Undergraduate Academic Programs

Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Recreation (BSR), Public, Nonprofit, and Community Recreation Major

Description of Program

In the specialization, public, nonprofit, and community recreation, students acquire professional management skills that can be applied in a wide variety of recreation and leisure facilities (such as community centers, museums, and public parks) and programs around the world. Quality courses with small faculty/student ratio and varied fieldwork opportunities guarantee our students an outstanding educational experience.

Admission

Apply online for undergraduate admission to Indiana University at http://admissions.indiana.edu/.

A newly admitted freshman pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Recreation degree with a major in public, nonprofit, and community recreation will receive an offer of direct freshman admission to this desired program if he or she meets both of the following criteria:

  1. Entrance Test Scores: The applicant must have earned one of the following minimum standardized test scores:
    • a combined critical reading and math score on the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) of 1290. --or--
    • a composite score on the ACT (American College Test) of 27.
  2. Academic Performance: The applicant must either:
    • possess a minimum cumulative high school GPA of 3.5. --or--
    • rank in the top 12 percent of his or her high school graduating class.

Before entering the School of Public Health - Bloomington as a public, nonprofit, and community recreation major, all other students begin studies in the University Division, and then subsequently certify into this program as soon as they satisfy the following two admission criteria:

  1. successful completion of at least 30 credit hours.
  2. minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) at Indiana University.

Students in the University Division must also declare their intention to major in public, nonprofit, and community recreation to the University Division Records Office. If a student earns less than 2.0 semester GPA for the term before entering the School of Public Health-Bloomington, the student may be admitted on academic probation as long as the student has completed 30 credits and has at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA.

International applicants for admission to a second undergraduate degree program in the School of Public Health - Bloomington, whose primary language is not English, must satisfy one of the following criteria before being considered for admission directly into one the School's degree programs:

  • submission of a minimum score on the Test Of English As a Foreign Language (TOEFL), of 550 on the paper-based test, or 213 on the computer-based test, or 80 on the Internet-based test.
  • submission of a minimum score of 7 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).
  • proof of completing at least three full years of secondary school in a predominantly English speaking country.

For students from countries where the TOEFL and the IELTS are not available, other evidence of English proficiency may be considered.

All entering international students whose primary language is not English will be required to take a special examination in English with IU prior to registering. Prepared by IU and designed to test a student’s ability to use English in an academic setting, the exam consists of three parts: an essay on a general topic, a listening comprehension exercise, and a grammar, vocabulary, and reading comprehension section. There is little that one can do to prepare for this exam other than to continue using written and spoken English at every opportunity. Appropriate remedial English courses may be prescribed on the basis of the results of this test.

International students whose primary language is not English must agree to take any English language courses prescribed from the results of this examination. Fees for special part-time English courses are the same as for other courses; however, credits earned do not meet degree requirements. If the results of the proficiency examination indicate that full-time work in English is required, the student will be assigned to the Intensive English Program (IEP).  

Students enrolled in IEP do not take academic courses until they achieve adequate English proficiency. If a student has serious doubts about English ability and is not financially prepared to undertake the additional time and expense of an intensive English program here, the student should consider completing English study in the student’s home country. In addition, the student may consider delaying admission to a future session.

Degree Requirements

This is a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Recreation degree with a major in public, nonprofit, and community recreation.  A minimum of 30 successfully completed credit hours and a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA) are required for admission to this program.  Graduation requirements include:

  • completion of general education requirements.
  • completion of public, nonprofit, and community recreation major requirements.
  • a minimum of 120 successfully completed credit hours which count toward the degree program.
  • a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA.
  • a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA in courses used to complete the major.
  • No Pass/Fail except for free electives.
General Education (20 – 39 credits)

All undergraduate students must complete the IU Bloomington campus-wide general education common ground requirements. Such students must visit the 2016-2017 General Education Bulletin to view these requirements.

Major (75 cr.)
Public, Nonprofit, and Community Recreation Specialization (24 cr.)

Complete one of the following communication courses:

  • COLL-P 155 Public Oral Communication (3 cr.) (minimum grade of C–)
  • BUS-C 104 Business Presentations (3 cr.) (minimum grade of C–)

Complete one of the following computer courses:

  • CSCI-A 110 Introduction to Computers and Computing (3 cr.) +(N&M)
  • BUS-K 201 The Computer in Business (3 cr.)

