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2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Table of Contents

2006-2008 Undergraduate Studies Northwest Campus Bulletin: Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

 

Indiana University
Northwest 2006-2008
Undergraduate Studies
Bulletin

IU Northwest
Office of Admissions 
Hawthorn Hall 100 
3400 Broadway 
Indiana University Northwest 
Gary, IN 46408-1197 
Local: (219) 980-6991 
Toll Free: (888) 968-7486 
Fax: (219) 981-4219 
Contact Office of Admissions
 

School of Nursing and Health Professions

School of Nursing
Allied Health Sciences
Dental Education

School of Nursing

Web site:
www.iun.edu/~nurse

Telephone:
(219) 980-6549

Administrative Officers
Faculty
Mission
Standards of Conduct
General Policies
Academic Regulations
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

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Administrative Officers

Linda A. Rooda, Ph.D., R.N., Dean

Susan Rouse, Ph.D., R.N., Interim Assistant Dean

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Faculty

Nancy L. Allen, M.A., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing

Doris R. Blaney, Ed.D., Professor Emerita of Nursing

Karen Bertram, M.S.N., R.N., Visiting Lecturer in Nursing

Rosalinda DeLuna, M.S.N., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Linda R. Delunas, Ph.D., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing

Glenda Dexter-Brown, M.S.N., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing, Clinical Coordinator

Mary Goolik, M.S.N., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Evalyn Gosset, M.S.N., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Margaret Maicher, M.S.N., F.N.P., Clinical Assistant Professor Emerita of Nursing

C. Hazel Malone, M.A.L.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing

Catherine Lazo-Miller, M.S.N., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Sonya Mitchell, M.S.N., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Marcia Mulcahey, M.S.N., C.S., A.N.P., Lecturer in Nursing

Jo Anna Newman, M.S.N., F.N.P., C., R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Esther Nicksic, M.S., Professor Emerita of Nursing

Hilda Richards, Ed.D., Chancellor Emerita and Professor Emerita of Nursing

Linda A. Rooda, Ph.D., R.N., Professor of Nursing

Susan Rouse, Ph.D., R.N., Interim Assistant Dean

Eva M. Roth, M.S., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing

Donna L. Brown-Russell, M.S.N., C.S., A.N.P., Associate Professor Emerita of Nursing

Melanie Samardzija, M.S.N, R.N., Lecturer in Nursing

Sandy Sperling, M.S., Lecturer in Nursing

The School of Nursing offers the Bachelor of Science in Nursing. In addition, there is a mobility option for the A.S.N. or diploma registered nurse to earn a B.S.N. The accelerated B.S.N. Mobility Option is an 18-month, full-time program, designed for individuals who have earned a bachelor’s degree in a non-nursing field and have decided on a career in nursing. Selected graduate courses are offered over two-way video conferences (VIC) and the Internet.

Accreditation
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program is accredited by the Indiana State Board of Nursing, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 61 Broadway, New York, NY, 10006, phone: (212) 989-9393 and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), One Dupont Circle N.W., Suite 530, Washington, D.C., 20036-1120, phone: (202) 887-6791.

Memberships
The School of Nursing is an agency member of the Council of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs, National League for Nursing, and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Alumni Association
The School of Nursing Alumni Association is a constituent member of the Alumni Association of the university with representation on its executive council.

Sigma Theta Tau The Alpha Chapter of the international honor society of nursing was organized at Indiana University. Students in baccalaureate and graduate programs may be admitted to membership when they have demonstrated excellence in their nursing programs and have shown superior academic and personal records. Qualified members of the nursing profession, upon demonstration of marked achievement in nursing, are also eligible for membership. Leadership, research, and scholarship constitute the purposes of Sigma Theta Tau.

Student Nurses’ Association Undergraduate students are eligible for membership in the National Student Nurses’ Association, Indiana Association of Nursing Students, and IU Northwest’s local chapter. This eligibility includes the students enrolled in the baccalaureate program, including the R.N. to B.S.N. mobility option, second degree option, and pre-nursing students. Sustaining membership is obtained by individuals or organizations interested in furthering the growth and development of the National Student Nurses’ Association. The chief purpose of the organization is to aid in the preparation of students for the assumption of professional responsibilities.

Mission

The mission of the Indiana University School of Nursing is to collaborate across campuses to integrate the values of Indiana University and the profession of nursing as they relate to research, scholarship, teaching, practice and service. We are committed to advancing the science of nursing through excellence in nursing education by preparing nurses who provide high quality nursing care to a diverse, multicultural society.

Vision
Our vision for the Indiana University School of Nursing is to promote nursing care excellence through a community of lifelong learning that focuses on society’s needs for high-quality health care and scientifically educated professional nurses. We will strive to provide a supportive environment that fosters the educational and developmental needs of students, faculty, staff, and alumni from diverse, multicultural backgrounds. Faculty in our undergraduate and graduate programs will be known for their scholarship in the areas of research, interactive learning, discovery, application, and integration. We are committed to advancing the science and practice of nursing through excellence in nursing education based on preparing graduates who will provide high quality nursing care to a diverse, multicultural society, conduct research and teach future nurses. We will achieve these goals through cooperative teaching strategies, promotion of critical thinking skills, and use of cutting-edge technology.

The Code of Ethics for Nurses
Students who are preparing to enter the profession of nursing are expected to follow the Code of Ethics for Nurses. Each person, upon entering the profession, inherits a measure of responsibility and trust in the profession and the corresponding obligation to adhere to standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. The code was adopted by the American Nurses’ Association in 1950 and revised in 1960, 1968, 1976, and most recently, 2001.

  1. The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth, and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.
  2. The nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community.
  3. The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.
  4. The nurse is responsible and accountable for individual nursing practice and determines the appropriate delegation of tasks consistent with the nurse’s obligation to provide optimum patient care.
  5. The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to preserve integrity and safety, to maintain competence, and to continue personal and professional growth.
  6. The nurse participates in establishing, maintaining, and improving healthcare environments and conditions of employment conducive to the provision of quality health care and consistent with the values of the profession through individual and collective action.
  7. The nurse participates in the advancement of the profession through contributions to practice, education, administration, and knowledge development.
  8. The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public in promoting community, national, and international efforts to meet health needs.
  9. The profession of nursing, as represented by associations and their members, is responsible for articulating nursing values, for maintaining the integrity of the profession and its practice, and for shaping social policy.

Standards of Conduct

Students are subject to the standards of conduct as defined in Indiana University’s Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct. Stated due process will be followed for any student found to be in violation of this code. All Indiana University students are responsible for acquainting themselves with and adhering to policies outlined in this document.


General Policies

Student Responsibility
Students in the School of Nursing are responsible for planning their own programs, meeting degree requirements, and receiving academic advising from the Coordinator of Nursing Student Services each semester. Academic counselors, faculty, and administrators are available to assist students in understanding degree requirements. It is important for students to acquaint themselves with all regulations and to remain properly informed throughout their nursing studies. All provisions of the bulletin are in effect for the year in which the nursing student enters the nursing major. Students interrupting their studies, or pursue part-time study, or full-time students who take more than one year to complete prerequisite requirements are subject to policy and curriculum changes as they occur. Curriculum changes during the progress toward the degree may result in revision of degree requirements.

Drug-free Campus Policy
Students are prohibited by Indiana University to use or possess alcoholic beverages, any drug or controlled substance, or drug paraphernalia on university property or in the course of a university activity or student organization activity. Students are responsible for acquainting themselves with this policy and the sanctions for violation of the policy.

Professional Liability Insurance
All students in the School of Nursing having patient/client contact will be covered under the malpractice contract for Indiana University. This liability insurance will not extend to employment outside of course-related activities. The student should be aware that failure to pay course and other fees would result in non-coverage under the malpractice contract of Indiana University. Such non-coverage makes the student ineligible to attend clinical classes.

Policy for Limited Criminal History Check
Many of the clinical sites where Indiana University School of Nursing Northwest Campus students complete their hands-on clinical experiences (such as hospitals, clinics, and other agencies) require verification of criminal history before students can be placed in their organizations. Based on the requirements of these agencies, as well as state and federal regulations, all students accepted for admission to the School of Nursing must provide evidence that they have submitted to a limited criminal history check.
A student’s past criminal history may impact his or her admission status in the School of Nursing programs, limit the number of suitable practice placement sites, and/or affect ability to obtain licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in the state of Indiana and other states.

Continuing students are to submit a yearly limited criminal history check. The criminal history check is to be submitted to the Records Specialist at least two (2) weeks prior to the first day of the semester.

Failure to adhere to the above policy will result in administrative withdrawal from all nursing courses and placement of the student on academic checklist. The student will not be able to re-register until this requirement is met.

Health Requirements
All nursing students at IU Northwest must show proof that they have met the immunization, physical examination, and laboratory examination requirements of hospitals and other health agencies used for clinical experiences, as well as CPR certification. Specific instructions will be distributed prior to clinical assignment. Failure to meet those health requirements will make the student ineligible for clinical classes. OSHA training related to blood-borne pathogens is required of all students annually. Students will be notified of training dates and times. The School of Nursing faculty and administrators strongly encourage students to carry personal health insurance. The school will not be liable for any health problems requiring medical treatment for students enrolled in programs.

Drug Screen Policy
Some clinical sites may require a drug screen. In addition, faculty reserve the right to require a drug screen, at the student’s expense, if the situation warrants. Failure to comply immediately will result in dismissal from the nursing program.

Dress Code Nursing students wear the designated uniform of the school. Registered nurse students wear the uniform of their choice. All students wear the designated photo identification badge. For experience in community nursing, all students wear the uniform designated by agency policy. Students not appropriately attired may be asked to leave the clinical area by their instructor. Such an occurrence constitutes an absence.

Transportation
Students are to provide their own transportation for educational experiences requiring travel. Classes and clinical facilities are distributed in various locations throughout northwest Indiana and the Chicago area, with limited public transportation. Students using cars for clinical must be able to show proof of auto insurance that is compliant with Indiana law. In addition, the student must show proof of a valid driver’s license. Indiana University does not assume liability for individual incidents involving personal vehicles.

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Remedial Course Requirements
Applicants to the nursing programs must successfully complete all developmental courses in which they place, including the following:

EDUC X151  Reading and Learning Techniques II
EDUC X155  Critical Reading and Research
EDUC X157  Key Strategies for Academic Success
ENG W031  Pre-Composition
ENG W130  Principles of Composition
MAT 044  Refresher
MATH M007  Elementary Algebra

A minimum of MATH M100 is required for admission to Nursing.
Students interested in nursing should complete courses in mathematics as early as possible to facilitate completion of science prerequisite courses.

Correspondence Courses
Required and elective courses for the nursing major, other than SPCH S121 Public Speaking, that are available through the Independent Study Program of Indiana University may be taken for credit. Some correspondence courses, however, may not meet the degree requirements. Students should contact the coordinator of Nursing Student Services before enrollment. Students are required to have the signature of the coordinator of Nursing Student Services for all correspondence courses.

Application Ineligibility
A student shall be ineligible for the nursing program if, by the second completed attempt, he/she fails to earn a minimum grade of C (2.0) in any required general-education course. Students may repeat no more than three required general-education courses. Of the three courses, no more than two sciences may be repeated. A pattern of course withdrawals may reduce the student’s chances of admission to the undergraduate nursing program.
Individuals convicted of sexual crimes will be ineligible for admission to nursing. Should such a situation occur during enrollment in the program, decisions related to dismissal will be addressed on a case-by-case basis.

Dismissal
Falsification of records and reports, plagiarism, or cheating on an examination, quiz, or any other assignment is cause for dismissal. The faculty reserves the right to dismiss any student whose personal integrity, health, or conduct demonstrate unfitness to continue preparation for the nursing profession.
Student dismissal is subject to the appeal process of IU Northwest.

Disciplinary Probation
Disciplinary probation is administered according to the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct.

Eligibility for Licensure
Any person who makes application for examination and registration as a registered nurse in the state of Indiana shall submit to the Indiana State Board of Nursing at the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency written evidence, verified by oath, that he/she

  1. has completed an approved high school course of study or the equivalent as approved by the appropriate educational agency;
  2. has completed the prescribed curriculum in a state-accredited school of nursing and holds a diploma or certificate there from; and
  3. has not been convicted of any act that would constitute a ground for disciplinary sanction
  4. under the state board rules and regulations or of any felony that has direct bearing on the individual’s ability to practice competently. (Note: Convictions include the possession and use of drugs or controlled substances.)
Rules and regulations governing licensing in Indiana are available from the Indiana State Board of Nursing.

International students and graduates of schools of nursing that are outside the United States must meet the requirements of the Indiana State Board of Nursing for eligibility to sit for the licensing examination.

Application for National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX)
The School of Nursing will make available the necessary forms to take the examination in Indiana. Those students taking the examination in other states are responsible for obtaining the appropriate forms from those states. It is the student’s responsibility to complete the application procedure and meet the mailing and payment deadlines for taking the NCLEX (state board examination for licensure).

