IU Bulletins HomeBloomington CampusIndianapolis Campusred
Indiana University

Search Public and Environmental Affairs 2007-2009 Online Graduate Bulletin

Request Public and Environmental Affairs 2007-2009 Online Graduate Bulletin

School of Public and Environmental Affairs 2007-2009 Online Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of Public and
Environmental Affairs
2007-2009 Graduate
Academic Bulletin

www.indiana.edu/~speaweb
School of Public and
Environmental Affairs
Indiana University
SPEA 260
1315 E. Tenth Street
Bloomington, IN 47405-1701
(800) 765-7755 Local (812) 855-2840
Fax (812) 855-7802
Contact SPEA Graduate Office

www.spea.iupui.edu
Business/SPEA Building (BS) 3027
801 W. Michigan Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 274-4656/toll free (877) 292-9321
Contact SPEA Graduate Office
 

Bloomington Campus Graduate Degree Programs

Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)
Master of Public Affairs Joint Degree Programs
Other Joint M.P.A. Degree Programs
Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)
Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs
Other Joint M.S.E.S. Degree Programs
Master of Arts in Arts Administration (M.A.)
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Science
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Policy
Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs
Certificate Programs

Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

General Information
Degree Requirements
Core Requirements
Concentration Requirements
Experiential Requirements
Prior Professional Experience Credit
General Elective Courses
Fields of Concentration

Return to Top

General Information

The Master of Public Affairs program is an interdisciplinary, professional program that prepares students for positions in local, state, or federal government, quasi-governmental service, or the nonprofit (including philanthropic) arena. It broadens students’ comprehension of the economic, environmental, political, and social context in which the public servant works. The course of study requires completion of (1) the M.P.A. core, (2) the concentration requirement, (3) the experiential requirement, and (4) sufficient electives and/or prior professional experience credit to total 48 credit hours.

The curriculum of this program as contained in the core requirements encompasses preparation in a broad range of skills relevant to the operation of public or nonprofit agencies. It is based on the academic disciplines but not limited to any one. It is also problem-oriented, bringing the disciplines to bear on critical social, environmental, economic, and administrative issues.

Although the environment of public service is diverse and changing, effectiveness in that environment requires the development of special skills attained through detailed study in a chosen field of concentration. The fields of concentration span the variety of professional specialties found in public service. Thus, the program provides expertise in the core requirement and in a specific concentration area, as well as a general working knowledge of public affairs.

The M.P.A. program is fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA).

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Degree Requirements

(48 credit hours)
The core requirements of the M.P.A. degree consist of 18 credit hours of work in six courses. Each student must also complete the requirements of (at least) one concentration.

The experiential requirement ensures that each graduate of the M.P.A. program has gained insight into the world of public service by way of an experience outside the classroom. This experience may or may not involve the accumulation of credit hours toward the degree.

The remaining credit hours necessary for graduation, if any, are general electives that can be used to add breadth to a student’s program; to further explore a field of concentration; or to enhance skills in foreign languages, quantitative tools, or administrative techniques.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Core Requirements

(18 credit hours)

The M.P.A. core is designed to ensure that each student acquires both the prerequisite analytical skills and an understanding of policy issues and governmental processes that compose the environment within which graduates will pursue their careers.

Required Courses
SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Extremely well-prepared applicants may petition the program director to waive one or more of the core requirements on the basis of advanced course work done elsewhere. Students may be exempted on the basis of satisfactory equivalent course work or by examination. Credit hours waived from the core add to the electives a student may use. Students requesting course waivers should contact the appropriate graduate program director for requirements and guidelines.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Concentration Requirements

(15–24 credit hours)

Concentrations give students educational experiences in a substantive area of interest. The course of study in each concentration area is determined in conjunction with an advisor. Up to 3 credit hours of the concentration may be taken in V 585 Practicum in Public Affairs, if approved in advance by an advisor.

Concentration requirements may be waived on the same basis as core requirements. Consult with an advisor about course prerequisites.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Experiential Requirements

Each M.P.A. student must obtain professionally relevant experience through one of the following options: an approved internship (0-6 credit hours); SPEA-V 590 Research in Public Affairs; SPEA-V 601 Workshop in Public Affairs; or the award of prior professional experience credit.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Prior Professional Experience Credit

The M.P.A. Program Director of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs may grant up to 12 credit hours toward the M.P.A. degree for students who have had significant policy-level work experience in their backgrounds. In general, credit requires work experience above the entry level that involves some independent managerial, analytic, or scientific responsibility. Credit will be granted for work experience gained until initial matriculation in the program according to the following guidelines.

  1. To receive 3 credit hours, a student must have a minimum of two years’ technical, administrative, or policy-level work experience with a government, nonprofit, or private agency.
  2. 6 credit hours will be awarded for four years of managerial experience in directing programs, preparing budgets, and making decisions on organizational or staff development or for four years of professional experience in policy analysis or planning.
  3. Those with four or more years of executive assignment may be awarded 9 to 12 credit hours. Applicants must have had responsibility for supervision of high-level staff, budget preparation, and organizational control of public agencies, or executive responsibility for policy analysis or planning.

Application Process and Policies
Students are eligible to apply for prior professional experience credit up to the completion of 24 credit hours, which usually occurs before the close of their second semester of M.P.A. graduate study. Applicants may appeal the initial professional credit decision by submitting a request, in writing, for reconsideration and providing additional information to the appropriate program or campus director.

Determination of professional credit is made separately from decisions about transfer of credit. Under no circumstances will the prior professional experience credit and transfer credit total more than 21 credit hours of the 48 required for the M.P.A. degree. Students receiving prior professional experience credit should carefully plan the balance of their program with a faculty advisor.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

General Elective Courses

Graduate courses, or undergraduate courses approved for graduate credit, may be used to complete the overall degree requirement of 48 credit hours.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Fields of Concentration

Concentrations give students focused educational experiences in substantive areas of interest. Concentrations offered on the Bloomington campus are:

Students also may design specialized concentrations.

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Comparative and International Affairs Concentration

(18 credit hours)

The Comparative and International Affairs Concentration has two major functions:

  1. to provide a comparative basis for considering U.S. public policy and its underlying principles; and
  2. to examine the international links and institutions through which nations interact.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
SPEA-V 575 Comparative Public Management and Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 578 Introduction to Comparative and International Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 669 Economic Development, Globalization, and Entrepreneurship (3     cr.)

Electives (9 credit hours)
In consultation with your academic advisor, select one course. A partial list includes:
SPEA-E 518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 529 Application of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 519 Database Management Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 609 Seminar in Revenue Theory and Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 610 Seminar in Government Budget and Program Analysis (3 cr.) SPEA-V 622 Seminar in Urban Economic Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 667 Seminar in Public Capital and Debt Theory (3 cr.)

In consultation with your academic advisor, select two courses. A partial list includes:

SPEA-E 535 International Environmental Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 518 Intergovernmental Systems Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 574 Environmental Management in the Tropics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 576 Approaches to Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 589 Democratization and Transition in Eastern Europe and the Newly     Independent States (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 592 Global Health Issues and Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 596 Sustainable Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 524 Civil Society in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 510 Government Regulation in Market Economies (3 cr.)

In consultation with your academic advisor, select any 3 credit hour (or higher credit) course in area studies and/or language studies. In special circumstances, students are eligible to take up to 6 credit hours of area studies and/or language studies.

Or

In consultation with your academic advisor, select one course from electives list above and one Overseas Experience option below:

Overseas Experience

Option 1: Overseas Study Experience—includes 4 credit hours of SPEA-V 580 and/or up to 6 credit hours of area studies and/or language studies.

Overseas Study Experiences include individualized experiences that students develop independently or any of the numerous overseas programs currently administered by Indiana University area studies programs and the Office of International Programs in cooperation with SPEA, including programs in Africa, Asia, Europe, the former Soviet Union, and Latin America. Contact the SPEA Graduate Programs Office for more information.

Option 2: Graduate Seminar Europe (4 cr.) Students are selected competitively. Contact the Graduate Programs Office for additional information.

Option 3: Individualized Internship—up to 6 credits of SPEA-V 590 in consultation with your academic advisor and the Career Services Office.

With consent of the student’s academic advisor, Individualized Internships include internships performed in academic or governmental or professional organizations overseas. Relevant internships completed at U.S.-based organizations may also qualify, for example, internships in U.S. offices of international organizations or in international affairs offices of state or federal government agencies.

Special arrangements for fulfillment of course requirements will be made for foreign language and area studies (FLAS) fellowship students, in consultation with the student’s academic advisor and the Graduate Programs Office.

Return to Fields of Concentration

Economic Development Concentration

(18 credit hours)

The economic development concentration prepares students for positions in economic development at the city, county, and state levels.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)

SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 622 Seminar in Urban Economic Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 669 Economic Development, Globalization, and Entrepreneurship (3     cr.)

Electives (9 credit hours)
Select three of the following courses:
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 563 The Planning Process (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 564 Urban Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 567 Public Financial Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 568 Management of Urban Government Services (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 578 Introduction to Comparative and International Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 609 Seminar in Revenue Theory and Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 610 Seminar in Government Budget and Program Analysis (3 cr.) SPEA-V 667 Seminar in Public Capital and Debt Theory (3 cr.)

Or

other relevant SPEA courses with the approval of an economic development concentration advisor. At least one elective must be chosen from the above list. A student may choose up to two electives outside of SPEA with the approval of an advisor.

Return to Fields of Concentration

Environmental Policy and Natural Resource Management Concentration

(21 credit hours)

The environmental policy and natural resource management concentration integrates public policy and environmental science perspectives covering a range of topics including the economic analysis of natural resource utilization and allocation.

Required Courses (12 credit hours)

SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Electives (9 credit hours)
In consultation with your advisor, select one course in public policy and/or public management. A partial list includes:
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 510 Government Regulation in Market Economies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 518 Intergovernmental Systems Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)

In consultation with their advisors, students select two courses from one of the following groups or an equivalent course cluster:

Environmental Management
SPEA-E 536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 542 Hazardous Materials (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Resource Management
SPEA-E 460 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 461 Fisheries and Wildlife Management Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 528 Forest Ecology and Management (3 cr.)
BIOL-L 575 Ecosystem Structure and Function (3 cr.)

