the social meanings of health and illness, the social epidemiology of disease, and the social dimensions of the illness experience. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 382 Social Organization of Health Care (3 cr.) Surveys the nature of, and recent changes in, the health care delivery system in the United States. Patient and professional roles and the characteristics of different health care settings are explored. Current debates about the nature of the professions and professional work are emphasized. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 410 Alcohol, Drugs and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. This is a survey of the use and abuse of alcohol, including extent of use, history of use and abuse, "biology" of alcohol, alcoholism as a problem, legal actions, and treatment strategies. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 415 Sociology of Disability (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. An examination of current models of disability and of disability at the interpersonal and societal level. Topics include recent legal, social, and educational changes; the ways in which people with disabilities interact with the nondisabled; the role played by relatives and caregivers; and the image of people with disabilities in film, television, and other media. Recommended for students in nursing, education, physical and occupational therapy, and social work, as well as for the medical sociology minor. Available for graduate credit. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 420 Sociology of Education (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. A survey of sociological approaches to the study of education, covering such major topics as education as a social institution, the school in society, the school as a social system, and the sociology of learning. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 425 Gender and Work (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. This course examines the changing roles that women and men play in paid and unpaid work, and how these roles are socially constructed through socialization practices, social interaction, and actions of social institutions. The interaction of gender, race, ethnicity, and social class on individuals' involvement in work will also be explored. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 430 Families and Social Policy (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. This seminar explores how the state and labor market currently affect family structure and the quality of family life in the United States and the role the state and labor market could play in the future. Family policies in other parts of the world will be considered for possible applicability to the United States. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 461 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. Comparative study of racial, ethnic, and religious relations. Focus on patterns of inclusion and exclusion of minority groups by majority groups. Discussion of theories of intergroup tensions--prejudice and discrimination--and of corresponding approaches to the reduction of tensions. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 463 Inequality and Society (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. Presentation of conservative and radical theories of class formation, consciousness, mobility, and class consequences. Relevance of social class to social structure and personality. Emphasis on the American class system, with some attention given to class systems in other societies. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 467 Social Change (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. Basic concepts, models, and individual theories of social change; historical and contemporary analysis of the structural and psychological ramifications of major social trends. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 476 Social Movements (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. Study of the origins and dynamics of contemporary social movements in American society, with some attention to cross-national movements. Coverage of progressive and regressive movements aimed at changing the social, economic, and political structure of the society. Case studies of expressive and ideological movements, including fads, cults, and revolts and revolutions. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 478 Formal Organizations (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. Sociological inquiry into the nature, origin, and functions of bureaucratic organizations. Emphasis on bureaucratic organizations as the predominant mode of contemporary task performance and on their social-psychological consequences. Theoretical and empirical considerations in organizational studies from Weber to contemporary findings. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 480 Sociology and Social Policy (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. This course is a broad review of the increasing use of sociology in the formulation and implementation of social policy. Specific case studies will be examined. Recommended for students with an interest in medicine, law, education, social service, urban affairs, etc. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 481 Evaluation Research Methods (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100, SOC-R 351, SOC-R 359, or consent of instructor. A comprehensive study of research techniques and practical applications in the area of the evaluation of social programs. Recommended for students with an interest in social research concerning medicine, law, education, social service, urban affairs, etc.
  • SOC-R 485 Sociology of Mental Illness (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 or consent of instructor. A survey of current problems in psychiatric diagnosis, the social epidemiology of mental illness, institutional and informal caregiving, family burden, homelessness, and the development and impact of current mental health policy. Cross-cultural and historical materials, derived from the work of anthropologists and historians, are used throughout the course. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 490 Survey Research Methods (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100, SOC-R 351, SOC-R 359, or consent of instructor. In this practicum, students will design and conduct a survey, learn how to code survey results, enter data, and analyze data with the mainframe computer. A report will also be written. The advantages and disadvantages of survey methodology will be highlighted and ethical issues will be discussed.
  • SOC-R 493 Practicum in Sociological Fieldwork (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100 and SOC-R 351, senior standing, or consent of instructor. Role of systematic observation as a sociological method. Training in fieldwork techniques and the application of sociological concepts to actual social situations. The core of this course will involve a supervised fieldwork research project in some area of social life.
  • SOC-R 494 Internship Program in Sociology (3-6 cr.) P: SOC-R 100, 9 credits of sociology with a B (3.0) or higher, junior standing with consent of instructor. This course involves students working in organizations where they apply or gain practical insight into sociological concepts, theories, and knowledge. Students analyze their experiences through work logs, a paper, and regular meetings with the internship director. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 495 Topics in Sociology (3 cr.) Exploration of a topic in sociology not covered by the regular curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular semester. Topics to be announced. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 497 Individual Readings in Sociology (3 cr.) P: Consent of instructor and 9 credit hours of sociology courses with at least a B (3.0) or higher. Investigation of a topic not covered in the regular curriculum that is of special interest to the student and that the student wishes to pursue in greater detail. Normally available only to majors through arrangement with a faculty member. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 498 Sociology Capstone Seminar (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100, SOC-R 351, SOC-R 355 (or SOC-R 356 or SOC-R 357) and senior status. Designed to help graduating senior sociology majors to synthesize and demonstrate what they have learned in their major while readying themselves for a career and/or graduate study. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 312 Sociology of Religion (3 cr.) Examination of religion from the sociological perspective. Religious institutions, the dimensions of religious behavior, the measurement of religious behavior, and the relationship of religion to other institutions in society are examined. PUL=5
  • SOC-R 385 Aids and Society (3 cr.) This course examines the HIV/AIDS epidemic from a sociological perspective. Students will explore how social factors have shaped the course of the epidemic and the experience of HIV disease. The impact of the epidemic on health care, government, and other social institutions will also be discussed.
  • SOC-R 333 Sports and Society (3 cr.) This course will examine the importance sports and leisure activities play in society. From local examples such as Indiana motorsports and high school basketball, to international examples such as the Olympics and World Cup, we will examine sports from the perspective of athletes and fans, look at sports as an increasingly important business, and discuss how sports have been a significant agent for social change (including Title Nine, and the integration of major league baseball).
Graduate Courses
  • SOC-R 515 Sociology of Health and Illness (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. Surveys important areas of medical sociology, focusing on social factors influencing the distribution of disease, help-seeking, and health care. Topics covered include social epidemiology, the health care professions, socialization of providers, and issues of cost and cost containment.
  • SOC-R 517 Sociology of Work (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. Topics include the changing meaning of work, the quest for dignity in the workplace, the plight of the working poor, and the transformation of the culture of work and its impact on occupations and professions. The prospects for a revival of the labor movement will also be examined.
  • SOC-R 525 Gender and Work (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and 6 credit hours of sociology, or consent of instructor. This course critically analyzes contemporary theory and research on gender and work. It examines how women's and men's roles in paid and unpaid work are socially constructed, through socialization, social interaction, and the actions of social institutions. The interaction gender, race, ethnicity, and social class will be explored.
  • SOC-R 530 Families and Social Policy (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 100, SOC-R 220 or SOC-R 314, and graduate standing. This seminar will explore how the government and labor market affect family structure and the quality of family life. Students will study the implications of family research for social policy and learn to develop theoretical frameworks for evaluating social policies affecting families.
  • SOC-R 537 Gender and Society (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. This course examines some central emphases on gender of social interactionist theory and feminist theory/methods. In addition, we will relate these approaches to the study of contemporary gender approaches in selected social spheres, which may vary according to instructor's specializations.
  • SOC-R 551 Quantitative Research Methods (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course surveys the major techniques for investigating current sociological problems. It emphasizes the relationship between theory and practice in understanding and conducting research. Although methods intended for rigorous hypothesis testing through quantitative analysis will be of major concern, the course will also examine issues in field research essential to a full understanding of a research problem.
  • SOC-R 556 Advanced Sociological Theory I (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. In-depth study of classical sociological theorists, particularly Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Examines their roles in defining the discipline of sociology.
  • SOC-R 557 Advanced Sociological Theory II (3 cr.) P: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

    In-depth study of cotemporary sociological theories (e.g., social conflict, struc­tural functionalist, symbolic interactionist) as a continuation of the issues raised by the classical sociological theorists as well as a response to the epistemological and social changes of the late twentieth century.