Students with Disabilities
Persons who have physical, mental or learning impairments are encouraged to work with academic counselors to plan how the applicant can be helped to meet essential program requirements. The person with disabilities must meet academic requirements and technical standards that are essential to the program of instruction or to any directly related licensing requirements. Modifications in the means by which academic requirements are met will be given individual consideration. Students can also contact the Office of Student Support Services, Hawthorn Hall.

Essential Abilities
The School of Nursing faculty has specified essential nonacademic abilities critical to the success of students enrolled in any of the school’s nursing programs. Once admitted to an academic program, students are expected to meet School of Nursing standards for these essential abilities in order to participate in the nursing education program and the study of nursing. Copies of the school’s “Essential Abilities Policy” are available upon request from the school’s Office of Nursing Student Services.

Modifications in the learning environment to assist students in meeting these essential abilities and all other progression requirements will be made in accordance with federal and university guidelines and in consideration of individual needs. For more information, call (219) 980-6549.

Academic Regulations

Semester Load
Full-time undergraduate students are those enrolled for 12 or more credit hours during a regular semester or 6 or more credit hours during a summer session. Less than this constitutes part-time study.

Absences Loss of time in any one clinical area may require that the student repeat the course. Faculty will distribute specific absence policies.

Withdrawals (Grade of W)
Withdrawals are issued to students wishing to withdraw from any or all courses if the official withdrawal form is completed by the automatic withdrawal deadline dates printed in the current class schedule. A grade of W will appear on student transcripts when students complete the official withdrawal forms and obtain the appropriate signatures. After the automatic withdrawal deadline, the grade awarded will be an F or W as determined by the instructor. W is an option after the withdrawal deadline only if the student is passing. A grade of FN will be recorded on the official transcript if a student stops attending but does not officially withdraw from class. Students enrolled in a modular (half-semester) nursing course must withdraw from that course before the course meets for the sixth time.

Academic Distinction
To graduate with academic distinction, degree candidates must rank within the highest 10 percent of the graduating class. Additionally, baccalaureate degree candidates must have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours at Indiana University. Academic distinction is conferred on graduates as follows:

3.83-4.00 Highest Distinction 3.66-3.82 High Distinction 3.50-3.65 Distinction
Distinction is based on course work completed at Indiana University including the final semester.

Dean’s List
Full-time undergraduate students in the School of Nursing will be placed on the School of Nursing Dean’s List each semester that they receive a GPA of 3.5 or above. Part-time students will be honored after they have had consecutive fall and spring semesters (during the same academic year) on a part-time basis and they have accumulated 12 credit hours or more.

Satisfactory/Fail Grades
Satisfactory/Fail (S/F) grades are used by the School of Nursing for grading undergraduate clinical nursing courses. Grades are recorded as S or F. Students must demonstrate a satisfactory level of clinical competence and skill to receive a satisfactory grade in these courses. Satisfactory performance standards are stated in each course syllabus, and faculty evaluate the quality of student clinical performance by these standards. An S indicates a grade of A, B, or C (2.0 or higher). Inability to receive a grade of S constitutes failure. Students cannot progress in their nursing program until this deficiency is corrected.

Pass/Fail Option
This option is offered to any student in good standing wishing to enroll in an elective course that is not considered a prerequisite to or part of the nursing curriculum. A maximum of 6 non-nursing elective credit hours taken under this option may be applied to the degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

Completion of Degree Requirements
The records specialist must receive removal of all Incomplete and Deferred grades, special credit, and Independent Study Division course grades no later than three weeks prior to the end of classes of the student’s last semester before graduation.

Audit Student
An audit student officially registers for a class and pays applicable credit hour rates. Upon completion, the course is entered on the permanent university record as one taken for no credit (NC). Check with your academic counselor for specific instructions. Required general education courses taken for NC will not apply toward completion of nursing program requirements. Students may not audit any clinical nursing course. The opportunity to audit a didactic nursing course is dependent on the availability of space.

Cumulative Grade Point
All work attempted at Indiana University is used to calculate the cumulative grade point average. Courses transferred from another institution are not included for calculation in the cumulative grade point average. However, the pre-nursing grade point average is calculated by including all (transfer and IU) courses used toward the nursing degree.

Intercampus Transfers
Students in good academic standing may seek intercampus transfer by petitioning the faculty on the campus of desired transfer at least one semester in advance of requested transfer. Intercampus transfer requests will be evaluated individually on the basis of student record review and the availability of course positions, faculty, and facilities to meet student needs and program objectives
.
Residency Requirement
A minimum of 51 percent of the required nursing courses must be completed at Indiana University. Courses assigned to the Indiana University transcript through the process of validation will not count toward meeting the residency requirement.

The Indiana University campus on which the student met the residency requirement will award the degree. Course work taken on site as offered through distributive educational technology would be considered for residency if the campus of origin were the campus to which the student was accepted and is progressing toward the attainment of degree requirements.

Portfolio Validation for Undergraduate Students
Students may validate prior learning (academic work or professional experience) by preparing a portfolio to demonstrate acquisition of content and skills commensurate with outcomes and competencies of specific course(s). Each campus has the responsibility for determining the circumstances under which the portfolio validation process is acceptable.

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Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Philosophy
Bachelor of Science Program Outcomes
Application and Admission
Admission to the Baccalaureate Major for Traditional Undergraduate Students
Admission to the Baccalaureate Major for Graduates of Associate and Diploma Nursing Programs
Advanced Standing
Accelerated B.S.N. Mobility Option
Academic Standing
Degree Requirements
Policies Governing Baccalaureate Study
Curriculum Plan for Traditional B.S.N. Students
General-Education Requirements for the B.A./B.S. to B.S.N.
B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. Curriculum
R.N. to B.S.N. Fast Track Mobility Option

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Philosophy

Baccalaureate nursing education provides a broad foundation in the sciences and liberal arts necessary for preparing professional nurses who are capable of practicing in a competent and responsible fashion as informed citizens in a dynamic and diverse society. Graduates of the baccalaureate nursing program are expected to demonstrate competencies consistent with being a critical thinker; a culturally competent person; a knowledgeable coordinator of community resources; a politically aware professional; a beginning practitioner whose actions are consistent with professional legal and ethical standards; an effective communicator; a competent provider of health care; and a person who exemplifies a positive image. Baccalaureate graduates assist individuals, families, and communities in attaining mutually established health goals and in facilitating the highest level of functioning for individuals, families and communities toward the maximization of their health potential. Baccalaureate education must prepare graduates to be knowledgeable workers, processors of information, and navigate complex health care systems using available technologies as they design and develop more efficient and effective approaches to the delivery of health care services independently or in conjunction with others.

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Bachelor of Science Program Outcomes

  1. A critical thinker who demonstrates intellectual curiosity, rational inquiry, problem-solving skills, and creativity in framing problems.
  2. A culturally competent person who provides holistic nursing care to a variety of individuals, families, and communities.
  3. A knowledgeable care coordinator who facilitates access to resources necessary to meet health care needs of individuals, families, and communities.
  4. An individual who understands the political dynamics in various settings and participates in the change process to shape health care policy.
  5. An individual who practices within an ethical and legal framework for the nursing profession.
  6. An effective communicator who is able to share accurate information.
  7. A competent provider of nursing care who functions in various professional nurse roles in structured or semi-structured health care settings.
  8. A professional role model who promotes a positive public image of nursing.
  9. A responsible manager who balances human, fiscal, and material resources to achieve quality health care outcomes.
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Application and Admission

Entry into undergraduate work depends on student preparation, high school rank, and results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) scores.

Three categories of students are admitted to the baccalaureate program:
Basic or traditional baccalaureate students pursuing initial preparation for nursing

Registered Nurse students (graduates of diploma or associate degree programs)

B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. (students who hold a bachelor’s degree in fields other than nursing)

The baccalaureate curriculum has one year of prerequisite courses followed by three years of nursing and other general education courses. Nursing courses are open only to students who have been certified into the nursing program. Prerequisite courses may be taken at any of the Indiana University campuses or may be accepted as transfer credits from other accredited institutions.
Direct all inquiries concerning the School of Nursing, counseling, and application for certification to the baccalaureate major to the coordinator of Student Services, School of Nursing, 3400 Broadway, Gary, IN 46408. Phone: (219) 980-6549

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Admission to the Baccalaureate Major for Traditional Undergraduate Students

Traditional undergraduate students are those who have not graduated from a diploma or associate degree nursing program. Admission to the baccalaureate nursing major is highly selective and competitive. Application and admission are valid only for the semester designated and will be considered when the following requirements are met:

  1. Admission to Indiana University as a degree-seeking student.
  2. Completion of 26-28 credit hours of prerequisite courses with a grade of C (2.0) or above in each course by the second completed attempt. Students may repeat no more than three (3) required B.S.N. general-education courses. Of the three (3) courses, no more than two (2) sciences may be repeated.
  3. Submission of the Application for Admission to the Baccalaureate Nursing Major by April 1 for fall semester. Applications are obtained from the Nursing Student Services office or online.
  4. Achieving a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average and a minimum 2.7 pre-nursing grade point average. The cumulative grade point average (GPA) will be calculated according to the Indiana University Policy for FX Grading Option regardless of when the course was taken. The nursing GPA is calculated on all required courses for the nursing program. Students may exercise the grade replacement policy for a limit of three general education courses.
  5. Return of the signed acceptance letter by the date indicated on the offer of admission.
  6. Submission of an official transcript to the School of Nursing for all work being transferred from another university. To obtain an official transcript, the student must request an official transcript from the other institution(s) to be forwarded to the Office of Admissions, IU Northwest, for evaluation.

Applicants meeting the above criteria will be placed in rank order from high to low based upon cumulative grade point average in the required prerequisite courses.

Applicants meeting the above criteria will be placed in rank order from high to low based upon cumulative grade point average in the required prerequisite courses.

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Admission to the Baccalaureate Major for Graduates of Associate and Diploma Nursing Programs

Advanced placement in the nursing major is available to the registered nurse who holds an associate degree and/or diploma from another nursing program.

The registered nurse student must complete all the prerequisite courses with a grade of C (2.0) or higher to be eligible to enroll in the upper-division nursing courses. Placement in these courses is subject to available resources.
All R.N.-B.S.N. Mobility Option students enrolled in clinical courses must provide proof of current employment during the first week of the semester. Students must submit a “Registered Nurse Employment Verification Form” and a letter from the human resources/personnel department on agency letterhead verifying employment.

Students who are not currently employed as registered nurses must meet with course faculty during the first week of the semester to develop a plan for achieving clinical course outcomes/ competencies. This plan may include, but is not limited to, assignment to a clinical preceptor or a clinical rotation schedule with senior B.S.N. nursing students in the Baccalaureate Program. The final clinical placement decision rests solely with course faculty.
Students who have never worked as registered nurses will be assigned to a clinical preceptor or a clinical rotation schedule with senior B.S.N. nursing students in the Baccalaureate Program.

R.N.-B.S.N. students must have a valid Indiana R.N. license in order to enroll in S472, S473, S481, S482, S483 and S485.

Students are to notify faculty promptly of any change in employment status during their clinical courses. Students may be required to submit a new “Registered Nurse Employment Verification Form” and a letter from the human resources/personnel department on agency letterhead verifying employment. Failure to notify faculty of any change in employment status may result in failure of clinical course(s) in which students are enrolled.

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Advanced Standing

Registered nursing students receive advanced standing in the baccalaureate program following successful completion of transition courses. Special credit will be awarded for the following nursing courses once the transition courses have been completed.

NURS B230 Developmental Issues and Health  (4 cr.) 
NURS B248 Science and Technology of Nursing  (2 cr.) 
NURS B249 Science and Technology of Nursing: Practicum  (2 cr.)
NURS H351 Alterations in Neuro-Psychological Nursing  (3 cr.)
NURS H352 Alterations in Neuro-Psychological Nursing: Practicum  (2 cr.)
NURS H353 Alterations in Health I (3 cr.)
NURS H354 Alterations in Health I: Practicum  (2 cr.)
NURS H361 Alterations in Health II  (3 cr.)
NURS H362 Alterations in Health II: Practicum (2 cr.) 
NURS H363 The Developing Family and Child  (3 cr.) 
NURS H364 The Developing Family and Child: Practicum  (3 cr.)
NURS S470 Restorative Health Related to Multi-System Failures  (3 cr.)
NURS S471 Restorative Health: Related to Multi-System Failures  (2 cr.)
Total Credits 34 cr.

A grade of S will be recorded on the student’s transcript for the above courses according to criteria determined by the faculty.

Upper-division nursing elective credit may be awarded to registered nurses holding valid specialty certification from a professional nursing organization in an appropriate area of nursing. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be awarded and used for open credit.

For specific information on the process for advanced standing, contact the academic counselor in the Office of Nursing Student Services.

Residency Requirements
A student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in the Indiana University School of Nursing Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program to be eligible for graduation. Credit for correspondence courses and advanced standing by the validation process may not be used to meet residency requirements. All candidates for the R.N. to B.S.N. Mobility Option must complete the degree requirements within four years of the first enrollment.

