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School of Journalism 2004-2006 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of
Journalism
2004-2006
Academic Bulletin

School of Journalism
Ernie Pyle Hall 
940 E. 7th St.
Bloomington, IN 47405-7108
Local (812) 855-92476166
ax (812) 855-0901
Contact Journalism Office

School of Journalism
Information and Communications Complex(IT)
535 W. Michigan Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 278-5320
Contact Journalism Office
 

Campus Life at Bloomington

The Journalism Library
The Roy W. Howard Archive
Deadline
Honors and Scholarships
Campus Media
Student Organizations
Internships and Placement
Honors College
Writing Tutorial Services
Overseas Study Programs

The Journalism Library

The Weil Journalism Library will, by fall 2004, be completely renovated to meet the needs of twenty-first century scholars. An information commons will provide comfortable workspace for groups of students and faculty who wish to work together in an environment with computer access to hundreds of online databases in the humanities and social sciences, including LEXIS/NEXIS, ComAbstracts and ComIndex. In addition, the library will contain a broad selection of the journals and other publications of our field, along with a selection of the 30,000 cataloged volumes in journalism and mass communications currently housed in the library. (Volumes not in the Journalism Library will be housed in the Main Library and Auxiliary Library Facility, and are easily retrieved upon request.) The librarian and staff are available to assist with research, using IU’s Web-based computer catalog and other databases.

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The Roy W. Howard Archive

The Roy W. Howard Archive in the Scripps Howard Foundation Suite contains personal and public material on Roy Howard. Howard grew up in Indianapolis and worked on newspapers in St. Louis and Cincinnati before becoming the first president of the United Press in 1912. In 1922 he was named chairman of the board of Scripps Howard Newspapers, a position he held until his retirement in 1953. The School of Journalism directs the annual Roy W. Howard National Reporting Competition and Howard Lecture for journalism students.

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Deadline

The School of Journalism offers students a range of awards, scholarships, opportunities and activities in student organizations, internships and workshops. To inform students of such events and opportunities, the school publishes <>Deadline, an online newsletter. The school makes Deadline available to all its majors by posting it on the school’s Web site and by e-mailing it directly to students.

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Honors and Scholarships

The school recognizes and rewards the academic and professional accomplishments of its majors with a program of awards and scholarships on both the Bloomington and Indianapolis campuses.

The school places its outstanding students on the Dean’s List each semester, based on their grade point average for that semester. In addition, the school annually awards nearly $155,000 in scholarships, ranging in value from $1,000 to $7,000, to its majors. The application process begins in September. Applicants are selected for these scholarships by a faculty-student committee. The school announces the awards at an annual ceremony for students and parents in the spring.

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Campus Media

The School of Journalism does not require that students work on campus media nor does it give them academic credit if they do. Nevertheless, the school strongly urges all journalism students to work on campus media to practice and develop the skills they are learning in their journalism classes. Students considering professional careers in the media will find that campus media experience is essential for securing professional internships and full-time employment in news, public relations, broadcasting, and advertising.

More than 300 students work each semester on the Indiana Daily Student in news-editorial, advertising, circulation, and production. The campus newspaper publishes five days a week in regular semesters and twice weekly during summer terms. Students have full responsibility for the news-editorial content of the newspaper, which is entirely funded through advertising revenues.

In addition, nearly two dozen students are involved in the production of the daily online student medium, the Indiana Digital Student at www.idsnews.com. The Indiana Digital Student is playing an increasingly key role in breaking campus news. Also affiliated with the Indiana Daily Student is the weekly arts and entertainment magazine, IDS Weekend, that gives about two dozen students experience in magazine production and publishing. The editorial and advertising offices for all of the student IDS enterprises are located on the first floor of Ernie Pyle Hall.

Students also have full responsibility for the content of the Arbutus, the IU yearbook. This publication offers excellent experience for students interested in photojournalism, layout and design, and magazine and feature writing. It also offers opportunities for students interested in the management and marketing of publications. The Arbutus offices are also on the first floor of Ernie Pyle Hall.

Students with aspirations for careers in print should also explore opportunities for contributing to the Indiana Alumni magazine (offices at 1000 E. 17th Street), and other publications and newsletters in academic units, residence halls, sororities, and fraternities.

Broadcast news students are encouraged to seek experience at WTIU and WFIU, the public television and radio stations located in the Radio-Television Building on the Bloomington campus. WTIU airs a student-produced newscast, and both WTIU and WFIU offer internship opportunities. Students may also work for WIUS, the student-run radio station.

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Student Organizations

The School of Journalism encourages students to become involved in academic life and to develop their professional preparation through student organizations and student chapters of professional organizations.

Students are appointed to appropriate school committees by the dean.