Return to Fields of Concentration

Information Systems Concentration

(18 credit hours)

The information systems (IS) concentration prepares students for entry-level and mid-career positions—such as systems analysts, consultants, Webmasters, and database managers—in the exciting, evolving, and rapidly growing fields of computing and communication technologies as they apply to public organizations. The IS concentration builds on a solid core of three courses and provides the flexibility to add three more electives from a wide range of course offerings. Students are encouraged to combine the IS concentration with other concentrations to strengthen their technical skills in a variety of applied areas.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
The following courses are required:
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 519 Database Management Systems (3 cr.)

Select one of the following:
SPEA-E 518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 550 Topics in Public Affairs (GIS only) (3 cr.)

Electives (9 credit hours)
Three courses from the following information systems application groups. (Note: Two of the courses must be from group A, B, or C.)

Group A: Geographic Information Systems
SPEA-E 518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 529 Application of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 550 Topics in Public Affairs (GIS only) (3 cr.)

Group B: Decision Support and Analysis
SPEA-E 555 Topics in Environmental Science: Computing Methods for     Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)

Group C: Design and Management of Information Systems
SPEA-V 602 Strategic Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations (3     cr.)
SPEA-V 611 Design of Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 613 Implementation of Information Systems (3 cr.)

Group D: Networking and Telecommunications
BUS-S 515 Foundations of Business Telecommunications (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 561 The Information Industry (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 564 Computerization in Society (3 cr.)
SLIS-L 571 Information Architecture for the Web (3 cr.)

Group E: Additional Options
Graduate courses that address issues in information technology, such as programming and the digital economy, are offered in other units such as the Department of Computer Science, the School of Informatics, the Kelley School of Business, and the School of Library and Information Science. Students may elect to take one of these electives with the approval of a faculty advisor.

Return to Fields of Concentration

Local Government Management Concentration

(24 credit hours)

The local government management concentration prepares students for entry-level and mid-career management and policy positions in local government. Course work includes an urban management core required of all students and a selection of advanced electives. Students should consult with a faculty concentration advisor to choose the advanced electives best suited to their interests. Students also participate in a Seminar in Urban Management in conjunction with the International City/County Management Association’s annual conference.

Required Courses (15 credit hours)
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 542 Government Financial Accounting and Reporting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 561 Public Human Resource Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 568 Management of Urban Government Services (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 623 Seminar in Urban Management (3 cr.)

Advanced Electives (6 credit hours)
Students must select two additional courses in consultation with their concentration advisors from one of the approved subject areas listed below:

  • Planning
  • Personnel/Labor Relations
  • Operations Management
  • Analysis and Information Systems
  • Government Finance
  • Administrative Law

Local Government Management Seminar

(3 credit hours)

Students are required to enroll in SPEA-V 550 Topics in Public Affairs – Professional Development Seminar (3 cr.) during their second year of study. This course is held in conjunction with attendance at the International City/County Management Association’s annual conference.

Return to Fields of Concentration

Nonprofit Management Concentration

(15 credit hours)

The nonprofit management concentration prepares persons for leadership positions in not-for-profit organizations. The core requirements for the M.P.A. degree provide a strong management and policy base. The concentration offers students the opportunity to develop this base through not-for-profit applications. Most courses in the concentration address the unique features and practices of not-for-profit organizations or the policies affecting them. Supplementary courses available in the concentration offer management techniques helpful to nonprofit leaders.

Required Courses (6 credit hours)
SPEA-V 521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector (3 cr.)

Electives (9 credit hours)

Elective Group I: All three electives may be selected from this group.

SPEA-V 522 Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.) SPEA-V 523 Civil Society and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 524 Civil Society in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 526 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations
SPEA-V 534 NGO Management in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 558 Fund Development for Nonprofits (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 602 Strategic Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations (3     cr.)
JOUR-J 531 Public Relations in Nonprofits (3 cr.)
LAW-B 761 Law and Philanthropy (3 cr.)

Elective Group II: One course in a nonprofit area may count towards the electives. Examples include:

AADM-Y 525 Museum Management ( 3 cr.)
SPEA-V 568 Management of Urban Government Services (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 576 Approaches to Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 577 International Economics Strategies and Trade Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 589 Democratization and Transition in Eastern Europe and the Newly     Independent States (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 592 Global Health Issues and Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 622 Seminar in Urban Economic Development (3 cr.)

Elective Group III: One course with a management skills focus may count towards the three electives. Examples include:

AADM-Y 525 Museum Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 547 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 569 Managing Interpersonal Relations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 622 Seminar in Urban Economic Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 652 Managing Work Force Diversity in Public Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 654 Public Program Management and Contracting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 662 Seminar in Accountability and Performance (3 cr.)

Return to Fields of Concentration

Policy Analysis Concentration

(18 credit hours)

The policy analysis concentration emphasizes substantive applications of management science/operations research, statistical analysis, cost-benefit analysis, program evaluation, and related techniques and approaches to public
policy issues and decisions.

Policy Analysis Skills (9 credit hours)
Required course:
SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)

Take a minimum of two of the following three courses:
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)

Note: Should the student decide to take V 539, V 541, and V 562, the third course can be counted as one of the three public courses required below.

Policy Field (9 credit hours)
Select three public policy courses with the permission of a concentration advisor. Courses that may be chosen include, but are not limited to, the following:

SPEA-V 510 Government Regulation in Market Economies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.) SPEA-V 547 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 550 Topics in Public Affairs (3 cr.) (approved topics)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 565 Environmental Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (3 cr.) SPEA-V 622 Seminar in Urban Economic Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 669 Economic Development, Globalization, and Entrepreneurship (3     cr.)

Return to Fields of Concentration

Public Financial Administration Concentration

(18 credit hours)

Courses in this concentration develop technical skills necessary for budget analysis, preparation, and operation; analysis and application of tax
policy; and public financial planning.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
Three of the following courses:

SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 609 Seminar in Revenue Theory and Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 610 Seminar in Government Budget and Program Analysis (3 cr.) SPEA-V 667 Seminar in Public Capital and Debt Theory (3 cr.)

One of the following courses:
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 542 Governmental Financial Accounting and Reporting (3 cr.)

Electives (6 credit hours)
Two of the following courses or other graduate courses approved by a concentration advisor as equivalent substitutions:
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 570 Public Sector Labor Relations (3 cr.)

Return to Fields of Concentration

Public Management Concentration

(15 credit hours)

The public management concentration covers the skills and tools appropriate for entry-level or mid-career management positions in a variety of public and nonprofit settings. Course work is distributed between a management core and
advanced electives. Selection of courses must be made in consultation with a concentration advisor.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
Three of the following courses:
SPEA-V 504 Public Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 550 Topics in Public Affairs: Public Program Management and     Contracting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 550 Topics in Public Affairs: Managing Workforce Diversity in Public     Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 602 Strategic Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations (3     cr.)

Electives (6 credit hours)
Two of the following courses or other graduate courses approved by a concentration advisor as equivalent substitutions:
SPEA-V 518 Intergovernmental Systems and Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 547 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 561 Public Human Resources Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 570 Public Sector Labor Relations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 610 Seminar in Government Budget and Program Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 662 Seminar in Accountability and Performance (3 cr.)

Return to Fields of Concentration

Specialized Concentration

(18 credit hours)

In consultation with advisors, students may design curricula that anticipate their career and educational goals and reflect their background and training. Specialized concentrations must be approved by two faculty advisors to ensure high standards of rigor, depth, and breadth. Specialized concentrations must be declared within the first 24 credit hours of a student’s program.

Return to Fields of Concentration

Accelerated Master of Public Affairs

This program allows the School of Public and Environmental Affairs’ top undergraduates to complete both their undergraduate and graduate degrees in five years. To be considered for this program a student must have earned a minimum GPA of 3.5, completed 96 undergraduate credit hours, and satisfied all general-education and School of Public and Environmental Affairs undergraduate core requirements. Because of the specialized nature of this program, potential applicants should contact the Bloomington undergraduate and graduate program directors for details.

Return to Fields of Concentration

Return to Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.)

Return to Top

Master of Public Affairs Joint Degree Programs

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

Return to Top

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

This combined master’s program is a 60-credit-hour program that gives the student more depth and breadth than is possible in a single degree.
M.P.A. and M.S.E.S. degrees are awarded concurrently after the student has completed the requirements for both degrees.

Application and Admission
Program Requirements
Public Affairs Core
Environmental Science Competencies
Capstone
Program Options
Professional Experiential Requirement

Return to Master of Public Affairs Joint Degree Programs

Application and Admission

The student must apply to and be accepted by both the Master of Public Affairs program and the Master of Science in Environmental Science program. The normal criteria for admission to each program apply.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Program Requirements

(60 credit hours)

The combined M.P.A.–M.S.E.S. program requires a minimum of 60 credit hours distributed among four components: environmental science core, public affairs core, environmental science and policy concentration, and professional experience.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Public Affairs Core

Required Courses (15 credit hours)
SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
        (With consent of the advisor, may substitute SPEA-E 538 Statistics for
         Environmental Science. Credit not given for both SPEA-E 538 and
         SPEA-V 506. Course should be taken in the first semester.)

SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Environmental Science Competencies

Requirements may be waived according to individual student backgrounds and professional objectives.

Required Courses (12 credit hours)
SPEA-E 526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Capstone

Required Course (3 credit hours)

Choose one of the listed capstone options from either the M.P.A. or M.S.E.S.

Students must fulfill the professional presentation requirement.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Program Options

All M.P.A.-M.S.E.S. joint degree students must complete the M.P.A. core requirements. Joint students can pursue one of four concentration options.

1. Environmental Management Concentration
2. Environmental Systems Analysis and Modeling Concentration
3. Specialized Concentration
4. Any M.S.E.S. or M.P.A. Concentration

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

1. Environmental Management Concentration

(24 credits hours)

Required Courses (24 credits hours)
Four of the following courses:
SPEA-E 515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.) or SPEA-E 410 Introduction to     Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 545 Lake and Watershed Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 562 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (3 cr.)

