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School of Public and Environmental Affairs 2001-2003 Online Graduate Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of Public and
Environmental Affairs
2001-2003 Graduate
Academic Bulletin

www.indiana.edu/~speaweb
School of Public and
Environmental Affairs
Indiana University
SPEA 260
1315 E. Tenth Street
Bloomington, IN 47405-1701
(800) 765-7755 Local (812) 855-2840
Fax (812) 855-7802
Contact SPEA Graduate Office

www.spea.iupui.edu
Business/SPEA Building (BS) 3027
801 W. Michigan Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 274-4656/toll free (877) 292-9321
Contact SPEA Graduate Office
 

Bloomington Campus Graduate Degree Programs

Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.)

The Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.) program educates professionals who combine specialization in an area of environmental science with some administrative and policy skills necessary to apply this knowledge in a broader context. The degree allows specialization in either disciplinary or interdisciplinary areas of environmental science.

The M.S.E.S. program requires 48 credit hours distributed among four areas: core requirements (20 cr.), concentration area (21-22 cr.), general electives (4-7 cr.), and experiential requirement (0-6 cr.). The core curriculum provides students with a general knowledge of environmental science. Courses in environmental management and policy allow students to apply that knowledge. In a concentration, students establish an area of expertise.

A bachelor’s degree in a physical or life science, engineering, or a related field is required for admission. Students are required to have taken at least ONE semester (or two quarters) of calculus, chemistry with laboratory, and statistics. In addition, the best-prepared students will have taken courses in the life sciences and economics. All applicants must be computer literate. In some cases, a student may be admitted contingent upon completion of selected courses as specified by the SPEA Admissions Committee.

Core Requirements

(20 credit hours)

SPEA E526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (2 cr.)
SPEA E527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.) or
  approved equivalent
SPEA E536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E538 Statistics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.) or
  SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

To complete the comprehensive project, select one of the following courses. This requirement should be fulfilled near the end of each student’s course work.
SPEA E560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA E620 Environmental Analysis Workshop (3 cr.)
SPEA V520 Environmental Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Students must fulfill the 0-credit-hour professional presentation requirement.

Concentration Requirements

(21-22 credit hours)

The concentrations give students an educational experience in a substantive area of interest. The course of study in the concentration area is determined in conjunction with a concentration advisor. Concentration requirements may be waived on the same basis as core requirements.

Applied Ecology Concentration

(22 credit hours)

The applied ecology concentration focuses on problem-solving techniques applied to current ecological issues. The diversity of the earth’s living species in both natural and managed ecosystems offers students a variety of study areas within applied ecology, including forest management, fisheries and wildlife management, soil and watershed management, endangered species, and wetlands.

Required Courses (10 credit hours)
SPEA E440 Wetlands: Biology and Regulation (3 cr.)
SPEA E455 Limnology (4 cr.)
SPEA E528 Forest Ecology and Management (3 cr.)

Electives (12 credit hours or four courses selected from the following; other courses may be selected with the advisor’s approval)
SPEA E460 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (3 cr.)
SPEA E461 Fisheries and Wildlife Management Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA E518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA E519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA E520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA E529 Applications of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA E537 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA E545 Lake and Watershed Management (3 cr.)
SPEA E557 Conservation Biology (3 cr.)
SPEA E560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)

The following biology courses may be selected with the approval of an Applied Ecology faculty advisor:
BIOL L570 Seminar in Ecology and Environmental Biology (2 cr.)
BIOL L575 Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (3 cr.)
BIOL L578 Advanced Population Biology (3 cr.)
BIOL L579 Community Ecology (3 cr.)
BIOL L581 Behavioral Ecology (3 cr.)

SPEA policy courses may be appropriate for some students in this concentration. One or two of the following courses may be selected with the approval of an Applied Ecology faculty advisor.
SPEA E535 International Environmental Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V574 Environmental Management in the Tropics (3 cr.)
SPEA V625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Risk Assessment Concentration

(21 credit hours)

This concentration addresses the fate and transport of chemicals in the environment and the hazards and risks to human health and the environment associated with chemical pollution. This is achieved through courses that study the chemical/physical/biological reactions of pollutants in soil, aquatic, and atmospheric systems. Additional classes study the hazards associated with chemicals used in modern society, technologies available to manage and remediate contaminated sites, the toxicological effects of chemical exposure, and methods to qualify the risks associated with chemicals in the environment.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)
SPEA E520 Environmental Toxicology (3 cr.)
SPEA E537 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA E560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)

Electives (12 credit hours or four courses selected from the following; other courses may be selected with the advisor’s approval)
SPEA E515 Fundamentals of Air Pollution (3 cr.)
SPEA E518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA E519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA E529 Applications of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA E539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E542 Hazardous Materials (3 cr.)
SPEA E544 Subsurface Microbiology and Bioremediation (3 cr.)
SPEA E554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)
SPEA E555 Topics in Environmental Science: Advanced Topics in Atmospheric Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E555 Topics in Environmental Science: Fate of Organic Chemicals in the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA E562 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (3 cr.)
SPEA E570 Soil Mechanics and Science (3 cr.)