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B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. Mobility Option for Graduates of a Bachelor’s Degree Program in a Non-Nursing Field

Our accelerated BSN mobility option is designed for men and women who have earned a bachelor’s degree in a non-nursing field but have decided on a career in nursing. This 18-month, full-time program prepares graduates to meet the current and future health needs of society, and provides a solid academic foundation in the practice, science and technology of nursing. Upon completion of this program, graduates are ready to take the registered nurse licensing exam.

Admission to this program is competitive. Candidates for admission will have previously earned a bachelor’s degree in a non-nursing field, have an overall GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale and a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for all general-education course work counting toward the B.S.N. degree.

More information regarding this program can be obtained from the Office of Nursing Student Services.

Academic Standing

Students Admitted to the Nursing Major
The following policies apply to all students admitted to the baccalaureate major in the School of Nursing.

Good Standing
Students who maintain a C (2.0) or higher average in all courses, a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all courses required for the degree, and a grade of S in clinical nursing courses will be in good academic standing.

Academic Probation
A student will be placed on probation when any of the following conditions exist:

  1. Cumulative grade point average is below 2.0.
  2. Semester grade point average is below 2.0. 3. A grade below C has been earned in a required course.

Academic probation will be removed after the semester when the following conditions exist:

  1. Cumulative grade point average is 2.0 or higher.
  2. Semester average is 2.0 or higher.
  3. A grade of C or above has been earned in the required course(s).
  4. Remedial course work, if required, has been completed, and/or specified conditions have been met.

Dismissal
A student may be dismissed from the school when, in the judgment of the faculty, there is lack of progress toward the degree. Evidence of lack of progress consists of one or more of the following, but is not limited to:

  1. Failure to attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in two semesters.
  2. Failure to attain a grade of C (2.0) or above for theory or S for clinical upon repeating a nursing course.
  3. Failure to attain a grade of C (2.0) or above in two or more nursing courses.
  4. Failure to meet probationary stipulations in the semester following the assignment of probation.
  5. Failure to achieve a grade of C (2.0) or above in any required general education course upon the second attempt.
  6. Falsification of records or reports, plagiarism, or cheating on an examination, quiz, or any other assignment; violation of patient/client confidentiality resulting in denial of access to a clinical facility.

A student may be dismissed from the School of Nursing without being placed on probation when any of the above conditions exist.

The faculty reserves the right to request the withdrawal of any student whose personal integrity, health, or conduct demonstrates unfitness to continue preparation for professional nursing.

Dismissal is subject to the appeal process. The student can initiate the appeal through a letter sent to the coordinator of Student Services, who will forward it to the faculty.

Reentry
Failure to register in each sequential semester, excluding summer sessions, constitutes an interruption in the student’s program. Students who have so interrupted their programs are required to submit written notification of intent to reenter the program to the academic counselor. All requests for reentry will be evaluated on the basis of available resources. Students who reenter must adhere to the academic policies in effect at the time of reentry. Reentry of students who have interrupted their study, for any reason, is not guaranteed.

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Degree Requirements

Prospective students should study the requirements for admission to the School of Nursing, the specific curriculum requirements and sequences, and requirements for the degree. Students are responsible for meeting degree requirements and for making application for the degree. The deadlines for filing the application for a degree are September 1 for December graduation and December 1 for May, June, or August graduation. The School of Nursing is not responsible for certifying students for the degree if they do not file the application.

All candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 124 credit hours that apply to the degree.
  2. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
  3. Minimum of a C (2.0) in each required course or equivalent.
  4. Completion of the nursing major within six years of the first enrollment.
  5. Residency requirements.
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Policies Governing Baccalaureate Study

Grade Point Average for Required Courses
Minimum of a C (2.0) grade is required in each required course. A grade of C– (1.7) is less than minimum. A grade of S in each clinical nursing course is required.

S/F Grades for Clinical Nursing Courses
A student must receive a grade of S (satisfactory) in each clinical nursing course. Failure to receive a grade of S constitutes failure. An S indicates a grade of A, B, or C (2.0).

Repeat of Nursing Courses
A student who receives less than a C (2.0) in a nursing theory course or less than an S in a clinical course may be permitted to repeat the course. A student will receive no more than two opportunities to successfully complete a given nursing course. Failure to receive a C (2.0) upon repeating a nursing course or failure in two or more nursing theory or clinical nursing courses will result in dismissal.

Repeat of Required General Education Courses
To qualify for admission and progression, a student must earn a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all required general-education courses (C– is not acceptable) by the second completed attempt. Students may repeat no more than three (3) required B.S.N. general-education courses. Of the three (3) courses, no more than two (2) sciences may be repeated.

Pass/Fail Option
A maximum of 6 prerequisite elective credit hours taken under this option may be applied to the B.S.N. degree.

Correspondence Courses
All required and elective courses for the nursing major, except public speaking, currently available by correspondence at Indiana University may be taken for credit. Some courses, however, may not meet degree requirements. Contact a School of Nursing academic counselor before enrollment. Nursing majors are required to have the academic counselor’s signature for all correspondence courses. Final examinations in all correspondence courses must be taken no later than six weeks prior to the expected graduation date. Correspondence courses with nursing numbers do not satisfy residency requirements.

Courses Excluded from the Degree
Credits earned in remedial courses do not apply to the B.S.N. degree. Credits from courses that have been repeated may be counted only one time to meet the credit hour requirement for the degree.

Withdrawals
If a student withdraws from a didactic course, withdrawal from the concurrent clinical course is required.

Seven-Year Limit
Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Statistics, and Life Span Development have a seven year age limit. Students may opt to: (1) take the course again or (2) challenge the course by examination. This policy does not apply to R.N. to B.S.N. students.

Transfers
Transfer students from other baccalaureate nursing programs must complete prerequisites before progression to the nursing courses is allowed. Transfer students from other baccalaureate nursing programs who lack first-semester, sophomore-year courses must apply for admission.

Clinical Absence Policy
Loss of time in any one clinical area may require that the student repeat the course. Faculty will distribute specific absence policies.

Completion of Degree Requirements
The records specialist must receive all removal of incompletes, deferred grades, special credit, and independent study grades no later than three weeks prior to the end of classes of the student’s last semester or summer session prior to graduation.

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General Education Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) (Application to Traditional and R.N. to B.S.N. Students Only)

The general education courses for the B.S.N. have been divided into six clusters. Some courses within the cluster may be required while others may be selected from a specific list of courses.

Cluster I
Critical/analytical/science (23 credit hours required).
Courses in this cluster must include:

PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease (4 cr.)
PSY K300 Statistics (3 cr.)

The remaining 8 credit hours may be taken from the following:
Ethics
Logic
Mathematics
Natural sciences
Philosophy
Research

Cluster II
Communication (6 credit hours required).
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.) required.

The remaining 3 credit hours may be taken from the following:
Communication (Speech)
Computers
Creative/Professional writing
Foreign language

Cluster II
Communication (6 credit hours required).
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.) required.

The remaining 3 credit hours may be taken from the following:
Communication (Speech)
Computers
Creative/Professional Writing
Foreign Language

Cluster III
Cultural Diversity (6 credit hours required).
The 6 credit hours may be taken from the following:

Anthropology
History/Civilization
Humanities courses promoting cultural understanding
Religious studies

Cluster IV
Social Competence (9 credit hours required). The following courses are required:

SOC S161 Principles of Sociology (3 cr.)
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I(3 cr.) or PSY P102 Introductory Psychology II(3 cr.)

The remaining 3 credit hours may be taken from the following:
Additional sociology or psychology course Political science
Economics
Law/Justice
Management of resources

Cluster V
Humanistic Appreciation (6 credit hours required).
PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.) required.
The remaining 3 credit hours may be taken from the following:

Fine arts
Literature
Music
Philosophy
Religion

Cluster VI
Open credit (total of 6 credit hours). This area is unspecified. The courses taken can be nursing or non-nursing and should reflect the student’s study goals and program outcomes. These courses could lead to a minor area of study (15-18 credit hours necessary for a minor). Consult the coordinator of student services for advice.

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Curriculum Plan for Traditional B.S.N. Students

Freshman Year

Semester One

Communication course 3 cr.
ENG W131 Elementary Composition 3 cr.
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I or 3 cr.
PSY P102 Introductory Psychology II 3 cr.
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 cr.

Semester Two

PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 cr.
SOC S161 Principles of Sociology 3 cr.
Critical/Analytical course 3 cr.
Humanistic appreciation course 3 cr.

Sophomore Year

Semester Three

BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease 4 cr.
Communication course 3 cr.
NURS B231 Communication for Health Care Professionals 3 cr.
NURS B233 Health and Wellness 4 cr.
NURS B244 Comprehensive Health Assessment 2 cr.
NURS B245 Comprehensive Health Assessment: Practicum 2 cr.

Semester Four

Critical/Analytical course 3 cr.
NURS B230 Developmental Issues and Health 4 cr.
NURS B232 Introduction to the Discipline of Nursing Theory, Practice, Research 3 cr.
NURS B248 Science and Technology of Nursing 2 cr.
NURS B249 Science and Technology of Nursing: Practicum 2 cr.

Junior Year

Semester Five

NURS H351 Alterations in Neuro-Psychological Health 3 cr.
NURS H352 Alterations in Neuro-Psychological Health: Practicum 2 cr.
NURS H353 Alterations in Health I 3 cr.
NURS H354 Alterations in Health I: Practicum 2 cr.
Cultural diversity course 3 cr.
PSY K300 Statistics 3 cr.

Semester Six

NURS H361 Alterations in Health II 3 cr.
NURS H362 Alterations in Health II: Practicum 2 cr.
NURS H363 The Developing Family and Child 2-3 cr.
NURS H364 Developing Family and Child: Practicum 3 cr.
NURS H365 Nursing Research 3 cr.

Senior Year

Semester Seven

NURS S470 Restorative Health Related to Multi-System Failures 3 cr.
NURS S471 Restorative Health Related to Multi-System Failures: Practicum 2 cr.
NURS S472 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community 3 cr.
NURS S473 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community: Practicum 2 cr.
NURS S484 Research Utilization Seminar 1 cr.
Open elective 3 cr.
PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics 3 cr.

Semester Eight

NURS S481 Nursing Management 2 cr.
NURS S482 Nursing Management: Practicum 3 cr.
NURS S483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone 3 cr.
NURS S485 Professional Growth and Empowerment 3 cr.

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General-Education Requirements for the B.A./B.S. to B.S.N.

Cluster I
Critical/analytical/science (23 credit hours required).
Courses in this cluster must include:

PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I(4 cr.)
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II(4 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease (4cr.)
PSY K300 or SPEA K300 Statistics (3 cr.)

The remaining 8 credit hours may be taken from the following:

Ethics
Logic
Mathematics
Natural Sciences
Philosophy
Research

Cluster II
Communication (6 credit hours required)
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 credits required)
The remaining 3 credit hours may be taken from the following:

Communication (Speech)
Computers
Creative/Professional Writing
Foreign Language

Cluster III

Cultural Diversity (6 credit hours required)
The 6 credit hours may be taken from the following:

Anthropology
History/Civilization
Humanities courses promoting cultural understanding
Religious studies
Afro Studies
Women’s Studies
Chicano Riqueno Studies

Cluster IV
Social Competence (9 credit hours). The following courses are required:

SOC S161 Principles of Sociology
PSY P1O1 Introductory Psychology or
PSY P102 Introductory Psychology II
EDUC P214 or PSY P216 Life Span Development

Cluster V
Humanistic Appreciation (6 credit hours required)
PHIL P393 Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.) required

The remaining 3 credit hours may be taken from the following:

Fine Arts
Literature
Music
Philosophy
Religion

Cluster VI

Open credit (total of 9 credit hours) This area is unspecified. The courses taken can be nursing or non-nursing and should reflect the student’s study goals and program outcomes. These courses could lead to a minor area of study (15-18 credit hours necessary for a minor). Consult the Coordinator of Student Services for advice.

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B.A./B.S. to B.S.N. Curriculum

SUMMER SEMESTER I

B231 Communication for Health Care Professionals 3 cr.
B232 Introduction to the Discipline of Nursing 3 cr.
B244 Comprehensive Health Assessment 2 cr.
B245 Comprehensive Health Assessment: Practicum 2 cr.

SUMMER Semester II

B233 Health and Wellness 4 cr.
B248 Science and Technology of Nursing 2 cr.
B249 Science and Technology of Nursing: Practicum 2 cr.

FALL Semester

H351 Alterations in Neuro-Psychological Health 3 cr.
H352 Alterations in Neuro-Psychological Health: Practicum 2 cr.
H353 Alterations in Health I 3 cr.
H354 Alterations in Health I: Practicum 2 cr.

SPRING Semester

H361 Alterations in Health II 3 cr.
H362 Alterations in Health II: Practicum 2 cr.
H363 The Developing Family and Child 3 cr.
H364 The Developing Family and Child: Practicum 3 cr.
H365 Nursing Research 3 cr.