Four of the following:
SPEA-E 512 Risk Communication (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 510 Government Regulation in Market Economies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 516 Public Information Management Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 565 Environmental Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 571 State and Local Environmental Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)


Return to Program Options

2. Environmental Systems Analysis and Modeling Concentration

(27 credit hours)

Required (27 credit hours)

The following three courses:
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)

Four of the following courses:
SPEA-E 515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution Control (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 518 Vector-Based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 529 Application of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 555 Topics in Environmental Science (3 cr.) (modeling related)

Two of the following courses:
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)

Return to Program Options

3. Specialized Concentration

(21 credit hours)

Select four M.S.E.S. courses from one of the listed M.S.E.S. concentrations and three M.P.A. courses from one of the listed M.P.A. concentrations.

Return to Program Options

4. Any M.S.E.S. or M.P.A. Concentration

Any M.S.E.S. concentration plus 9 additional credit hours from a listed M.P.A. concentration
Or
Any M.P.A. concentration plus 12 additional credit hours from a listed M.S.E.S. concentration.

Return to Program Options

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Experiential Requirement

Each double master’s degree candidate must obtain professionally relevant experience through one of the following options: an approved internship (0-6 credit hours); advanced project; independent research/thesis; the award of prior professional experience credit; or an environmental science research project culminating in a master’s thesis. Students are encouraged to discuss with faculty members the relative merits of their experiences according to individual career objectives.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science
  (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

Return to Master of Public Affairs Joint Degree Programs

Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

The combined Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence program enables the student to take a four-year sequence of courses leading to both degrees.

Application and Admission
Program Requirements
Master of Public Affairs Requirements
Doctor of Jurisprudence Requirements

Return to Master of Public Affairs Joint Degree Programs

Application and Admission

The applicant must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education and must apply separately to both the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

If the applicant is admitted to only one school, the applicant is permitted to attend that school and is, of course, required to meet the graduation requirements of that school. It is recommended that the student apply to both schools simultaneously for the combined M.P.A.–J.D. program. It is possible, however, for a person already enrolled in the School of Law to apply for admission to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs up to the end of the second year of law study. It is also possible for a student enrolled in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs to seek admission to the School of Law up to the end of the first year of the M.P.A. course of study.

Academic Standing
Grade point averages in the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs are computed separately. To continue in the program, the student must meet the academic standards in each school. A student failing in one school but meeting academic standards in the other may complete work for the degree in the school in which the student is able to meet the academic standards. Such completion must be according to the same conditions (credit hours, residency, etc.) required of regular (noncombination) degree candidates; that is, 82 credit hours in law and 48 credit hours in SPEA. Students are eligible for honors in each school based on the criteria of each school.

School Residency
Students in the joint M.P.A.–J.D. program should enroll in courses through the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in the first year of the program and through the School of Law—Bloomington in the second year of the program. Alternatively, joint M.P.A.–J.D. students do have the option of enrolling in courses through the School of Law— Bloomington in the first year and in SPEA in the second year. In the third and fourth years, or until the program is completed, students should enroll through the school in which the majority of their credit hours reside in each enrollment period.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

Program Requirements

(113 credit hours)

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 36 credit hours of SPEA courses distributed among the M.P.A. core and a specialization area.

Required Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)

Specialization Area (15 credit hours)
The student chooses a field of specialization and develops a program of specialization courses in consultation with a SPEA faculty advisor.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

Doctor of Jurisprudence Requirements

(79 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 79 credit hours of law courses and to satisfy all requirements for the degree Doctor of Jurisprudence. For specific requirements, see the School of Law—Bloomington Bulletin.

Return to Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

Return to Master of Public Affairs Joint Degree Programs

Return to Top

Other Joint M.P.A. Degree Programs

In addition to joint degree programs with the Indiana University School of Law–Bloomington, the School of Public and Environmental Affairs collaborates with centers on area studies, other Indiana University Bloomington departments, and professional schools to deliver joint degree programs. SPEA’s combined master’s degree programs address the demand for specialists with expertise in policy, management, and science and the expertise and skill offered by the partner program. Candidates for the combined degree programs, excluding the program with the School of Law–Bloomington, complete the core requirements for the M.P.A. degree, additional course credits in a specialized concentration for a total of 36 credit hours in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, plus the required courses of the participating joint program. In every case students must apply separately to and be accepted into both programs to participate in a joint degree program. Joint degree students (other than the M.P.A.–J.D. and the M.P.A.–M.A. in Russian and East European Studies) must complete:

  1. the core requirements for the M.P.A. and a specialized SPEA concentration (36 credit hours) to include:

    Required Courses
    SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.) SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 560 Publlic Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

    Specialized Area
    Students may design and develop a program of specialization courses in consultation with SPEA faculty advisors.
    and

  2. the required courses of the other school or department for the joint degrees.

To determine the requirements for participating joint degree departments or schools, refer to the section of the University Graduate School Bulletin about the participating unit or visit the appropriate Web page.

SPEA participates with the following units in the M.P.A. program:

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in African American and African
    Diaspora Studies (M.P.A.–M.A.)
    Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies
    www.indiana.edu/~afroamer/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Central Eurasian Studies
(M.P.A.–M.A.)
    Department of Central Eurasian Studies
    www.indiana.edu/~ceus/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in East Asian Studies (M.P.A.–M.A.)
    Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures
    www.indiana.edu/~ealc/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Information Science (M.P.A.–M.I.S.)
    School of Library and Information Science
    www.slis.indiana.edu/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Journalism (M.P.A.–M.A.)
    Department of Journalism
    www.journalism.indiana.edu/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (M.P.A.–M.A.)
    The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
    www.indiana.edu/~clacs/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Library Science (M.P.A.–M.L.S.)
    School of Library and Information Science
    www.slis.indiana.edu/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Russian and East European Studies     (M.P.A.–M.A.)
    Russian and East European Institute

Note: Specialized Concentration Area—Joint degree students are required to enroll in SPEA-V 589 Democratization and Transition in Eastern Europe and Newly Independent States or its equivalent. For the remaining courses in the specialization area, students must develop a program of specialization in consultation with a SPEA advisor which is adapted to their educational and career objectives and complements the Russian and East European Studies curriculum. www.indiana.edu/~reeiweb/

Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in West European Studies     (M.P.A.–M.A.)
    West European Studies
    www.indiana.edu/~west/

Return to Top

Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

General Information
Degree Requirements
Entrance Requirements
Prior Professional Credit Option
Environmental Science Core Competencies
Economics, Policy, and Law Core Competencies
Concentration Requirements
Applied Ecology Concentration
Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Risk Assessment Concentration
Environmental Management Concentration
Water Resources Concentration
Tool Skill Courses
Capstone Course
Thesis Option
Professional Experiential Requirement
Accelerated Master of Science in Environmental Science

Return to Top

General Information

The Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.) program educates professionals who combine specialization in an area of environmental science or management with the analytical and policy skills necessary to apply that knowledge in a broader context. This degree program includes an experiential requirement, usually fulfilled by an internship, but also allows for a research focus culminating in a traditional master’s thesis.

For students desiring more in-depth study in environmental science, the M.S.E.S. program is an excellent preparation for entry into the Ph.D. in Environmental Science program. Alternatively, students desiring more in-depth preparation in policy, law, or other related fields can combine their M.S.E.S. degree with a degree in Public Affairs (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S), law (M.S.E.S.–J.D.), or a number of other disciplines in Biology, Geography, Geological Sciences, or Journalism.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Degree Requirements

The M.S.E.S. program requires 48 credit hours distributed among four sets of courses: science courses, policy and management courses, tool skill courses, and an experiential requirement. There are no required courses per se; however, each student is expected to demonstrate several competencies, depending on his or her concentration. These competencies include relevant natural and physical sciences, economics, policy or law, and quantitative problem solving. A Curriculum Advisory Committee works with the student to ensure that these competencies are met and that the student is pursuing a suitable plan of study. This curriculum provides students with a general knowledge of environmental science and management, the tool skills to allow them to apply that knowledge, and a specialized area of expertise.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Entrance Requirements

All students must have undergraduate coursework relevant to their intended area of focus in the M.S.E.S. degree program. Students are expected to have an adequate background in quantitative natural science subjects (e.g., mathematics, chemistry, and biology/ecology), which may vary according to the concentration the student selects.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Prior Professional Credit Option

The M.S.E.S. program director of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs may grant up to 12 credit hours toward the M.S.E.S. degree for students who have had significant technical or administrative work experience in their backgrounds. Credit will be granted for work experience gained until the end of the semester in which the student completes 24 credit hours according to the following guidelines.

  1. To receive 3 credit hours, a student must have a minimum of one year’s technical or administrative work experience.
  2. 6 credit hours will be awarded for one to four years of experience in environmental science or environmental management.
  3. Those with four or more years of executive assignment may be awarded 9 to 12 credit hours. Applicants must have had responsibility for environmental science or environmental management.

Application Process and Policies
Students are eligible to apply for prior professional experience credit up to the completion of 24 credit hours, which usually occurs before the close of their second semester of M.S.E.S. graduate study. Applicants may appeal the initial professional credit decision by submitting a request, in writing, for reconsideration and providing additional information to the appropriate program or campus director.

Determination of professional credit is made separately from decisions about transfer of credit. Under no circumstances will the prior professional experience credit and transfer credit total more than 21 hours of the 48 required for the degree. Students receiving prior professional experience credit should carefully plan the balance of their program with a faculty advisor.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Environmental Science Core Competencies

(Typically 12–15 credit hours)

Each student should demonstrate a competency in the following areas of environmental science: mathematics, chemistry, and biology/ecology. The selection of courses may vary according to the student’s concentration and professional objectives. Some or all of the following courses may be appropriate.