The following courses may be selected with the approval of an Environmental Chemistry, Toxicology, and Risk Assessment faculty advisor:
CHEM C483 Biological Chemistry (3 cr.)
CHEM C612 Spectrochemical Methods of Analysis (1.5-3 cr.)
CHEM C614 Chromatography (1.5-3 cr.)
GEOL G451 Principles of Hydrogeology (2-3 cr.)
GEOL G550 Surface Water Hydrology (3 cr.)

SPEA policy courses may be appropriate for some students in this concentration. One or two of the following courses may be selected with the approval of a faculty advisor.
SPEA E512 Risk Communication (3 cr.)
SPEA E535 International Environmental Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA V625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Water Resources Concentration

(22 credit hours)

The water resources concentration focuses on the scientific principles of water quantity and water quality. Courses provide fundamental information and problem-solving skills using biological, chemical, and physical descriptions of water in the environment.

Required Courses (10 credit hours)
SPEA E455 Limnology (4 cr.)
SPEA E539 Aquatic Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E554 Groundwater Flow Modeling (3 cr.)

Electives (12 credit hours or four courses selected from the following; other courses may be selected with the advisor’s approval)
SPEA E440 Wetlands: Biology and Regulation (3 cr.)
SPEA E518 Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA E519 Applied Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA E529 Applications of Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA E537 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3 cr.)
SPEA E544 Subsurface Microbiology and Bioremediation (3 cr.)
SPEA E545 Lake and Watershed Management (3 cr.)
SPEA E546 Stream Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA E555 Topics in Environmental Science: Fate of Organic Chemicals in the Environment (3 cr.)
SPEA E570 Soil Mechanics and Science (3 cr.)
GEOL G550 Surface Water Hydrology (3 cr.)
GEOL G551 Advanced Hydrogeology (3 cr.)

One or two of the following courses may be selected with the approval of a faculty advisor.
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA V643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Specialized Concentration

(21-22 credit hours)

In consultation with an advisor, students may design a curriculum that anticipates their career and educational goals and reflects their background and training. Specialized concentrations must be approved by students’ advisors and the program director to ensure high standards of rigor, depth, and breadth. Each specialized concentration must contain the required courses for one of the regular concentrations. Students must submit written proposals outlining and justifying their course of study, which must be approved by a concentration faculty advisory.

Professional Experiential Requirement

(0-6 credit hours)

Each candidate for the M.S.E.S. degree must gain professionally relevant experience through one of the following options: an approved internship (0-6 credit hours); advanced project; independent research/thesis; the Environmental Fellowship Program; the Mid-Career Credit Option; or an environmental science research project culminating a master’s thesis. Students are encouraged to discuss with faculty members the relative merits of their experiences according to individual career objectives.

Accelerated Master of Environmental Science

This program allows the School of Public and Environmental Affairs’ top undergraduates to complete both their undergraduate and graduate degrees in five years. To be considered for this program a student must have earned a minimum GPA of 3.5, completed 96 undergraduate credit hours, and satisfied all general-education and School of Public and Environmental Affairs undergraduate core requirements. Because of the specialized nature of this program, potential applicants should contact the Bloomington undergraduate and graduate program directors for details.

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Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Environmental Science

This doctoral program is administered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in cooperation with the departments of biology, chemistry, geography, and geological sciences. The Ph.D. in environmental science degree is awarded by the University Graduate School.

The program provides a rigorous, comprehensive education in environmental science. The specific objectives of the program are (1) to conduct advanced research and scientific analysis of environmental events, issues, and problems; (2) to further understanding of the nature and management of natural and human environments; and (3) to provide an opportunity for students and faculty members in several departments to engage in collaborative environmental research in an interdisciplinary mode.

Admission

A student must apply to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs for doctoral studies, and those accepted will be recommended to the University Graduate School for formal admission into the Ph.D. program. Applicants to this program must have completed at least a bachelor’s degree in science, mathematics, engineering, or a closely related field. Prospective students are required to submit (1) a statement of purpose, which should be as specific as possible and, preferably, should refer to potential research mentors by name; (2) official results of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); (3) official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work completed; and (4) three letters of recommendation. Applicants whose native language is not English must also submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Degree Requirements

The degree requires (1) substantial knowledge in a primary environmental science concentration; (2) breadth in related environmental science and policy; (3) an understanding of research methods; (4) an in-depth knowledge of the dissertation topic; and (5) a dissertation that demonstrates the student’s ability to analyze, explain, and interpret research clearly and effectively.

Advisory Committee
During the first semester of enrollment, each student must organize an advisory committee. Normally this committee consists of at least four faculty members: at least two should be from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; the others may be from other departments. Membership of the advisory committee is approved by the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science and the dean of the University Graduate School. At least three members of the advisory committee must be members of the graduate faculty.

Fields of Study
Each student defines a principal field of study and describes it in a narrative statement. This statement should discuss the student’s previous educational experiences, outline a program of course work that lies within the student’s proposed field of study, and state the student’s career objectives. The principal field may be interdisciplinary. The student should prepare a proposal outlining a program of course work that the student believes lies within that field.

Each student is also required to prepare a program of course work that fulfills the requirement of breadth in environmental science and policy. The breadth requirement may be fulfilled by using a wide spectrum of environmentally related courses, including areas such as economics, law, and management, in addition to other science courses.