Students run the following organizations, usually with the guidance of a faculty advisor, enriching their professional development through attending workshops, lectures, and social activities:

  • International Association of Business Communicators, for students interested in advertising, public relations or corporate communication careers.
  • Society of Professional Journalists, for students interested in careers in news.
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Internships and Placement

The career services director, Marcia Debnam, helps students prepare for internships and full-time employment. Information about opportunities is posted regularly on the school’s bulletin board in Ernie Pyle Hall. Such opportunities are also published in Deadline, the school’s online newsletter.

The school’s career services director advises students in preparing resumes, clips, cover letters, interviews and job and internship search strategies, and coordinates school visits from recruiters and employers. The Placement and Internship Office is located in EP 202.

Students may earn up to 3 credit hours (1 credit per internship) for properly supervised internships, provided they arrange to meet the school’s requirements in advance of taking the internship. Students may not apply the credit to the minimum of 30 hours required for the journalism major. They may use it only as elective credit in the total 123 credit hours required for the degree. For information about requirements for securing internship credit, consult the Placement and Internship Office.

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Honors College

The School of Journalism encourages superior students to take advantage of the variety of opportunities offered through the Honors College and is pleased to cooperate with their advisors in helping first-year students plan their individual programs.

Honors Seminars and Special Sections
Honors seminars are 3 credit hour discussion classes with limited enrollment, open only to students formally admitted to the Honors College. Many different topics are offered in these seminars. Some honors seminars may be applied toward distribution requirements.

Many departments offer special sections for students in the Honors College. The School of Journalism has offered honors sections of Journalism J 200 and Journalism J 300, and opportunities for honors research through Journalism J 499.

The Honors College faculty also teach honors seminars in their various disciplines. The material covered in these courses is broader in scope or greater in depth than that of a regular course.

Grants and Scholarships
The Honors College offers a limited number of merit-based, renewable scholarships to incoming freshmen only. To be eligible to apply, an applicant must have been admitted to Indiana University Bloomington, have a minimum SAT of 1350 (or a minimum ACT composite of 31), or rank within the top 5 percent of his or her high school class.

Any junior or senior with a 3.2 or higher cumulative GPA may apply for Honors College support. Grants are available for research, creative activity, teaching internships, and professional experience internships. Awards are for a maximum of $600 during the academic year and $1,750 in the summer. In addition, any undergraduate student with a 3.2 GPA is eligible to apply for the Edward L. Hutton International Experiences Program Grant for up to $2,000. All awards are competitive. See the Honors College Web site (www.indiana.edu/~iubhonor) for more information.

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Writing Tutorial Services

Writing Tutorial Services (WTS) provides free, one-on-one tutorial help for students writing papers for any course. Students visiting WTS (located in Ballantine 206) meet with tutors in hour-long appointments to talk about papers at any stage of the writing process—brainstorming, drafting, revising, or polishing. Whenever possible, a student seeking help at WTS will meet with a tutor who is familiar with the student’s discipline and course, and who can therefore help with discipline- or course-specific aspects of the student’s writing. To make an appointment for a tutorial, call WTS at (812) 855-6738. In addition to the main location in Ballantine, WTS tutors are also available at several branch locations for walk-in tutorials in the evenings: on the undergraduate side of the Main Library and at the Academic Support Centers in Briscoe, Teter, and Forest residence halls.

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Overseas Study Programs

Journalism students are encouraged to make overseas study a part of their regular degree program. Students can spend a full academic year, a semester, or a summer abroad earning IU credits while enrolled in outstanding foreign universities. IU offers more than 80 overseas study programs in 14 languages (including English) in 32 countries and in nearly every field of study. For example, students can study Renaissance art in Florence, international politics in Aix, English history in Canterbury, international news gathering in London, tropical biology in Costa Rica, or Spanish in Cuernavaca.

Some programs require a strong foreign language background, so that students can attend regular courses in the host university. Others, especially summer programs, provide intensive language instruction as part of the program. A number of semester programs offer courses in English on international topics such as environmental policy. Indiana University grants direct credit for all IU-sponsored programs so that students can continue normal academic progress while abroad. Journalism students usually satisfy distribution and elective requirements abroad. IU overseas credit may be counted toward the senior residency requirement, and students may apply IU financial aid to all program costs. There are special study-abroad scholarships for certain programs, minority students, and students from IU’s nonresidential campuses.

Students who are interested in overseas study should begin planning early in their first year to include study abroad in a degree program. For more information, visit the Overseas Study Information Center (which is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday in Franklin Hall 303), call (812) 855-9304, see their Web site: www.indiana.edu/~overseas, or contact overseas study coordinators on other IU campuses.

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Last updated: 31 October 2014 06 52 36

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