SUMMER Semester I

S472 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community 3 cr.
S473 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community: Practicum 2 cr.

SUMMER Semester II

S481 Nursing Management 2 cr.
S482 Nursing Management: Practicum 2 cr.
S484 Research Utilization Seminar 1 cr.

FALL Semester

S470 Restorative Health Related to                           
Multi-System Failures

3 cr.
NURS S471 Restorative Health Related to Multi-System Failures: Practicum 2 cr.
S483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone 3 cr.
S485 Professional Growth and Empowerment 2 cr.

R.N. to B.S.N. Fast Track Mobility Option

SUMMER Semester I

B231 Communication for Health Care Professionals           

3 cr.

SUMMER Semester II

B304 Professional Nursing Seminar I

3 cr.
B244 Comprehensive Health Assessment 2 cr.
B245 Comprehensive Health Assessment: Practicum 2 cr.

FALL Semester II

H365 Nursing Research

3 cr.
S484 Research Utilization Seminar 1 cr.
B404 Professional Nursing Seminar 3 cr.

SPRING Semester

S481 Nursing Management

2 cr.
S482 Nursing Management: Practicum 3 cr.
S483 Clinical Nursing Practice Capstone 3 cr.

SUMMER Semester I

S485 Professional Growth and Empowerment

3 cr.
S472 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community 3 cr.
S473 A Multi-System Approach to the Health of the Community: Practicum 3 cr.

Students who wish to take more than one year to complete nursing courses should meet with an advisor for information regarding required course sequencing.

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Allied Health Sciences

Web site:
www.iun.edu/~ahealth

Telephone:
(219) 980-6863

Administrative Officers
Faculty
General Information
Course Descriptions
Certificate Programs
Associate Degree Programs

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Administrative Officers

Linda A. Rooda, Ph.D., Dean, School of Nursing and Health Professions

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Faculty

Arlene Adler, M.Ed., Professor of Allied Health Sciences and Director of the Radiologic Sciences Programs

Carolyn DeWitt, M.P.A., Visiting Lecturer and Interim Program Director of Respiratory Therapy


Linda Galocy, B.S., Visiting Lecturer and Clinical Coordinator of Health Information Technology

Susan Higgins, M.S., Clinical Assistant Professor and Program Director of Clinical Laboratory Science Programs

Bradley Johnson, B.S., Lecturer in Radiologic Sciences

Robin J. Jones, M.S., Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinical Coordinator of the Radiologic Sciences Programs

Sharon Lakia, B.S., Lecturer in Radiologic Sciences

Margaret A. Skurka, M.S., Professor of Allied Health Sciences and Director of Health Information Management Programs

Loshay Willis, M.B.A., Visiting Lecturer and Interim Director of Clinical Education for Respiratory Therapy Program

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General Information

Allied Health Sciences at IU Northwest offers degree programs in a wide range of health-related fields. Detailed information is presented in the sections that follow. While every effort has been made to provide accurate information, students should seek academic advice from a faculty member of the specific program in which they are interested before making final decisions based on the program descriptions contained in this bulletin.

Admission Policies
Admission Procedures
Transfer Credit
Academic Policies
Honors
Dismissal
Accreditation

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Admission Policies

The admission policies of individual programs within Allied Health Sciences comply with the following standards:

Prerequisite Course Work
Applicants must complete prerequisite courses at an accredited high school (or by GED equivalent), college, or university. Individual programs determine the specific courses and the minimum grade that must be achieved in any course (see specific program information). Each program must approve the completion of a prerequisite course with a Pass/Fail grade. Students are eligible to apply for admission to an associate or baccalaureate program when their academic progress shows reasonable probability that entry-level requirements can be completed prior to the beginning date of the professional program. Applicants should read the admission policies and program descriptions in this bulletin for specific entry-level requirements.

Grade Requirements
Without exception, applicants must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for all course work completed at Indiana University and/or any other college or university. Some programs have established a minimum grade point average higher than 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Some programs also use a component of the overall grade point average (for example, math/science grade point average). See specific program information. Only completed course work and the resultant grade point average are evaluated. In evaluating the high school record of applicants to an associate degree program, only academic course work will be used in calculation of the admission grade point average. Students may not be admitted to, hold a position in, or begin a program if they would be on probation as defined by Allied Health Sciences. Students are placed on probation within Allied Health Sciences when the cumulative and/or semester grade point average falls below a 2.00 on a 4.00 scale.

The applicant must also maintain the minimum grade point average as established by the program. The applicant’s grade point average will be the major consideration (51 percent or greater) for admission. (See specific program information.)

Repeated Courses
Applicants whose grade point average is at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale and who have repeated courses will have their admission grade point average calculated by using the highest of the two grades earned. This repeat option includes the use of the Indiana University FX option and is applied with the following restrictions: no more than three courses will be deleted, which can total no more than 10 credits; and the grade will be deleted no more than once for a given course. If more than three courses are repeated, the applicant will determine which of the repeated courses are to be deleted. This request must be attached to the application.

Academic Bankruptcy
Applicants whose grade point average is at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale may petition the program for up to one year (fall, spring, and summer) of academic bankruptcy based on compelling nonacademic reasons. The bankrupted semesters must be consecutive. Academic bankruptcy is for admission purposes only and in no way affects the university’s official grade point average. Course work that has been bankrupted for admission purposes cannot be used for the fulfillment of program prerequisites or counted as credit hours toward the degree.

Fresh Start
Allied Health Sciences, for the purposes of selecting candidates for its various undergraduate programs, will allow an applicant to appeal to the program’s admissions committee for “academic forgiveness.” Students must request academic forgiveness at the time of program application. Academic forgiveness will eliminate, during the forgiveness period, all courses and grades earned by the applicant for the purpose of calculating the admission grade point averages. Only grades from courses completed after the forgiveness period will be considered in admission calculations. No course taken during this forgiveness period may be used for the fulfillment of any prerequisite or graduation requirement.

The forgiveness period begins with the applicant’s first academic enrollment period (at any college/university) and ends on a date designated by the applicant but no less than four calendar years for baccalaureate degree programs (two calendar years for associate degree programs) prior to the program’s starting date. To invoke this policy, the student must meet the following conditions:

  • Have a 2.00 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) including all course work taken during the requested forgiveness period,
  • Complete a minimum of 24 credit hours for bachelor’s degree programs (12 credit hours for associate degree programs) of graded course work after the forgiveness period,
  • Meet all other program-specific admission requirements.

The granting of academic forgiveness by a program does not alter the student’s official record. Students must meet all minimum degree requirements and may invoke this policy only one time. The petition for academic forgiveness must be attached to the application.

Testing
Applicants may be required to complete testing as designated by the program.

Interview Applicants may be required to complete a personal interview. The interview may be a component of the admission decision.

Technical Standards
A degree in one of the allied health sciences disciplines attests to the mastery of knowledge and skills. It follows from this that graduates must possess the essential knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical situations and render a wide spectrum of patient care in a safe and effective manner.

The Allied Health Sciences faculty has therefore specified nonacademic criteria, Technical Standards for Admission and Retention, which all applicants and students are expected to meet in order to participate in the allied health programs. These criteria include the following five categories: observation; communication; motor function; intellectual-conceptual, integrative, and quantitative abilities; and behavioral and social attributes. All accepted students would be required to sign a statement certifying that they can meet the technical standards that apply to the program to which they have been admitted.

A copy of the technical standards will be sent to each applicant who is invited for an interview. Additionally, a copy may be obtained from the program of interest or Allied Health Sciences.

Preference to In-State Students
Preference is given to applicants who are Indiana residents. Preference is also given to applicants who complete the majority of applicable course work at a public college or university in Indiana. This policy is applied at the time of program application.

Policy Changes
Policies concerning the minimum grade point average for admission consideration are subject to change. Changes become effective the semester following the announcement of the decision to the university counselors and other constituencies. Changes in prerequisite courses or the minimum grade required in a prerequisite course will be required as follows:

  1. Applicants who have taken the course prior to the change and who meet the old grade requirement will have satisfactorily completed the requirement.
  2. Applicants who have taken the course prior to the change and who do not meet the old grade requirement must complete the course under the new requirements.
  3. Applicants enrolled in the course at the time of the change will be permitted to meet the old course requirements.
  4. Applicants who have not taken the course prior to the change will have to meet the new grade requirements.
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Admission Procedures

  1. In addition to the general admission requirements stated above, individuals must read the program-specific sections in this bulletin for additional admission requirements and deadlines.
  2. Individuals seeking admission to a professional program must submit a complete school application prior to the program's application deadline. Admission to the professional program is competitive; application for admission to the university does not constitute automatic admission to a program.
  3. Applicants who are not Indiana University students must also file an Indiana University application and pay the application fee prior to the program application deadline. Applications for admission to Indiana University can be obtained from the Office of Admissions on the campus of interest. Some campuses may have application deadlines.
  4. The program's admission committee reviews all completed applications. The selection of a class is based on school and program admission criteria. All applicants receive written notification of their admission status.
  5. Applicants may appeal any admission decision except the requirement of a grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Copies of the policies and procedures governing the appeals process are available on request from the Allied Health Sciences administrative offices.
  6. Individuals interested in being admitted to one of the school's programs should contact the program of interest annually for an update of admission criteria.
  7. Applicants must obtain an application for the year in which they wish to apply.
  8. Applicants should check the current school application for the deadlines for submission.
  9. Students who have been convicted of a felony may be unable to obtain appropriate credentials to practice in some disciplines. Contact the program director for further information.
  10. A student whose name appears on the Sex Offenders List will not be allowed to pursue admission to any program in Allied Health Sciences.
  11. Programs to calculate the competitive grade point average may utilize grades earned in remedial courses differently. See the program-specific section.
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Transfer Credit

The campus Office of Admissions will determine acceptance of credit from a regionally accredited college or university for transfer to Indiana University.

While the grades from all course work completed at Indiana University and all other colleges and universities are used to calculate the admission grade point average, only grades of C or above will be considered for transfer. The university does not accept the transference of special credit by examination awarded by another college or university. The transfer of credit earned through a regionally accredited junior college or a community college is normally limited to the equivalent of two years of academic work toward a baccalaureate degree and one year of academic work toward an associate degree.

Correspondence Courses
All credit to be applied to an Allied Health degree earned through IU's Division of Extended Studies, correspondence study, or other nontraditional methods must be validated and approved by the faculty of the program to which the student is applying. Allied Health Sciences retains the right to determine the acceptability of transfer credit to meet degree requirements.

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Academic Policies

Students in Good Standing
Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of C (2.0) and a minimum grade point average of 2.0 for the most recent academic session and meet additional programmatic, academic, and professional standards in order to be considered in good standing. Students are informed of programmatic, academic, and professional standards during program orientation.

Class Standing
Within Indiana University, class standing is based on the total number of credit hours a student has earned. However, within the school, class standing is assigned according to a student’s progress in the professional curriculum.

Semester Load
To be considered a full-time student by the university, the student must register for a minimum of 12 credit hours each fall and spring semester and a total of 6 credit hours for summer sessions I and II combined. The maximum load is 18 credit hours. The number of credit hours determining full-time student status may vary with the nature of the program. For any enrollment period required by a program, the student is considered to be full time regardless of the number of credit hours taken during that period. Students who want to carry more than 18 credits must obtain permission of the program director and dean or the dean’s campus representative. In addition, students should have a cumulative B (3.0) average or have earned a B (3.0) average in their last semester.

Probation Upon the recommendation of the faculty in the student’s program, a student is placed on probation. Probationary recommendations are made when the student does not meet standards of academic performance or professional behavior. A student will be placed on academic probation for the academic session following the one in which the student fails to attain a minimum C (2.0) cumulative and/or semester grade point average. Individual programs may have additional academic and/or professional standards. A student who fails to meet these program-specific standards may also be placed on probation. Students are informed of program-specific standards upon entering the program. A student will be removed from probation after satisfactorily completing the program’s specified requirements. Students are notified in writing of probationary actions by the school’s dean or the dean’s campus representative.

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Honors

Allied Health Sciences offers the following honors to recognize superior student performances:
Degrees Awarded with Distinction The university recognizes a student’s superior performance in course work by awarding the associate or bachelor’s degree with one of three levels of distinction: distinction, high distinction, or highest distinction. A student must meet the following criteria to receive a degree awarded with distinction:

  1. To graduate with academic distinction, baccalaureate and associate degree candidates must rank within the highest 10 percent of their graduating class. The faculty of Allied Health Sciences will make the determination of eligibility for graduating with academic distinction so the candidates will be ranked with classmates who received the same type of degrees.
  2. If the 10 percent determination of any class results in a fractional value, the number will be rounded upward (e.g., a graduating class of 11 would have two individuals eligible for distinction).
  3. Calculation of the grade point average for graduation with distinction will be based upon the total number of credit hours completed at Indiana University. A candidate must have earned a minimum 50 percent of the total credit hours required for that degree at Indiana University.
  4. No more than 10 percent of the Indiana University credit hours may be eliminated from the grade point average determination by utilization of the mechanisms of Pass/Fail or special credit.
  5. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50 must have been achieved to be eligible.
  6. Three levels of distinction will be recognized and determined as follows:
    3.50 through 3.74—Distinction
    3.75 through 3.89—High Distinction
    3.90 through 4.00—Highest Distinction
  7. The determination of candidates who will wear honor cords at the May graduation ceremonies should include all academic credit earned at IU including the spring semester prior to Commencement.
  8. Unique cases and appeals should be forwarded to the dean of Allied Health Sciences or the dean’s campus designee for consideration.