  • SOC-R 559 Intermediate Sociological Statistics (3 cr.) P: SOC-R 359 or equivalent, graduate standing or consent of instructor. SOC-R 359 or equivalent, graduate standing or consent of instructor. Basic techniques for summarizing distributions, measuring interrelationships, controlling extraneous influences, and testing hypotheses are reviewed, as students become familiar with the computer system. Complex analytical techniques commonly applied in professional literature are examined in detail, including analysis of variance, path diagrams, factor analysis, and log-linear models.
  • SOC-R 585 Social Aspects of Mental Health and Mental Illness (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This is a graduate-level course on the sociology of mental illness and mental health. Provides a thorough grounding in the research issues and traditions that have characterized scholarly inquiry into mental illness in the past. Students will become familiar with public policy as it has had an impact on the treatment of mental illness and on the mentally ill themselves.
  • SOC-R 593 Applied Fieldwork for Sociologists (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course will provide students with both a theoretical and methodological background in the different types of qualitative analysis used in sociological fieldwork. Students will have the opportunity to study and to evaluate representative examples of qualitative studies and to complete by themselves a project done using qualitative methods.
  • SOC-R 594 Graduate Internship in Sociology (3-6 cr.) P: Graduate standing, 18 hours of graduate credit in sociology, and consent of instructor. This course involves master's degree students working in organizations where they apply or gain practical insight into sociological concepts, theories, knowledge, and methodology. Students analyze their experiences through work logs, a lengthy written report and regular meetings with a faculty committee. (Students on the thesis track may also take this course as an elective.)
  • SOC-R 610 Sociology of Health and Illness Behavior (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This seminar explores sociological and social scientific research on health and illness behavior. Special emphasis is placed on examining how social factors and conditions shape people's responses to disease, illness, and disability.
  • SOC-R 697 Individual Readings in Sociology (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and consent of instructor, 6 hours of graduate credit in sociology with grades of B or better. Investigation of a topic not covered in the regular curriculum that is of special interest to the student and that the student wishes to pursue in greater detail. Available only to sociology graduate students through arrangement with a faculty member.
  • SOC-S 500 Proseminar in Sociology (1 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. Introduction to current sociological research interests and concerns through the work of departmental members.
  • SOC-S 526 The Sociology of Human Sexuality (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. This is a one-semester graduate-level course on the sociology of human sexuality. This course will provide a detailed examination of the development of sex research, a sociological perspective on and critique of this corpus, and an opportunity for students to develop research of their own.
  • SOC-S 530 Introduction to Social Psychology (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. This course examines the broad range of work in social psychology. Emphasis is placed on the relation between the classic and contemporary literature in the field.
  • SOC-S 560 Graduate Topics (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor, variable with topic. Exploration of a topic in sociology not covered by the regular curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular semester. Topics to be announced.
  • SOC-S 569 M.A. Thesis (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor.
  • SOC-S 610 Urban Sociology (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. Historical and contemporary causes, trends, and patterns of urbanization throughout the world. Various approaches to studying the process of urbanization, including ecological, social organizational, and political perspectives. Current developments and problems in urban planning.
  • SOC-S 612 Political Sociology (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. An analysis of the nature and operation of power in a political system. Topics may include classical theories of power, political behavior and campaigns, the role of mass media in sustaining power, the state as a social institution, and political movements.
  • SOC-S 613 Complex Organizations (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. Theory and research in formal organizations: industry, school, church, hospital, government, military, and university. Problems of bureaucracy and decision making in large-scale organizations. For students in the social sciences and professional schools interested in the comparative approach to problems of organizations and their management.
  • SOC-S 616 Sociology of Family Systems (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. Focus on the nature, structure, functions, and changes of family systems in modern and emerging societies, in comparative and historical perspective. Attention is given to relationships with other societal subsystems, and to interaction between role occupants within and among subsystems.
  • SOC-S 632 Socialization (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. The processes of development of the individual as a social being and societal member, focusing on childhood or socialization into adult roles.
  • SOC-S 659 Qualitative Methods in Sociology (3 cr.) P: Graduate standing and/or consent of instructor. Methods in obtaining, evaluating, and analyzing qualitative data in social research. Methods covered include field research procedures, participant observation, interviewing, and audio-video recording of social behavior in natural settings.
Women's Studies (WOST)
Undergraduate Courses
  • WOST-W 105 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3 cr.) This introductory course examines both the relation of Women's Studies to other disciplines and the multiple ways in which gender experience is understood and currently studied. Beginning with a focus on how inequalities between women and men, as well as among women, have been explained and critiqued, the course considers the impact of social structure and culture on gender. The intersections of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, and age are investigated in both national and international contexts. PUL=5
  • WOST-W 300 Topics in Women’s Studies: (variable title) (1-3 cr.) An interdisciplinary study of selected themes, issues, and methodologies in Women's Studies. PUL=5 May be repeated for up to 6 credit hours.
  • WOST-W 480 Women’s Studies Practicum (3-6 cr.) P: WOST-W 105 and consent of instructor and program director. Internships in the Women's Studies Program are offered to provide opportunities for students to gain work experience while serving women's needs. This experience is combined with an academic analysis of women's status and experience in organizations. PUL=3
  • WOST-W 495 Readings and Research in Women’s Studies (1-6 cr., 6 cr. max cr.) Individual readings and research. PUL=5 May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
  • WOST-W 499 Senior Colloquium in Women’s Studies (1 cr.) P: Consent of instructor. Must be approved by the WOST Director prior to the semester in which the student plans to take the course. Reserved for students who are pursuing a Women's Studies minor. The final course for the Women's Studies minor, is a one credit independent study capstone course. Students are expected to make arrangements with a full-time faculty member to supervise the course, at least one semester in advance, before requesting permission from the Director. Typically, students build on research conducted in earlier Women's Studies courses, in order to produce a high quality, research paper, however other models are possible, pending agreement with the supervising faculty member. For clarification on the course or to request permission, contact the Women's Studies office at 274-7611 or wostudy@iupui.edu. PUL=3
Graduate Courses
  • WOST-W 500 Feminist Theory (3 cr.) An examination of contemporary feminist analyses of gender relations, how they are constituted and experienced, and how social structures maintaining sexist hierarchies intersect with hierarchies of race, class, and ethnicity. Rival theories are applied to particular issues to demonstrate connections between theory and practice.
  • WOST-W 601 Survey of Contemporary Research in Women’s Studies: The Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 cr.) An exploration of feminist perspectives in the social sciences. Theoretical frameworks and research styles used by feminist social scientists are examined, as are feminist critiques of traditional social scientific frameworks and research methods. Research reports by feminist researchers in social scientific disciplines are also read and analyzed.
  • WOST-W 602 Contemporary Research in Women’s Studies: The Humanities (3 cr.) Review of literature on sex roles, psychology of women, socialization, and politicization of women. Training in methodology of research on women; critique of prevailing and feminist theoretical frameworks for studying women.
  • WOST-W 695 Graduate Readings and Research in Women’s Studies (3-6 cr.) An opportunity for graduate students in various programs at IUPUI to explore specific issues within the field of Women's Studies, guided by faculty with particular expertise in these areas. The course is used to do readings and research that go beyond what is covered in other Women's Studies graduate courses offered on this campus. It also involves faculty not normally involved in the teaching of these other courses but who have skills and knowledge relevant to the issues being investigated.
  • WOST-W 701 Graduate Topics in Women’s Studies (3-4 cr.) Advanced investigation of selected research topics in Women's Studies. Topics to be announced.
Overseas Studies
  • OVST-B 490 Overseas Study in Canada (0 cr.)
  • OVST-B 491 Overseas Study-IU Program (0 cr.)
  • OVST-B 492 OVST-Student Teaching Abroad (0 cr.)
  • OVST-L 491 Overseas Study in UK-Derby Exchange Program (0 cr.)
  • OVST-M 490 Overseas Study in UK-Newcastle Exchange Program (0 cr.)
  • OVST-Y 496 Overseas Study/Non-IU Program (0 cr.)
  • OVST-Y 498 Overseas Study/Non-IU Program II (0 cr.)
  • OVST-C 591 Overseas Study-Teach Abroad (0 cr.)
  • OVST-M 592 Overseas Study Worldwide-Social Work Field Practice (0 cr.)
Latino Studies (LATS)
  • LATS-L 101 Introduction to Latino Studies (3 cr.) General inquiry into the historical and cultural heritage of Latinos who have lived or currently live in what is today the United States. Through readings and discussions, the course studies the varied histories of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban and other Latin American peoples in the United States. PUL=3, 5