Each student is also required to prepare a statement of activities for meeting the research methods requirement. Normally these include subjects such as computer science, geographic information systems, remote sensing, statistics, and mathematical modeling, although other technical skill areas such as electronics and analytical chemical techniques may be appropriate for some students.

Each student must submit a narrative statement, program of course work, and statement of activities for meeting the research methods requirement to their advisory committee for approval. This should be accomplished before the end of the student’s first semester in the program.

The research undertaken by the student will be interdisciplinary. Because a knowledge of the basic sciences is necessary to understanding environmental problems, and the application of that knowledge is necessary for the development of solutions to those problems, the research may be primarily basic, primarily applied, or some mixture of both.

Course Requirements
The exact nature and amount of course work in each of the three areas—principal field of study, breadth in environmental science and policy, and research methods—is determined by the advisory committee after review and approval of the student’s proposed plan of study in each of these areas. Selection of specific courses is based on obtaining (1) adequate knowledge for qualifying examinations, (2) appropriate preparation for a research project, and (3) a mixture of courses that meets the individual professional goals of the student.

The Ph.D. degree requires the completion of at least 90 credit hours in advanced study and research beyond the bachelor’s degree. A student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of advanced course work in environmental science and policy. Students must also complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of research, normally taken as SPEA E625 or SPEA E890. The student, with the approval of the advisory committee, should complete some combination of additional course work and research sufficient to meet the 90 credit hour requirement.

Each student is required to enroll in SPEA E680 Seminar in Environmental Science and Policy (1 credit hour/semester) for six semesters during the course of their degree program. Students enrolled in SPEA E680 may either make a formal presentation or write a brief synopsis and critique of four presentations attended during the semester. Six credit hours of SPEA E680 may be used to fulfill a portion of the breadth requirement. Each student is also required to enroll at least once in SPEA E710 Advanced Topics in Environmental Science during the course of their degree program. SPEA E710 may be taken multiple times, as the topics will vary. Advanced topics courses may be used to meet requirements in either the principal field of study or breadth in environmental science and policy, depending upon the topic and the student’s area of interest.

Students should note that all 30 credit hours of advanced course work, if properly selected, and 6 credit hours of research, may be applied toward the Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.S.E.S.) degree. With an additional 12 credit hours of approved course work, a student may be awarded the M.S.E.S. degree while completing the requirements for the Ph.D. in environmental science. Completion of the M.S.E.S. degree as part of this doctoral program is not a requirement; however, this option may be appropriate for some students.

Qualifying Examinations
Before a student is admitted to candidacy, all requirements determined by the advisory committee must be met and the qualifying examinations passed. A student who fails qualifying examinations may retake them only once.

The decision to admit a student to doctoral candidacy is made by the advisory committee, which evaluates the student’s performance in the written examination, research proposal, and oral examination.

Written Examination
This examination should be taken by the end of a student’s fifth semester in the Ph.D. program. The exam focuses on topics covered by the student’s course work and related to the student’s research interests. The examination is written and graded by the student’s advisory committee. The written examination is graded as pass, conditional pass, or fail.

Research Proposal
No later than the end of the fifth semester, the student should submit a written research proposal for review by the advisory committee. The proposal should be documented, clearly stating a research objective, the approach to be taken, and the significance of the work.

Oral Examination
Each candidate is examined orally by the advisory committee. The oral examination is comprehensive in nature and covers the student’s research proposal.

Research Committee
Upon the student’s successful completion of the qualifying examination, a research committee is formed. Normally this committee consists of at least four faculty members: at least two should be from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; the others may be from other departments. The director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science recommends the student’s research committee to the dean of the University Graduate School. At least three members of the research committee must be full members of the graduate faculty.

Dissertation
A dissertation is required and must be of sufficient value to warrant publication. The dissertation must represent a substantial research effort, both in quality and quantity. The dissertation requirement may be met by preparing a traditional dissertation or by preparing a portfolio of research documents including publications, manuscripts in press, and completed manuscripts suitable for submission to a journal. These documents may have multiple authors, although the doctoral candidate must demonstrate that he or she made significant contributions to at least two of the publications or manuscripts submitted for review. The research portfolio must have introductory and concluding chapters to integrate across the topics. The research portfolio also must be prepared to meet the Graduate School’s requirements for dissertations. A public presentation of the dissertation research is required. The dissertation must be approved by the research committee.

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Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Affairs

The Doctoral Program in Public Affairs was created to take advantage of the unique strengths of SPEA’s interdisciplinary faculty and research programs, both of which have earned wide recognition from peer institutions, national and international agencies, and professional groups. The curriculum equips students with the necessary skills for independent research and analysis of problems, issues, and solutions in government and the nonprofit sector in three major fields:

  1. Public finance: the theory and practice of fiscal administration, including public budgeting, revenue administration, and financial management;
  2. Public management: the design and operation of government institutions, including strategic/operations management and interrelationships between public and private organizations; and
  3. Public policy analysis: research methods and quantitative techniques for policy analysis, including the content, design, and evaluation of public programs.
Instead of being grounded in a traditional academic discipline, each of the fields has developed from several theoretical literatures applied to real-world public affairs problems. Although research is grounded in the social sciences, the context of inquiry reverses the normal research process. Instead of beginning with questions originating in discipline-based scholarship, the research process begins with public problems and issues. The research challenge, then, is to match available tools of inquiry to the research opportunities presented by problems.
Admission

