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Optometry 2005-2007 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of Optometry
2005-2007
Academic Bulletin

www.opt.indiana.edu
School of Optometry
800 E. Atwater Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405-3680
Local (812) 855-4447
Fax (812) 855-8664
Contact Optometry
 

Professional Optometry Degree Program

The Optometric Oath
Admission
Preoptometry Requirements
Optometry Degree Requirements
Optometry Curriculum
Academic Regulations
Academic Standing
Courses in Optometry
Student Honors and Awards
Student Organizations
Financial Aid

The Optometric Oath

With full deliberation, I freely and solemnly pledge that:

I will practice the art and science of optometry faithfully and conscientiously and to the fullest scope of my competence.

I will uphold and honorably promote by example and action the highest standards, ethics, and ideals of my chosen profession and the honor of the degree, Doctor of Optometry, which has been granted to me.

I will provide professional care for those who seek my services, with concern, with compassion, and with due respect for their human rights and dignity.

I will place the treatment of those who seek my care above professional gain and strive to see that none shall lack the proper care.

I will hold as privileged and inviolable all information entrusted to me in confidence by my patients.

I will advise my patients fully and honestly for all which may serve to restore, maintain, or enhance their vision and general health.

I will strive continuously to broaden my knowledge and skills so that my patients may benefit from all new and efficacious means to enhance the care of human vision.

I will share information cordially and unselfishly with my fellow optometrists and other professionals for the benefit of patients and the advancement of human knowledge and welfare.

I will do my utmost to serve my community, my country, and humankind as a citizen as well as an optometrist. I hereby commit myself to be steadfast in the performance of this my solemn oath and obligation.

As adopted by the American Optometric Association and the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry

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Admission

Application for Admission
The Admissions Timetable
Early Decision Process
Functional Standards and Expectations
Admission Test
Deposit Policy

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Application for Admission

Qualified applicants are sought from all racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and cultural groups in order to enhance the diversity of the class. The ideal candidates for the Doctor of Optometry degree should have demonstrated high scholastic ability, leadership, and a record of community and volunteer service. Applicants are judged on scholastic ability (demonstrated by college grades, high school class rank, and admission and aptitude test scores). Written and oral communication skills are extremely important. The applicants' personal characteristics are evaluated through character references, interviews, amount and kind of extracurricular and leadership activities, work experience, and the narrative explaining why they chose optometry as a career.

An admission interview is arranged for those applicants with the greatest potential for success in completing the program. The interview is usually conducted at the School of Optometry.

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The Admissions Timetable

The IU School of Optometry does not require a bachelor's degree before admission. Students can enter the Doctor of Optometry program with or without a bachelor's degree. Those who enter without a bachelor's degree will receive the Bachelor of Science in Optometry after two years in the professional program.

The regular application period for students entering with or without a bachelor's degree begins on September 1 and ends on February 1. Interviewing begins in October and continues through April. A rolling admissions process is used, and the selection process is usually completed by the end of May. A new class begins each fall.

The School of Optometry also offers an "Early Decision" process for outstanding students hoping to enter with or without a bachelor's degree. In this process students apply before the regular application period begins. The "Early Decision" application period begins on February 1 and ends on August 1.

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Early Decision Process

The Early Decision admission process offers numerous advantages. If the Indiana University School of Optometry is the school that a talented student wants to attend, then an early decision can eliminate the necessity of application to multiple schools. Knowing the decision in advance gives peace of mind. A student admitted under the early decision procedure will receive regular communication from the school, can be involved in some school activities, and generally stay connected. In addition, an early decision provides more time for students to make financial arrangements to attend the Indiana University School of Optometry. Students seeking admission by this process are evaluated by the criteria listed below.

The early decision admission process offers numerous advantages. If the Indiana University School of Optometry is the school that a talented student wants to attend, then an early decision can eliminate the necessity of application to multiple schools. Knowing the decision in advance gives peace of mind. A student admitted under the early decision procedure will receive regular communication from the school, can be involved in some school activities, and generally, stay connected. In addition, an early decision provides more time for students to make financial arrangements to attend the Indiana University School of Optometry. Students seeking admission by this process are evaluated by the criteria below.

Students can apply anytime after they have completed 40 graded hours of credit with a minimum GPA of 3.60 and before September 1 of the year immediately prior to the year when the applicant wishes to enter. Credits acquired by examination and through pass/fail courses do not count in the 40-hour total. Thus, students can know whether they are accepted as early as the spring of their second year of college.

Admission to the School of Optometry under this process (after four years of undergraduate work) is conditional upon the following:

  1. Maintaining a cumulative GPA of at least 3.30 throughout the remainder of undergraduate studies.
  2. Obtaining a score of at least 320 on the Quantitative and Total Science sections of the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), with no section score on the OAT below 280. Students should plan to take the OAT for the first time in the spring of their second year of college. Students who do not achieve this level in the spring of their second year can take the test again.
  3. Completing all the prerequisite courses for admission to the School of Optometry as outlined in this bulletin.
Students are encouraged to complete a bachelor's degree prior to entering the School of Optometry. Some exceptional students, however, can enter the optometry program after three years of undergraduate work, which can decrease the total years of university study to seven. Early decision is also available for these students. These students should have a minimum GPA of 3.7 upon completion of 40 graded hours of credit.

Admission to the School of Optometry under this process (after three years of undergraduate work) is conditional upon the following:

  1. Maintaining a GPA of at least 3.45 for the remainder of the undergraduate studies.
  2. Obtaining a score of at least 330 on the Quantitative and Total Science sections of the Optometry Admission Test, with no section score below 300. Students should plan to take the OAT for the first time in the spring of their second year of college. Students who do not achieve this level in the spring of their second year can take the test again.
  3. Completing all the prerequisite courses for admission to the School of Optometry as outlined in this bulletin.
If a student who is conditionally admitted under an early decision plan for acceptance after three years of undergraduate study fails to meet the above conditions but meets the conditions for acceptance after four years, the student will be accepted after four years.

Applicants for either Early Decision plan who fail to meet all conditions will be reevaluated by the Committee on Admissions. In such cases the Committee will consider all information and use its discretion in making decisions.

The School of Optometry will make an effort to accept no more than 50 percent of the class through the Early Decision program. Students applying for an early decision who are not accepted or who do not successfully complete the conditions of the early decision requirements will be considered with the normal pool of applicants. A negative decision on an Early Decision application in no way jeopardizes a student's chances for admission through the normal admission process.