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Dismissal

Upon the recommendation of the faculty in the student’s program, a student may be dismissed from Allied Health Sciences. Dismissal is based on the failure to meet academic or professional standards. The student will be informed of the dismissal in writing by the dean of the School of Nursing and Health Professions or the dean’s representative.

A student in Allied Health Sciences may be dismissed from the school when, in the judgment of the faculty, the student has ceased to make satisfactory progress toward a degree. When an undergraduate student fails to attain a C (2.0) grade point average in any two consecutive academic sessions, has a cumulative grade point average below C (2.0) for two consecutive sessions, or fails to earn higher than a D (1.0) grade point average in any one semester, the student is automatically considered to be making unsatisfactory progress toward a degree and is thereby eligible for dismissal.

In addition, a student who fails to meet program-specific academic requirements is considered not to be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree and may be dismissed. At the time of initial enrollment, each student receives a copy of the program-specific academic requirements.

A student failing to meet the standards of professional and personal conduct may also be recommended for dismissal.

Students in good standing who voluntarily and temporarily withdraw from a program will be placed in a temporary inactive status within Allied Health Sciences. At the time of departure, it is the student’s responsibility to arrange for continuation in writing with the individual program director. The student is allowed to reenroll without a review as specified in the continuation agreement. The student must meet any specific academic/clinical requirements associated with reenrollment under the continuation agreement. Students failing to reenroll as specified in the continuation agreement are subject to dismissal from Allied Health Sciences.

A student who withdraws without arranging in writing for continuation or fails to enroll in any semester will not be allowed further enrollments in the school and will be considered as not making satisfactory progress toward a degree. Such students who wish to reenroll must file an application for admission and will be considered as new applicants. These students may be considered for advanced standing in the program provided the completed work meets the current standards of the program.

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Accreditation

Allied Health Sciences shares with the other schools of the university the accreditation accorded Indiana University as a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

The programs in medical laboratory technology, health information technology, radiography, respiratory therapy, and medical technology are fully approved by their respective professional accrediting agencies.

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Course Descriptions

The letters preceding the number in Allied Health Sciences courses indicate the program. The letters used and their meanings are as follows:

AHLT C— Clinical Laboratory Sciences
AHLT F—Respiratory Therapy
AHLT J—Radiation Therapy
AHLT L—Clinical Laboratory Sciences – Medical Laboratory Technology
AHLT M—Health Information Technology/Coding Technology
AHLT R—Radiography/Radiologic Sciences

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Certificate Programs

Coding Specialist Program
Phlebotomy Technician Program

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Coding Specialist Program

Changing regulations for payment of health services issued by the government and other third-party payors continually create a need for qualified coders. This demand has created the need for an educational level that will produce skilled coders at a lesser level than an associate or bachelor’s degree.

To ensure that quality training is available to persons interested in this field, IU Northwest offers a special training program that combines an understanding of medical terminology and of the disease process with ICD-9-CM and CPT coding principles and guidelines.

Career Opportunities
Coders are employed in hospitals, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, insurance companies, and other settings where diagnostic and procedural data are coded in ICD-9- CM and CPT for reimbursement purposes.
Program graduates are immediately eligible to write the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) exam offered by the American Health Information Management Association. Three exams are offered—one for the hospital-based coders and one for the physician-based coders at the advanced level and the entry level CCA exam referenced above. Work experience is strongly suggested before writing the advanced certification exams.

Coding Specialist Curriculum

Course No.  Title Credit Hours
AHLT M195 Medical Terminology 3
AHLT M190 Coding I 3
AHLT M191 Coding II 3
AHLT M192 Introduction to HIM and Reimbursement 3
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4
AHLT R200 Pathology* or 3
AHLT C150 Body Structure and Function 3
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease (No Lab) 3

18-23

The course of study is coordinated by the Health Information Technology Program and consists of two semesters of course work. The number of required credit hours depends upon the specific individual courses chosen by the student.

*In order to enroll in AHLT R200 Pathology, students choose the PHSL P261-PHSL P262 science sequence. This sequence then transfers directly into the A.S. program in Health Information Technology.

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Phlebotomy Technician Program

The length of the program is one semester plus a 160- hour clinical rotation. The phlebotomy technician core courses, including clinical education, are offered during the day. The program’s offices and classroom are located in Hawthorn Hall. This program is fully approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), 8410 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 670, Chicago, IL, 60631-3415, phone: (773) 714-8880.

Admission Criteria
High school and/or college grade point average. Students applying to the program must complete the admission requirements of Allied Health Sciences and the Phlebotomy Technician Program before acceptance into the program. Admission to the program is competitive; therefore, completion of the program application does not guarantee admission.

Class Size
Maximum 18 students each spring semester.

Specific Requirements
In addition to the Allied Health Sciences admission policies found at the beginning of this section of the bulletin, the following admission policies apply to the Phlebotomy Technician Program:

Application Deadline
September 15 of the year before anticipated entry.

Minimum Academic Requirements
The applicant must be a high school graduate or equivalent.

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as hours toward the certificate.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
High school grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. This requirement is applied when students are selected from the applicant pool.

Technical Standards/Essential Functions
These will be given to the prospective student upon receipt of Allied Health Sciences application and available on the Web site.

Limited Criminal Background Check
Information regarding this requirement will be given to the prospective student upon receipt of Allied Health Sciences application.

Medical Requirements
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required before placement in a clinical site. Immunization records and other information will also be needed.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
See the Allied Health Sciences policy.

Volunteer Experience
While volunteer experience is not required, it is very helpful in making a career choice.

Scholarships
Scholarship opportunities may be available through the Office of Financial Aid.

Phlebotomy Technician Curriculum

Courses coded with (G) meet school general education requirements.

Course No. Title Credit Hours
AHLT R185 Medical Terminology 1
SPCH S122 Interpersonal Communication (G) 3
AHLT C142 Introduction to Phlebotomy 3
AHLT C102 Phlebotomy Seminar Topics 2
AHLT C150 Body Structure and Function 3
AHLT C143 Phlebotomy Practicum (Summer)
3
  15

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Return to Allied Health Sciences

Associate Degree Programs1

Medical Laboratory Technology
Health Information Technology
Radiography
Respiratory Care
Radiologic Sciences

Return to Allied Health Sciences

Medical Laboratory Technology

About the Program
Requirements
Medical Laboratory Technology Curriculum
2 + 2 Articulation to B. S.

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About the Program

Affiliated with several northwest Indiana hospitals. A medical laboratory technician is an indispensable member of the health care team. The medical laboratory technician performs a large variety of diagnostic laboratory tests, thereby contributing greatly toward meeting patients’ and physicians’ needs.

The Medical Laboratory Technology Program leads to an associate degree, preparing the student for a satisfying career in laboratory medicine. It provides students with the proper balance of academic background and clinical/practical experience necessary to complete the program successfully. Students accepted into the Medical Laboratory Technology Program begin the course of study in the fall semester. The curriculum consists of general-education courses, technical professional courses in laboratory technology, and clinical experience.

Graduate medical laboratory technicians perform tests in each laboratory department, including hematology, chemistry, microbiology, immunohematology, and serology. They use manual techniques as well as advanced computerized/ electronic equipment in performing the various tests. In addition, a medical laboratory technician is adept at specimen collection and helping to assess the laboratory’s quality control program. Program graduates are eligible to apply for the national certification medical examination in laboratory technology. The Medical Laboratory Technology offices and classrooms are in Hawthorn Hall at IU Northwest. Clinical training occurs in affiliated hospitals within the seven-county area.

The Indiana University Medical Laboratory Technology Program is fully accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS), 8410 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 670, Chicago, IL, 60631-3415, phone: (773) 714-8880.

1 Some Associate of Science degree programs do not provide for part-time or evening participation. Students must be prepared to make a full-time commitment to these programs. The first year of the two-year Respiratory Therapy Program may be completed on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Respiratory Therapy Program first-year curriculum.

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Requirements

Admission Criteria
High school and/or college grade point average, SAT score, and a personal interview. Students applying to the program must complete the admission requirements of Allied Health Sciences and the Medical Laboratory Technology Program before acceptance into program. Admission to the professional program is competitive; therefore, completion of the program application does not guarantee admission.

Class Size
Maximum 18 students each year.

Specific Requirements
In addition to Allied Health Sciences admission policies found at the beginning of this section of the bulletin, the following admission policies apply to the Medical Laboratory Technology Program:

Application Deadline
April 1 of the year of anticipated entry.

Minimum Academic Requirements
The applicant must be a high school graduate or equivalent and have successfully completed MATH M100 Basic Math and CHEM C101/CHEM C121 Elementary Chemistry I with laboratory, and ENG W131 Elementary Composition prior to being accepted into the program.

Distribution of Credits in Specific Areas
Prospective students are required to complete one year of high school chemistry and algebra.

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as credit hours toward the degree.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
High school or college grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Interview
All qualified applicants may be expected to participate in an interview.

Technical Standards/Essential Functions
These will be given to the prospective student upon receipt of the Allied Health Sciences application and are also available on the Web site.

Limited Criminal Background Check
Information regarding this requirement will be given to the prospective student upon receipt of Allied Health Sciences application.

Medical Requirements
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required before placement in a clinical site. Immunization records and other information will also be needed.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
See Allied Health Sciences policy.

Volunteer Experience
While volunteer experience is not required, it is very helpful in making a career choice.

Scholarships
Scholarship opportunities are available through the Office of Financial Aid and professional medical societies.

Return to Medical Laboratory Technology Program


Medical Laboratory Technology Curriculum (75 cr.)

Two-Year Semester Sequence

Course No.  Title Credit Hours

Prerequisites
MATH M100 Basic Mathematics 4
ENG W131 Elementary Composition 3
CHEM C101/CHEM 1211, 3 Elementary Chemistry II with Lab 5

12

Fall Semester
AHLT C1801 Introduction to the Clinical Laboratory 3
AHLT C1211 Clinical Techniques and Principles 4
PHSL P1302 Introduction to Human Biology 4
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I 3
AHLT R185 Medical Terminology 1

15

Spring Semester
AHLT C1311 Hematology 4
AHLT C1411 Clinical Immunoserology 4
AHLT L2011Pathology 2
CHEM C102/CHEM 1221, 3 Elementary Chemistry II with Lab 5

15

Summer Session I
AHLT C1611 Body Fluids I 3
AHLT C1521 Clinical Parasitology and Mycology 3

6

Summer Session II
AHLT C1811 Clinical Education I 3
SPCH S122 Interpersonal Communication 3

6

Fall Semester
AHLT C1221 Clinical Chemistry 4
AHLT C1511 Clinical Microbiology 4
AHLT C1401 Immunohematology 4

12

Spring Semester
AHLT C1821 Clinical Education II 4
AHLT L2811 Clinical Education III 4
AHLT L2021 Advanced Clinical Topics 2

10

B.S. in Biology, Medical Technology Track Refer to the “Biology” section in “College of Arts and Sciences” to see how the A.S. in Medical Laboratory Technology fits into a B.S. in Biology program. Further information is available from the program director upon request.

1 Professional core course: A grade of C (2.0) or higher is required for successful completion of the program.

2 Students interested in the B.S. degree should take the PHSL P261/PHSL P262 sequence.

3 Students interested in the B.S. degree should take the CHEM C105/CHEM C125 and CHEM C106/CHEM C126 sequence.

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2 + 2 Articulation to B. S. (Alternate to B.S. in Biology, MT Track)

ASCP has an alternate route to Medical Technology certification. A certified MLT-A.D. with two years’ work experience and the appropriate course work needed for a B. S. degree (which also meets ASCP criteria) can sit for the MT certification examination without any additional internship.

A curriculum has been developed at IU Northwest that will allow the MLT-AD student to continue on to a B. S. degree in an additional two years after obtaining the A.D., with some course substitution in the A.D. curriculum. The student selects one of four tracks in this 2 +2 articulation, indicating a specific minor. The student would receive a B. S. degree in general studies, with a minor in one of four areas, either chemistry, biology, microbiology, or health administration.

Further information on this and other B.S. degree options is available from the program director upon request.

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Return to Associate Degree Programs

Health Information Technology

About the Program
Educational Program
Admission
Health Information Technology Curriculum

Return to Associate Degree Programs

About the Program

Affiliated with all Lake County hospitals and several others.

The health technician is a professional skilled in the collection, analysis, and reporting of health care data and provision of clinical data support to health care information systems operation.