Students apply directly to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs; those accepted are recommended to the University Graduate School for formal admission into the Ph.D. program. Applicants to this program must have completed at least a bachelor’s degree. Prospective students are required to submit (1) a statement of purpose, which should be as specific as possible and, preferably, should refer to potential research mentors by name; (2) official results of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); (3) official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work completed; and (4) three letters of recommendation. Applicants whose native language is not English must also submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Advisory Committee
Early in the student’s program, but in no case later than the third semester in the program, the student must form an advisory committee. The committee consists of four to five members and includes at least one faculty member from each of the student’s two chosen major fields of study and also a representative of his or her minor field. The committee members act as mentors and help monitor the selection and fulfillment of program requirements. The chairperson of the committee serves as the student’s principal advisor.

Degree Requirements

Major Fields of Study
Students must study two of the following major fields: public finance, public management, or public policy analysis.

Minor Field
In addition to these major fields, students must select a minor. The minor field is designed in consultation with a faculty advisor and the chosen department.

Professional Ethics and Teaching
Because of the unique and sensitive issues surrounding government ethics and public trust, all doctoral students are required to complete a seminar in the professional ethics and teaching of public affairs. This seminar is usually taken over two semesters, generally during the student’s first year in the program.

Course Requirements
In addition to the required course in Professional Ethics and Teaching, all students complete a core sequence of courses that includes a course in research design and methods in public affairs and three semesters of Workshop in Public Policy. Students without prior graduate work in a field related to public affairs are also required to take an introductory course in public affairs. Students must also complete a research skills sequence (a two-semester quantitative analysis sequence) and must demonstrate either (1) advanced proficiency in quantitative or qualitative analysis or (2) proficiency in a foreign language appropriate to their field of study. Two required courses and two approved electives must be completed in each major field. The minor field consists of three to four courses within a given field.

Advisory Committee Review
During the third semester, the advisory committee meets with the student to review academic progress and to approve the program of study. The committee reviews and approves any graduate course credits (not to exceed 30 semester hours) that the student is permitted to transfer toward the program. Prior to completion of the fifth semester, the student will submit a research paper to the advisory committee and present the paper orally. The advisory committee will evaluate the paper and the presentation and will advise the Ph.D. program director whether the student should be permitted to continue in the program.

Qualifying Examination
To enter into formal degree candidacy, students must successfully complete written and oral qualifying examinations covering content from their two major fields of study.

Dissertation
Upon completion of course work and exams, the student writes a dissertation. This allows the student to apply knowledge acquired during the formal parts of the program and to contribute to the advancement of the student’s field of study.

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Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Policy

The Joint Ph.D. Program in Public Policy is a collaborative endeavor of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the Department of Political Science.

Its emphasis is on the broad field of public policy, concerning the environment of public policy; the processes of policy formation, management, and implementation; and the analysis and evaluation of policy outputs and results. The institutional setting and design of the program offer a unique educational opportunity. Students in the program receive rigorous social science training and gain knowledge of government decision-making processes, problem-solving capabilities, and an understanding of the substantive aspects of public problems and their effects on public institutions.

Admission

All applicants to the public policy program are subject to approval by a SPEA–Department of Political Science joint admissions committee. Applicants for admission and for financial assistance are required to submit a statement of career goals, official results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work, and a minimum of three letters of recommendation. Students whose native language is not English also must submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Joint Program Committee on Admissions and Financial Aid examines each application closely to determine suitability for the program. The committee looks beyond the formal academic record, at the applicant’s demonstrated ability to pursue independent study, language and research skill training, and maturity and experience.

Advisory Committee
The advisory committee must include at least two faculty members from SPEA and two from the Department of Political Science. Members of the committee who hold joint appointments are considered representatives of their primary unit.

The chairperson of the committee serves as the student’s principal advisor. Early in the student’s program—no later than the third semester—the committee provides the student with a formal review of the progress made toward the degree.

Degree Requirements

Fields of Study
Public policy must be the student’s major field of preparation and specialization. In addition, each student must select one of the following fields of concentration in Political Science: American politics, comparative politics, international relations, or political theory and methodology; and one of the following fields of concentration in Public and Environmental Affairs: environmental policy, public finance, public management, or urban affairs.

Course Requirements
All first-year students must take POLS Y570 Introduction to the Study of Politics; a research skill course such as POLS Y575/Y576 Political Data Analysis; and SPEA V690 Seminar in the Public Policy Process. Students are also required to take SPEA V691 Workshop in Public Policy for six semesters. Due to the unique and sensitive issues surrounding professional ethics and public teaching, all doctoral students are required to complete a seminar in the professional ethics and teaching of public affairs. This seminar is usually a two-semester sequence. All course work in Public Policy and the two concentration fields (one each in Political Science and SPEA) must be approved by the advisory committee (or the program director if a committee has not been appointed). Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B). For specific courses acceptable for this degree, consult the public policy doctoral advisor.