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Functional Standards and Expectations

The Indiana University School of Optometry expects that admitted students will be able to meet all of the functional standards for optometric education established by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry. These standards require that students possess appropriate abilities in the following areas:

  • Observation Abilities
    The student must be able to acquire a defined level of knowledge as presented through lectures, laboratories, patient interaction, and self-study. Acquiring this body of information necessitates the functional use of visual, auditory, and somatic sensation enhanced by the use of other sensory modalities. Examples of these observational skills in which accurate information needs to be extracted in an efficient manner include:
    Visual abilities (as they relate to such things as visual acuity, color vision and binocularity)
    Visualizing and reading information from papers, films, slides, video and computer displays
    Observing optical, anatomic, physiologic and pharmacologic demonstrations and experiments
    Discriminating microscopic images of tissue and microorganisms
    Observing a patient and noting non-verbal signs
    Discriminating numbers, images, and patterns associated with disgnostic tests and instruments
    Visualizing specific ocular tissues in order to discern three-dimensional relationships, depth and color changes
  • Auditory Abilities
    Understanding verbal presentations in lecture, laboratory, and patient settings
    Recognizing and interpreting various sounds associated with laboratory experiments as well as diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
  • Tactile Abilities
    Palpating the eye and related areas to determine the integrity of the underlying structures
    Palpating and feeling certain cardiovascular pulses
  • Communication Abilities
    Students must be able to communicate effectively, efficiently, and sensitively with patients and their families, peers, staff, clinic faculty, and other members of the health care team. The student must be able to demonstrate established communication skills using traditional and alternative means. Examples of required communications skills include:
    Relating effectively and sensitively to patients, conveying compassion and empathy
    Perceiving verbal and nonverbal communication such as sadness, worry, agitation, and lack of comprehension from patients
    Eliciting information from patients and observing changes in mood and activity
    Communicating quickly, effectively, and efficiently in oral and written English with patients and other members of the health care team
    Reading and legibly recording observations, test results, and management plans accurately
    Completing assignments, patient records, and correspondence accurately and in a timely manner
  • Sensory and Motor Coordination Abilities
    Students must possess the sensory and motor skills necessary to perform an eye examination, including emergency care. In general, this requires sufficient exteroception sense (touch, pain, temperature), proprioceptive sense (position, pressure, movement, stereognosis, and vibratory) and fine motor function (significant coordination and manual dexterity using arms, wrists, hands and fingers). Examples of skills required include:
    Instillation of ocular pharmaceutical agents
    Insertion, removal, and manipulation of contact lenses
    Assessment of blood pressure and pulse
    Removal of foreign objects from the cornea
    Simultaneous manipulation of lenses, instruments, and therapeutic agents and devices
    Reasonable facility of movement
  • Intellectual—Conceptual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities
    Problem-solving, a most critical skill, is essential for optometric students and must be performed quickly, especially in emergency situations. In order to be an effective problem-solver, the student must be able to accurately and efficiently use such abilities as measurement, calculation, and reasoning, analysis, judgment, investigation, memory, numerical reasoning, and synthesis. Examples of these abilities include being able to:
    Determine appropriate questions to be asked and clinical tests to be performed
    Identify and analyze significant findings from history, examination, and other test data
    Demonstrate good judgment and provide a reasonable assessment, diagnosis, and management of patients
    Retain, recall, and obtain information in an efficient manner
    Identify and communicate the limits of one's knowledge and skill
  • Behavioral and Social Attributes
    The student must possess the necessary behavioral and social attributes for the study and practice of optometry. Examples of such attributes include:
    Satisfactory emotional health required for full utilization of one's intellectual ability
    High ethical standards and integrity
    Empathy with patients and concern for their welfare
    Commitment to the optometric profession and its standards
    Effective interpersonal relationships with patients, peers, and instructors
    Professional demeanor
    Effective functioning under varying degrees of stress and workload
    Adaptability to changing environments and uncertainties inherent in patient care
    Positive acceptance of suggestions and constructive criticism
Candidates with questions or concerns about how their own conditions or disabilities might affect their ability to meet the functional standards are encouraged to meet with an optometry school counselor before to submitting an application.

Qualified applicants to the School of Optometry who have disabilities that might hinder them in achieving these standards can, if they are admitted, receive reasonable accommodation from the School of Optometry. This accommodation will be based on an evaluation of the disability conducted by Indiana University's Office of Disability Services for Students.

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Admission Test

Each applicant is required to take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), which is designed to measure general academic ability and scientific knowledge. The test is given at various testing centers across the United States. Information concerning the test is available online at the Web site of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, www.opted.org, or by contacting the Optometry Admission Testing Program at 211 E. Chicago Avenue, Sixth Floor, Chicago, IL 60611-2678; 1-800-232-2159.

Note: Applicants must take the OAT for the first time before the February of the year in which they wish to enter. Applicants must provide OAT scores by February 1.

All applicants whose native language is not English are required to establish English proficiency. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is preferred. For information concerning the TOEFL, write to TOEFL Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541, or visit the TOEFL Web site at www.toefl.org.

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Deposit Policy

Students admitted to the Doctor of Optometry program are required to pay an enrollment deposit of $500. This fee is due as directed in admission letters before the start of the program. If the student enrolls in the IU School of Optometry, the deposit will be applied to the student's tuition. If the student does not enroll, the deposit is not refunded.

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Preoptometry Requirements

A total of 90 semester hours of college credit is required as a minimum for admission to the School of Optometry; however, a bachelor's degree is strongly recommended. Preoptometry requirements must be completed by the time the student enters the School of Optometry. Students who already have a bachelor's degree with a major in a science field are often fully prepared for admission to the School of Optometry. Those with degrees in nonscience fields may find additional course work required. Students may take their preoptometry course work at any accredited institution. Each course meets just one requirement. All preoptometry requirements must have been completed within 10 years from the time when the student hopes to start the Doctor of Optometry program.

Students entering with a bachelor's degree must have completed the following courses:

Subject area Min. sem. cr. hrs. req'd. Comparable
IU courses
Biology/Zoology
  Introductory, with lab 4 L 112 and L 113
  Advanced (animal or developmental) 3 see recommended list below
  Microbiology, with lab 4 M 250 and M 255
(formerly M310 and M315)
Chemistry
  Organic, 2 courses:
  lecture and lab or 2 lectures 4 C 341, C 342, or C 343
  Inorganic, with labs 8 C 105, C 125, C 106,
C 126 or C 117 and 118 or C 117, C 341, and
N 330
Mathematics
  Calculus 4 M 211 or M 119-120
Physics
  General 8 P 201 and P 202
Statistical Techniques and/or Experimental Design 3 K 300
Psychology, Introductory 3 P 101
Writing Skills—two courses; English composition W 131 or 132 and an additional course with a strong writing component2 6 W 131 or 132 and the Intensive Writing Requirement

Students entering the Indiana University School of Optometry without a bachelor's degree must have completed the following courses in addition to the above:

Subject area Min. sem. cr. hrs. req'd. Comparable
IU courses
Arts and Humanities1 6
Foreign Language3 6
Social and Historical Studies4 6
Additional credits as needed
  Total 90

Of the 90 credit hours, at least 20 must be at the 300-400 level. A maximum of 60 semester hours may be taken at a junior college.