  • LATS-L 350 Contemporary Issues in Latino Studies: Latinos in the US: Origins and Prospects (3 cr.) This course will provide a theoretical overview of themes important to understanding Latino communities and also examine how the relationships between Latinos and non-Latinos help determine their perceptions of the United States and each other. PUL=3,4
  • LATS-L 228 AN INTERDISCIPLINARY LOOK AT U.S. LATINO/A IDENTITIES (3 cr.) Exploration of historical and contemporary constructions of Latino/a identities and experiences in the U.S. Emphasizes trans-cultural social contexts, racial formations, and intersections with other identities, including class, sexuality, and gender. PUL=5
Sociology (SOC)
  • SLA-S 100 First Year Success Seminar (1-3 cr.) An introduction to IUPUI designed especially for first year students with interests in the liberal arts. These disciplines will be used to demonstrate university expectations with regard to written and oral communication, critical thinking, information technology, and the ethics and values of the academic community. Strategies for student success, especially support networks and using campus resources will be developed.
  • SLA-S 498 Internship Course - Part Time (0 cr.) An internship course offered through the IU School of Liberal Arts and administered by the Career Development Office. It is a noncredit course used simply to maintain halftime status. To qualify the student for course enrollment, the work experience must last at least 6 weeks; require at least 12 hours of work per week, and a minimum of 180 hours total (provides part-time student status); further the student's understanding of a career field or build on coursework taken; increase employability in the student's field of interest.
  • SLA-S 499 Internship Course - Full Time (0 cr.) An internship course offered through the IU School of Liberal Arts and administered by the Career Development Office. It is a noncredit course used simply to maintain full-time status. To qualify the student for course enrollment, the work experience must last at least 6 weeks; require at least 24 hours of work per week, and a minimum of 360 hours total (provides full-time student status); further the student's understanding of a career field or build on coursework taken; increase employability in the student's field of interest. PUL=3
  • SLA-S 200 Career Preparation for the Liberal Arts Student (3 cr.) This course will provide students with direction into their collegiate studies via possible career paths of their own selection. Students will be able to analyze their abilities and their passion as it relates to their academic and employment aspirations. Students then will be able to employ their knowledge in career exploration. PUL=1C
  • SLA-H 315 Texts and Interpretation (3 cr.) P: SLA-H 215. This course is a required course for all members of the SLA Honors Program. Texts form the foundation for all the Liberal Arts, yet the problems of what a text is, how it is created and transmitted, and how it is to be interpreted are extremely complex and are prerequisite to understanding and meaning. Thus such issues are ones we still face as students of the Liberal Arts, and are of central, indeed fundamental importance to our society and culture of today as essential for our understanding of ourselves and our world culture. The internet and digital media have transformed human communication, yet we remain in a "textual condition," and indeed do so as never before. To analyze and understand this textual condition is indeed the purpose of this course, for which SLA-H 215 is a prerequisite. In analyzing the "phenomena" of texts, the course reflects on the impact of the Liberal Arts tradition as it remains foundational for our understanding of "the educated individual" today, and how the Liberal Arts tradition continues to serve an essential function for our contemporary, post-modern world. The course is primarily a seminar and colloquium, supplemented with lectures by the instructor. Class participation is essential, and the course requires extensive reading and writing assignments. This course is prerequisite to Honors 499 Senior Thesis, and one of the major goals of the course is to have students develop a research proposal for their senior thesis/project, based on a sophisticated analysis of the evidentiary basis therefor. PUL=2
  • SLA-H 215 SLA Honors Seminar (3 cr.) P: Acceptance into the SLA Honors Program as a Freshman admitted to the Honors College or as a continuing SLA student. This course is a required course for all new members of the SLA Honors Program. The course is a seminar, focused on the intensive, common reading of a given text, a classic of the western Liberal Arts tradition, supplemented by lectures. Students will read the text together, and will present on assigned sections of the text. The Instructor will introduce the text, provide context and insights, and guide students in their reading and interpretations. PUL=2
  • SLA-U 200 Introductory Internship Course (1-3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131. Students will build professional skills and explore major and career options working at an approved internship site. For freshman or sophomore students in University College or in majors that do not currently offer an internship course. Students must complete (50) hours per credit hour at the internship site and the course's writing assignments. The internship application form must be submitted and approved prior to students beginning the course. PUL=3,2
Latino Studies (LATS)
  • NAIS-N 101 Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies (3 cr.) Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the many components that combine to create the contemporary American Indian and Indigenous experiences across North America, with a focus within the United States. This course is an introduction to the historic and contemporary perspectives on the social, political, and cultural issues of the Indigenous Peoples of North America. Through readings, lectures, discussion, multi-media presentations, critical thinking assignments and reflection exercises, students will be exposed to the many unique challenges faced by contemporary Native Americans. A primary objective of this course is to examine the structural and disciplinary constraints systemically placed on Native Americans and Indigenous cultures from a Native American perspective and students will examine identity, sovereignty, Indian-White relations, federal Indian law and policy, tribal government, art, literature, and film from a Native American perspective. A primary goal for students this term is to explore dominant academic and media representation and research practices and compare and contrast those offered by contemporary Native American scholars, artists, and educators. Students will be encouraged to engage in the process of inquiry and be pushed to think critically and independently. PUL=5
  • NAIS-N 364 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 cr.) A survey of traditional and modern literature by American Indians, especially of the high plains and southwest culture areas, with particular attention to the image of the Indian in both native and white literature. PUL=5, 1a, 6
  • NAIS-N 209 Native American Culture and Communication (3 cr.) This course is designed to provide students with the tools for understanding Native American culture and communication in a variety of contexts. Through readings, lectures, discussion, assignments and reflection, students will be exposed to the fundamental definitions, concepts and theories used in the intellectual approach for analysis and reflection of Native American rhetoric and communication processes. A primary objective of this course is to empower students as they work to understand the extent to which cultural differences influence the interpretation and expression of events, ideas, and experiences. A primary goal for students this term is to learn as much as possible about the contributions of Native American cultures and communication in order to achieve a greater sense of awareness of how attitude and behavior can affect situational outcomes. PUL=5
  • NAIS-N 320 Indians of North America (3 cr.) The intent of this course is to introduce you to the academic study of American Indians and Native peoples. The emphasis is on "introduce" because the subject is extremely complex, and in one semester you really will only receive some basics. The perspective to be taken here is one of scholarship, not an approach that is personal or political, though certainly these approaches will enter into lectures, readings, videos and discussions. You'll be looking at the way in which academic disciplines have examined American Indian and Native cultures, traditions and histories. The viewpoints primarily will be from anthropology, but perspectives also will come from museum studies, literature, history, law, political science, and a range of other disciplines. PUL = 1
  • NAIS-N 480 Comparative Native American History (3 cr.) Course examines history of Native peoples in North American during both the colonial and republican periods through a comparative perspective of the Spanish/French/British empires and then the post-colonial periods of U. S. and Mexican history. PUL=5, 1a, 6
  • NAIS-N 356 American Indian Philosophies (3 cr.) An examination of the philosophical views, themes, and implications of North American Indian traditions, with applications to a variety of cross-cultural and philosophical issues. PUL=5, 1a, 6
  • NAIS-N 396 American Indian Philosophies (3 cr.) The experiential seminar is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in Native American Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the additional supervision of a faculty mentor. Although the most common way of completing this course is the writing of a research thesis of approximately 8000 words, alternate projects can be explored in consultation with the instructor of the course and the Native American Studies Director. The completed thesis or project should synthesize your learning throughout your Native Studies courses as well as an intentional and designed experience working with or for a specific Native population. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. PUL = 4,5,1
  • NAIS-N 207 Introduction to Native American History (3 cr.) This introductory course surveys the history of Native peoples of North America from the earliest times to the present. It seeks to provide students with a broad understanding of Native American history, prepare students for more advanced course work in Native studies, and enhance students' understanding of colonialism and American history. PUL=5
  • NAIS-N 398 Women in American Indian Religions (3 cr.) Women in American Indian Religions is a course designed to examine the roles of women in America, Indian religions and practice, and the expression the feminine aspects in their world views. PUL = 4,5,1
  • NAIS-N 399 Studies in NAIS (3 cr.) Specialized and intensive studies in Native American and Indigenous Studies with an interdisciplinary emphasis. PUL = 5, 2
  • NAIS-N 300 Topics in NAIS (1-3 cr.) Specialized topics in Native American and Indigenous Studies with a multidisciplinary emphasis. PUL = 5, 2
Journalism
Sports Journalism
  • JOUR-J 152 Introduction to Sports in Society (3 cr.)