SPEA-E 526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 538 Statistics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
    or SPEA-V 506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.) SPEA-E 552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Economics, Policy, and Law Core Competencies

(Typically 6–12 credit hours)

Each student should demonstrate a competency in the following areas of environmental management. The selection of courses may vary according to the student’s concentration and professional objectives. Courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

SPEA-E 535 International Environmental Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 543 Environmental Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 596 Sustainable Development (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Environmental Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Concentrations

(Typically 18–21 credit hours)

Each student should select one of the following concentrations. Topics courses and independent study credits may be included in any concentrations with the approval of a faculty advisor.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Applied Ecology Concentration

The applied ecology concentration focuses on problem-solving techniques applied to current ecological issues. The diversity of the earth’s living species in both natural and managed ecosystems offers students a variety of study areas within applied ecology, including forest ecology and management, fisheries and wildlife management, soil and watershed management, endangered species, and wetlands. Courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

SPEA-E 440 Wetlands: Biology and Regulation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 455 Limnology (4 cr.)
SPEA-E 460 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 461 Fisheries and Wildlife Management Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 528 Forest Ecology and Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 534 Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 544 Subsurface Microbiology and Bioremediation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 545 Lake and Watershed Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 546 Stream Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 557 Conservation Biology
SPEA-E 570 Environmental Soil Science (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Risk Assessment Concentration

This concentration addresses the fate and transport of chemicals in the environment and the hazards and risks to human health and the environment associated with chemical pollution. Courses on the chemical/physical/biological reactions of pollutants in soil, aquatic, and atmospheric systems are included. Additional courses study the hazards associated with chemicals used in modern society, technologies available to manage and remediate contaminated sites, the toxicological effects of chemical exposure, and methods to assess risks associated with chemicals in the environment. Courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

SPEA-E 515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 537 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 542 Hazardous Materials (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 544 Subsurface Microbiology and Bioremediation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 562 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 570 Environmental Soil Science (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Environmental Management Concentration

This concentration incorporates principles and practices from both the natural and social sciences to identify, assess, and remedy problems affecting natural systems and human health. Applied physical, chemical, and biological sciences are foundations of knowledge for environmental managers. But environmental problems—and their solutions—typically involve questions of law, health and financial risks, economic and political trade-offs, and other institutional and organizational concerns. Students in this concentration are encouraged to focus on either natural or engineered systems. Courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Natural Systems Focus
SPEA-E 440 Wetlands: Biology and Regulation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 455 Limnology (4 cr.)
SPEA-E 460 Fisheries & Wildlife Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 461 Fisheries & Wildlife Management Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 528 Forest Ecology and Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 534 Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 545 Lake and Watershed Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 546 Stream Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 557 Conservation Biology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 570 Environmental Soil Science (3 cr.)
GEOG-G 532 Physical Meteorology/Climatology (3 cr.)
GEOG-G 550 Surface Water Hydrology (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Engineered Systems Focus
SPEA-E 431 Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 537 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 542 Hazardous Materials (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 544 Subsurface Microbiology and Bioremediation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 562 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (3 cr.)
GEOL-G 550 Surface Water Hydrology (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 510 Government Regulation in Market Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Environmental Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Water Resources Concentration

The water resources concentration emphasizes scientific principles of water quantity and quality. Courses provide information and problem-solving skills using biological, chemical, and physical descriptions of water in the environment. Courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

SPEA-E 440 Wetlands: Biology and Regulation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 455 Limnology (4 cr.)
SPEA-E 460 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 461 Fisheries and Wildlife Management Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 528 Forest Ecology and Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 534 Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 537 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 544 Subsurface Microbiology and Bioremediation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 545 Lake and Watershed Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 546 Stream Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 557 Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Tool Skill Courses

(Typically 3–9 credit hours)

Students are encouraged to acquire competency in analytical methods by focusing on tool skills appropriate to their concentration. Courses should be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.

SPEA-E 512 Risk Communication (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 529 Applications of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 507 Data Analysis and Modeling for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 547 Negotiation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Capstone Course

(3 credit hours)

Each candidate for the M.S.E.S. degree should take a course during which they participate in a team to carry out an integrative project that addresses a multidisciplinary problem. This requirement may be met in one of the following ways:

  1. SPEA-V 600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs, sections with an environmental focus.
  2. An alternative course with a similar structure, such SPEA-E 546 Stream Ecology or SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis or other approved course.
  3. SPEA-E 625 Research in Environmental Science (work with an advisory committee to complete a research project).

All capstone projects are expected to culminate in a formal report and public presentation.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Thesis Option

(Typically 18–24 credit hours)

For this option, the student pursues a research project culminating in a master’s thesis. This research is done under the supervision of a principal advisor and thesis committee, whom the student selects preferably in their first semester, but no later than at the start of their third semester. The amount of course work and selection of specific courses is determined by the student’s background, research topic, and the recommendations of the thesis committee. Completion of this option requires approval of the thesis and a successful oral defense of the project.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Experiential Requirement

(0–24 credit hours)

Each candidate for the MSES degree must obtain professionally relevant experience through one of the following options:

  1. Approved Internship (0–6 credit hours) The student will work with the SPEA Career Services Office to arrange for a suitable internship. Internships vary greatly according to the expectations and requirements of the sponsor. Students are expected to give careful attention in the selection of an internship suitable to their professional goals.
  2. Thesis Option (18–24 credit hours) Refer to the discussion of the thesis option above.
  3. Prior Professional Experience (0–6 credit hours) Students who have had significant environmental management, technical, or administrative work experience in the past may receive 6 credit hours. To receive 3 credit hours, a student must have a minimum of one year’s technical or administrative work experience. To receive 4–6 credit hours, the student should have two or more years of experience in environmental science or environmental management.
  4. Determination of professional credit is made separately from decisions about transfer of credit. Under no circumstances will the prior professional experience credit and transfer credit total more than 21 hours. Students receiving prior professional experience credit should carefully plan the balance of their program with the Curriculum Advisory Committee.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Accelerated Master of Science in Environmental Science

This program allows highly qualified undergraduate students in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs to complete both their undergraduate and graduate degrees in five years. To be considered for this program, a student must have earned a minimum GPA of 3.5, completed 96 undergraduate credit hours, and satisfied all general-education and SPEA undergraduate core requirements. Because of the specialized nature of this program, potential applicants should contact the M.S.E.S. program director for details.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

Return to Top

Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs

Master of Science in Environmental Science–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.S.E.S.–J.D.)

General Information
Application and Admission
Program Requirements
Master of Science in Environmental Science Requirements
Doctor of Jurisprudence Requirements

Return to Top

General Information

The combined Master of Science in Environmental Science–Doctor of Jurisprudence program is a four-year, 115-credit-hour sequence of courses and research that provides depth and breadth in both environmental science and law.

Both degrees are awarded when the student meets the degree requirements of the School of Law—Bloomington and SPEA.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs

Application and Admission

The student must have a bachelor’s degree in a physical or life science, engineering, or related field. Students interested in the joint M.S.E.S.–J.D. must apply to both the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Students normally apply to both schools concurrently for the combined program. It is possible, however, for a person already enrolled in the School of Law to apply for admission to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs up to the end of the second year of law study. A student enrolled in SPEA may seek admission to the School of Law— Bloomington up to the end of the first year of the M.S.E.S. program.

Academic Standing
Grade point averages in the School of Law—Bloomington and SPEA are computed separately. To continue in the program, the student must meet the academic standards in each school. A student failing in one school but meeting academic standards in the other may complete work for the degree in the school in which academic standards are being met. Such completion must be according to the same conditions required of regular (noncombination) degree candidates; that is, 82 credit hours for law and 48 credit hours for SPEA. Students are eligible for honors in each school based on the criteria of each school.

Program Advisors
Students enrolled in the combined program are required to have a SPEA faculty advisor and are encouraged to seek an advisor from the faculty of the School of Law—Bloomington. The co-advisors can then review and counsel with respect to each student’s course selection for each semester to assure attainment of educational objectives.

School Residency
Students in the joint M.S.E.S.–J.D. program should enroll in courses through SPEA the first year of their programs and through the School of Law in the second year of their programs. Alternatively, joint M.S.E.S.–J.D. students have the option of enrolling in courses through the School of Law—Bloomington in the first year and SPEA in the second year. In the third and fourth years, or until the joint program is completed, students should enroll through the school in which the majority of their credit hours resides in each enrollment period.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs

Program Requirements

(115 credit hours)

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs

Master of Science in Environmental Science Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 36 credit hours of courses distributed among the environmental science competencies, environmental sciences focus, and a multidisciplinary capstone project.

Environmental Science Competencies
(15 credit hours)

Five of the following courses with the approval of an advisor.
SPEA-E 512 Risk Communication (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 529 Applications for Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 538 Statistics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 643 Natural Resource Management (3 cr.)

Environmental Science Focus
(18 credit hours)

Students are required to develop an area of specialization approved by a SPEA faculty advisor.

It is recommended that this be done in consultation with both joint law and environmental science faculty advisors.

Capstone Course
(3 credit hours)

Each student in the M.S.E.S.-J.D. degree program must take SPEA-V 600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs that addresses a multidisciplinary problem.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs

Doctor of Jurisprudence Requirements

(79 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 79 credit hours of law courses and to satisfy all requirements for the degree Doctor of Jurisprudence. For specific requirements, see the School of Law—Bloomington Bulletin.

Return to Master of Science in Environmental Science Joint Degree Programs

Return to Top

Other Joint M.S.E.S. Degree Programs

In addition to joint degree programs with the Indiana University School of Law–Bloomington, the School of Public and Environmental Affairs collaborates with centers on area studies, other Indiana University Bloomington departments, and professional schools to deliver joint degree programs. SPEA’s combined master’s degree programs address the demand for specialists with expertise in policy, management, and science and the expertise and skill offered by the partner program. Candidates for the combined degree programs, excluding the program with the School of Law–Bloomington, complete the competency requirements for the M.S.E.S. degree, additional course credits in a specialized focus for a total of 36 credit hours in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, plus the required courses of the participating joint program. In every case students must apply separately to and be accepted into both programs to participate in a joint degree program. Joint degree students (other than the M.S.E.S.–J.D.) must complete:

  1. the competency requirements for the M.S.E.S. and a specialized SPEA
    concentration (36 credit hours) and
  2. the required courses of the other school or department for the joint degrees.