Strongly Recommended
Vertebrate or Human Anatomy with lab 4 A 215
Physiology with lab 4 P 215
Biochemistry (300-level if possible) 3 M 350
Other Recommended Courses
Small Business Management—1 semester X 100
Medical Terminology—1 semester C 209
Histology—1 semester A 464
Ethics—1 semester P 140
Independent Research 490 series


1 A minimum of two courses is required.
2 A minimum SAT Verbal score of 670 or ACT English score of 32 will exempt the student (without credit) from the requirement. Other means of completing the composition requirement exist. Consult the College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin for details on these options.
3 A minimum of two courses is required. This requirement for a Bachelor of Science in Optometry may be met by placement examination. Students who have completed two or more years of a single foreign language in high school with an average grade of C or above, or have completed a bachelor’s degree at another institution, are exempt from this requirement. (Note: Variation exists among academic divisions of the university in basic foreign language requirements and exemption policies. For a bachelor’s degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, or from another division of the university, consult the appropriate bulletin for foreign language statements.)
4 A minimum of two courses is required. For departments in this area, consult the College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin.


None of the specified courses may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. The credit hours required in the individual subjects are considered absolute minimums, which must be met or exceeded. If the credit hours in any subject total less than the minimum specified, the student should complete the next higher course in that subject. Quarter hours convert to semester hours by the following scale:

3 quarter hours = 2 semester hours
4 quarter hours = 3 semester hours
5 quarter hours = 3.33 semester hours
6 quarter hours = 4 semester hours
For further information, contact the Office of Student Administration, School of Optometry, Indiana University, 800 E. Atwater Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405-3680; (812) 855-1917; e-mail iubopt@indiana.edu.

Transfer Admissions
The Indiana University School of Optometry admits students with advanced standing only when a vacancy exists and when the student would have met the Indiana University preoptometry requirements and standards for admission had he or she applied here originally. Students may lose credits in transferring, and for this reason, transfer is generally not recommended.

The student must have a minimum cumulative average of B in the optometry curriculum, be in good standing with his or her present institution, and have a compelling reason for wanting to transfer to Indiana University’s School of Optometry. No deficiencies in the Indiana University preoptometry requirements may exist at the time of admission.

Candidates for transfer must submit a statement of good standing from the dean of the school from which they are transferring. A regular application for admission should be submitted along with the statement of good standing and other documents specific to the transfer request.

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Optometry Degree Requirements

Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) Degree
Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Optometry Degree

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Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) Degree

The courses required for this degree are listed in the section of this bulletin entitled “Optometry Curriculum.” All of the courses except those identified as electives must be completed. A baccalaureate degree is required prior to receiving the O.D. degree. The curricular requirements for preoptometry are described in the section of this bulletin entitled Preoptometry Requirements.

Students are responsible for understanding all requirements for graduation and for completing them by the time they expect to graduate.

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Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Optometry Degree

Students who enter the Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) program without an undergraduate degree will receive the B.S. in Optometry upon successful completion of the first two years of the four-year professional degree program. The following requirements, in addition to the preoptometry requirements and the courses in the first two years of the professional degree program, must be satisfied by the student seeking this degree:

  1. A minimum of 122 credit hours in courses that may be counted toward the B.A., B.S., or higher degree of one or more degree-granting divisions of the university; that may include the allowable credits from the associate degree program of the School of Optometry (see 10 below).
  2. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
  3. A minimum of 30 credit hours in courses at the 300 level or above.
  4. At least 30 credit hours of V-lettered courses, which are regularly offered by the School of Optometry and/or the Vision Science Graduate Program, and which may include allowable credits at the 200 level (see 10 below).
  5. A minimum of 60 credit hours at Indiana University, of which at least 26 credit hours, including not fewer than 10 credits in the V-lettered courses, must be completed in residence on the Bloomington campus.
  6. Courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis can be applied only as electives in meeting the degree requirements. The limit is a total of eight courses with two courses allowed per year.
  7. Not more than 60 credit hours earned in accredited junior colleges may be applied toward the degree.
  8. Not more than 10 credit hours earned through correspondence study and/or special credit examination may be applied toward the degree, except by special permission of the dean.
  9. Work for a degree must be completed within six years from the time the student first registers in the university, except by special permission of the dean.
  10. Students enrolled in optometry courses that include material also covered in courses of the optometry associate degree program may earn credit in recognition of the partial overlap.
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Optometry Curriculum

The curriculum includes instruction in all of the clinical and practical phases of optometry as well as in the theoretical and fundamental aspects of vision science. It requires four years of professional degree courses, including at least a three-week summer assignment before the third year.1 The university schedules two regular academic semesters and two summer sessions. The regular fall semester includes 14 weeks and two days of instruction plus one week for final examinations; the spring semester includes 15 weeks of instruction plus one week for final examinations. Most optometry courses are scheduled for a full academic semester. Some, however, are scheduled for three, six, or eight weeks, and will be scheduled back-to-back with other courses that will be taken in the remaining weeks of the semester. The first summer session lasts six weeks; the second summer session lasts eight weeks.

First Year

First Semester Cr.
V 511 Human Gross Anatomy 4.0
V 514 Neuroanatomy 1.5
V 515 Medical and Ocular Biochemistry 4.0
V 517 Histology 3.0
V 521 Geometric Optics I 3.5
V 540 Ocular Microbiology 2.0
V 550 The Clinical Interview and Health History Taking 1.0
V 578 Public Health Policy and the Optometric Profession     2.0
Total 21.0

Second Semester Cr.
V 512 Ocular Anatomy 2.0
V 516 Ocular Physiology 2.5
V 522 Geometric Optics II 3.5
V 542 Systemic Physio-Pharmacology I 4.0
V 543 General Pathology 5.0
V 551 Clinical Optometry I 2.0
V 553 Diagnostic Procedures I     3.5
Total 22.5

Second Year

First Semester Cr.
V 631 Ophthalmic Optics I 3.0
V 642 Systemic Physio-Pharmacology II 5.0
V 652 Clinical Optometry II 2.0
V 654 Diagnostic Procedures II 3.5
V 663 Physiological Optics I: Visual Optics 3.5
V 665 Physiological Optics III: Ocular Motility     2.5
Total 19.5

Second Semester Cr.
V 632 Ophthalmic Optics II 2.5
V 633 Contact Lenses I 3.0
V 644 Ocular Disease I 3.0
V 646 Ocular Pharmacology 3.0
V 648 Neurophysiology of Vision 1.0
V 656 Diagnostic Procedures III 2.0
V 664 Physiological Optics II: Visual Function 3.0
V 666 Physiological Optics IV: Binocular Function 2.0
V 670 Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Optometry     1.0
Total 20.5