The graduate health information technician generally works in the health information department of a hospital, ambulatory care facility, or other type of health care facility. Some of the functions are supervising within the health information department; coordinating flow of health information to all departments of the hospital; compiling statistics; analyzing health record data for electronic completeness and accuracy; coding and classifying diagnoses and procedures that impact facility reimbursement; assigning diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) or ambulatory payment classifications (APCs); operating a cancer registry; functioning as a primary officer for the facility; preparing special studies and tabulating data for research; and performing quality, management and utilization management activities, and other performance improvement activities.

Graduates are eligible to apply to write the American Health Information Management Association

National Certification exam. Upon passing this exam, they may use the initials RHIT, Registered Health Information Technician.

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Educational Program

Length of the Program
The Health Information Technology Program is two years in length if the student attends on a full-time basis. Opportunities are available for progression through the program on a part-time basis.

Structure of the Professional Program
Health Information Technology core courses are offered primarily during the day. General-education courses are offered both day and evening.

Design of the Professional Curriculum
Students accepted into the Health Information Technology Program typically begin the course of study in the fall semester. The curriculum consists of general-education courses, technical courses in health information technology, and clinical experience in health care facilities in the Lake County area. The Health Information Technology Program is designed to:

  • Provide educational experiences to prepare students for beginning a career as a health information technician.
  • Provide concentrated clinical experiences by a rotation schedule through the hospitals and other health care institutions in the community.
  • Provide the medical community with individuals
    qualified to effectively carry out the functions of
    the health information management discipline.
  • Contribute to the liberal education of the students by providing a core of general education courses.
  • Qualify students for progression to a baccalaureate degree in specific areas.
  • Assist students in reaching their goals by providing academic, occupational, and personal guidance.

Location of Clinical Sites
The program utilizes all hospitals in Lake County, Indiana; one hospital in Porter County, Indiana; two hospitals in LaPorte County, Indiana; and two hospitals in Cook County, Illinois. Additional nonacute care facilities throughout the area are also utilized.

Additional Cost
In addition to regular university fees, students are responsible for the cost of a physical examination before attending clinical sites. They are also responsible for any travel expenses incurred as part of the clinical experience.

Opportunity for Students to Work
Many students accept part-time employment in local health care facilities while completing the professional course work.

Program Facilities
The Health Information Technology Program offices and classrooms are located in Hawthorn Hall at IU Northwest.

Accreditation
The Health Information Technology Program of IU Northwest is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education.

Return to Health Information Technology Program

Admission

General Information
Admission to the program is competitive; therefore, completion of the corequisites does not guarantee admission to the program.

Criteria Used for Selection of Class
Students may apply for admission to the Health Information Technology Program after qualifying for regular admission to Indiana University. Admission to the program is based upon each applicant's high school and/or college grade point average, SAT scores, and a personal interview.

Class Size
25 students each fall semester.

Specific Requirements
In addition to the Allied Health Sciences admission policies and procedures found at the beginning of the bulletin, the following admission policies apply to the Health Information Technology Program at Indiana University Northwest:

Application Deadline
April 1 of the year of anticipated entry.

Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
This is a direct high school entry program.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale). Grades from remedial courses are not figured into the cumulative grade point average.

Distribution of Credit Hours in Specific Areas
Students must complete 26 credit hours in liberal arts as part of the degree requirements.

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial courses may not be counted as credit hours toward a degree. Courses completed in the former Division of General and Technical Studies do not count toward a degree.

Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
The program computes a selected course grade point average based on courses the student may have taken that are required by the program. Grades from remedial course are not included.

Interview
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview.

Technical Standards
See Allied Health Sciences technical standards.

Medical Requirement
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required prior to placement at a clinical site.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
See Allied Health Sciences policy.

Volunteer Experience
While volunteer experience is not required, it is very helpful in making a career choice.

Return to Health Information Technology Program

Health Information Technology Curriculum (65 cr.)

Course  No. Title Credit Hours

Fall Semester
ENG W131 Elementary Composition I 3
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4
AHLT M1951 Medical Terminology 3
AHLT M1201 Health Statistics 2
CSCI A106 Introduction to Microcomputers and Computing 3

15

Spring Semester
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4
AHLT M1011 Introduction to Health Records 5
AHLT M1071 Computer Applications in Health Information Technology 2
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I 3

14

Summer Session I
AHLT M1021 Professional Practice Experience I 3

Fall Semester
AHLT M2011 Coding and Classification Systems 5
AHLT M2022 Professional Practice Experience II 5
AHLT M2451 Health Record Law 2
AHLT R2002 Pathology 3
SOC S161 Principles of Sociology 3

18

Spring Semester
AHLT M2001 Supervision in Health Information Services 3
AHLT M2031 Health Care Delivery and Quality Management 4
AHLT M2042 Professional Practice Experience III 2
BUS Z302 Managing and Behavior in Organization 3
SPCH S121 Public Speaking or
SPCH S122 Interpersonal Communication
3

15

1 Professional core course: A grade of C (2.0) or higher is required in order to take professional core courses that occur later in the course sequence for this major.

2 Core course: A grade of C or higher is required for graduation from this program.

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Radiography

About the Program
Educational Program
Admission
Curriculum
Radiography Curriculum

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About the Program

Radiology is a science involving the medical use of X rays, radium, and radioactive isotopes in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Radiographers are essential members of the health care team. They are experts in the performance of examinations requiring the use of X rays and highly complex machinery to produce a quality X-ray image (radiograph) of the internal parts of the body for interpretation by a medical doctor (radiologist).

Radiographers find employment possibilities in various medical settings ranging from doctors’ offices to large medical centers. In addition, some seek employment in industry or in the marketing and sales of X-ray products.

Return to Radiography Program

Educational Program

Length of the Program
24 months beginning in May. Professional course work begins each July (summer session II).

Structure of the Program
The Radiography Program is a full-time day program involving classroom and laboratory experiences on campus and clinical experiences at local hospitals.

Design of the Professional Curriculum
The curriculum follows a pattern designed to train the student to become adept in the performance of diagnostic radiologic procedures. Courses in radiologic principles, radiographic procedures, clinical application of theory, and general education are included in the curriculum. The Radiography Program curriculum objectives are designed to:

  • Provide educational experiences to prepare students for entering careers as radiographers.
  • Provide concentrated clinical experiences by a rotation schedule through the hospitals in the community.
  • Provide the medical community with individuals
    qualified to perform radiographic procedures.
  • Contribute to the liberal education of students by
    providing a core of general education courses.
  • Qualify students for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program.
  • Assist students in reaching their academic and professional goals.
  • Instill in students a desire for lifelong learning.

Opportunities for Students to Work
Students often seek employment in part-time positions outside the program. These positions cannot interfere with clinical and class schedules and must be balanced with necessary study time.

Program Facilities
The Radiography Program offices and classrooms are located in the Dunes Medical/Professional Building at IU Northwest.

Location of Clinicals
Clinical experiences occur in local hospitals, including the Community Hospital in Munster; LaPorte Hospital in LaPorte; Methodist Hospital of Gary, Inc., in Gary and Merrillville; Porter Hospital in Valparaiso; St. Anthony Medical Center in Crown Point; St. Anthony Memorial Health Centers in Michigan City; St. Margaret Mercy Healthcare Centers in Hammond; and St. Mary Medical Center in Hobart.

Additional Costs
In addition to regular university tuition and fees, students should expect to pay program-related expenses such as books, uniforms, physical examination, lead markers, and radiation monitoring.

Accreditation
The Radiography Program is fully accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), 20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606- 3182; phone: (312) 704-5300; www.jrcert.org.

Return to Radiography Program

Admission

General Information
Students may apply for admission to the Radiography Program after qualifying for regular admission to Indiana University. Admission to the professional program is competitive; therefore, completion of the application does not guarantee admission to the program.

Criteria Used for Class Selection
Admission to the program is based upon each applicant’s high school and/or college course work and a personal interview.

Class Size
Approximately 40-45 students each May (beginning professional course work in summer session II).

Specific Requirements
In addition to the Allied Health Sciences admission policies and procedures, the following apply to the Radiography Program at IU Northwest:

Application Deadline
February 1 of the year of anticipated entry.

Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
To be eligible for admission, applicants should have completed high school courses in algebra, geometry, biology, and English. In addition, physics, chemistry, and computer science are recommended. Prior to beginning professional course work, all students must complete the program’s math and English requirement with a C (2.0) or higher. In addition, students are encouraged to complete the Arts and Science course work required for the degree.

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work does not count as credit hours toward the degree or for purposes of calculation of a grade point average during the admission process.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
A high school grade point average of 3.0 or a college grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale is required for admission into the Radiography Program. The college grade point average will be used if the applicant has completed a minimum of 12 credit hours with at least one math or science course on the transcript. The program admissions committee implements this requirement when the incoming class of students is selected from the applicant pool.

Interview
An interview is required for admission. However, if the number of applications to the program far exceeds the number of positions available, the program admissions committee reserves the right to limit the number of applicants interviewed. Interviews will be scheduled during the spring semester.

High School Applicants
Check with your school to see if you can earn college credit while in high school to complete the two prerequisite courses.

Technical Standards
Technical standards are mailed to all program applicants.

Medical Requirements
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required prior to beginning clinical experience.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
The program gives some preference to Indiana residents.

Volunteer Experience
While volunteer experience is not required; it is very helpful in making a career choice.

Return to Radiography Program

Curriculum

Prerequisites
Prior to beginning professional course work, all students must complete the program’s math and English requirement with a C (2.0) or better. Students may earn up to 6 hours of Indiana University credit by correspondence toward fulfilling the requirements for the associate degree. Students are encouraged to seek advising prior to enrolling in course work. The faculty retain the right to determine acceptability of course work taken by nontraditional methods outside of Indiana University to meet degree requirements.

Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
To be eligible for admission, applicants should have completed high school courses in algebra, geometry, biology, and English. In addition, physics, chemistry, and computer science are recommended. Prior to beginning professional course work, all students must complete the program’s math and English requirement with a C (2.0) or higher.

Professional Program
Courses in the professional program are sequential and, therefore, must be taken in the order specified by the program faculty.

Awards
The program faculty will recommend to the university graduating students with superior academic performance for degrees awarded with distinction. Also, the program may recognize students with outstanding academic and clinical achievement during their professional program at the time of graduation.

Scholarships
For information on scholarships and grants, students should contact the Financial Aid Office. Some hospitals offer financial assistance for students pursuing radiography. Contact the program faculty for further information.

Graduation Requirements
Satisfactory completion of 76/77 credit hours to include 23/24 credit hours of prerequisite and general education courses and 52 credit hours of professional courses. All course work must be completed in compliance with the program’s and school’s academic and professional policies. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to take the examination of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (AART) (www.arrt.org).

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Radiography Curriculum (73 cr.)

Two-Year Semester Sequence

Course No.  Title Credit Hours

Summer Session II
MATH M100/M119 College Level Mathematics* 3-4
ENG W131 Elementary Composition* 3
  6-7

Summer Session II
AHLT R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology* 2
AHLT R100 Introduction to Clinical Radiography* 2
AHLT R181 Clinical Experience I 1
AHLT R185 Medical Terminology* 1
  6

Fall Semester
AHLT R101 Radiographic Procedures* 3
AHLT R102 Principles of Radiography I* 3
AHLT R182 Clinical Experience II* 4
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4

14

Spring Semester
AHLT R201 Radiographic Procedures II* 3
AHLT R202 Principles of Radiography II* 3
AHLT R281 Clinical Experience III 4
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4

14

Summer Sessions
AHLT R282 Clinical Experience IV 4

4

Fall Semester
AHLT R205 Radiographic Procedures III* 3
AHLT R222 Principles of Radiography III* 3
AHLT R250 Physics Applied to Radiography* 3
AHLT R283 Clinical Experience V* 4
CSCI A106 Introduction to Computing 3

16

Spring Semester
AHLT R260 Radiobiology and Protection* 3
AHLT R200 Pathology* 3
AHLT R290 Comprehensive Experience* 4
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology 3
SPCH S121/SPCH S122 Oral Communication Requirement 3

16
Total Credit Hours 76/77

*Core course

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Respiratory Care

About the Program
Admission Requirements
Respiratory Care Curriculum

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About the Program

Mission of the Respiratory Therapy Program
The mission of the Respiratory Therapy Program is to provide a high-quality Associate of Science in Respiratory Therapy to students in the seven counties of northwest Indiana. The faculty and staff are committed to excellence in teaching and community service. The program is designed to provide an environment that promotes intellectual discovery both didactically and clinically.

Description of the Profession
Respiratory care practitioners are health care professionals who evaluate, treat, and care for patients with breathing disorders. They perform both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on pulmonary patients ranging from premature infants to the elderly.

Graduates of the Program
Graduates of the Respiratory Care Program are eligible for state licensure after they successfully pass credentialing examinations offered by the National Board of Respiratory Care.

Career Opportunities
Respiratory care is one of the fastest growing medical fields with excellent career opportunities and competitive salaries. Respiratory care practitioners can be employed in a variety of settings such as hospitals, clinics, home care, education, medical sales, research, physicians’ offices, skilled nursing facilities, and others.