Language and Research Skill Requirements
First-year students are required to take a basic research skill sequence in statistics (such as POLS Y575/Y576, SOC S554/S650, or the equivalent) approved by the major advisor and the dean of the University Graduate School. Students also are required to either demonstrate Proficiency-in-Depth in a foreign language or to take two advanced research skill courses. Students are not permitted to take qualifying examinations until these requirements are satisfied.

Qualifying Examinations
Qualifying examinations have both written and oral components. The examinations cover the primary field of public policy and the two concentration fields.

Dissertation
Following successful completion of the qualifying examinations, the student shall form a dissertation committee subject to the approval of the program director. The committee shall consist of a chairperson, who shall serve as the student’s principal advisor; at least two members from the Department of Political Science; and at least two members from SPEA. The responsibilities of the dissertation committee include granting formal approval of the student’s research proposal, guiding the student’s research to completion, and conducting the formal defense of the dissertation. Following the satisfactory defense of the dissertation, the committee recommends to the University Graduate School that the candidate be awarded the degree Doctor of Philosophy.

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Doctoral Minors in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs

The School of Public and Environmental Affairs provides course work and other student-related activities for those working toward doctoral degrees in other schools and colleges of Indiana University who select a minor field in Public and Environmental Affairs. Four minor fields are available: environmental studies, public management, regional economic development, and urban affairs.

Environmental Studies Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in Ph.D. programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their advisory committee, choose environmental studies as an outside minor. The minor is flexible and is usually designed by students in accordance with their needs.

Requirements

  1. The doctoral candidate must secure a faculty advisor in consultation with the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science. The advisor may not be from the candidate’s major department. The candidate’s advisor serves as the representative in all examinations or other requirements of the candidate’s Ph.D. program that relate to the minor. The advisor decides on the character of the examination, if any, in the minor field and certifies that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of graduate-level courses related to environmental studies. These courses must be from at least two different disciplines outside the candidate’s major department. The choice of courses should be made in consultation with the candidate’s advisor and must be approved by the director of the Doctoral Program in Environmental Science. Acceptance of the proposed minor is based on two criteria: (a) the courses must have a direct relationship to environmental studies and (b) the courses must not normally be required as part of major or tool skill options in the student’s major department. Courses in the minor program should be selected according to the student’s interest. Students majoring in areas other than the natural sciences, for example, may wish to consider the offerings in the natural sciences; similarly, natural science students might consider course offerings in the social and behavioral sciences.
  3. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) must be attained in all courses used for the minor.
Public Management Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in doctoral programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their advisory committee, select public management as an outside minor.

Requirements

  1. The doctoral candidate must secure an advisor from the faculty of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. The faculty advisor serves as the representative of SPEA in all examinations and other requirements of the student’s Ph.D. program that pertain to the minor.
  2. The student must take at least 12 credit hours of SPEA graduate-level courses in public management. The choice of courses must be approved by the advisor.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained.
Regional Economic Development Minor

(12 credit hours)

The minor field in regional economic development involves study in the topics facing regional planners, developmental specialists, and researchers, and an introduction to the body of knowledge in regional development. The study of regional economic development broadens students’ perspectives and students may apply this knowledge to a research agenda that incorporates regional development questions. The student is expected to have studied both micro- and macroeconomics before beginning the minor program.

Requirements

  1. The director of the Institute for Development Strategies serves as minor advisor. The advisor ensures that prerequisites have been met and certifies that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor. An examination may be required at the discretion of the advisor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of approved courses, which must include two core courses and 6 credit hours of electives. The core curriculum consists of a topics course and a general methodology course. (If the required methodology course has been completed as a requirement for the student’s major, an additional elective must be taken to fulfill the minor requirement.) The required topics course is SPEA V669 Economic Development, Globalization, and Entrepreneurship. This course is cross-listed as GEOG G817 Seminar in Regional Geography. The elective courses may come from a variety of disciplines and must be selected in consultation with and approved by the student’s minor advisor.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained.
Urban Affairs Minor

(12 credit hours)

Students in doctoral programs at Indiana University may, with the consent of their advisory committee, choose urban affairs as an outside minor. The minor is flexible and is designed by students and their advisors in accordance with students’ needs.

Requirements

  1. After consulting the director of the Joint Ph.D. in Public Policy program, the doctoral candidate must secure an advisor from the faculty of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. This faculty advisor serves as the school’s representative in all examinations or other minor program requirements of the candidate’s Ph.D. program. The advisor determines the character of the minor examination (if any), participates in the candidate’s oral examinations, and certifies that the candidate has met the requirements of the minor.
  2. The candidate must take at least 12 credit hours of graduate-level courses related to urban affairs. Courses should be selected from at least two departments outside that of the candidate’s major. The selection of courses must be approved by the candidate’s SPEA advisor.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained.
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Master of Public Affairs–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.P.A.–J.D.)

The combined Master of Public Affairs– Doctor of Jurisprudence program enables the student to take a four-year sequence of courses leading to both degrees.

Application and Admission

The applicant must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education and must apply separately to both the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

If the applicant is admitted to only one school, the applicant is permitted to attend that school and is, of course, required to meet the graduation requirements of that school. It is recommended that the student apply to both schools simultaneously for the combined M.P.A.–J.D. program. It is possible, however, for a person already enrolled in the School of Law to apply for admission to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs up to the time he or she completes the second year of law study. It is also possible for a student enrolled in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs to seek admission to the School of Law up to the end of the first year of the M.P.A. course of study.