Summer Session Cr.
V 680 Introduction to Clinic 2.5

Third Year

First Semester Cr.
V 745 Ocular Disease II 3.0
V 748 Principles and Methods of Physical Assessment and Medicine 3.0
V 752 Contact Lenses II 3.0
V 753 Optometric Gerontology and Geriatrics 1.0
V 756 Clinical Assessment I 2.0
V 786 Optometry Clinic1 2.0
V 787 Optometry Clinic1     2.0
Total 16.0

Second Semester Cr.
V 746 Ocular Disease III (Neuro-Optometry) 2.0
V 749 Applied Ocular Therapeutics 3.0
V 755 Low Vision and Rehabilitation 1.0
V 753 Basic Visual Therapy 3.0
V 757 Clinical Assessment II 1.0
V 774 Socioeconomic Aspects of Optometry 2.0
V 781 Pediatric Optometry 1.5
V 782 Visual Perception and Learning Disabilities 1.5
V 788 Optometry Clinic1 2.0
V 789 Optometry Clinic1     2.0
Total 19.0

Fourth Year2 Cr.
V 885 Optometry Clinic (Bloomington) 10.0
V 887 Extension Clinic (Indianapolis) 10.0
V 888 External Clinic 10.0
(Fourth Clinical Assignment): V 885,V 887, or V 888 10.0
V 889 Special Projects     2.0
Total 42.0

Total 163.0

Electives Cr.
V 569 Selected Studies arr. 1.0-8.0
V 758 Advanced Visual Therapy 2.0
V 884 Optometry Clinic—Arranged 5.0

Clinical Improvement Cr.
V 780 Clinical Skills Enhancement—3rd year 2.0-2.5
V 880 Clinical Skills Enhancement—4th year 5.0-10.0

Note: This curriculum is currently in revision, and changes will be phased in over several years.



1 Elementary school vision-screening program assignments will be arranged.
2 Students in the final year of the program will spend 12 weeks at each of their four clinic assignments (V885, V887, V888, and the Fourth Clinical Assignment). Three of these four assignments are at various external locations.


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Academic Regulations

Registration and Counseling
Semester Load
Withdrawals from Courses
Addition of Courses
Grades
Absences from Scheduled Classes
Absences from Final Examinations

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Registration and Counseling

Designated staff members of the School of Optometry’s Office of Student Administration serve as advisors to optometry students in the school. Students are required to meet with their advisors before registration to arrange their programs. All students are required to register at the appointed time each semester.

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Semester Load

A student is not permitted to enroll in fewer than 12 credit hours during a fall or spring semester except with special permission from the dean.

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Withdrawals from Courses

Withdrawals during the first eight weeks of a semester, first four weeks of a half-semester course, or first two weeks of a summer session are automatically marked W (Withdrawn). Withdrawals that would reduce a student’s enrollment below 12 credit hours ordinarily will not be authorized.

Petitions for withdrawal after the periods specified above will not be authorized by the dean except for urgent reasons related to extended illness or equivalent distress. The desire to avoid a low grade is not an acceptable reason for withdrawal from a course.

If a student withdraws with the dean’s consent, the grade in the course will be W if the student is passing at the time of withdrawal and F if the student is not passing. The grade will be recorded on the date of withdrawal. Failure to complete a course without authorized withdrawal will result in the grade F.

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Addition of Courses

No course may be added by students after the first two weeks of a semester or first week of a summer session or half semester unless the instructor of the course petitions that an exception be made and the request is approved by the dean.

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Grades

The quality of a student's work is indicated by the following grades and numerical values:

A+ (4.00), A (4.00), A- (3.70) High degree of academic performance
B+ (3.30), B (3.00), B- (2.70) Above-average achievement
C+ (2.30), C (2.00), C- (1.70) Average achievement
D+ (1.30), D (1.00), D- (0.70) Passing work but below desired standards
No more than one grade of D (e.g., D+, D, or D-) in each of the following academic areas may be counted toward graduation:
  1. V 511 Human Gross Anatomy, V 512 Ocular Anatomy, V 514 Neuroanatomy, V 515 Medical Biochemistry, V 516 Ocular Physiology, V 517 Histology, V 540 Ocular Microbiology, V 542/V 642 Systemic Physio-Pharmacology I and II, V 543 General Pathology, V 646 Ocular Pharmacology
  2. V 521/V 522 Geometric Optics I and II, V 631/V 632 Ophthalmic Optics I and II, V 648 Neurophysiology of Vision, V 663 Visual Optics, V 665 Ocular Motility, V 664 Visual Function, and V 666 Binocular Function
  3. V 578 Public Health Policy and the Optometric Profession; V 633/V 752 Contact Lenses I and II; V 644/V 745/V 746 Ocular Disease I, II, and III; V 670 Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Optometry; V 748 Principles and Methods of Physical Assessment; V 749 Applied Ocular Therapeutics; V 751 Low Vision; V 753 Optometric Gerontology and Geriatrics; V 755 Visual Therapy; V 774 Socioeconomic Aspects of Optometry; V 776 Environmental Optics; V 781 Pediatric Optometry; and V 782 Visual Perception and Learning Disabilities
  4. V 550 The Clinical Interview and Health History Taking; V 551/V 652 Clinical Optometry I and II; V 553/V 654/V 656 Diagnostic Procedures I, II, and III; V 680 Introduction to Clinic; V 756 Clinical Assessment, V 757 Clinical Assessment II, V 780 Clinical Skills Enhancement–3rd Year; V 786/V 787/ V 788/V 789 Optometry Clinic; V 885 Optometry Clinic Bloomington; V 887 Extension Clinic Indianapolis; V 888 External Clinic; V 884 Optometry Clinic—Arranged; V 880 Clinical Skills Enhancement–4th Year; and V 889 Special Projects
F — Failure in a course or failure to complete a course without an authorized withdrawal. When a failing grade is recorded in an optometry course, the instructor(s) may require specific remedial procedures to be taken by the student before readmission to the course. The FX option is not accepted by the School of Optometry. Retaking and passing a failed course will, therefore, not remove the original grade of F from the student’s record.
W —  Withdrawn. Given automatically when the student, with the approval of the academic advisor and the dean, officially withdraws during the first eight weeks of a semester, first four weeks of a half-semester course, or first two weeks of a summer session. After these deadlines, the grade W is given in the instance of an approved and properly executed withdrawal only if the student is passing at the time of withdrawal.
R — Deferred Grade. Given when the grade determination will be deferred until completion of two or more terms of study, as with research or thesis courses. Also given either at the end of the first term of a two-term course or midway through a single course that overlaps two terms, when the course has been identified as one for a deferred grade in the Schedule of Classes. At the end of the final term in the sequence, the entry or entries R will be replaced with standard letter grades. Instructors will designate the standard grades on the rosters for the final term or by means of a form for removal of deferred grades.
I  — Incomplete. May be given only when the work of the course is substantially completed and when the student’s work is of passing quality. When an Incomplete is assigned, a record will be maintained in the Office of Student Administration of the School of Optometry. The record will include a statement of the reason for recording the Incomplete and an adequate guide for its removal, with a suggested final grade in the event of the departure or extended absence of the instructor from the campus.