    This course will introduce students to sports and will take a macroscopic approach in discussing sports' societal influence. It will study sport from a socio-cultural-historical perspective as well as from a contemporary position. It will focus on the converging worlds of print journalism, electronic media, public relations, advertising, documentary and emerging technologies as expressed in the new commercial reality of sport. (PUL 5, 6, 1C)

  • JOUR-J 150 An Introduction to Sports Journalism: Controversy, Conflict & Characters (3 cr.) This course will explore the state and practice of sports journalism, through case studies of some of this decade's most controversial sports stories. We will explore these issues through evaluating coverage, reading related texts and talking directly to prominent sports journalists, executives and athletes. (PUL 2, 3, and 5)
  • JOUR-J 345 Sports Journalism Writing (3 cr.) P: J150, J200, J210. This class will offer an overview of sports writing from its origins to its current status in the twenty-first century. The course will teach students fundamentals of the sports-writing process from information gathering and interviewing to writing and editing copy. Students will gain requisite skills for working in today's sports departments and will write and publish stories on IUPUI athletics and area professional teams and events.
  • JOUR-J 361 Issues in Sports Journalism (3 cr.) P: J150. This course will study sports journalism's key policies, trends and issues. It will examine sociological, political, legal, ethical and technological issues in college and professional sports. It will focus on current events and controversies in the world of sports journalism. This course will discuss the symbiotic relationship between sport media and race, gender, doping, steroids, sexuality and homophobia, politics and nationalism, sports fans, loyalty, violence, disability in sport, and other provocative issues.
  • JOUR-J 501 Public Affairs Reporting (3 cr.)

    This course includes lectures and roundtable discussion of problems in covering public affairs issues at the national, state, and local levels. Emphasis is on reporting on government, social welfare agencies, elections, political parties, special interest groups and other areas of general public interest.

  • JOUR-J 510 Media and Society Seminar (3 cr.)

    This course offers an examination of structure, functions, ethics, and performance of communication and mass media, stressing a review of pertinent research literature. Students will analyze media policies and performance in light of communication theory and current economic, political and social thought.

  • JOUR-J 540 Business of Sports Media (3 cr.)

    A history of how media have evolved from radio, network television and magazines into the multi-dimensional world of regional and national cable, the Internet, and the networks. The way media provide so much of the revenue for sports as an entertainment industry has made it the anchor for the sports industry.

  • JOUR-J 541 Digital Sports Journalism (3 cr.)

    Students in this hands-on, practical course will learn how to envision, build, design and produce a sports website. Students will receive substantive training in the software used to produce web videos, podcasts and interactive graphics. And, students will be taught how to marry all of those elements into a compelling website.

  • JOUR-J 542 Sports Journalism and Society (3 cr.)

    This course provides a broad understanding of how social issues impact sports and how sports impacts society. Included will be a historical overview of sports, athletes’ rights, race and gender in sports, the Olympics and international sports, youth sports, the commercialization of sports and the influence of the media on sports.

  • JOUR-J 543 Sports Law (3 cr.)

    Students will develop a basic understanding of the relationship between sports and the law and of the basic concepts of major legal issues—antitrust, labor, contract and intellectual property—in sports today, while translating that knowledge into analytical reporting on those subjects.

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  • JOUR-J 545 Sports Writing (3 cr.)

    This course is an intensive, in-depth and practical instruction on reporting and writing for print, magazines and the Web. This course will include a broad range of sports writing, from long-form narrative for magazines to twittering on the Web. It also will explore the essentials of beat reporting, with experiential learning at live press conferences and events.

    .

  • JOUR-J 546 Sports Journalism Research (3 cr.)

    This course explores issues surrounding the highly lucrative nature of collegiate sports in America, such as which sports are the most and least profitable and the gap between men’s and women’s sports. Students will produce a research project in collaboration with a major media outlet.

  • JOUR-J 547 Sports Broadcast Journalism (3 cr.)

    The course is an intensive, in-depth and practical instruction of sports broadcasting. This course will include instruction in everything from play-by-play broadcasting of live events to the art of interviewing for television to writing and editing long segments.

  • JOUR-J 620 Media Coverage of Sports (3 cr.)

    This course will examine athletes, coaches, events and sports media coverage. It will focus on current events and controversies such as amateurism, competitive balance, debate over school mascots, gambling and problems in recruiting and the ensuing media coverage.

Undergraduate Courses
  • JOUR-J 152 Introduction to Sports in Society (3 cr.)