Complete each of the following courses:

  • SPH-R 101 Introduction to Resource Development/Fundraising (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 220 Foundations of Public, Nonprofit, and Community Recreation (3 cr.) (minimum grade of C–)
  • SPH-R 221 Recreation Facilities Management (3 cr.) (minimum grade of C–)
  • SPH-R 230 Recreational Sports Programming (3 cr.) (minimum grade of C–)
  • SPH-R 412 Marketing for Leisure Services (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 414 Legal Aspects of Recreation (3 cr.)

Recreation Core (30 cr.)
Complete each of the following courses:

  • SPH-R 200 (Formerly: SPH-R 110) Foundations of Leisure and Public Health (3 cr.) +(S&H)
  • SPH-R 210 Inclusion in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (3 cr.) --or-- SPH-R 315 Leadership in a Diverse Society (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 311 Management in Recreation, Parks and Tourism (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 312 Career Perspectives and Internship Preparation (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 314 Data-Based Decision-Making Methods (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 410 (Formerly: SPH-T 410) Event Planning and Program Development (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 497 Professional Internship (12 cr.)
  • 320 Hours of Field Experience are required.

Focal Tracks (21 cr.)
Complete a minimum of 21 credits in one of the following three focal tracks: 1) Parks and Recreation, 2) Sport Delivery and Active Living, 3) Culture and Community Services. Course options are as follows:

Parks and Recreation

If this track is chosen, complete each of the following courses:

  • SPH-O 305 Integrated Resource Management (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 223 Recreation-Based GIS (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 413 Fiscal Management of Leisure Service Organizations (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 426 Human Resource Management in Leisure Services (3 cr.)

Complete the remaining 9 credits from the following courses:

  • AAAD-A 420 Transforming Divided Communities and Societies (3 cr.)
  • ANTH-E 380 Urban Anthropology (3 cr.)
  • ANTH-E 444 People and Protected Areas: Theories of Conservation (3 cr.)
  • CJUS-P 413 Police-Community Relations (3 cr.)
  • GEOG-G 313 Place and Politics (3 cr.)
  • GEOG-G 448 Capitalism and Nature (3 cr.)
  • HIST-A 347 American Urban History (3 cr.)
  • HPSC-X 342 Arborescence: Keeping Trees in Mind (3 cr.)
  • MSCH-P 384 Communication, Culture, and Community (3 cr.)
  • MSCH-R 321 Principles of Public Relations (3 cr.)
  • PACE-C 250 Leadership & Public Policy (3 cr.)
  • PSY-P 303 Health Psychology (3 cr.)
  • PSY-P 315 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)
  • SOC-S 309 The Community (3 cr.)
  • SOC-S 365 Health Behavior Analysis (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-E 422 Urban Forest Management (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-V 340 Urban Government Administration (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-V 365 Urban Development and Planning (3 cr.)
  • SPH-B 366 Community Health (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 301 Capital Campaigns (2 cr.)
  • SPH-R 425 Strategic Planning for Recreation Organizations (3 cr.)
  • SPH-T 302 Management of Food and Beverage Operations (3 cr.)
  • SPH-V 241 (Formerly SPH-V 351) Foundations of Environmental Health (3 cr.) +(N&M)

One of the following courses may be chosen as part of the 9 credits:

  • REL-D 350 Religion, Ethics and the Environment (3 cr.)
  • SPH-O 210 Introduction to Outdoor Recreation, Parks, and Human Ecology (3 cr.)
  • SPH-O 279 Outdoor Adventure Education (3 cr.)
  • SPH-O 340 Interpretation and Tour Guiding (3 cr.)
  • SPH-O 360 Human Health and Natural Environments (3 cr.)
  • SPH-O 430 Outdoor Adventure Programs: Foundation and Theories (3 cr.)

Sport Delivery and Active Living

If this track is chosen, complete each of the following courses:

  • SPH-K 216 Foundations of Physical Activity and Public Health (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 413 Fiscal Management of Leisure Service Organizations (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 426 Human Resource Management in Leisure Services (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 431 Youth Sport Management (3 cr.)