Length of Program
A minimum of two years is required to complete work for the associate degree in respiratory therapy. Students may complete the prerequisites for program admission (first-year preprofessional course work) on a part-time basis. Admission to the program is granted in the second professional year (second-year day course work) of the program and requires a full-time commitment of 16 consecutive months.

Description of Facilities
The Respiratory Care Program offices are in Hawthorn Hall.

Location of Clinical Affiliates
Clinical experience occurs at local hospitals in Lake and Porter Counties, Indiana, in addition to Chicago- and South Bend-area hospitals.

Additional Costs
In addition to regular university fees and books, students are responsible for program-related expense such as physical examination, immunizations CPR certification, lab kit, board examination fees, uniforms and supplies, and travel expenses incurred as part of the clinical experience.

Accreditation
The Respiratory Therapy Program is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC).

Opportunities for Students to Work
During the professional year and after successful completion of necessary clinical competencies, students may seek employment as a respiratory therapy student at local area hospitals.

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Admission Criteria

Selection Criteria
Admission to the program is based on the student’s successful completion of the prerequisite courses with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or greater. Completion of the prerequisite courses does not guarantee admission to the program. When the number of applicants exceeds the class size capacity, specific math and science GPA will be a strong factor in the selection criteria. Repeating required first year courses will be viewed less favorably in the selection process. Students will have only two opportunities to decline admission. Students who decline admission twice will be ineligible to reapply.

Prerequisites
Prior to beginning professional course work, all students must complete the required prerequisite courses. Further, the general education courses are not required to be completed prior to admission; however, their completion is strongly recommended.

Application Deadline
April 1 of the year of anticipated entry.

Minimum Grade Point Average
A GPA of 2.0 or higher on a scale of 4.0.

Class Size
Approximately 20 students each fall. Class size is restricted by the number of clinical sites available.

Awards
The program will recommend students with superior academic performance for degrees awarded with distinction.


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Respiratory Care Curriculum (73 cr.)

Students should consult with their academic counselors for proper academic courses and semester sequence in order to complete the first-year program prerequisite courses in a timely manner. Courses coded with (G) meet the division's general education requirements.

First-Year (Preprofessional) Courses

Prerequisites (19 cr.)
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (G) 3
PHSL P261 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (G) 4
MATH M014 Basic Algebra 41
PHSL P262 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4
CHEM C101 Elementary Chemistry I (Lecture) 31
CHEM C121 Elementary Chemistry I (Laboratory) 21

General Education Requirements (10 cr.)
BIOL M200 Microorganisms in Nature and Disease 41
PSY P101 Introductory Psychology I (G) 3
Choose one from the following: 3
SPCH S121 Public Speaking (G) (3 cr.)
SPCH S122 Interpersonal Communications (G) (3 cr.)

Second-Year Courses (Professional Year)

Course No.  Title Credit Hours

Fall
AHLT F1051 Pharmacology 2
AHLT F2052 Introduction to Respiratory Care I 3
AHLT F2702 Gas Therapy 2
AHLT F2712 Resuscitation and Airway Management 1
AHLT F272 1 Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology 3

11

Spring
AHLT F1812 Clinical Education I
(16 hrs./wk. x 14 wk. = 224 hours)
3
AHLT F2022 Respiratory Care II 3
AHLT F2532 Diagnostic Testing and Monitoring 5
AHLT F2732 Principles and Management of Ventilators 4

15

Summer
AHLT F1822 Clinical Education II
(24 hrs./wk. x 14 wk. = 336 hours)
6

Fall
AHLT F2742 Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care 3
AHLT F2752 Comprehensive Clinical Education III
(32 hrs./wk. x 14 wk. = 448 hours)
8
AHLT F276 Case Studies and Projects in Respiratory Care 1

12

1 A grade of C or higher is required for graduation.

2 Professional core course: A grade of C (2.0) or higher is required for successful completion of the program.

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Radiologic Sciences

The B.S. degree in Radiologic Sciences offers individuals the opportunity to pursue three separate concentrations—advanced clinical/health management concentration for the associate degree radiographer, diagnostic medical sonography, and radiation therapy. Diagnostic medical sonography and radiation therapy are open to individuals with either a health professional A.S. degree background or a non-health professions background.

Radiologic Sciences-Clinical/Health Management Concentration for Radiographers
Admissions
Curriculum
Concentration Course Work Options

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Radiologic Sciences-Clinical/Health Management Concentration for Radiographers

Description of the Profession
Within the radiologic sciences profession there is a need for qualified radiographers with the advanced skills necessary to provide patient services in cardiovascular interventional technology, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. These professionals require unique skills specific to the specialty. Cardiovascular interventional technologists assist physicians in performing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of the cardiovascular system. These procedures involve the injection of iodinated contrast media to demonstrate diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Computed tomography (CT) technologists image selected planes of the body by combining the use of an X-ray beam and a computer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologists utilize a magnetic field along with radio waves to create images of patients’ anatomy for interpretation by a physician.

Graduates of the Program
Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and are eligible to take specialty examinations depending on their clinical concentration.

Credentials Required to Practice
R.T.(R) (ARRT) Registered Radiographer.

Indiana Certification Requirements

State certification is required to operate an X-ray machine. The state accepts the ARRT Registry for certification.

The Bachelor of Science Program in Radiologic Sciences is designed to prepare qualified radiographers with the skills to provide patient services in cardiovascular interventional technology, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Students receive a theoretical foundation in all of these specialties and select a clinical/health management concentration.

Length of the Program A new class begins the professional course work in the fall semester and completes the professional year at the end of the following spring semester.

Structure of the Professional Program
Classes are held during the day. Clinical experience is scheduled in cooperation with the clinical site with most experience during normal daytime hours.

Design of the Professional Curriculum
Lectures and clinical experiences are integrated throughout the two semesters.

Opportunity for Students to Work
Students may be employed as radiographers at local area hospitals. Students may find full-time employment during the professional year difficult.

Description of Facilities
The radiologic sciences classroom and offices are located in the Dunes Medical/Professional Building at IU Northwest. Clinical experience is provided at local area hospitals.

Return to Radiologic Sciences

Admissions

General Information
Admission to the professional year is competitive. Students are selected based on their previous academic background, a personal interview, and evidence of registration or registration eligibility with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Students will need to select an area of clinical or health management concentrations. There are a limited number of spaces available in each clinical concentration.

Class Size
Class size is restricted by the number of clinical sites available. An attempt will be made to place all qualified applicants.

Specific Requirements
The following admission policies, in addition to those policies at the beginning of this section, apply to the Radiologic Sciences Program.

Application Deadline
February 1 of the year the student wishes to begin the professional year.

Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
92 credit hours.

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as credit hours toward the degree or for purposes of calculation of a grade point average during the admission process.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale at the time of the interview.

Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
2.5 on a 4.0 scale for all radiography courses.

Minimum Grade Requirement in a Stated Prerequisite
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale).

Interview
Qualified applicants may be asked to participate in an interview. Interviews are held in May.

Technical Standards
Technical standards are mailed to all program applicants.

Medical Requirements
Students must meet the medical requirements of the clinical education center providing clinical experience.

Experience
While radiography experience beyond the initial radiography program is not required, it is recommended.

Return to Radiologic Sciences

Curriculum

Prerequisites
Prior to entering the program, students must complete the following minimum prerequisites. Prerequisites may be taken at any accredited college or university. The code (G) indicates a course that meets the school’s general-education requirements.

Verbal communication (G) 
2-3 cr.
Written communication (G)
2 courses
Humanities elective (G)
3 cr.
Social/Behavioral science elective (G)
3 cr. 
Introductory psychology (G) 
3 cr.
Computer science elective 
3 cr.
College-level mathematics (G) 
3-5 cr.
Physical and biological sciences (G) 
16-20 cr.
Elementary chemistry with lab (G) 
4-5 cr.
Human anatomy and physiology with lab (G) 
8-10 cr.


Special Credit/Transfer Policy
Students seeking to transfer credit or receive special credit for radiography course work taken in a non–credit­awarding radiography program that has been accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) (www.jrcert.org) should contact the program director for additional information and counseling.

Professional Program
The professional program consists of 30 credit hours of 400-level courses. Courses in the professional senior year are sequential. Therefore, the following courses must be taken on a full-time basis in the order specified by the program faculty.

Course  No. Title Credit Hours

Fall Semester
AHLT R404 Sectional Imaging Anatomy 3
AHLT R405 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging I 3
AHLT R408 Topics in Radiologic Sciences 3
Concentration Course Work 6

15

Spring Semester
AHLT R406 Advanced Diagnostic Imaging II 3
AHLT R414 Sectional Imaging Pathology 3
AHLT R409 Senior Project in Medical Imaging Technology 3
CConcentration Course Work 6

15

CONCENTRATION COURSE WORK OPTIONS

The Clinical Concentration prepares qualified radiographers for advanced skills in 1) cardiovascular interventional technology, 2) computed tomography, and 3) magnetic resonance imaging technology. The Health Management Concentration helps prepare radiographers for supervisory roles within the health care environment.

Students receive a theoretical foundation in these advanced imaging specialties and then select a clinical concentration and/or a health management concentration. Clinical experience is obtained at local hospitals throughout northwest Indiana. Health management concentration course work is offered through the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA).

Students may select from any of the following courses to complete their 12 credit hours of concentration course work. Students interested in advanced clinical skills are encouraged to enroll in the Clinical Concentration courses. For every 1 credit hour of clinical course work, students spend 60 hours per semester in the clinical environment learning the advanced skills. Students interested in supervisory roles are encouraged to take 12 credit hours of the health management concentration course work. Students may elect to combine these two concentrations to equal 12 credit hours total.

Clinical Concentration Courses (0-12 Credit Hours Total)
R481 Clinical Practicum: Vascular Imaging 1-12 cr.
R482 Clinical Practicum: Computed Tomography 1-12 cr.
R483 Clinical Practicum: Magnetic Resonance Imaging      1-12 cr.

Health Management Concentration Courses (0-12 Credit Hours Total)
SPEA H320 Health Systems Administration* 3 cr.
SPEA H441Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration 3 cr.
SPEA H352 Health Finance and Budgeting 3 cr.

SPEA H371 Human Resource Management
in Health Care Facilities

3 cr.
SPEA V450Contemporary Issue in Public Affairs: Health Issues
3-6 cr.

* SPEA H320 is a required course for all students pursuing this concentration.

Radiologic Sciences—Diagnostic Medical Sonography Concentration

Description of the Profession
Within the radiologic sciences profession, there is a need for qualified diagnsotic medical sonographers. These professionals require unique skills specific to the field of ultrasonography. Under the direction of a radiologist, the diagnostic medical sonographer is concerned with the proper operation of the ultrasound equipment and preparation of patients for various types of diagnostic procedures. Upon request of a physician, the diagnostic medical sonographer examines various parts of the body by using sound waves. This imaging technique may reveal evidence of disease, injury, or other significant medical information.

Graduates of the Program
Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and are eligible to take the General Physics, Abdomen/Small Parts, and OB/Gyn exams offered by the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS).

Length of the Program
A new class begins the professional course work in summer session II for non-health care students and in the fall semester for the health care student. This program will complete their professional portion at the end of the following fall semester.

Structure of the Professional Program
Classes are held during the day. Clinical experience is scheduled in cooperation with the clinical site and are also during normal daytime hours.

Design of the Professional Curriculum
Lectures, lab, and clinical experiences are integrated throughout the program.

Opportunity for Students to Work
Students may find full-time employment during the professional year difficult.

Description of Facilities
The classroom and offices of the Radiologic Sciences—DMS Concentration Program are located in the Dunes Medicali' Professional Building at IU Northwest. Clinical experience is provided at local hospitals.

ADMISSIONS

General Information
Admission to the professional year is competitive. Students are selected based on their previous academic background, a personal interview, and evidence of registration if applying under the health care professional background.

Class Size
Class size is restricted by the number of clinical sites available.

Specific Requirements
The following admission policies apply to the Radiologic Sciences Program, in addition to those policies at the beginning of this section.

Application Deadline
April 1 of the year the student wishes to begin the professional year.

Total Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
79 credit hours

Limitations of Course Work
Remedial course work will not count as credit hours toward the degree or for purposes of calculation of a grade point average during the admission process.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale at the time of the interview.

Minimum Grade Requirement in a Stated Prerequisite
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale)

Interview
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview. Interviews are held in May.

Technical Standards
Technical standards are mailed to all program applicants.

Medical Requirements
Students must meet the medical requirements of the clinical education center providing clinical experience.

CURRICULUM
Prior to entering the program, students must complete the following minimum prerequisites. Prerequisites may be taken at any accredited college or university. The code (G) indicates a course that meets the school’s general-education requirements.