    This course will introduce students to sports and will take a macroscopic approach in discussing sports' societal influence. It will study sport from a socio-cultural-historical perspective as well as from a contemporary position. It will focus on the converging worlds of print journalism, electronic media, public relations, advertising, documentary and emerging technologies as expressed in the new commercial reality of sport. (PUL 5, 6, 1C)

  • JOUR-J 407 News Gathering and the Law (3 cr.) P: JOUR J300. Students study the law relating to the content of news media and the processes by which that content is created. Discussion includes the legal issues triggered by story framing, selection of sources, interviewing, photography, and access to information. The course involves reading and research using primary legal materials. (PUL 2, 5, 4)
  • JOUR-J 354 Photojournalism Editing (3 cr.) P: JOUR J344 or permission of the instructor. Workshop on the role and function of the print media picture editor. Theory and practice of picture editing skills including assigning, selecting, cropping, writing captions and blurbs, producing informational graphics, designing photo pages, editing by computer, and managing. (PUL 1A, 3, 5)
  • JOUR-J 385 Television News (3 cr.) P: JOUR J343 and JOUR J353 or permission of the instructor. Preparation and presentation of news for television. Practice in writing, reporting, filming, and editing news for TV. TV writing problems; use of photographs, film, and videotape; problems of sound in TV news; ethical problems of the TV film reporter and editor. (PUL 1C, 1A, 2)
  • JOUR-J 401 In-Depth Reporting and Editing (3 cr.) P: One 300-level reporting course and one 300-level editing course. Study and practice in using techniques of social science and traditional methods of investigative reporting. Class will plan, write, and edit news stories in depth. (PUL 1C, 1A, 3)
  • JOUR-J 415 Literary Journalism (3 cr.) P: JOUR J200 and JOUR J210. A study of literary forms and techniques used in journalism. Topics to be considered include formal considerations such as voice and structure, reporting methods, and ethical issues. Students will supplement reading with writing experimental pieces of their own. (PUL 3, 1A, 5)
  • JOUR-J 423 Public Opinion (3 cr.) Behavioral study of nature, operation, molding, and influence of public opinion, with practice in its measurement and evaluation. Discussion of major political, social, economic, and cultural problems. (PUL 1B, 1C, 4)
  • JOUR-J 425 Supervision of School Publications (3 cr.) 12 credit hours of journalism. Lectures and discussion on designing, producing and financing school newspapers, magazines and yearbooks. Management of school news bureau.
  • JOUR-J 444 Advanced Photojournalism (3 cr.) P: JOUR J344 Advanced techniques of reporting and interpreting news with photography. Practice in news, sports, features, photographic essays, color photography, electronic imaging, and studio illustration. (PUL 1A, 3, 6)
  • JOUR-J 465 Computerized Publication Design II (3 cr.) P: JOUR J463 This publishing design course incorporates typesetting, electronic photo editing, graphics, and page design. Students are instructed in design theory, computer publishing skills, and creative problem solving. (PUL 3, 1A, 2)
  • JOUR-J 455 News Analysis and Opinion Writing (3 cr.) P: JOUR J200 and JOUR J210 Techniques for understanding, analyzing and reporting on complex events and issues. Development and refinement of skills and techniques for writing news analysis, editorials and opinion articles. (PUL 2, 3, 1A)
  • JOUR-J 470 Broadcast Media Analysis (3 cr.) Seminar on problems of communicating news through aural and visual channels. Application of communications theory to broadcast news and public affairs presentations. Study of effects of format, verbal content, nonverbal content, and presenter on communications process. (PUL 2, 1A, 3)
  • JOUR-J 493 Journalism: Off-Campus Registration (0 cr.) This noncredit course is for journalism students studying off campus temporarily as part of the Bachelor of Arts in Journalism degree program.
  • JOUR-C 190 Perspectives on Communication (1 cr.) Students are introduced to college learning within a journalism and mass communications environment. Classroom instruction, library activities, and projects are designed to introduce technology and information resources, develop teamwork, and sharpen analytical and evaluative skills. Topics include career planning, study techniques, time management, data collection, and presentations. (PUL 1A, 5, 1C)
  • JOUR-C 201 Topics in Journalism (3 cr.) Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic. Will not count toward journalism major requirements.
  • JOUR-C 300 The Citizen and the News (3 cr.) A study of the institutions that produce news and information about public affairs for the citizens of American mass society. The problems about the selection of what is communicated. Case studies. International comparisons. Will not count toward journalism major requirements. (PUL 5, 2, 4)
  • JOUR-C 327 Writing for Mass Media (3 cr.) A workshop for nonmajors to improve writing skills and learn basic requirements of writing for publication. Instruction in market analysis and interpreting specific editorial requirements, in gathering and researching background materials, and in preparing manuscripts. Examination of various types and styles of published writing. Will not count toward journalism major requirements.
  • JOUR-J 496 Foreign Study in Journalism (3-8 cr.) Consent of the chair. Planning of research project during year preceding study abroad. Time spent in research abroad must amount to at least one week for each credit hour granted. Research paper must be presented by end of semester following foreign study. 
  • JOUR-J 337 Media Economics (3 cr.) This course explores how economic forces influence production of media content, particularly at U.S. organizations. It examines basic economic concepts, such as market and competition, as they relate to commercial media organizations. Special attention is paid to the effect of advertising and market considerations on news decision making.
  • JOUR-J 100 Computer Methods for Journalism (3 cr.)

    An introduction to computing uses in journalism. Hands-on experience with computer software packages commonly used in journalistic research and expression. Experience with using the Internet, Lexis/Nexis, and other library resources for research. This course is for students on the Indianapolis campus only. Bloomington students take J155 Research Techniques for Journalists. (PUL 1C, 2, 1A)

  • JOUR-J 321 Principles of Public Relations (3 cr.)

    Students are introduced to the creative integration of advertising and public relations as a mass media campaign tool. Topics include the role of integrated communications in marketing and media, an examination of current practice, and the creative process of a campaign, including planning strategies and media characteristics. (PUL 3, 6, 2)

  • JOUR-J 201 Reporting, Writing and Editing II (3 cr.) P: JOUR J200

    Working seminar focused on the strengthening of basic journalism skills, including in-depth reporting, editing, and multimedia presentations. Creativity, cooperation, and critical thinking are used to shape effective messages for diverse audiences. (PUL 1A, 1C, 3)