Academic Standing
Grade point averages in the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs are computed separately. To continue in the program, the student must meet the academic standards in each school. A student failing in one school but meeting academic standards in the other may complete work for the degree in the school in which the student is able to meet the academic standards. Such completion must be according to the same conditions (credit hours, residency, etc.) required of regular (noncombination) degree candidates; that is, 82 credit hours in law and 48 credit hours in SPEA. Students are eligible for honors in each school based on the criteria of each school.

School Residency
Students in the joint M.P.A.–J.D. program should enroll in courses through the School of Law—Bloomington in the first year of the program and through the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in the second year of the program. Alternatively, joint M.P.A.–J.D. students do have the option of enrolling in courses through SPEA in the first year and in the School of Law—Bloomington in the second year. In the third and fourth years, or until the program is completed, students should enroll through the school in which the majority of their credit hours reside in each enrollment period.

Program Requirements

(113 credit hours)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 36 credit hours of SPEA courses distributed among the M.P.A. core and a specialization area.

Required Courses (24 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Specialization Area (12 credit hours)
The student chooses a field of specialization and develops a program of specialization courses in consultation with a SPEA advisor.

Doctor of Jurisprudence Requirements

(77 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 77 credit hours of law courses and to satisfy all requirements for the degree Doctor of Jurisprudence. For specific requirements, see the School of Law—Bloomington Bulletin.

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Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Central Eurasian Studies (M.P.A.–M.A.)

The School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) and the Central Eurasian Studies Program (CEUS) collaborate in a combined master’s degree program that addresses the demand for specialists who combine expertise in public policy and management and area studies expertise in the countries of Eurasia. Graduates will have a variety of domestic and international professional opportunities in public, nonprofit, and private organizations.

Candidates for the combined degree complete the core requirements for the M.P.A. and 15 additional credit hours selected from an approved list of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Candidates also complete core requirements and elective courses from the Central Eurasian Studies Program. Students must separately apply to and be accepted into both the M.P.A. program in SPEA and the M.A. degree program in CEUS.

Program Requirements

(60 credit hours)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Required Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Policy Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Specialized Concentration (15 credit hours)
Each student is required to develop a specialized concentration comprised of courses approved by a SPEA faculty advisor.

Master of Arts in Central Eurasian Studies Requirements

(24 credit hours)

Twenty-four credit hours are required for the Master of Arts in Central Eurasian Studies. Coursework, a research language, and a thesis are required. For specific requirements see Central Eurasian Studies in the University Graduate Bulletin or confer with the Director of Graduate Studies in Central Eurasian Studies.

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Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Journalism (M.P.A.–M.A.)

The School of Public and Environmental Affairs and the School of Journalism collaborate in a combined master’s degree program that addresses the demand for specialists who combine public management and public policy with public affairs reporting and writing or the study of media in society. The program prepares students for positions in the media, government, business, and nonprofit organizations.

Candidates for the combined degree complete the core requirements for the M.P.A. and 15 additional credit hours selected from an approved list of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Candidates also complete core requirements and elective courses from the School of Journalism. Candidates must be admitted to both schools.

Program Requirements

(57 credit hours)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Required Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Policy Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Specialization Courses (15 credit hours)
Each student is required to develop a specialized concentration comprised of courses approved by a SPEA faculty advisor. Courses may include SPEA, journalism, and other courses.

Master of Arts in Journalism Requirements

(21 credit hours)

Twenty-one credit hours are required for the Master of Arts in Journalism. For specific requirements, see the School of Journalism Bulletin.

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Master of Public Affairs–Master of Arts in Russian and East European Studies (M.P.A.–M.A.)

The Russian and East European Institute and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs offer a three-year program that qualifies students for a dual master’s degree.

The first semester of course work toward the dual degree should be completed in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in order to complete prerequisite courses that are only offered in the fall. Candidates for the combined degree complete the core requirements for the M.P.A. and 15 additional credit hours selected from an approved list of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Candidates also complete core requirements and elective courses from the Russian and East European Studies program. Students must be admitted to both programs.

Program Requirements

(60 credit hours)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Required Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Policy Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Specialization Courses (15 credit hours)
Each student is required to develop a specialized concentration comprised of courses approved by a SPEA faculty advisor. The following course must be included:

SPEA V589 Democratization and Transition in Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States (3 cr.)

Master of Arts in Russian and East European Studies

(24 credit hours)

Twenty-four credit hours are required for the Master of Arts in Russian and East European Studies. For specific requirements, see Russian and East European Institute in the University Graduate Bulletin.

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Master of Public Affairs–Master of Information Science (M.P.A.–M.I.S.)

The School of Library and Information Science and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs collaborate in a combined master’s degree program that addresses the demand for information specialists with public management problem-solving skills. The program prepares students for positions in information science in the public and private sectors, as wells as for professional positions in information management, public affairs, and a variety of administrative positions.

Candidates for the combined degree complete the core requirements for the M.P.A. and 15 additional credit hours selected from an approved list of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Candidates also complete core requirements and elective courses from the School of Library and Information Science with an information science emphasis. Candidates must be admitted to both schools.