A student must complete work required to have the Incomplete removed within one calendar year from the date of its recording, although the dean may authorize adjustment of this period in exceptional circumstances. An Incomplete that still stands after one calendar year is replaced by a grade of F.

Once a student has graduated, nothing in these regulations will prohibit the Incomplete from remaining on the record.

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Absences from Scheduled Classes

Illness is usually the only acceptable excuse for absence from class. Other absences must be explained to the satisfaction of the instructor, who will decide whether omitted work may be made up. The names of students who are excessively absent are to be reported by their instructors to the dean.

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Absences from Final Examinations

A student who fails to attend the final examination of a course and who has a passing grade up to that time may be given a grade of Incomplete if the absence is explained to the instructor’s satisfaction. A missed final examination for which there is no satisfactory excuse will be assigned a grade of F. When called upon, the Academic Review Committee of the School of Optometry will assist an instructor in weighing an excuse concerning absence from a final examination.

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Academic Standing

It is the intent of the School of Optometry that its professional students be able to graduate after four years of instruction (but in six years at the maximum). Although primary responsibility rests with the student, the school will work to help all students maintain good academic standing and will seek out and attempt (within limits) to provide remedial help for students who are having academic difficulties.

Good Standing
Probation
Academic Review
Clinical Competence
Remediation
National Board Requirement
Ineligible to Continue
Dismissal and Reinstatement
Academic Misconduct
Professional Misconduct
Academic Fairness Committee

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Good Standing

The minimum standard for academic good standing is a semester and cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.00, that is, a C average, which is also the minimum standard for graduation from Indiana University and the School of Optometry. A student who has repeated a course and received a grade of D+ or below both times is not in good standing, irrespective of the semester and cumulative GPA (see below: Ineligible to Continue, Item 4). Included in the final GPA presented for graduation may be no more than one grade of D+ or below in each of the academic areas listed under Grades.

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Probation

Academic probation results when the semester or cumulative GPA is below 2.00.

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Academic Review

If any student is placed on probation or receives grades of D+ or below, the Academic Review Committee will make recommendations about help and remedial work that will make it possible for the student to achieve better academic performance. If a student has received two or more grades of D+ or below in any one academic area defined under Grades, the Committee will decide which course may count toward graduation and which must be repeated. A student repeating a course must register for the course a second time. If any course to be repeated is a prerequisite to another course, the other course may not be taken until the prerequisite course is satisfactorily repeated.

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Clinical Competence

At the end of the second year, students are required to pass a competency examination in preparation for the course V 680 Introduction to Clinic. A student who fails the competency examination must complete remediation and take the examination again. If the student fails any part of the competency twice, the student must petition the Academic Review Committee in a timely way for permission to retake it a third time. The chair of competency examinations will then consult with faculty and make a written recommendation to the Academic Review Committee. A student who fails it three times will be ineligible to continue.

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Remediation

In the event that an intern receives a D grade in any clinical rotation in the third or fourth professional year, the clinic faculty will offer a remedial program to assist the intern in addressing areas of weakness and improving clinical and/or didactic skills.

If an intern receives a second D grade in any third- or fourth-year clinic course, the student must accept remediation and must enroll in either V 780 Clinical Skills Enhancement–3rd Year or V 880 Clinical Skills Enhancement–4th Year.

A student who fails to complete V 780 or V 880 with a grade of C– or better will be ineligible to continue.

If an intern is unable to continue with a clinical rotation for academic or clinical performance reasons, the grade of F will be assigned.

Policies and procedures are explained in detail in the most recent Indiana University School of Optometry Eye Care Centers Student Orientation Manual.

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National Board Requirement

Part I Basic Sciences of the National Board of Examiners in Optometry (NBEO) examination represents the comprehensive assessment of basic sciences education in optometry. Competency in the basic sciences is a foundational prerequisite and must be demonstrated prior to graduation from the IU School of Optometry. Therefore, students must pass part I before they will be allowed to graduate.

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Ineligible to Continue

A student is ineligible to continue when one or more of the following conditions hold:

  1. the student earns lower than a 1.00 GPA for any semester, regardless of cumulative GPA;
  2. the student earns both (a) lower than a 2.00 GPA in a semester and (b) lower than a 2.00 GPA in the following semester;
  3. the student's cumulative GPA after three semesters is lower than 2.0;
  4. the student has repeated a course and received a grade of D+ or below both times; this condition includes the courses V780 and V880, when taken as remediation of a clinical course in which the student received a D+ or below;
  5. the student has failed the clinical competency examination two times and is not permitted to take it a third time, or fails it a third time;
  6. the student fails a clinical course after remediation; clinical courses are V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, V 789, V 885, V 887, V 888;
  7. the student has received consecutive grades of F for two rotations during the fourth year;
  8. the student has failed to complete the professional curriculum in six years;
These conditions indicate unsatisfactory progress and could result in automatic dismissal.

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Dismissal and Reinstatement

A student dismissed for the first time may petition the Academic Review Committee for reinstatement without delay. If granted, the student will be expected to attain a minimum GPA of 2.00 in the first semester of reinstatement. A student whose petition has been denied may not petition for reinstatement until the lapse of at least one semester of a regular academic year.

A student who is dismissed for the second time may not petition for reinstatement until the lapse of at least one full academic year. Depending on the circumstances, a dismissed student may be allowed to retake specific courses in which the previous grades were low, but unless officially reinstated to the curriculum, this student may not take courses that represent progress toward the degree. The Academic Review Committee may recommend additional conditions or restrictions to precede reinstatement of a student.

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Academic Misconduct

Academic integrity is fundamental to the intellectual life of the university and to the education of each student. The following acts of academic dishonesty are prohibited: cheating, fabrication, plagiarism, interference, and facilitating academic dishonesty. Proven academic misconduct is grounds for dismissal.

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Professional Misconduct

Maintaining standards of professional conduct is essential to the integrity of the profession. Professional misconduct is strictly prohibited. This includes dishonest conduct (including, but not limited to, false accusation of misconduct; forgery; alteration or misuse of any university document, record, or identification; and giving to a university official any information known to be false) and use or possession of alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs on university property or during a university activity.

In addition, fraud and patient endangerment and abandonment will be grounds for dismissal. Standards for patient care procedures and for professional behavior in a clinical setting are detailed in the most recent Indiana University School of Optometry Eye Care Centers Student Orientation Manual.

Additional rules and regulations of the university are available in the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct published by Indiana University. It is each student's responsibility to be aware of these regulations. Violation of the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct may result in dismissal.