  • JOUR-J 110 Foundations of Journalism and Mass Communication (3 cr.) Survey of the institutions of journalism and mass communication, their philosophical foundations, history, processes, economic realities and effects. (PUL 5, 6)
  • JOUR-J 200 Reporting, Writing and Editing I (3 cr.) P: ENG-W 131 or ENG-W 140. and fundamental computer skills. Working seminar stressing the creation of journalistic stories for diverse audiences. Students will learn to develop story ideas, gather information, combine visual and verbal messages, and to write and edit news. (PUL 1A, 1C, 2)
  • JOUR-J 210 Visual Communication (3 cr.) Theories of visual communications including human perception, psychology of color and principles of design. Application of those theories to photography, video and graphic design in news communication. (PUL 1A, 3, 6)
  • JOUR-J 300 Communications Law (3 cr.) P: Sophomore standing or above. History and philosophy of laws pertaining to free press and free speech. Censorship, libel, contempt, obscenity, right of privacy, copyright, government regulations, and business law affecting media operations. Stresses responsibilities and freedoms in a democratic communications system. (PUL 3, 1A, 4)
  • JOUR-J 315 Feature Writing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200. or permission of instructor. Emphasis on developing story ideas, identifying sources, organizing materials, planning, and outlining the story. Techniques for capturing the reader's interest. (PUL 1A, 1C, 5)
  • JOUR-J 320 Principles of Creative Advertising (3 cr.) Analysis of strategy employed in developing creative advertising, with emphasis on role of the copywriter. Research media, legal aspects andethical standards as they apply to the copywriting functions. Place of the creative function within the advertising agency and the retail business. (PUL 3, 6, 2)
  • JOUR-J 335 Retail and Direct Advertising (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200, JOUR-J 320, or permission of the instructor. Role of advertising in retail and service establishments. Forms of retail and direct media advertising, including production and distribution. Procedures, requirements, and techniques of newspaper advertising departments and broadcast stations; in-store promotions; budgeting; evaluation. (PUL 1A, 3, 5)
  • JOUR-J 341 Newspaper Reporting (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. Techniques of gathering, analyzing, and writing news and features for newspapers. Practice in interviewing, observation, and use of documentary references that include computer information retrieval and analysis skills. (PUL 1A, 1C, 3)
  • JOUR-J 342 Magazine Reporting (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. Techniques of gathering, analyzing, and writing material for specialized and general circulation magazines. Practice in interviewing, observation, and use of documentary references that include computer information retrieval and analysis skills. (PUL 1A, 1C, 3)
  • JOUR-J 343 Broadcast News (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. Techniques of gathering, analyzing and writing news and features for broadcast. Practice in interviewing, observation and use of documentary references that include computer information retrieval and analysis skills. (PUL 1C, 1A, 2)
  • JOUR-J 344 Photojournalism Reporting (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. This is an introductory photojournalism course focusing on the basics of light, camera operation, and the use of chemical and digital darkrooms. It includes instruction in spot news and feature photography as well as instruction in ethics, privacy and law. (PUL 1A, 3, 6)
  • JOUR-J 351 News Editing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. Workshop in fundamentals of editing newspapers, including both individual and team projects. Emphasis on news judgment, fairness, accuracy, editorial balance, and language usage. Practice in writing news summaries, editing copy, writing headlines, laying out pages, and using computer editing technology. (PUL 1A, 1C, 2)
  • JOUR-J 352 Magazine Editing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. Workshop in fundamentals of editing specialized and general interest publications. Individual and team functions are stressed. Attention is given to editorial voice and judgment, fairness, accuracy, and language usage. Practice in writing headlines and titles, layout, design, and use of computer editing technology. (PUL 1A, 3, 5)
  • JOUR-J 353 Advanced Broadcast News (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200, JOUR-J 210, and JOUR-J 343. Continuing workshop in reporting, writing and editing for broadcast. Individual and team functions are stressed. Emphasis on news judgment, fairness, accuracy, editorial balance and language usage. Practice in editing copy, audio and video tape. (PUL 1A, 3, 6)
  • JOUR-J 409 Media Management (3 cr.) Research seminar that examines techniques and processes used in managing media organizations. Through discussions, case analysis, and group projects, the course explores organizational missions and social responsibilities, market analysis techniques, personnel management issues, and budgeting. (PUL 3, 1C, 1B)
  • JOUR-J 410 The Media as Social Institutions (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 300. and Junior standing or above Examination of the functions and impact of the mass media in society with primary focus on the United States. Discussion of the values of media organizations and the professional and ethical values of journalists. Critical analysis of the relationship of the media and society and the effect of political, economic and cultural factors on the operation of the media. (PUL 6, 5, 2)
  • JOUR-J 414 International News-Gathering Systems (3 cr.) Structure and function of international communication systems and barrier to flow of information among nations. Emphasis on gathering and disseminating information around the world. Study of the major newspapers of the world, international news agencies, and international broadcasting and satellite networks. (PUL 4, 2, 5)
  • JOUR-J 420 Advertising Research & Management (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 320 and JOUR-J 335. Lectures and practice in copywriting, graphics, layout and production. Incorporates psychological, social, legal and marketing aspects of creativity for mass media. (PUL 1A, 1C, 2)
  • JOUR-J 438 Advertising Issues & Research (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 300, JOUR-J 320, JOUR-J 335, and JOUR-J 420. Seminar on current developments and problems concerning advertising as an economic and social force. Stresses independent investigation on topics such as politics and advertising and advertising and public taste. (PUL 5, 4, 2)
  • JOUR-J 450 History of Journalism (3 cr.) American social-intellectual history integrated with the story of news media development, emphasizing the historical relationship of the mass media to American social, economic, and cultural patterns and developments. Origin, growth, shortcomings, and achievements of media. Impact of society on the media and vice versa. (PUL 5, 4, 3)
  • JOUR-J 460 Topics Colloquium (1-3 cr.) P: Junior or Senior standing. Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.
  • JOUR-J 463 Graphic Design I (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. This design course incorporates electronic photo editing, graphics, and page design. Students are instructed in design theory, computer publishing skills, and creative problem solving. (PUL 3, 1A, 2)
  • JOUR-J 475 Race, Gender, and the Media (3 cr.) Survey and analysis of how news and entertainment media represent issues of race and gender. History of women and people of color as media professionals and media consumers. Discussion of contemporary problems and potential solutions. (PUL 5, 2, 4)
  • JOUR-J 492 Media Internship (1 cr.) P: Prior approval of the faculty member; journalism majors only. (S/F Grading) Supervised professional experience in communications media. (PUL 3, 1A, 2) May be repeated, but a student may take no more than three credit hours total of internship credit for the journalism degree.
  • JOUR-J 499 Honors Research in Journalism (1-3 cr.) Opportunity for independent reading, research, and experimentation on relevant issues in mass communications. Work with faculty member on individual basis. (PUL 1A, 2, 4)
  • JOUR-J 360 Journalism Specialites (1-3 cr.) Topical course dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. Course may be repeated once for credit.
  • JOUR-J 413 Magazine Article Writing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 342. In-depth explanation of the nonfiction magazine article field. Examination of trends and problems in nonfiction writing for both general and specialized magazines. Criticism of student articles written for publication. Seminar sessions with editors and freelance writers. (PUL 1A, 1C, 3)
  • JOUR-J 402 Careers in Journalism (1 cr.) P: Junior standing or above. Prepare for job or internship searches. Polish your resume and portfolio. Learn how to write impressive cover letters. Practice interviewing skills. Understand how to articulate your abilities and experiences to market yourself to potential employers. (PUL 1A, 1C, 4)
  • JOUR-J 150 An Introduction to Sports Journalism: Controversy, Conflict & Characters (3 cr.) This course will explore the state and practice of sports journalism, through case studies of some of this decade's most controversial sports stories. We will explore these issues through evaluating coverage, reading related texts and talking directly to prominent sports journalists, executives and athletes. (PUL 2, 3, 5)
  • JOUR-J 340 Public Relations Tactics and Techniques (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 219. Covers a wide variety of knowledge and skills needed by entry-level public relations practitioners. Topics include media relations, community relations and internal communications. (PUL 3, 1C, 2)
  • JOUR-J 345 Sports Journalism Writing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 150, JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 210. This class will offer an overview of sports writing from its origins to its current status in the twenty-first century. The course will teach students fundamentals of the sports-writing process from information gathering and interviewing to writing and editing copy. Students will gain requisite skills for working in today's sports departments and will write and publish stories on IUPUI athletics and area professional teams and events. (PUL 1A, 1C, 3)