Program Requirements

(69 credit hours)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Required Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Policy Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Specialization Courses (15 credit hours)
Each student is required to develop a specialized concentration comprised of courses approved by a SPEA faculty advisor. Two of the following must be included:

SPEA V516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA V519 Database Management Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA V613 Implementation of Information Systems (3 cr.)

Master of Information Science Requirements

(33 credit hours)

Thirty-three credit hours are required for the Master of Information Science (M.I.S.). For specific requirements, see the School of Library and Information Science Bulletin.

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Master of Public Affairs–Master of Library Science (M.P.A.–M.L.S.)

The School of Library and Information Science and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs collaborate in a combined master’s degree program that addresses the demand for information specialists with public management and problem-solving skills. The program prepares students for positions in information centers and libraries in the public and private sectors, as well as for professional positions in information management, public affairs, and a variety of administrative positions.

Candidates for the combined degree complete the core requirements for the M.P.A. and 15 additional credit hours selected from an approved list of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Candidates also complete core requirements and elective courses from the School of Library and Information Science with an information science emphasis. Candidates must be admitted to both schools.

Program Requirements

(66 credit hours)

Master of Public Affairs Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Required Core Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Policy Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Specialization Courses (15 credit hours)
Each student is required to develop a specialized concentration comprised of courses approved by a SPEA faculty advisor. Two of the following must be included:

SPEA V516 Public Management Information Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA V519 Database Management Systems (3 cr.)
SPEA V613 Implementation of Information Systems (3 cr.)

Master of Library Science Requirements

(30 credit hours)

Thirty credit hours are required for the Master of Library Science (M.L.S.). For specific requirements, see the School of Library and Information Science Bulletin.

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Master of Public Affairs–Master of Science in Environmental Science (M.P.A.–M.S.E.S.)

This combined master’s program is a 60-credit-hour program that gives the student more depth and breadth than is generally possible in a single degree. M.P.A. and M.S.E.S. degrees are awarded simultaneously after the student has completed the requirements for both degrees.

Application and Admission

The student must apply to and be accepted by both the Master of Public Affairs program and the Master of Science in Environmental Science program. The normal criteria for admission to each program apply.

Program Requirements

(60 credit hours)

The combined M.P.A.–M.S.E.S. program requires a minimum of 60 credit hours distributed among four components: environmental science core, public affairs core, environmental science and policy concentration, and professional experience.

Public Affairs Core

Required Courses (21 credit hours)
SPEA V501 Professional Development Practicum: Information Technology (1 cr.)
SPEA V502 Public Management (3 cr.)
SPEA V503 Professional Development Practicum: Writing and Presentation (1 cr.)
SPEA V505 Professional Development Practicum: Teamwork and Integrated Policy Project (1 cr.)
SPEA V506 Statistical Analysis for Effective Decision Making (3 cr.)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V560 Public Finance and Budgeting (3 cr.)
SPEA V600 Capstone in Public and Environmental Affairs (3 cr.)

Note: The SPEA V501/V503/V505 requirement is suspended for 2001-02.

Environmental Science Core

Required Courses (12 credit hours)
SPEA E526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA E536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Environmental Science and Policy Concentration

(18 credit hours minimum)

Students develop specialized concentrations in consultation with two or more faculty advisors, at least one representing the M.S.E.S. program and at least one representing the M.P.A. program. Concentrations should incorporate substantial natural science and policy content.

Professional Experience

Each double master’s degree candidate must obtain professionally relevant experience through one of the following options: an approved internship (0-6 credit hours); advanced project; independent research/thesis; SPEA V601 Workshop in Public Affairs, the Environmental Fellowship Program; or the Mid-Career Credit Option.

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Master of Science in Environmental Science–Doctor of Jurisprudence (M.S.E.S.–J.D.)

The combined Master of Science in Environmental Science–Doctor of Jurisprudence program is a four-year, 114-credit-hour sequence of courses and research that provides depth and breadth in both environmental science and law.

Both degrees are awarded when the student meets the degree requirements of the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Application and Admission

The student must have a bachelor’s degree in a physical or life science, engineering, or related field. Students interested in the joint M.S.E.S.–J.D. must apply to both the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Students normally apply to both schools simultaneously for the combined program. It is possible, however, for a person already enrolled in the School of Law to apply for admission to the School of Public and Environmental Affairs up to the time he or she completes the second year of law study. A student enrolled in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs may seek admission to the School of Law—Bloomington up to the end of the first year of the M.S.E.S. program.

Academic Standing
Grade point averages in the School of Law—Bloomington and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs are computed separately. To continue in the program, the student must meet the academic standards in each school. A student failing in one school but meeting academic standards in the other may complete work for the degree in the school in which academic standards are being met. Such completion must be according to the same conditions required of regular (noncombination) degree candidates; that is, 82 credit hours for law and 48 credit hours for SPEA. Students are eligible for honors in each school based on the criteria of each school.

Program Advisors
Students enrolled in the combined program are assigned co-advisors—one each from the faculty of the School of Law and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs. The co-advisors are responsible for reviewing and counseling with respect to each student’s course selection for each semester to assure attainment of educational objectives.