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Academic Fairness Committee

The charge of the committee is to consider, arbitrate, and adjudicate grading disputes in cases of procedural errors and in cases where evaluation on nonacademic grounds is alleged.

The Academic Fairness Committee is composed of three students and three faculty members, chosen by the dean of the School of Optometry.

Issues dealing with substantive quality of the student’s academic performance and involving intrinsic, professional, academic judgments by a faculty member lie outside the Committee’s jurisdiction.

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Courses in Optometry

The number of credit hours given a course is indicated in parentheses following the course title. The abbreviation “P” refers to the course prerequisite(s). The abbreviation “C” refers to courses that are corequisite(s). Unless otherwise noted, the prerequisites for all courses include enrollment in the School of Optometry and permission of the instructor.

V 511 Human Gross Anatomy (4 cr.) Regional study of anatomy using human specimens. Emphasizes head and neck, axilla, abdomen, and thorax.

V 512 Ocular Anatomy (2 cr.) A detailed study of the normal anatomy and embryology of the eye and its adnexa. The organization of the various components of the eye is studied at the light and electron microscopic level and this organization is related to the molecular structure where it is known.

V 514 Neuroanatomy (1.5 cr.) C: V 511. Functional anatomy of the human brain, with emphasis on the visual system.

V 515 Medical and Ocular Biochemistry (4 cr.) Medical and biochemical principles that relate to understanding and treatment of disease.

V 516 Ocular Physiology (2.5 cr.) C: V 512. Vegetative physiology of the eye, with attention to the chemical constitution, intermediary metabolism, regulation of hydration and intraocular pressure, transparency of the ocular components, and retinal physiology.

V 517 Histology (3 cr.) Microscopic anatomy of human cells, tissues, and organs.

V 521 Geometric Optics I (3.5 cr.) Optics of lenses, prisms, and mirrors; properties of light.

V 522 Geometric Optics II (3.5 cr.) P: V 521. A continuation in the study of optics of lenses, prisms, and mirrors; properties of light.

V 540 Ocular Microbiology (2 cr.) Biology of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and other organisms that infect ocular tissues. Host response to infections and epidemiology will be presented.

V 542 Systemic Physio-Pharmacology I (4 cr.) P: V 515. Integrated pharmacology and physiology of organ systems, including cellular-level activity and intercellular communication.

V 543 General Pathology (5 cr.) P: V 511 and V 517. General concepts in inflammation, immunology, neoplasia. Infectious, genetic, systemic diseases and diseases of organs and systems studied.

V 550 The Clinical Interview and Health History Taking (1 cr.) .) Introduction to interview techniques, health history content, and medical record documentation as applies to the optometric setting. The course will include optometric and medical terminology, interview techniques for special populations, legal aspects of medical records, and differential diagnosis of visual symptoms. Requirements include completion of outside health history assignments.

V 551 Clinical Optometry I (2 cr.) Introduction to visual examination techniques and evaluation of results as they relate to subjective symptoms, visual performance, and health. Study of the principles involved in the measurement and treatment of ametropia, oculomotor imbalances, and associated conditions.

V 553 Diagnostic Procedures I (3.5 cr.) P: V 521. C: V 543 and V 551. Vision examination techniques, theory and application of instrumentation, and ocular diagnostic procedures.

V 569 Selected Studies (elective, cr. arr.) Items of current scientific interest. Consideration given to student's special interests. May include writing of abstracts and reviews of current vision science literature. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

V 578 Public Health Policy and the Optometric Profession (2 cr.) .) Introduction to the fundamentals and principles of public health and epidemiology; an overview of public and community health problems, planning, and care, with special attention to optometric and other visual aspects of variously identified segments of the community. Includes methods of epidemiological investigation and study design, plus considerations of quality, efficiency, economics, and regulation of vision and health care delivery and utilization.

V 631 Ophthalmic Optics I (3 cr.) P: V 521 and V 522. Design and application of ophthalmic materials; study of the physical and optical characteristics of ophthalmic single vision and multifocal lens designs, ophthalmic prism, absorptive lenses, and the measurement and fitting of lenses and frames. Includes related laboratory exercises.

V 632 Ophthalmic Optics II (2.5 cr.) P: V 521 and V 522. A continuation in the design and application of ophthalmic materials; study of the physical and optical characteristics of ophthalmic single vision and multifocal lens designs, ophthalmic prism, absorptive lenses, and the measurement and fitting of lenses and frames. Includes related laboratory exercises.

V 633 Contact Lenses I (3 cr.) Theory and practice of contact lenses. Includes contact lens terminology, ocular anatomy and physiology as it applies to contact lens wear, general principles of lens materials, lens design, contact lens optics, lens care systems, the prefitting examination, basic fitting principles, and aftercare problems as they apply to contact lens practice.

V 642 Systemic Physio-Pharmacology II (5 cr.) P: V542. Integrated pharmacology and physiology of organ systems, including blood, immune, digestive, renal, respiratory, circulatory, and central nervous systems.

V 644 Ocular Disease I (3 cr.) P: V543. A detailed discussion of the signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management of ocular diseases of the anterior segment.

V 646 Ocular Pharmacology (3 cr.) P: V 642. Medications used in treatment of ocular disease. Ocular effects of systemic medications.

V 648 Neurophysiology of Vision (1 cr.) Introduction to the functional organization of the visual system and the physiological basis of vision. This course treats the visual system as a biological image processor to reveal how the structure and function of the retina and brain determine visual performance and constrain the quality of vision.

V 652 Clinical Optometry II (2 cr.) P: V 551. Introduction to visual examination techniques and evaluation of results as they relate to subjective symptoms, visual performance, and health. Principles involved in the measurement and treatment of ametropia, oculomotor imbalances, and associated conditions are studied.

V 654 Diagnostic Procedures II (3.5 cr.) P: V 551, V 553, V 543. C: V 642 and V 652. Advanced diagnostic techniques stressing differential diagnosis, treatment, and appropriate interpretation. Emphasis on binocular vision examination techniques, theory, and application of instrumentation along with advanced disease detection.

V 656 Diagnostic Procedures III (2 cr.) P: V 553 and V654. C: V 644 and V 646. Advanced clinical analysis, procedures, and protocols for examinations of patients in the clinical setting, and comprehensive eye examinations with scheduled patients. Requirements include completion of outside practice examinations, clinical observations by arrangement, and the Clinical Competency Examination.

V 663 Physiological Optics I: Visual Optics (3.5 cr.) P: V 522. The eye as an optical instrument.

V 664 Physiological Optics II: Visual Function (3 cr.) The basic aspects of monocular vision, including light and dark adaptation, color vision, and both spatial and temporal resolution. The science of measuring visual performance and its application to clinical optometry.

V 665 Physiological Optics III: Ocular Motility (2.5 cr.) Characteristics, control, and deficits of the five somatic eye-movement systems (convergence, saccadic version, pursuit version, fixation maintenance, vestibular reflex) and the autonomic systems subserving accommodation and pupillary diameter and reflexes.