  • JOUR-J 361 Issues in Sports Journalism (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 150. This upper-level course will study sports journalism's key policies, trends and issues. It will examine sociological, political, legal, ethical and technological issues in college and professional sports. It will focus on current events and controversies in the world of sports journalism. This course will discuss the symbiotic relationship between sport media and race, gender, doping, steroids, sexuality and homophobia, politics and nationalism, sports fans, loyalty and violence, disability in sport and other provocative issues. (PUL 5, 6, 4)
  • JOUR-J 390 Public Relations Writing (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 200 and JOUR-J 219. or permission of the instructor. A comprehensive survey of corporate publications from newsletters to corporate magazines, tabloids and annual reports with an emphasis on layout and design. Includes refreshing writing skills with review on interviewing and editing. (PUL 1A, 1C, 3)
  • JOUR-J 400 Careers in Public Relations (1 cr.) P: Junior Standing. Prepare for job or internship searches. Polish your resume and portfolio. Learn how to write impressive cover letters. Practice interviewing skills. Understand how to articulate your abilities and experiences to market yourself to potential employers. (PUL 1A, 1C, 2)
  • JOUR-J 428 Public Relations Planning & Research (3 cr.) P: JOUR-J 340 and JOUR-J 390. Theories and principles relevant to public relations practices in agency, corporate and nonprofit organizations, including development of goals and objectives, client relationships, budgets and research methods. (PUL 1B, 2, 4)
  • JOUR-J 431 Public Relations for Nonprofits (3 cr.) This seminar focuses on how a nonprofit organization creates images and how it shapes its programs and goals to gain public support. Assignments and readings are designed to foster a practical understanding of promotional techniques and campaigns using journalistic and other media. (Offered in summer only.) (PUL 2, 5, 3)
  • JOUR-J 219 Introduction to Public Relations (3 cr.) Provides an overview of public relations and introduces theory and practice of the field. Topics include the relationship between public relations and marketing, the history and development of public relations, media relations, measurement and assessment methods, ethics, and law.
Graduate Courses
  • JOUR-J 660 Topics Colloquium (3 cr.) Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit.
  • JOUR-J 501 Public Affairs Reporting (3 cr.) This course includes lectures and roundtable discussion of problems in covering public affairs issues at the national, state, and local levels. Emphasis is on reporting on government, social welfare agencies, elections, political parties, special interest groups and other areas of general public interest.
  • JOUR-J 510 Media and Society Seminar (3 cr.) This course offers an examination of structure, functions, ethics, and performance of communication and mass media, stressing a review of pertinent research literature. Students will analyze media policies and performance in light of communication theory and current economic, political and social thought.
  • JOUR-J 528 Public Relations Management (3 cr.) Designed to enable students to manage a public relations department. Theories and principles relevant to public relations practiced in agency, corporate and not-for-profit organizations will be covered. This will include developing goals and objectives, working with clients, developing budgets, and research methods.
  • JOUR-J 540 Business of Sports Media (3 cr.) A history of how media have evolved from radio, network television and magazines into the multi-dimensional world of regional and national cable, the Internet, and the networks. The way media provide so much of the revenue for sports as an entertainment industry has made it the anchor for the sports industry.
  • JOUR-J 541 Digital Sports Journalism (3 cr.) Students in this hands-on, practical course will learn how to envision, build, design and produce a sports website. Students will receive substantive training in the software used to produce web videos, podcasts and interactive graphics. And, students will be taught how to marry all of those elements into a compelling website.
  • JOUR-J 560 Topics Colloquium (1-4 cr.) Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
  • JOUR-J 563 Computerized Publication Design I (3 cr.) Institutional and industrial publications are an important means of internal and external communications. This course looks at the principles of design and production techniques. Students are provided with opportunities to create a variety of different public relations products while using state of the art desktop publishing applications.
  • JOUR-J 804 Read and Research in Journalism (1-9 cr.)
  • JOUR-J 529 Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.) This capstone course provides students with an opportunity to apply campaign model methodology to public relations planning so that they will be able to apply the research, theories, planning, and evaluation processes in working conditions which may not provide them with the time to deliberate on and evaluate each step in the way that the classroom provides.
  • JOUR-J 531 Public Relations for Non-Profits (3 cr.) The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation in public relations for those considering careers in nonprofit organizations or in fundraising. Specific coursework will involve the public relations campaign process and its relationship to organizational goals and to the specifics of organizational development and fundraising. An additional focus will involve the communications efforts required to maintain relationships with donors, volunteers and key community and industry officials.
  • JOUR-J 542 Sports Journalism and Society (3 cr.) This course provides a broad understanding of how social issues impact sports and how sports impacts society. Included will be a historical overview of sports, athletes rights, race and gender in sports, the Olympics and international sports, youth sports, the commercialization of sports and the influence of the media on sports.
  • JOUR-J 543 Sports Law (3 cr.) Students will develop a basic understanding of the relationship between sports and the law and of the basic concepts of major legal issues: antitrust, labor, contract and intellectual property in sports today, while translating that knowledge into analytical reporting on those subjects.
  • JOUR-J 545 Sports Writing (3 cr.) This course is an intensive, in-depth and practical instruction on reporting and writing for print, magazines and the Web. This course will include a broad range of sports writing, from long-form narrative for magazines to twittering on the Web. It also will explore the essentials of beat reporting, with experiential learning at live press conferences and events.
  • JOUR-J 546 Sports Journalism Research (3 cr.) This course explores issues surrounding the highly lucrative nature of collegiate sports in America, such as which sports are the most and least profitable and the gap between men's and women's sports. Students will produce a research project in collaboration with a major media outlet.
  • JOUR-J 547 Sports Broadcast Journalism (3 cr.) The course is an intensive, in-depth and practical instruction of sports broadcasting. This course will include instruction in everything from play-by-play broadcasting of live events to the art of interviewing for television to writing and editing long segments.
  • JOUR-J 620 Media Coverage of Sports (3 cr.) This course will examine athletes, coaches, events and sports media coverage. It will focus on current events and controversies such as amateurism, competitive balance, debate over school mascots, gambling and problems in recruiting and the ensuing media coverage.
Latino Studies (LATS)
  • JOUR-J 321 Principles of Public Relations (3 cr.) Students are introduced to the creative integration of advertising and public relations as a mass media campaign tool. Topics include the role of integrated communications in marketing and media, an examination of current practice, and the creative process of a campaign, including planning strategies and media characteristics.
  • JOUR-J 219 Introduction to Public Relations (3 cr.) Provides an overview of public relations and introduces theory and practice of the field. Topics include the relationship between public relations and marketing, the history and development of public relations, media relations, measurement and assessment methods, ethics, and law.
  • JOUR-J 390 Public Relations Writing (3 cr.) P: J200, J219. A comprehensive survey of corporate publications from newsletters to magazines, tabloids and annual reports with an emphasis on layout and design. Includes refreshing writing skills with review on interviewing and editing.
  • JOUR-J 428 Public Relations Planning & Research (3 cr.) P: J340 and J390. Theories and principles relevant to public relations practices in agency, corporate and nonprofit organizations, including development of goals and objectives, client relationships, budgets and research methods.
  • JOUR-J 431 Public Relations for Nonprofits (3 cr.) This seminar focuses on how a nonprofit organization creates images and how it shapes its programs and goals to gain public support. Assignments and readings are designed to foster a practical understanding of promotional techniques and campaigns using journalistic and other media. (Offered in summer only)
  • JOUR-J 340 Public Relations Tactics and Techniques (3 cr.) P: J219. Covers a wide variety of knowledge and skills needed by entry-level public relations practitioners. Topics include media relations, community relations and internal communications.
  • JOUR-J 400 Careers in Public Relations (1 cr.) P: Junior Standing Prepare for job or internship searches. Polish your resume and portfolio. Learn how to write impressive cover letters. Practice interviewing skills. Understand how to articulate your abilities and experiences to market yourself to potential employers.
Graduate Courses
  • JOUR-J 660 Topics Colloquium (3 cr.) Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester. May be repeated twice for credit.
  • JOUR-J 528 Public Relations Management (3 cr.) Designed to enable students to manage a public relations department. Theories and principles relevant to public relations practiced in agency, corporate, and not-for-profit organizations will be covered. This will include developing goals and objectives, working with clients, developing budgets, and research methods.
  • JOUR-J 560 Topics Colloquium (1-4 cr.)