To determine the requirements for participating joint degree departments or schools, refer to the section of the University Graduate School Bulletin about the participating unit or visit the appropriate Web page.

SPEA participates with the following units in their M.S.E.S. program:

Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Arts in Biology
    (M.S.E.S.–M.A.)
    Department of Biology
    www.bio.indiana.edu/

Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Arts in Geography
    (M.S.E.S.–M.A.)
    Department of Geography
    www.indiana.edu/~geog/

Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Science in Geography
    (M.S.E.S.–M.S.)
    Department of Geography
    www.indiana.edu/~geog/

Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Science in Geological
    Sciences (M.S.E.S.–M.S.)
    Department of Geological Sciences
    www.indiana.edu/~geosci/

Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Arts in Journalism
    (M.S.E.S.–M.A.)
    School of Journalism
    www.journalism.indiana.edu/

Return to Top

Master of Arts in Arts Administration (M.A.)

Program Goals and Objectives
Administration of the Program
Degree Requirements

Return to Top

Program Goals and Objectives

Arts administrators are extraordinary individuals. They must function not only as leaders, but also as managers, fundraisers, planners, educators, conciliators, facilitators, and communicators. They must be realists as well as idealists, respectful of the needs of both art and business, and forward-looking yet mindful of the past.

Since 1971 the Indiana University Arts Administration Program has been committed to the development of such leaders. The program, a two-year, multidisciplinary course of study leading to an M.A. in Arts Administration, is broad-based in outlook and curriculum and strives to achieve a balance of artistic and management concerns, theory and hands-on experience. Students complete three semesters of course work, on-campus practicums, and a one-semester supervised internship off campus. Specialization is available in both visual and performing arts areas. The program seeks to serve students who are at the beginning stages of their careers as well as older students wishing to change careers.

Though small in size, the City of Bloomington provides an ideal setting for the program. The city’s thriving arts community includes more than 150 arts organizations as well as the internationally acclaimed Lotus World Music and Arts Festival. On the IU Bloomington campus, the School of Music presents more than 1,000 concerts and events each year, and a new production opens almost every other week on one of the two stages in the Department of Theatre and Drama. Other cultural organizations on campus include the IU Auditorium, which offers touring Broadway productions; the IU Art Museum, one of the nation’s finest university art museum; the Mathers Museum of World Cultures; the African American Arts Institute; the Archives of Traditional Music; and the Lilly Library of rare books and manuscripts.

Return to Master of Arts in Arts Administration (M.A.)

Administration of the Program

The program is administered by a full-time director and also utilizes an advisory committee, faculty drawn from fine arts, music, theatre and drama, SPEA, business, anthropology/museum studies, and the African American Arts Institute.

Return to Master of Arts in Arts Administration (M.A.)

Degree Requirements

(45 credit hours)

The program requires 45 credit hours of course work. A typical two-year course schedule includes 13.5 credit hours the first semester of Professional Component and Skill Requirements. The second semester of 13.5 credit hours includes Managing Artistic Organizations, skill requirements, and an elective. The third semester of 12 credit hours includes the capstone seminar course and electives. In the final semester, students complete a four- to six-month internship in an arts organization of their choice. Recent sites have included Carnegie Hall, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Smithsonian, the Museum of Fine Arts–Houston, and the Barrier Island Group for the Arts (BIG ARTS) on Sanibel Island. While there is no thesis requirement, extensive writing projects are part of the capstone seminar course and internship experiences.

The following courses are required:

Semester I
AADM-Y 525 Museum Management (3 cr.)
AADM-Y 535 Arts Administration and the Cultural Sector (3 cr.)
AADM-Y 540 Computer Applications for the Arts (1.5 cr.)
BUS-L 575 Legal Issues in the Arts (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector (3 cr.)

Semester II
AADM-Y 515 Financial Management for the Arts (3 cr.)
AADM-Y 530 Audience Development and Marketing the Arts (3 cr.)
AADM-Y 626 Desktop Computer Communications (1.5 cr.)
Select two electives with approval of the Arts Administration Program advisor.

Semester III
AADM-Y 511 Performing Arts Center Management (3 cr.)
AADM-Y 650 Seminar in Arts Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 558 Fund Development for Nonprofits (3 cr.)
Select one elective with approval of the Arts Administration Program advisor.

Semester IV
AADM-Y 550 Internship in Arts Administration (3 cr.)
AADM-Y 550 Practicum in Arts Administration (3 cr.)

Return to Master of Arts in Arts Administration (M.A.)

Return to Top

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Science

General Information
Admission
Degree Requirements

Return to Top

General Information

This doctoral program is administered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in cooperation with the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Geography, and Geological Sciences. The Ph.D. in environmental science degree is awarded by the University Graduate School.

The program provides a rigorous, comprehensive education in environmental science. The specific objectives of the program are: (1) to conduct advanced research and scientific analysis of environmental events, issues, and problems; (2) to further understanding of the nature and management of natural and human environments; and (3) to provide an opportunity for students and faculty members in several departments to engage in collaborative environmental research in an interdisciplinary mode.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Science

Admission

A student must apply to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs for doctoral studies; those accepted will be recommended to the University Graduate School for formal admission into the Ph.D. program. Applicants to this program must have completed at least a bachelor’s degree in science, mathematics, engineering, or a related field. Prospective students are required to submit: (1) a statement of purpose, which should be as specific as possible and, preferably, should refer to potential research mentors by name; (2) official results of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); (3) official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work completed; and (4) three letters of recommendation. Applicants whose native language is not English must also submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Science

Degree Requirements

The degree requires: (1) substantial knowledge in a primary environmental science concentration; (2) breadth in related environmental science and policy; (3) an understanding of research methods; (4) an in-depth knowledge of the dissertation topic; and (5) a dissertation that demonstrates the student’s ability to analyze, explain, and interpret research clearly and effectively.

Advisory Committee
During the first semester of enrollment, each student must organize an advisory committee. Normally this committee consists of at least four faculty members: at least two should be from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; the others may be from other departments or from outside the university. Membership of the advisory committee is approved by the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science and the dean of the University Graduate School. At least three members of the advisory committee must be full members of the graduate faculty.

Fields of Study
Each student should define a principal field of study, which may be interdisciplinary. The student should prepare a proposal outlining a program of course work that the student believes lies within that principal field.

Each student should also prepare a program of course work that fulfills the requirement of breadth in environmental science and policy. The breadth requirement may be fulfilled by using a wide spectrum of environmentally related courses, including areas such as economics, law, and management, in addition to other science courses.

Each student should also prepare a statement of courses or activities for meeting the research methods requirement. Normally these include subjects such as computer science, geographic information systems, remote sensing, statistics, and mathematical modeling, although other technical skill areas such as electronics and analytical chemical techniques may be appropriate for some students.

Narrative Statement
Each student must prepare a narrative statement that includes a discussion of the student’s previous educational experiences, a statement of career objectives, a statement of research interests, and a proposed program of course work.

Each student must submit the narrative statement to the advisory committee for approval, usually during the first semester in the program.

Course Requirements
The exact nature and amount of course work in each of the three areas—principal field of study, breadth in environmental science and policy, and research methods—is determined by the advisory committee after review and approval of the student’s proposed plan of study in each of these areas. Selection of specific courses is based on obtaining (1) adequate knowledge for qualifying examinations, (2) appropriate preparation for a research project, and (3) a mixture of courses that meets the individual professional goals of the student.

The Ph.D. degree requires the completion of at least 90 credit hours in advanced study and research beyond the bachelor’s degree. A student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of advanced course work in environmental science and policy. Students must also complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of research, normally taken as SPEA-E 625 or SPEA­E 890. The student, with the approval of the advisory committee, should complete some combination of additional course work and research sufficient to meet the 90 credit hour requirement.

Each student is required to enroll in SPEA-E 680 Seminar in Environmental Science and Policy (1 credit hour/semester) for four semesters during their degree program. Students enrolled in SPEA-E 680 may either make a formal presentation or write a brief synopsis and critique of four presentations attended each semester. Students are encouraged to enroll in SPEA-E 710 Advanced Topics in Environmental Science, which may be taken multiple times as the topics will vary. Advanced topics and reading courses may be used to meet requirements, depending upon the topic and the student’s area of interest.
Students should note that 30 credit hours of advanced course work, if properly selected, and 6 credit hours of research, may be applied toward the Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.) degree. With an additional 12 credit hours of approved course work, a student may be awarded the M.S.E.S. degree while completing the requirements for the Ph.D. in environmental science. Completion of the M.S.E.S. degree as part of this doctoral program is not a requirement; however, this option may be appropriate for some students.

Qualifying Examinations
Before a student is admitted to candidacy, all requirements determined by the advisory committee must be met and the qualifying examinations passed. A student who fails qualifying examinations may retake them only once.

The decision to admit a student to doctoral candidacy is made by the advisory committee, which evaluates the student’s performance in the written examination, research proposal, and oral examination.

Written Examination
This examination should be taken by the end of a student’s fifth semester in the Ph.D. program. The exam focuses on topics covered by the student’s course work and related to the student’s research interests. The examination is written and graded by the student’s advisory committee. The written examination is graded as pass, conditional pass, or fail.

Research Proposal
No later than the end of the fifth semester, the student should submit a written research proposal for review by the advisory committee. The proposal should be documented, clearly stating a research objective, the approach to be taken, and the significance of the work.

Oral Examination
Each candidate is examined orally by the advisory committee. The oral examination expands upon the written examination and covers the student’s research proposal.

Research Committee
Upon the student’s successful completion of the qualifying examinations, a research committee is formed. Normally this committee consists of at least four faculty members: at least two should be from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; the others may be from other departments. The director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science recommends the student’s research committee to the dean of the University Graduate School. At least three members of the research committee must be full members of the graduate faculty.