V 666 Physiological Optics IV: Binocular Function (2 cr.) Binocular sensory mechanisms of vision. Summary of the geometry of 3-dimensional space and stereo vision, underlying neuroanatomy and physiology of binocular vision, prerequisites for normal stereopsis, and commonly encountered anomalies of binocular vision.

V 670 Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Optometry (1 cr.) Introduction to epidemiology and biostatistics, principles of epidemiological inquiry and research design, and the application of statistical methods to clinical data.

V 680 Introduction to Clinic (2.5 cr.) P: V 551, V 553, V 631, V 632, V 633, V 644, V 652, V 654, V 656, and a passing score on the Clinical Competency Examination in V 656. Introduction to clinical practice in visual analysis, optometric procedures, case conference; discussion and patient care for three 40-hour weeks during the summer, or the equivalent by arrangement.

V 745 Ocular Disease II (3 cr.) P: V 644. A detailed discussion of the signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management of ocular diseases of the posterior segment.

V 746 Ocular Disease III (Neuro-Optometry) (2 cr.) P: V 745. A detailed discussion of the signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management of neurological diseases affecting the eye.

V 748 Principles and Methods of Physical Assessment and Medicine (3 cr.) P: V 680 or comparable clinical experience. Comprehensive health history, physical examination with emphasis on HEENT and neurological screening, and their relationship to ocular health conditions and medical management; clinical chemistry and interpretation of clinical laboratory tests; criteria for referral to other providers; principles of CPR and emergency office procedures.

V 749 Applied Ocular Therapeutics (3 cr.) P: V 646, V 745. The use, in clinical optometric practice, of legend drugs, lasers, and other therapeutic devices in the treatment and management of ocular disease.

V 751 Low Vision and Rehabilitation (1 cr.) P: V 652 and V 654. Special examination procedures and patient management techniques for the visually impaired. Evaluations and prescriptions of optical, nonoptical, and electronic devices. Overview of rehabilitative services.

V 752 Contact Lenses II (3 cr.) P: V 633. Applications of contact lenses. This course covers the fitting and care of patients requiring specialty contact lenses and more difficult cases including, but not limited to, correcting astigmatism, tinted and cosmetic lenses, fitting the presbyopic patient, fitting infants and children, fitting keratoconic patients, fitting postsurgical and other distorted corneas, haptic lenses, cosmetic shells, and prosthetic eyes.

V 753 Optometric Gerontology and Geriatrics (1 cr.) The purpose of the course is to impart knowledge and understanding fundamental to comprehensive and primary vision care of older adults. Discussions will include the functional consequences of vision and aging, interdisciplinary aspects of care and community resources.

V 755 Basic Visual Therapy (3 cr.) Diagnosis, prognosis, and orthoptic treatment of anomalies of binocular vision, including the optical, motor, sensory, integrative, and perceptual systems.

V 756 Clinical Assessment I (2 cr.) P: V 6 80. C: V 745. Introduction to clinical reasoning and formulation of differential diagnostic protocols for investigation of various visual problems.

V 757 Clinical Assessment II (1 cr.) P: V 756. A continuation in the clinical reasoning and formulation of differential diagnostic protocols for investigation of various visual problems.

V 758 Advanced Visual Therapy (elective, 2 cr.) Advanced levels of topics dealt with in V755 Basic Visual Therapy.

V 774 Socioeconomic Aspects of Optometry (2 cr.) Optometry education; prevalence of visual anomalies; care of the blind, near-blind, and low-income groups; vision cults and propaganda; optometric careers; practice management.

V 780 Clinical Skills Enhancement—Third year (2-2.5 cr.) Increased supervision provided by clinical faculty for students having difficulty in areas of clinical performance.

V 781 Pediatric Optometry (1.5 cr.) P: V 755. Specialized diagnosis and management strategies for the infant and child. Topics to include refractive and binocular vision anomalies, disease, and pharmacology.

V 782 Visual Perception and Learning Disabilities (1.5 cr.) P: V 755. Optometrist's role in assessment and management of visual perception, learning disabilities, and reading problems. Communication with parents, educators, and other professionals will be emphasized.

V 786 Optometry Clinic (2 cr.) P: V 680. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.

V 787 Optometry Clinic (2 cr.) P: V 786. A continuation of V 786. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.

V 788 Optometry Clinic (2 cr.) P: V 787. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis, case presentation by student interns. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.

V 789 Optometry Clinic (2 cr.) P: V 788. Continuation of V 788. Clinical practice in visual analysis, patient care, and optometric procedures. Case discussion and student evaluation on a daily basis, case presentation by student interns. Patient care includes assisting patients with selection of suitable eye wear.

V 880 Clinical Skills Enhancement—Fourth year (5-10 cr.) Increased supervision provided by clinical faculty for students having difficulty in areas of clinical performance.

V 884 Optometry Clinic—Arranged (5 cr.) P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. Advanced clinical optometric training with emphasis on optometric specialties such as contact lens care, ocular disease diagnosis/ management, binocular vision analysis/therapy, and pediatrics.

V 885 Optometry Clinic (10 cr.)1 P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. Advanced clinical optometric training with emphasis on optometric specialties such as contact lens care, ocular disease diagnosis/ management, binocular vision analysis/ therapy, and pediatrics.

V 887 Extension Clinic (10 cr.)1 P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. An intensive, hands-on patient care experience at a large urban optometry clinic in Indianapolis. Includes experience in primary care as well as specialty services.

V 888 External Clinic (10 cr.)1 P: V 680, V 786, V 787, V 788, and V 789, as well as completion of all lecture and laboratory courses through the third professional year of study. An intensive, hands-on patient care experience at an affiliated external clinical site such as a military hospital, Veterans Administration medical facility, or referral eye center.

V 889 Special Projects (2 cr.) Research and writing of a paper in a style suitable for publication in a scientific journal.


1 V885, V887, and V888 may be taken in nonsequential order.


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Student Honors and Awards

Graduation with Honors
Awards and Recognitions
Competitions and Grants

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Graduation with Honors

The Doctor of Optometry degree is awarded with honors to students who have demonstrated laudatory scholarship in their professional studies. Similarly, the Bachelor of Science in Optometry degree is granted with distinction. The specific honor is noted on the graduate’s diploma. The cumulative grade point averages and the corresponding citations are 3.70, with honors; 3.80, with high honors; 3.90, with highest honors. Corresponding levels prevail for the B.S. and B.A. degrees.

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Awards and Recognitions

Each year, many awards are presented to School of Optometry students. Periodically, students will receive notices regarding eligibility and application deadlines. Inquiries should be directed to the School of Optometry’s Office of Student Administration or to the faculty chairperson of the Awards and Honors Committee. It is especially important for students to explore grants, scholarships, or other financial support available from their home states.