    Topical seminar dealing with changing subjects and material from semester to semester.  Topics offered may include but will not be limited to the following:

    Public Relations Research and Evaluation-This course is a survey of simple and scientific research and evaluation techniques for use in organizational social environment research including target public analysis, initial research for public relations campaign and program planning, public relations program effectiveness evaluation, and continuous implementation evaluation for the purpose of facilitating periodic adjustment. This course focuses on applied research techniques such as surveys, both printed and online, interviews, focus groups, Q Sorts, secondary research techniques and others. (Required.)

    Public Relations Theory-Theory is the backbone of public relations. This course examines both the historical and emerging theories underlying the practice of public relations. (Required.)

    Public Relations Planning-This course provides students with an opportunity to explore and learn the advanced management techniques for public relations programs and campaigns focusing on the use of research and evaluation techniques, development of goals and objectives, segmentation of audiences, development of strategies and tactics, and creation of timelines and budgets. The course also uses the case study method to illuminate and illustrate these concepts. The course provides theoretical and practical experience in public relations project planning and execution. (Required.)

    Agencies and Entrepreneurs-This course covers organizational structures, management approaches and problems commonly encountered in establishing and managing public relations, advertising, marketing and related communications firms. What you learn is relevant to those who might work in (as an employee) or with (as a client) an agency. It also covers the steps needed to establish, maintain and grow an agency or independent consultancy.

    Managing Online Public Relations-From blogs to Twitter, Facebook to websites and from Myspace to all of the emerging online tools available to communications professionals today, public relations managers must be able not only to use these tools, but to be able to integrate them into a coherent strategy. This course discusses not only the tools social media of Web 3.0, but also how to manage those tools and techniques.

    Issues and Crisis Communication-Identification and management of various issues impacting organizations are critical to their success. Of course, when issues become crises, or crisis strikes, management of that crisis via effective communication with key constituent public is critical to the success and even survival of the organization. This course examines the techniques of issues management and the management tools available. It also examines from a practical perspective how to manage the public relations for organizations in crisis.

    Public Relations in the Life Sciences-The medical product industry, including pharmaceuticals, medical devices and medical research, including genetic research, is a special industry that demands unique public relations activities. In addition, it is highly regulated and a complete understanding of that regulatory environment and the restrictions and requirements on public relations is critical for success of any organization. This course focuses on the unique elements of this industry and provides students not only with an understanding of the industry and its regulatory environment, but also with special understanding of the conduct of public relations in the industry and the management of communication in such organizations.

    Integrating Marketing Communication in Health Care-This course is designed to prepare students for senior management positions in hospitals, health care organizations, and the health support industry. It focuses on counseling senior management on unique issues regarding health care communication, unique health care communication problems and challenges, managing the public relations function in health care organizations, and orchestrating public relations campaigns in support of health care organizational goals.

    Managing Public Relations Tactics and Techniques-The mastery of a public relations tactics and techniques is the cornerstone of a public relations practitioner’s skill set. This course provides extensive hands-on learning and practice in some essential tactics and techniques. This course is designed to apply theory to actual problem solving.

    May be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.
  • JOUR-J 563 Computerized Publication Design I (3 cr.)

    Institutional and industrial publications are an important means of internal and external communications. This course looks at the principles of design and production techniques. Students are provided with opportunities to create a variety of different public relations products while using state of the art desktop publishing applications.

  • JOUR-J 804 Read and Research in Journalism (1-9 cr.)
  • JOUR-J 529 Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.)

    This capstone course provides students with  an opportunity to apply campaign model methodology to public relations planning so that they will be able to apply the research, theories, planning, and evaluation processes in working conditions which may not provide them with the time to deliberate on and evaluate each step in the way that the classroom provides.  

  • JOUR-J 531 Public Relations for Non-Profits (3 cr.)

    The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation in public relations for those considering careers in nonprofit organizations or in fundraising. Specific coursework will involve the public relations campaign process and its relationship to organizational goals and to the specifics of organizational development and fundraising. An additional focus will involve the communications efforts required to maintain relationships with donors, volunteers and key community and industry officials.

Law in Liberal Arts
  • POLS-Y 211 Introduction to Law (3 cr.) An introduction to law as an aspect of government and politics, and as a means for dealing with major social problems. Students will study legal reasoning, procedures, and materials, and may compare other nations' legal systems. The course usually includes a moot court or other forms of simulation. PUL=2
  • POLS-Y 221 Legal Research and Writing for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211. Development of research and communication skills special to the area of law. Includes methods of organizing and conducting legal research, resources available for legal research, presentation of findings in memoranda and briefs, other forms of legal writing. PUL=1C
  • POLS-Y 222 Litigation for Paralegal Studies I (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course examines the processing of a case from initial client interviews to final disposition. It includes drafting of complaints, answers, counterclaims, interrogatories and other discovery tools, gathering of evidence, and motions and judgments. Both Indiana and federal rules of evidence are emphasized. PUL=4
  • POLS-Y 223 Litigation for Paralegal Studies II (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211, POLS-Y 221, and POLS-Y 222. This elective course in advanced litigation focuses primarily on aspects of trial preparation not covered in depth in POLS-Y 222. Topics may include jury selection, witness preparation and examination, preparation of evidence for use at trial, jury instructions, post-judgment relief. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 324 Property Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course examines the legal rules governing various types of property and the ways in which human beings relate to property. Types of property include real and personal; relationships to property include both ownership and interest. Emphasis is placed on forms and procedures used in Indiana. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 325 Contract Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course includes the basic elements and principles involved in the drafting, interpretation, and enforcement of contracts, including current trends in contract law in Indiana. Includes Uniform Commercial Code. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 326 Tort Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course reviews current law and recent trends in negligence and liability. Different dimensions of liability are covered. Emphasis on conduct of a tort case from initiation through relief, and on the responsibilities of legal assistants therein. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 327 Criminal Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This in-depth review of criminal law in Indiana covers the Indiana Criminal Code--infractions, misdemeanors, and felonies. The course emphasizes real situations that legal professionals encounter throughout the process. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 328 Family Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course examines legal rules and procedures concerning domestic relations. Topics covered include separation and divorce, adoption, child custody and support, and other areas of domestic relations in Indiana. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 329 Estate Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course reviews legal rules and procedures concerning the transfer of property upon the owner's demise. Provides a practical approach to the language, procedures, forms, interpretation, and administration of wills and trusts. Emphasis on current trends in Indiana and federal law. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 330 Bankruptcy Law for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. Examines the legal rules relating to bankruptcy. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 431 Advanced Legal Writing for Paralegal Studies (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. Builds on POLS-Y 221 by giving students the opportunity for advanced study of research and communication skills needed for paralegals. PUL=1A
  • POLS-Y 232 Professional Responsibility for Paralegals (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. This course is a concentrated study of legal ethics from the perspective of the paralegal. It covers the study of ethical situations, rules and model codes of the paralegal profession, conflict of interest, client confidentiality, and other ethical dilemmas. The course presents a concrete, practical approach to the ethical challenges for paralegals. PUL=4
  • POLS-P 333 Business Associations for Paralegals (3 cr.) P: POLS-Y 211 and POLS-Y 221. Introduction to various business entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and other entities. Drafting partnership agreements and incorporation documents. Introduction to tax considerations and the Securities and Exchange Commission. PUL=4
  • POLS-Y 485 Field Experience in Paralegal Studies (1-5 cr.) A course that allows paralegal stduents to ernoll in a legal intesnhip for credit. Students will work with various employers and agencies. PUL=3
Latino Studies (LATS)
  • LAMP-L 216 LAMP Sophomore Seminar: Business and the Humanities (3 cr.) A topical seminar that introduces students to fundamental issues in the relationship between business and society. Topics vary with the instructor and year and include advertising in American culture and big business in American society. PUL = 2
  • LAMP-L 416 LAMP SENIOR SEMINAR: LIBERAL ARTS AND MANAGEMENT (3 cr.)

    A discussion course drawing together aspects of other LAMP courses to focus on specific problems of business management and corporate policy in the light of both practical and ethical considerations. Topics vary with the instructor and year and include the nature of business leadership and the legal and ethical practices of corporations. PUL=3,4

  • LAMP-L 316 LAMP JUNIOR SEMINAR: ANALYTICAL PROBLEM SOLVING (3 cr.) A discussion course emphasizing the use of quantitative methods and analytical skills in exploring and solving business-related problems. Topics vary with the instructor and year and include mathematical modeling and operations research, organizational control, and corporate finance.  PUL = 3,2