Dissertation
A dissertation is required and must be of sufficient value to warrant publication. The dissertation must represent a substantial research effort, both in quality and quantity. The dissertation requirement may be met by preparing a traditional dissertation or by preparing a portfolio of research documents including publications, manuscripts in press, and completed manuscripts suitable for submission to a journal. These documents may have multiple authors, although the doctoral candidate must demonstrate that he or she made significant contributions to at least two of the publications or manuscripts submitted for review. The research portfolio must have introductory and concluding chapters to integrate across the topics. The research portfolio also must be prepared to meet the Graduate School’s requirements for dissertations. A public presentation of the dissertation research is required. The dissertation must be approved by the research committee.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Science

Return to Top

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Affairs

General Information
Admission
Degree Requirements

Return to Top

General Information

The Doctoral Program in Public Affairs was created to take advantage of the unique strengths of SPEA’s interdisciplinary faculty and research programs, both of which have earned wide recognition from peer institutions, national and international agencies, and professional groups. The curriculum equips students with the necessary skills for independent research and analysis of problems, issues, and solutions in government and the nonprofit sector in four major fields:

  1. Public Finance: the theory and practice of fiscal administration, including public budgeting, revenue administration, and financial management;
  2. Public Management: the design and operation of government institutions, including strategic/operations management and interrelationships between public and private organizations; and
  3. Public Policy Analysis: research methods and quantitative techniques for policy analysis, including the content, design, and evaluation of public programs.
  4. Environmental Policy: the study of and contribution to public policies that affect the environment, both domestic and international, including legal, economic, and other policy tools and approaches.

Instead of being grounded in a traditional academic discipline, each of the fields has developed from several theoretical literatures applied to real-world public affairs problems. Although research is grounded in the social sciences, the context of inquiry reverses the normal research process. Instead of beginning with questions originating in discipline-based scholarship, the research process begins with public problems and issues. The research challenge, then, is to match available tools of inquiry to the research opportunities presented by problems.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Affairs

Admission

Students apply directly to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; those accepted are recommended to the University Graduate School for formal admission into the Ph.D. program. Application materials can be found at www.gradapp.indiana.edu/. Applicants to this program must have completed at least a bachelor’s degree. Prospective students are required to submit (1) a statement of purpose, which should be as specific as possible and, preferably, should refer to potential research mentors by name; (2) official results of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); (3) official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed; and (4) three letters of recommendation. Applicants whose native language is not English must also submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Affairs

Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. in Public Affairs degree requires the completion of at least 90 credit hous in advanced study and research beyond the baccalaureate. Typically, one-half to two-thirds of the 90 credit hours are taken in formal course work and one-third in thesis credit. Students completing a Master of Public Affairs or similar degree may be allowed to transfer some of their graduate course work (30 hours maximum) if approved by their Progress Review Committees, though a prior master’s degree is not required for admission.

Core Requirements

The following three courses are required for all Public Affairs students:

SPEA-V 680 Research Design and Methods in Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 621 Seminar in Teaching Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

This course prepares students for college teaching and their professional responsibilities toward current and future students. It is taken in a student’s first year in the program:
SPEA-V 691 Workshop in Public Policy.

Each student is required to take this 1 credit hour course for three semesters. The workshop features research presentations by faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced students. Its intent is to prepare students to critique current literature in the field, learn to prepare manuscripts for presentation and publication, and defend their ideas and theories.

Research Tool Skills

Required research skills include a two-semester quantitative analysis sequence and two additional elective courses or proficiency in a foreign language.

The two-semester quantitative analysis sequence can be fulfilled a number of different ways, including one of the sequences listed below.

SPEA-V 606 Statistics for Research in Public Affairs I (3 cr.) and
SPEA-V 607 Statistics for Research in Public Affairs II

BUS-G 651 Econometric Methods in Business I (3 cr.) and
BUS-G 652 Econometric Methods in Business II (3 cr.)

ECON-E 572 Statistical Techniques in Economics II (3 cr.) and
ECON-E 671 Econometrics I (3 cr.)

POLS-Y 576 Political Data Analysis II (3 cr.) and
POLS-Y 577 Advanced Topics in Political Science (3 cr.)

SOC-S 554 Statistical Techniques in Sociology I (3 cr.) and
SOC-S S 650 Statistical Techniques in Sociology II (3 cr.)

In addition, students must demonstrate either (1) advanced proficiency in quantitative analysis or specialized research skills by completing two additional courses approved by the student’s Progress Review Committee or (2) proficiency in a language proficiency exam from the appropriate language department at Indiana University.

Major Fields

Students select two of the four SPEA Public Affairs major fields to prepare for their qualifying examinations. For each field, the student must complete required courses and approved electives. The fields and the required courses are:

Public Management The design and operation of government and not-for-profit institutions, including strategic/operations management and interrelationships between public, private, and civil society organizations.

Required courses:
SPEA-V 671 Public Organization and Management I (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 672 Public Organization and Management II (3 cr.)

Public Finance The theory and practice of fiscal administration, including public budgeting, revenue administration, and financial management.

Required courses:
SPEA-V 666 Public Revenue (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 668 Seminar in Public Budgeting (3 cr.)

Public Policy Analysis Research methods and quantitative techniques for policy analysis, including the content, design, and evaluation of public programs.

Required courses:
SPEA-V 664 Seminar in Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 673 Public Policy Analysis and Management Science/Operations
    Research (3 cr.)

Environmental Policy Economics, law, politics, and implementation of environmental policies in the United States and abroad.

Required courses:
Economics
SPEA-V 625 Environmental Economics (3 cr.)

Law
SPEA-V 645 Environmental Law (3 cr.) or
LAW-B 783 International Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Policy
SPEA-V 710 Topics in Public Policy: Domestic Environmental Policy (3 cr.) or SPEA-V 710 Topics in Public Policy: International Environmental Policy (3 cr.)

Minor Field

Students select a minor field according to their research interests. A three- to four-course sequence is negotiated between the student and the Progress Review Committee, following the requirements of the department or school offering the minor. Among the minor fields chosen by students currently in the program are Economics, Finance, Political Science, Sociology, Geography, Economic Development, and Environmental Science.

Major Junctures

Progress Review Committee
Each student is assigned an advisor on arrival in Bloomington. If the advisor sufficiently reflects a student’s research interests, then the student can request that the advisor serve as chairperson of the student’s Progress Review Committee. The student may also select another professor who is more suited to the student’s research interests.

At the end of the first year, the student develops a Progress Review Committee. The committee, in cooperation with the student, defines program objectives, supervises the selection and completion of the minor field, monitors overall progress toward completion of course work requirements, and administers the qualifying exams. Members of the Progress Review Committee should be scholars who know the student’s academic record and who are recognized experts in the fields in which the student will stand examination. The committee will consist of four to five members chosen by the student in consultation with the director of the Ph.D. program. At least one member of the Progress Review Committee will be chosen from each of the student’s two major fields. It is required that one member of the Progress Review Committee be a non-School professor and represent the outside minor.

Third Semester Review
During the third semester each student holds a third semester review meeting with the Progress Review Committee. The purpose of the meeting is to reach an agreement between the student and the committee about the character and status of the student’s program. This meeting also serves as a formal evaluation of the student’s performance and prospects and includes a presentation of a research paper prepared by the student.

In this progress review meeting, the committee members review the student’s record of past and planned courses, the likely dissertation topic, and the quality of the research paper and its presentation. The committee determines whether the proposed program of courses will prepare the student for the examinations to be taken at the end of the course work as well as for the dissertation.

The principal objective of the research paper is to allow the faculty to judge whether the student has the ability to complete all requirements for this research-oriented degree in a timely fashion. Thus, of most importance will be that the paper demonstrates the student’s ability to carry out reasonably independent research and write the results in a well-reasoned and coherent fashion. The paper should also demonstrate that the student has a good command of the literature in the area and has the ability to use appropriate research methods in carrying out the analysis. It is anticipated that the progress review paper will be a revision of a substantial research paper prepared to fulfill a requirement for a regular course. (The student can, however, submit an entirely new paper to fulfill this requirement.) It should be of a quality warranting presentation at a professional society meeting.

Qualifying Examinations
After completion of course work, students take a written exam in each of their two major fields. The examination committee may also require an oral examination at its discretion. If there is an exam requirement in the minor department, then the student must also complete a third exam. Once the examinations are successfully completed, the student is formally admitted to candidacy.

Dissertation
After filing for candidacy status, the doctoral candidate forms a Research Committee consisting of at least four faculty members, including one representative of the candidate’s minor field. This committee may be but is not necessarily identical to the Progress Review Committee. The selection of Research Committee members should reflect the dissertation topic and expertise of the faculty chosen.

The candidate prepares a dissertation proposal to present and defend in a meeting of the Research Committee. The Research Committee is ultimately responsible for determining whether the dissertation is acceptable.

Placement
The Ph.D. Office, the director of the program, and individual faculty members work hard to ensure that graduates of the program are placed in academic or research organizations. Although the Public Affairs program has been operational only since 1993, graduates have been very successful recently in obtaining such positions. Recent placements include North Carolina State University, San Francisco State University, University of Colorado, University of North Carolina—Wilmington, Iowa State University, the U.S. Department of Labor, National Taipei University, and Yonsei University in South Korea.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Affairs

Return to Top

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Policy

General Information
Admission
Degree Requirements

Return to Top

General Information

The Joint Ph.D. Program in Public Policy is a collaborative endeavor of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Department of Political Science.

Its emphasis is on the broad field of public policy, concerning the environment of public policy; the processes of policy formation, management, and implementation; and the analysis and evaluation of policy outputs and results. The institutional setting and design of the program offer a unique educational opportunity. Students in the program receive rigorous social science training and gain knowledge of government decision-making processes, problem-solving capabilities, and an understanding of the substantive aspects of public problems and their effects on public institutions.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Policy

Admission

All applicants to the public policy program are subject to approval by a SPEA–Department of Political Science joint admissions committee.
Application materials can be found at www.gradapp.indiana.edu/. Applicants for admission and for financial assistance are required to submit a statement of career goals, official results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work, and a minimum of three letters of recommendation. Students whose native language is not English also must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Joint Program Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid examines each application closely to determine suitability for the program. The committee looks beyond the formal academic record, at the applicant’s demonstrated ability to pursue independent study, language and research skill training, and maturity and experience.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Policy

Degree Requirements

The University Graduate School requires doctoral students to complete 90 credit hours of graduate credit. Typically, two-thirds of the 90 hours are taken in formal course work and one-third in thesis credit. Students holding a Master of Public Affairs or similar degree may be allowed to transfer some of their graduate course work (30 credit hours maximum) if approved by their Progress Review Committee.