The following list describes a representative sample of the awards; it should be noted, however, that the actual list of awards may vary from year to year and that not all awards are automatically presented each year. The awards are listed according to eligibility categories. A complete listing is available at www.opt.indiana.edu.

First-Year O.D. Students
G.K. Optical, Duffens Optical, Diversified Ophthalmics, and Walman Optical: Student Indiana Optometric Association Awards
Indiana Affiliate of the American Foundation for Vision Awareness: Jane Hofstetter Award

Third-Year O.D. Students
Dr. & Mrs. Lewis Scott Scholarship
Indiana University Bloomington: Chancellor's Scholar
J. Thomas Eade, O.D., Fund
Jack W. Bennett Endowed Scholarship
Jack W. Bennett, O.D., Humanitarian Award
John Hitchcock Memorial Scholarship
Kentucky Optometric Foundation Scholarship
Roger W. Reading Endowed Award
Varilux Student Grant Award
Vision Service Plan Scholarships
Wal-Mart Optical Division Educational Scholarship

Fourth-Year O.D. Students
Alcon Scholarship Award
Beta Sigma Kappa: Silver Medal Award
Corning Low Vision Award
David H. Kolack, O.D., Award
Designs for Vision, Inc.: William Feinbloom Low Vision Award
Dr. Henry Hofstetter Scholarship Award
Essilor Corneal Reflection Pupilometer Award
Indiana Chapter of the American Academy of Optometry: John P. Davey Memorial Award and Roy E. Denny Award
Indiana University Optometric Student Association Past President's Award
Jack W. Bennett, O.D., Humanitarian Award
Marchon Eyewear Practice Management Award
Rigid Gas Permeable Lens Institute Award
Vistakon: Excellence Award
Wal-Mart Optical Division Educational Scholarship

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Competitions and Grants

American Optometric Association: Dr. Seymour Galina Grant
American Optometric Association: Student Leadership Award
American Optometric Foundation: Corning Scholarship
American Optometric Foundation: Dr. Gary Gross Scholarship Award
American Optometric Foundation: O.P. "Pete" Lyman Jr. Scholarship
American Optometric Student Association/ CIBA Vision Future Leadership Grant
American Public Health Association: Vision Care Outstanding Student Award
Beta Sigma Kappa Research Grant
Heart of America Contact Lens Society
IU Chapter of the National Optometric Student Association: Outstanding Student Award
Optometric Extension Program Foundation: Senior Students and Recent Graduate Research Grant Program

Many state affiliates of the American Foundation for Vision Awareness offer scholarships to students who are residents of that state. In addition to the awards listed here, scholarships, fellowships, and loans are available through the School of Optometry’s financial aid administrator.

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Student Organizations

The principal organizations open to, and governed by, students in the School of Optometry are the following:

American Optometric Student Association, Indiana University School of Optometry Chapter (AOSA)
All optometry students are eligible for membership in the IU chapter of this national organization. This organization serves as a source of information about changes in the field of optometry, provides a variety of learning experiences for students, and represents students in many allied organizations. Through its Board of Trustees, local chapters help to shape national policies on optometric education.

Indiana University Optometric Student Association (IUOSA)
All optometry students are eligible for membership in the IUOSA, which is affiliated with the American Optometric Student Association. The association is active in current student affairs, sponsors social events, and provides suggestions and assistance to the dean and faculty.

Indiana University National Optometric Student Association (NOSA)
The IU membership of NOSA comprises representatives of minority groups among the student body. The local chapter is a student affiliate of the National Optometric Association. The association sponsors an awards ceremony each year and aids the school in a variety of ways.

Beta Sigma Kappa
A chapter of this international honorary optometric society was established at Indiana University in 1983. The organization is open to optometry students with outstanding scholastic achievements and is dedicated to research and exemplary optometric practice.

Student Volunteer Optometric Services to Humanity (SVOSH)
This organization provides eye care to individuals, usually in developing countries, who are otherwise unable to obtain this care for themselves. SVOSH collects and catalogs used eyeglasses, which are then distributed during an eye-care trip to an area of need.

Fellowship of Christian Optometrists
FCO is an organization that promotes, furthers, and maintains Christian fellowship among optometry students. Activities include discussions of current topics of interest led by guest speakers, the establishment of an ongoing eye clinic at an overseas mission, and screening missions to Third World countries.

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Financial Aid

Federal Financial Aid
Borrowing
Other Programs

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Federal Financial Aid

To apply for federal financial assistance, students need to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) between January 1 and March 1 each year. They may also file after March 1, but may not be considered for all the aid possible, depending on funding. Students may file the FAFSA at the Web site www.fafsa.ed.gov.

In order to be eligible for federal financial aid, a student must:

  • be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen
  • have a valid Social Security number
  • register with the Selective Service, if required
  • not be in default or owe an overpayment on previous federal aid
  • be admitted to an IU degree program
  • make satisfactory academic progress
More information on eligibility requirements, the application process, and specific financial aid programs can be found at the Web site www.indiana.edu/~sfa.

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Borrowing

Financing an optometric education can be a long-term investment if a student needs to borrow money. Students must understand the implications of receiving student loans, such as the obligation to repay them with interest once they obtain their degrees. There are several student loan programs available to doctoral optometric students:

  • Federal Subsidized Stafford/Ford Loan through the Federal Family Educational Loan Program (FFELP)
  • Federal Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loan through the Federal Family Educational Loan Program (FFELP)
  • Federal Perkins Loan
  • Federal Health Professions Loan (students must provide parent data on the FAFSA to be considered for this loan)
There are other sources for loans (along with state and association assistance programs) that students can fully research to obtain funding. Information can be obtained from the American Optometric Association as well as from local and state optometric associations.

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Other Programs

Other federal aid programs include Federal Work-Study, Veterans Benefits, and Military Health Professions scholarships. In addition, other options include:

  • School of Optometry Emergency Assistance Program
  • Teaching Assistantships
  • IU Emergency Loans
  • Educational Opportunity Fellowships
  • Graduate Minority Fellowships
  • Diversity Enhancement Fee Scholarships
  • Wildermuth Fee Scholarships
Other scholarships and awards through the School of Optometry are listed in the Student Honors and Awards section in this bulletin. Applications and information about these programs can be obtained from the Office of Student Administration.

A free search for other scholarships, not from the school, is available online at www.fastweb.com.

Please contact the School of Optometry's Associate Director of Financial Aid with questions or concerns at School of Optometry, 800 E. Atwater Avenue, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-3680; e-mail iuoptfa@indiana.edu for in person or telephone appointments, which can be scheduled by calling the Office of Student Administration at (812) 855-1917. Information regarding other sources of financial aid is available on the School of Optometry's Web site at www.opt.indiana.edu.

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Last updated: 30 August 2016 03 23 15

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