School Residency
Students in the joint M.S.E.S.–J.D. program should enroll in courses through the School of Law in the first year of their programs and through the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in the second year of their programs. Alternatively, joint M.S.E.S.–J.D. students have the option of enrolling in courses through SPEA in the first year and in the School of Law—Bloomington in the second year. In the third and fourth years, or until the joint program is completed, students should enroll through the school in which the majority of their credit hours resides in each enrollment period.

Program Requirements

(113 credit hours)

Master of Science in Environmental Science Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 37 credit hours of courses distributed among the environmental science core, environmental management and policy core, and a specialization area.

Environmental Science Core
(15 credit hours)
The following courses are required:
SPEA E526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA E536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E538 Statistics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Environmental Management and Policy Core
(9 credit hours)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Select one from the following equivalent substitutes, or other policy/management graduate course approved by an advisor:
SPEA E560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V520 Environmental Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA V625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V643 Natural Resource Management (3 cr.)

Concentration Area (12 credit hours)
J.D./M.S.E.S. students are required to develop an area of specialization approved by a SPEA faculty advisor.

It is recommended that this be done in consultation with both joint law and environmental science faculty advisors.

Doctor of Jurisprudence Requirements

(77 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 77 credit hours of law courses and to satisfy all requirements for the degree Doctor of Jurisprudence. For specific requirements, see the School of Law—Bloomington Bulletin.

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Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Arts in Biology or Master of Science in Geological Sciences (M.S.E.S.–M.A./M.S.)

The combined Master of Science in Environmental Science and Master of Arts or Master of Science degree program, with major fields in biology or geological sciences, respectively, is a 60-credit-hour program. The M.S.E.S.–M.A./M.S. degrees are awarded after the student has completed the requirements for both programs.

Application and Admission

The student must apply to, and be accepted by, both the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and either the Department of Biology (M.A.) or the Department of Geological Sciences (M.S.).

Supervisory Committee
The student must select a supervisory committee of at least three faculty members, representing both SPEA and either the Department of Biology or the Department of Geological Sciences, to guide the course of study.

Program Requirements

(60 credit hours)

Program requirements meet all requirements for the Master of Science in Environmental Science degree and for the major chosen for the Master of Arts or Master of Science degree of the University Graduate School. Courses to satisfy the specific requirements of the Department of Biology and the Department of Geological Sciences are included in the respective area requirements. The program requires 60 credit hours distributed among the environmental science core, environmental management and policy core, area requirements, research, and general electives.

Environmental Science Core
(15 credit hours)
SPEA E526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA E536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E538 Statistics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Environmental Management and Policy Core
(9 credit hours)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)

Select two of the following, equivalent substitutes, or other policy/management graduate courses approved by an advisor:
SPEA E560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V520 Environmental Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA V625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Area Requirements (24 credit hours)
The student develops a program of courses in consultation with the supervisory committee to meet the Master of Arts (BIOL) or Master of Science (GEOL) major requirements.

Research Requirement (6 credit hours)
Each student must complete a minimum of 6 credit hours in research approved by the student’s supervisory committee.

General Electives
Each student must take sufficient additional courses approved by the student’s supervisory committee to meet the program requirement of 60 credit hours.

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Master of Science in Environmental Science–Master of Arts in Journalism (M.S.E.S.–M.A. in Journalism)

The combined Master of Science in Environmental Science and the Master of Arts in Journalism is a degree program that addresses the demands of information specialists who combine environmental science with reporting and writing or the study of media in society. The program prepares students for positions in the media, government, and business.

Candidates for the combined degree complete the core requirements for the M.S.E.S. and 12 additional credit hours selected from an approved list of courses offered by the School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Candidates also complete core requirements and elective courses from the School of Journalism. Candidates must be admitted to both schools.

Program Requirements

(57 credit hours)

Master of Science in Environmental Science Requirements

(36 credit hours)

Students are required to complete 36 credit hours of courses distributed among the environmental science core, environmental management and policy core, and a specialized concentration area.

Environmental Science Core
(15 credit hours)
SPEA E526 Applied Mathematics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E527 Applied Ecology (3 cr.)
SPEA E536 Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)
SPEA E538 Statistics for Environmental Science (3 cr.)
SPEA E552 Environmental Engineering (3 cr.)

Environmental Management and Policy Core
(9 credit hours)
SPEA V517 Public Management Economics (3 cr.)

Select two of the following, equivalent substitutes, or other policy/management graduate courses approved by an advisor:
SPEA E560 Environmental Risk Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V520 Environmental Policy Analysis (3 cr.)
SPEA V539 Management Science for Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V540 Law and Public Affairs (3 cr.)
SPEA V541 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Public and Environmental Policies (3 cr.)
SPEA V625 Environmental Economics and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V640 Law, Public Management, and Public Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V643 Natural Resource Management and Policy (3 cr.)
SPEA V645 Environmental Law (3 cr.)

Specialized Concentration

(12 credit hours)

Students are required to develop a specialization comprised of courses approved by a SPEA faculty advisor. Courses may include SPEA, journalism, and other courses.

Master of Arts in Journalism Requirements

(21 credit hours)

Twenty-one credit hours are required for the Master of Arts in Journalism. For specific requirements, see the School of Journalism Bulletin.

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