Core Requirements

Public Policy students are required to complete the following courses:

SPEA-V 680 Research Design and Methods in Public Affairs (3 cr.) or
   POLS-Y 570 Introduction to the Study of Politics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 690 Seminar in Public Policy Process (3 cr.) or
    POLS-Y 565 Public Administration, Law, and Policy: Approaches and Issues     (3 cr.)

This course is offered alternately each fall semester by SPEA (V 690) and the Department of Political Science (Y 565):
SPEA-V 691 Workshop in Public Policy (1 cr.)

Each student is required to take this 1 credit hour course for three semesters. The workshop features research presentations by faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced students. It prepares students to critique current literature in
the field, to prepare manuscripts for presentation and publication, and to defend
their ideas and theories. There are two sections offered: one by SPEA and the other by the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis.

SPEA-V 621 Seminar in Teaching Public and Environmental Affairs (2 cr.) or
  
POLS-Y 550 Political Science and Professional Development (1-3 cr.)

These courses prepare students for college teaching and their professional responsibilities toward current and future students. They are taken in a student’s first year in the program.

Research Tool Skills

Required course work for research skills includes a basic two-semester statistics sequence and two additional elective courses or proficiency in a foreign language.

Basic Tool Skills:
The two-semester quantitative analysis sequence requirement is generally fulfilled through one of the course sequences listed below.
SPEA-V 606 Statistics for Research in Public Affairs I (3 cr.) and
   SPEA-V 607 Statistics for Research in Public Affairs II (3 cr.)
POLS-Y 575 Political Data Analysis I (3 cr.) and
POLS-Y 576 Political Data Analysis II (3 cr.)
SOC-S 554 Statistical Techniques in Sociology I (3 cr.) and
   SOC-S 650 Statistical Techniques in Sociology II (3 cr.)

Advanced Tool Skills:
In addition, students must demonstrate either (1) advanced proficiency in quantitative analysis or specialized research skills by completing two additional courses approved by the student’s Progress Review Committee or (2) proficiency in a language appropriate to his/her field of study and approved by the Progress Review Committee. To qualify as language proficient, a student must take a language proficiency exam from the appropriate language department at Indiana University.

Fields of Concentration

The School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Department of Political Science share equally in delivering public policy as the major field of preparation and specialization. Students in the Public Policy Program select two concentration areas—one from SPEA and one from Political Science—in addition to the required concentration in public policy.

These fields of concentration include the following:

SPEA Political Science
Environmental Policy American Politics
Public Management Comparative Politics
Public Finance International Relations
Urban Policy Political Philosophy
   Political Theory and Methodology


Course offerings in SPEA and Political Science help the student prepare for examinations in these fields, and students supplement their course work with directed readings and research. There is no predetermined set of courses required of all students. Course selection is the responsibility of the student, working in conjunction with his or her Progress Review Committee.

Major Junctures

Progress Review Committee
The Progress Review Committee consists of from four to six faculty members. Two SPEA faculty must be selected for the SPEA concentration and two Political Science faculty for the Political Science concentration. For the shared public policy concentration, there must be one SPEA and one Political Science faculty member. One faculty member is chosen by the student to act as the chair of the committee. The chairperson serves as the student’s mentor and guides the student through the Progress Review and qualifying examination process.

Before the meeting of the Progress Review Committee, the student develops a Progress Review Statement. The statement needs to include background professional and educational information, course work completed and planned in each concentration and for basic and advanced tool skills, tentative dates for taking qualifying exams, and a discussion of a proposed dissertation topic. Once approved by the committee, the statement serves as a contract for the completion of degree requirements.

Qualifying Examinations
After completing the course work for a concentration, the student is eligible to take the qualifying examination for that concentration. All students except those in the Political Science concentration negotiate their own examination schedules. The Department of Political Science gives field examinations twice a year at times scheduled by the department. The examinations on policy and SPEA concentrations are written by the members of the Progress Review Committee representing those areas.

After receiving a pass or qualified pass on each of the three exams, the student schedules the oral examination. Upon completion of the oral examination, signatures of the committee member and program director are required on the “Report of Preliminary Examination Committee” form.

Dissertation
After filing for candidacy status, the doctoral candidate forms a Research Committee consisting of at least four faculty members. Two of the members must be School of Public and Environmental Affairs faculty, and two must be from Political Science. This committee may be but is not necessarily identical to the Progress Review Committee. The selection of the Research Committee members should reflect the dissertation topic and expertise of the faculty chosen.

The candidate prepares a dissertation proposal to present and defend in a meeting of the Research Committee. The Research Committee reviews the research proposal and requires changes as needed.

Once the dissertation research is completed, the candidate defends the thesis in an open oral examination meeting. The Research Committee is ultimately responsible for determining whether the dissertation is acceptable.

Placement
The Ph.D. Office, the director of the program, and individual faculty members work hard to ensure that graduates of the program are placed in academic or research organizations. Graduates of the Joint Program in Public Policy have been very successful in obtaining such positions. Recent placements include George Washington University, Emory University, Kennesaw State University, Minnesota State University, Ohio State University, the University of Arizona, Ulsan University (Korea), the University of Massachusetts, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and University of Washington.

Return to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Policy

Return to Top

Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

The School of Public and Environmental Affairs provides course work and other student-related activities for those working toward doctoral degrees in other schools and colleges of Indiana University who select a minor field in public and environmental affairs. Five minor fields are available: environmental studies, nonprofit management, public management, regional economic development, and urban affairs.

Environmental Studies Minor
Nonprofit Management Minor
Public Management Minor
Regional Economic Development Minor
Urban Affairs Minor

Return to Top

Environmental Studies Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in Ph.D. programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their advisory committee, choose environmental studies as an outside minor. The minor is flexible and is usually designed by students in accordance with their needs.

Requirements

  1. The doctoral candidate must secure a faculty advisor in consultation with the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science. The advisor may not be from the candidate’s major department. The candidate’s advisor serves as the representative in all examinations or other requirements of the candidate’s Ph.D. program that relate to the minor. The advisor decides on the character of the examination, if any, in the minor field and certifies that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of graduate-level courses related to environmental studies. These courses must be from at least two different disciplines outside the candidate’s major department. The choice of courses should be made in consultation with the candidate’s advisor and must be approved by the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science. Acceptance of the proposed minor is based on two criteria: (a) the courses must have a direct relationship to environmental studies, and (b) the courses must not normally be required as part of major or tool skill options in the student’s major department. Courses in the minor program should be selected according to the student’s interest. Students majoring in areas other than the natural sciences, for example, may wish to consider the offerings in the natural sciences; similarly, natural science students might consider course offerings in the social and behavioral sciences.
  3. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) must be attained in all courses used for the minor.

Return to Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Nonprofit Management Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in a Ph.D. program at Indiana University may select nonprofit management as an outside minor.

Requirements

  1. The doctoral student must secure an advisor from the faculty of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. The faculty advisor will serve as the representative of SPEA in all examinations and other requirements of the student’s Ph.D. program that pertain to the minor.
  2. The minor in nonprofit management requires 12 credit hours of courses approved by the advisor. Three of the four courses must be SPEA courses. The additional course may come from SPEA or from any of a variety of disciplines relevant to nonprofit management. Some examples of courses appropriate for the SPEA minor in nonprofit management are: SPEA-V 521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 522 Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations     (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 523 Civil Society and Public Policy (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 524 Civil Society in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 526 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.) SPEA-V 558 Fund Development for Nonprofits (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 602 Strategic Management of Public and Nonprofit
        Organizations (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 672 Public Organization and Management II (3 cr.)
    SPEA-V 685 Research Seminar in Management (approved topics) (3 cr.)
  3. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) must be attained in all courses used for the minor.
  4. Special requirement for 500-level courses. Students taking a 500-level course (and SPEA-V 602) are required to show that they have completed doctoral-level work in conjunction with the course in order to count the course for the minor. Students must alert the instructor to their doctoral status and request additional/alternative assignments. If the instructor is unwilling to do this, the student should select a different course in conjunction with the candidate’s advisor.

Return to Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Public Management Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in doctoral programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their advisory committee, select public management as an outside minor.

Requirements

  1. The doctoral candidate must secure an advisor from the faculty of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. The faculty advisor serves as the representative of SPEA in all examinations and other requirements of the student’s Ph.D. program that pertain to the minor.
  2. The student must take at least 12 credit hours of SPEA graduate-level courses in public management. The choice of courses must be approved by the advisor.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained.
Return to Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Regional Economic Development Minor

(12 credit hours)

The minor field in regional economic development involves study in the topics facing regional planners, developmental specialists, and researchers, and an introduction to the body of knowledge in regional development. The study of regional economic development broadens students’ perspectives, and students may apply this knowledge to a research agenda that incorporates regional development questions. The student is expected to have studied both micro- and macroeconomics before beginning the minor program.

Requirements

  1. The director of the Institute for Development Strategies serves as the minor advisor. The advisor ensures that prerequisites have been met and certifies that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor. An examination may be required at the discretion of the advisor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of approved courses, which must include two core courses and 6 credit hours of electives. The core curriculum consists of a topics course and a general methodology course. (If the required methodology course has been completed as a requirement for the student’s major, an additional elective must be taken to fulfill the minor requirement.) The required topics course is SPEA-V 669 Economic Development, Globalization, and Entrepreneurship. This course is cross-listed as GEOG-G 817 Seminar in Regional Geography. The elective courses may come from a variety of disciplines and must be selected in consultation with and approved by the student’s minor advisor.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained.

Return to Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Urban Affairs Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in doctoral programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their advisory committee, choose urban affairs as an outside minor. The minor is flexible and is designed by students and their advisors in accordance with students’ needs.