Complete the remaining 9 credits from the following courses:

  • ANTH-E 260 Culture, Health, and Illness (3 cr.)
  • PSY-P 303 Health Psychology (3 cr.)
  • PSY-P 327 Psychology of Motivation (3 cr.)
  • REL-C 402 Religion, Illness, and Healing (3 cr.)
  • REL-D 250, Religion, Ecology, and the Self (3 cr.) +(A&H)
  • SPEA-V 362 Nonprofit Management and Leadership (3 cr.)
  • SPH-B 366 Community Health (3 cr.)
  • SPH-M 328 Issues: Intercollegiate Athletics (3 cr.)
  • SPH-M 426 Sales Management in Sport (3 cr.)
  • SPH-O 279 Outdoor Adventure Education (3 cr.) --or-- SPH-O 430 Outdoor Adventure Programs: Foundations and Theories (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 321 Aquatic Management (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 335 Sport and Violence (3 cr.)
  • SPH-T 302 Management of Food and Beverage Operations (3 cr.)
  • SPH-Y 225 Disability, Health and Function (3 cr.)

One of the following courses may be chosen as part of the 9 credits:

  • AAAD-A 264 History of Sport and Afro-American Experience (3 cr.) +(S&H)
  • AAAD-A 265 Modern Sports and the Afro-American Experience (3 cr.) +(S&H)
  • SPH-M 333 Sport in America: Historical Perspective (3 cr.)
  • SPH-M 382 Sport in American Society (3 cr.)

Cultural and Community Services

If this track is chosen, complete each of the following courses:

  • SPH-R 203 Development Services (2 cr.)
  • SPH-R 413 Fiscal Management of Leisure Service Organizations (3 cr.)
  • SPH-T 333 Festival and Event Tourism (3 cr.)

Complete the remaining 13 credits from the following courses:

  • AAAD A 427 Cross-Cultural Communication (3 cr.)
  • ANTH-A 403 Introduction to Museum Studies (3 cr.)
  • ANTH-E 382 Memory and Culture (3 cr.)
  • FINA-A 390 Museum Studies I: Methods, History, Issues (3 cr.)
  • FINA-A 391 Museum Studies II: Museum Exhibitions (3 cr.)
  • MSCH-P 384 Communication, Culture, and Community (3 cr.)
  • MSCH-R 321 Principles of Public Relations (3 cr.)
  • REL-D 350 Religion, Ethics, and the Environment (3 cr.)
  • SOC-S 335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-A 354 Arts Marketing Fundamentals (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-V 362 Nonprofit Management and Leadership (3 cr.)
  • SPH-B 366 Community Health (3 cr.)
  • SPH-H 319 Global Health Promotion (3 cr.)
  • SPH-R 201 Annual Giving (2 cr.)
  • SPH-R 301 Capital Campaigns (2 cr.)
  • SPH-R 425 Strategic Planning for Recreation Organizations (3 cr.)

No more than 6 credits from the following courses may be chosen as part of the 13 credits

  • AAAD-A 150 Survey of Culture of Black Americans (3 cr.) +(A&H)
  • AMST-A 202 U.S. Arts and Media (3 cr.)
  • ANTH-A 122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.) +(S&H)
  • ANTH-E 200 Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.) +(S&H)
  • CMLT-C 155 Culture and Modern Experience (3 cr.)
  • ENG-R 224 Persuasion (3 cr.)
  • ENG-W 240 Community Service Writing (3 cr.)
  • FINA-H 100 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture (3 cr.) +(A&H)
  • FOLK-E 114 Music, Identity, and Social Life (3 cr.)
  • FOLK-F 230 Music in Social Movements (3 cr.)
  • GNDR-G 215 Sex and Gender: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3 cr.)
  • LATS-L 101 Introduction to Latino Studies (3 cr.) +(S&H)
  • SOC-S 220 Culture and Society (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-A 236 Music Industry I (3 cr.)
  • SPEA-A 241 Inside Community Arts Organizations (3 cr.)
  • THTR-T 100 Introduction to Theatre (3 cr.) +(A&H)
  • THTR-T 278 Applied Theatre (3 cr.)

+ Courses followed by a A&H notation apply toward completion of both the major requirement and the general education, arts and humanities requirement.

+ Courses followed by a S&H notation apply toward completion of both the major requirement and the general education, social and historical studies requirement.



Special Opportunities

During the course of their studies, students have the opportunity to work and train in a variety of professional public, nonprofit and community recreation management settings. Through class practica, projects, internship opportunities, and field experiences, students learn leadership, management, programming, marketing and evaluation, legal aspects of park and recreation management, and communication skills.

Careers

Graduates with this degree are prepared for a range of career positions, including: facility manager, community specialist, recreation leader, youth recreation services specialist, public sector special events programmer, aquatics director, recreation event manager, military recreation provider, recreation manager/supervisor, national park staff, and conservation officer.

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