Health Professions as a Degree Background

Two written communication courses (G) 
2 courses
Verbal communication course (G)
2-3 cr.
College level mathematics (G) 
3 cr.
Physical and Biological Sciences
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labs (G) 
8-10 cr.
General or Radiologic Physics (G)  Electives
4-5 cr.
Introductory psychology (G) 
3 cr.
Computer science elective 
3 cr.
Humanities elective (G)(G) 
3 cr.
Social/behavioral science elective (G)
Medical Terminology 
1-3 cr.
Professional course work in a health professions program 
40-48 cr.
Total Minimum Number of Credit Hours
79

Non-health Professions as Degree Background

Two written communication courses (G)  
2 courses
Verbal communication course (G)
2-3 cr.
*College level mathematics (G) 
3 cr.
Physical and Biological Sciences
Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labs (G) 
8-10 cr.
General or Radiologic Physics (G)  Electives
4-5 cr.
Introductory psychology (G)
3 cr.
Computer science elective
3 cr.
Humanities elective (G)(G)  
3 cr.
Medical Terminology 
1-3 cr.
**Orientation to Radiologic Technology
3 cr.
General Electives
33 cr.
Total Minimum Number of Credit Hours
79

** Class enrollment is conditional on acceptance into the B.S. in Radiologic Sciences—DMS Concentration program.

PROFESSIONAL YEAR

Courses in the professional senior year must be taken on a full-time basis. The following courses are required and offered as described below.

SENIOR YEAR SUMMER SEMESTER (FOR NON-HEALTH PROFESSIONALS ONLY)
AHLT R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology

FALL SEMESTER
AHLT R404 Sectional Imaging Anatomy
3
AHLT R408 Topics in Radiologic Sciences
3
Electives
6-9
6-15

SPRING SEMESTER
AHLT R490 Funadamentals of Ultrasound
4
AHLT R491 DMS Imaging I
5
AHLT R484 Clinical Practicum
4
13

SUMMER SEMESTER
AHLT R492 DMS Imaging II
5
AHLT R484 Clinical Practicum
6
11


FALL SEMESTER
AHLT R409 Senior Project in Medical Imaging Tech
3
AHLT R493 Ultrasound Physics
4
AHLT R484 Clinical Practicum
6
13
CORE COURSE TOTAL
43

Radiologic Sciences—Radiation Therapy Concentration

The educational program in radiation therapy accepts students every other year (odd years).

Description of the Profession
Radiation therapy involves the use of different forms of ionizing radiation for the treatment of benign and malignant tumors. Radiation therapists administer the prescribed dose of ionizing radiation to specific sites of the patient’s body as directed by the physician. They operate varied types of equipment, including high energy linear accelerators, and work with radioactive materials. In addition, radiation therapists observe the clinical progress of the patient undergoing radiation therapy, observe the first signs of any complication, and determine when treatment should be withheld until a physician may be consulted.

Graduates of the Program
The Radiation Therapy Program is designed to prepare graduates to meet the scope of practice standards for radiation therapy. Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible to take the radiation therapy certification examination given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Having successfully passed this exam, certificate holders are classified as registered radiation therapists, R.T.(T) (ARRT).

Licensure Required to Practice
Licensure of radiation therapists is not required in Indiana, but licensure requirements are mandated in some states.

PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT

The Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Sciences, Radiation Therapy concentration offered by IU Northwest is designed to prepare students for professional careers as radiation therapists in the medical field. By providing pertinent learning experiences, the program faculty strives to develop students’ interests in lifelong learning through the professional societies and continuing education. The curriculum is designed in accordance with the guidelines established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM

Length of the Program
The radiation therapy program is a four-year baccalaureate degree program and has two tracks: one for the nonradiographer and one for the radiographer. For the nonradiographer, the program is composed of 55 credit hours of prerequisite and general education requirements and a 22 month professional core in the junior and senior years. For the radiographer, the program includes general-education requirements and a 20-month professional core.

Design of the Professional Curriculum
The curriculum follows a pattern that trains the student to become skilled in the performance of radiation therapy procedures. Courses in radiologic principles, technical courses in radiation therapy, clinical application of theory, and general education are included in the curriculum. The Radiation Therapy Program is designed to:
  • Graduate radiation therapists who demonstrate
    Clinical competence
    Effective communication skills
    Critical thinking and problem solving skills
    Professional values
  • Provide the medical community with individuals qualified to perform radiation therapy procedures
  • Involve students in professional continuing education activities in an effort to instill a desire for lifelong learning
  • Involve the student in the community we serve

Program Facilities
The Radiation Therapy Program offices and classrooms are located in the Dunes Medical/Professional Building at IU Northwest. Clinical experiences have been planned in local hospitals, including the Community Hospital in Munster; Ingalls Hospital in Harvey, Illinois; LaPorte Hospital and Health Services in LaPorte; Memorial Hospital in South Bend; Methodist Hospital of Gary, Inc., in Merrillville; and St. Margaret Mercy Healthcare Center in Hammond.

Accreditation
The Radiation Therapy Program is approved by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60606-2901; phone (3120 704-5300; www.jrcert.org.

ADMISSION—NON-RADIOGRAPHER

General Information
Students may apply for admission to the Radiation Therapy Program after qualifying for regular admission to Indiana University.

Criteria Used for Selection of Class
Admission to the program is based upon each applicant’s high school or college course work and a personal interview.

Specific Requirements
In addition to the Allied Health Sciences admission policies and procedures found at the beginning of this section, the following apply to the Radiation Therapy Program at IUNorthwest.

Minimum Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
55 credit hours

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale. This requirement is applied at the time of program application. Grades from remedial courses are not calculated in the grade point average of the prerequisite courses to determine the admission index.

Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
Science and math grade point average of 2.3 and a 2.5 grade point average in stated prerequisite courses (on a 4.0 scale). This requirement is applied at the time of program application and must be maintained. Grades from remedial courses are not calculated in the mathematics and science grade point average to determine the admission index.

Minimum Grade Requirement in a Prerequisite Course
C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale).

Interview
A personal interview is required. If, however, the number of applications to the program far exceeds the number of positions available, the program’s admission committee reserves the right to limit the number of applicants to be interview to two times the number of positions available in the class.

Technical Standards
Technical standards are mailed to all program applicants.

Medical Requirements
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required prior to beginning clinical experience.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
The program gives some preference to Indiana residents.

Volunteer Experience
The student is encouraged to observe in a radiation oncology facility prior to the interview.

CURRICULUM—NON-RADIOGRAPHER

Prerequisites
The following prerequisite course of study must be completed to be eligible for admission into the professional program. Students should consult with their academic advisors for appropriate courses and semester sequence.

*Two written communication courses (G) 
4-6 cr.
*Verbal communication course (G)   
2-3 cr.
*College Algebra and Trigonometry(G)
3-5 cr.
Physical and Biological Sciences (G) 
16-20 cr.
*Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with lab (G)
*General Physics 
Electives
Introductory Psychology (G)
3 cr.
Computer Science Elective 
3 cr.
Social/behavioral science elective (G) 
3 cr. 
*Medical Terminology 
3 cr.
General Electives 
15 cr.


Total Minimum Number of Credit Hours (56 cr.) Electives
(To bring total credits up to 55) The number of elective course differs among students but must bring the student’s total prerequisite course work to at least 55 credit hours. Additional electives may be required, before or during the professional program, to complete a minimum of 122 credit hours of academic course work for graduation.
View Web page for updates: www.iun.edu/~ahealth/rad/radther.shtml

Professional Program
Courses in the professional program are sequential and, therefore, must be taken in the order specified by the program faculty.

Professional Program – Non-Radiographer

SUMMER II SEMESTER

AHLT R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology*
2
AHLT R181 Clinical Experience in Radiography I*
2
Total
3

FALL SEMESTER
AHLT R250 Physics Applied to Radiology*
3
AHLT R102 Principles of Radiography
3
AHLT J350 Clinical Experience I*
2
AHLT J301 Orientation to Radiation Therapy*
4
AHLT J205 Medical Imaging Anatomy*
2
TOTAL
14

SPRING SEMESTER
AHLT R260 Radiation Biology and Protection*
3

AHLT R200 Pathology*

3
AHLT J302 Radiation Oncology Techniques*
3
AHLT J304 Radiation Oncology Patient Care*
2
AHLT J351 Clinical Practicum II*
2
TOTAL
13

SUMMER SEMESTER
AHLT J402 Radiation Oncology Techniques II*
3
AHLT J450 Clinical Practicum III*
3
TOTAL
6

FALL SEMESTER
AHLT J400 Physics of Radiation Oncology* 3
AHLT J303 Clinical Oncology I* 3
AHLT J409 Senior Project in Radiation Oncology* 3
AHLT J305 Clinical Dosimetry I* 3
AHLT J451 Clinical Practicum IV* 4
TOTAL 16

SPRING SEMESTER
AHLT J401 Physics of Radiation Oncology II* 3
AHLT J403 Clinical Oncology II* 3
AHLT J404 Quality Management in Radiation
Oncology* 2
AHLT J452 Clinical Practicum VI* 4
AHLT R408 Topics 2
Total 14
PROFESSIONAL COURSE TOTAL 67

*Core courses

ADMISSION—RADIOGRAPHER

Specific Requirements
In addition to the Allied Health Sciences admission policies found at the beginning of this section, the following admission policies apply to the Radiation Therapy concentration.

Application Deadline
February 1 of the year of anticipated entry.

Minimum Number of Prerequisite Credit Hours
Satisfactory completion of general-education and technical specialty requirements.

Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
2.3 on a 4.0 scale. This requirement is applied at the time of program application. Grades from remedial courses are not calculated in the grade point average of the prerequisite courses to determine the admission index.
Maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 on 4.0 scale for all radiography course work.

Minimum Specific Grade Point Average
Science and math grade point average of 2.3 and a 2.5 grade point average in stated prerequisite courses (on a 4.0 scale). This requirement is applied at the time of program application and must be maintained. Grades from remedial courses are not calculated in the mathematics and science grade point average to determine the admission index.

Interview
All qualified applicants must participate in an interview.

Technical Standards
Technical standards are mailed to all program applicants.

Medical Requirements
Documentation of completion of a physical examination is required prior to beginning clinical experiences.

Indiana Residents Preference Policy
The program gives some preference to Indiana residents.

Volunteer Experience
The student is encouraged to observe in a radiation oncology facility prior to the interview.

CURRICULUM—RADIOGRAPHER

Prerequisites
The following prerequisite course of study must be completed for students to be eligible for admission into the professional program. Students should consult with their academic advisors for appropriate courses and semester sequence in order to complete prerequisites. Prerequisites may be taken at any accredited college or university. The code “G” indicates a course that meets the school’s general-education requirements.

*Two written communication courses (G)
4-6 cr.
*Verbal communication course (G)
2-3 cr.
*College algebra and trigonometry (G)
3-5 cr.
*Human anatomy and physiology I and II with lab (G)
16-20 cr.
Introductory psychology (G)
3 cr.
Computer science elective
3 cr.
Humanities elective (G)
3 cr.
Total Minimum Number of Credit Hours (G)
56 cr.

Technology Specialty
Students must provide evidence of registration in radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) or completion of an accredited radiography program. The technical specialty area is complete for applicants who have completed an associate or baccalaureate degree in radiography.
Students who received their technical training in non­credit awarding programs and who have full credentials in radiography (ARRT) may be awarded credit for their credentials and experiences and/or petition to test out of technical specialty courses.

Professional Program
Courses in the professional program are sequential and, therefore must be taken in the order specified by the program faculty.

Professional Curriculum—Radiographer

SUMMER II
AHLT R100 Orientation to Radiologic Technology* 2
AHLT R181 Clinical Experience in Radiography I* 1
3

FALL SEMESTER
AHLT J350 Clinical Experience I* 2
AHLT J301 Orientation to Radiation Therapy* 4
6
SPRING SEMESTER
AHLT J302 Radiation Oncology Techniques* 3
AHLT J304 Radiation Oncology Patient Care* 2
AHLT J305 Clinical Dosimetry I* 2
AHLT J351 Clinical Practicum II* 2
9
SUMMER
AHLT J402 Radiation Oncology Techniques II* 3
AHLT J450 Clinical Practicum III* 2
5
FALL SEMESTER
AHLT J400 Physics of Radiation Oncology* 3
AHLT J303 Clinical Oncology I*  3
AHLT J409 Senior Project in Radiation Oncology* 3
AHLT J306 Clinical Dosimetry II* 2
AHLT J451 Clinical Practicum IV* 4
15
SPRING SEMESTER
AHLT J401 Physics of Radiation Oncology II* 3
AHLT J403 Clinical Oncology II* 3
AHLT J404Quality Management in Radiation Oncology* 2
AHLT J452 Clinical Practicum VI* 4
AHLT J408 Topics 2
14
PROFESSIONAL COURSE TOTAL 53

*Core courses

Awards
The program faculty will recommend to the university graduating students with superior academic performance for degrees awarded with distinction. Also, the program may recognize students with outstanding academic and clinical achievement during their professional program at the time of graduation.

Graduation Requirements
Satisfactory completion of 122 credit hours to include 33-55 credit hours of prerequisite and general-education courses and 53-55 credit hours of professional courses. All course work must be completed in compliance with the program’s and school academic and professional policies. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to take the examination of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) (www.arrt.org).

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