Requirements

  1. After consulting the director of the Joint Ph.D. in Public Policy Program, the doctoral candidate must secure an advisor from the faculty of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. This faculty advisor serves as the school’s representative in all examinations or other minor program requirements of the candidate’s Ph.D. program. The advisor determines the character of the minor examination (if any), participates in the candidate’s oral examinations, and certifies that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of graduate-level courses related to urban affairs. Courses should be selected from at least two departments outside that of the candidate’s major. The selection of courses must be approved by the candidate’s SPEA advisor.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained.

Return to Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Return to Top

Certificate Programs

Program Information
Admission
Program Restrictions

Program Information

Five graduate certificates are offered on the Bloomington campus:

Certificate programs are flexible and adaptable to the needs of either precareer or in-service students.

Return to Certificate Programs

Admission

Admission Eligibility
The student must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university to apply. For the Certificate in Hazardous Materials Management, applicants must have completed one year of general chemistry. For the Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship, applicants must be enrolled in the M.P.A. program in SPEA or the M.B.A. program in the Kelley School of Business.

Application
Application forms and literature may be obtained from the same SPEA offices that offer material for the graduate degree programs.

Students should apply to the SPEA admissions office on the Bloomington campus.

Application Deadlines
Application deadlines for the certificate programs are May 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester.

Application Fee
Students must pay a nonrefundable application fee.

Return to Certificate Programs

Program Restrictions

  1. Students enrolled in a certificate program must complete it within 15 credit hours of approved SPEA course work with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B). Failure to do so results in automatic dismissal from the
    certificate program.
  2. Students who have completed more than three SPEA courses are not eligible for admission to a certificate program.
  3. Transfer credit, course substitutions, or course waivers are not accepted for meeting the Public Management or Nonprofit Management certificate requirements. Students in the Hazardous Materials Management Certificate Program may utilize these options; however, they must first have the approval of their campus graduate program advisors.
  4. Students admitted to a SPEA graduate degree program are not eligible for admission to the certificate program or eligible for the awarding of a certificate.
  5. Admission to or successful completion of a certificate program does not guarantee subsequent admission to a SPEA graduate degree program.
  6. Students enrolled in the certificate program who apply to SPEA’s graduate degree programs must meet all existing admission requirements.
  7. Students planning to request admission to a SPEA graduate degree program after successfully completing a certificate program should refer to the application procedure presented earlier in this bulletin.

Return to Certificate Programs

Certificate in Hazardous Materials Management

The Certificate in Hazardous Materials Management is a 15 credit hour program of study. The program provides managers and technicians in concerned organizations and agencies, public and private, with training in the management of hazardous materials. The certificate program provides an information base that these managers and technicians can use to develop, implement, manage, and assess hazardous waste programs for local, state, and federal regulatory agencies. Graduate students in other disciplines can use the program to supplement their primary fields with course work in hazardous materials management, possibly using the certificate courses as part of a doctoral or master’s minor.

Certificate Requirements
(15 credit hours)

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
SPEA-E 510 Hazardous Materials Regulation (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 542 Hazardous Materials (3 cr.)

Electives (6 credit hours)
Two of the following courses:
SPEA-E 515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 553 Creation and Solution of Environmental Models (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 555 Topics in Environmental Science: Limnology (2-3 cr.)
SPEA-E 560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA-E 562 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-H 433 Industrial Hygiene and Radiological Health (3 cr.)
GEOL-G 430 Principles of Hydrology (3 cr.)
GEOL-G 451 Principles of Hydrogeology (3 cr.)
GEOL-G 551 Advanced Hydrogeology (3 cr.)
GEOL-G 585 Environmental Geochemistry (3 cr.)
Or other specialty courses with the approval of the graduate program advisor.

Return to Certificate Programs

Certificate in Nonprofit Management

The Certificate in Nonprofit Management is a 15 credit hour program of study. The certificate is designed to serve the needs of individuals who would like exposure to the nonprofit sector and nonprofit management issues but who do not wish or need to pursue a degree in nonprofit management. The certificate complements other courses of study or career experience in such areas as social work, library science, and parks and recreation. Students pursuing a nonprofit management certificate gain an understanding of how to work in and with nonprofit organizations.

Certificate Requirements
(15 credit hours)

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
SPEA-V 522 Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.) SPEA-V 525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 526 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)

Electives
(6 credit hours)

Two additional SPEA graduate courses are selected with the approval of the student’s advisor. A sampling of current course titles includes: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector, Ethics and Values of Philanthropy, Fund Development for Nonprofit Organizations, Public Relations in Nonprofits, and History of Philanthropy in the West.

Students interested in continuing for the Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.) should consider selecting the electives from the nonprofit management concentration.

Return to Certificate Programs

Certificate in Public Budgeting and Financial Management

The Certificate in Public Budgeting and Financial Management is a 15 credit hour program for those seeking graduate training in the fundamentals of budgeting and finance for government and nonprofit organizations. It is designed for pre-career students, including graduate students in other disciplines who seek to additional capacity-building in their educational program, and for in-service professionals who seek additional expertise in their work or who plan to change their professional roles. The program is for those who wish to acquire additional knowledge and skills in public financial management and control, governmental or nonprofit accounting, and public expenditure planning, management, and control.

Certificate Requirements
(15 credit hours)

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
SPEA-V 517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 542 Governmental Financial Accounting and Reporting (3 cr.) or
     SPEA-V 526 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.) SPEA-V 560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)

Electives (6 credit hours)
Select two from the following courses:
SPEA-V 609 Seminar in Revenue Theory and Administration (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 610 Seminar in Government Budget and Program Analysis (3 cr.) SPEA-V 667 Seminar in Public Capital and Debt Theory (3 cr.)

Return to Certificate Programs

Certificate in Public Management

The Certificate in Public Management Program is a 15 credit hour program of study in public management. The certificate program is flexible enough to be adapted to the needs of precareer and in-service individuals. Graduate students in other disciplines can use the program to supplement their primary fields with course work in public management, possibly using the certificate courses as part or all of a doctoral or master’s degree minor. Career employees of public and private sector agencies seeking courses in public management, and especially those changing from professional or technical roles to managerial roles, find the certificate program beneficial.

Certificate Requirements
(15 credit hours)

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 561 Public Human Resources Management (3 cr.)

Electives (6 credit hours)
Two additional SPEA graduate public affairs courses approved by the program director.

Note: Students interested in continuing on for the Master of Public Affairs degree should consider selecting the two elective courses from the M.P.A. core; one of the courses recommended is V 506 Statistical Analysis for
Effective Decision Making.

Return to Certificate Programs

Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship

The Certificate in Social Entrepreneurship is an 18 credit hour program of study. The certificate is a cooperative program between the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the Kelley School of Business, and the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis and is available only for students enrolled in the M.P.A. or M.B.A. programs. The Social Entrepreneurship Certificate prepares students for innovatively approaching public needs with a combination of entrepreneurial practices and social purposes—through the for-profit, nonprofit, and governmental sectors.

Certificate Requirements
(18 credit hours)

Required Courses (9 credit hours)

SPEA-V 521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.)*
SPEA-V 559 Principles and Practices of Social Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)
BUS-W 504 New Venture Business Planning (1.5 cr.)
BUS-W 506 Entrepreneurship: Leadership and Practice (1.5 cr.)

Electives (9 credit hours, at least 3 of which must be taken in a school other than the one offering the degree)
SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 504 Public Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 510 Government Regulation in Market Economies (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 519 Database Management Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 522 Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.) SPEA-V 525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 526 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.) SPEA-V 542 Government Financial Accounting and Reporting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 544 Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 547 Negotiation and Dispute Resolution for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 558 Fund Development for Nonprofits (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 561 Public Human Resources Management (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 562 Public Program Evaluation (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 568 Management of Urban Government Services (3 cr.)
SPEA-V 602 Strategic Management of Public and Nonprofit Organizations (3
    cr.)
SPEA-V 622 Seminar in Urban Economic Development (3 cr.)
BUS-F 509 Financial Analysis for Corporate Decisions (1.5 cr.)
BUS-F 517 Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Finance (1.5 cr.)
BUS-J 501 Developing Strategic Capabilities (1.5 cr.)
BUS-M 511 Marketing Performance and Productivity Analysis
BUS-M 512 Marketing Strategy (with M511, 4.5 cr.)
BUS-M 521 Implementation of Marketing Strategies (1.5 cr.)
BUS-P 510 Service Operations (1.5 cr.)
BUS-P 552 Project Management (1.5 cr.)
BUS-P 561 Supply Chain Management and Technologies (1.5 cr.)
BUS-S 509 Information Systems in Modern Organizations (1.5 cr.)
BUS-S 510 Managing the Net-Enabled Organization (1.5 cr.)
BUS-S 520 Managing and Designing Data Base Systems (1.5 cr.)
BUS-W 503 Creativity and Innovation: Generating New Venture Ideas (1.5 cr.) BUS-W 511 Venture Strategy (1.5 cr.)
BUS-W 514 Venture Screening (1.5 cr.)
BUS-W 516 Organizational Development and Change: The Change Agent (1.5     cr.)
BUS-W 532 Organization Design Alternatives (1.5 cr.)
BUS-X 573 Corporate Entrepreneurship (1.5 cr.)

Other courses approved by a faculty advisor.
    *With approval, students desiring a public policy emphasis may substitute SPEA-V 502 Public Management (3 cr.).

An internship practicum is also required that can be satisfied by SPEA-V 585 Practicum in Public Affairs (0-6) credit hours, BUS-X 523 and BUS-X 524 Enterprise Experience I and II, or approved experiential credit. The internship consists of:

  1. A two-month project development period the semester before the internship.
  2. A three-month full-time (40 hour per week) internship on site at the host organization, agency, or business to execute the project.
  3. A final evaluation of the project, related to social entrepreneurial approaches.

Return to Certificate Programs

Return to Top



Indiana University
Office of Creative Services
Von Lee 319
517 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47408-4060

Last updated: 20 December 2014 20 26 48

Submit Questions or Comments
Copyright 2014 The Trustees of Indiana University