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University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
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Indiana University 
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Slavic Languages and Literatures

College of Arts and Sciences
Bloomington

Chairperson
Professor Ronald Feldstein

Departmental E-mail
iuslavic@indiana.edu

Departmental URL
www.indiana.edu/~iuslavic

Graduate Faculty
Degrees Offered
Program Information
Special Departmental Requirements
Master of Arts Degree
Master of Arts for Teachers Degree
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Courses

Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Professors
Henry Cooper Jr., Ronald Feldstein, Steven Franks, Felix Oinas (Emeritus), Nina Perlina, Cornelis Van Schooneveld (Emeritus), Bronislava Volková

Associate Professors
Andrew Durkin, George Fowler*, Dodona Kiziria*, Vadim Liapunov (Emeritus)

Visiting Scholar
Bogdan Rakic (Affiliate Member)

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Degrees Offered

Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy

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Program Information

Attention is called to the program of the Russian and East European Institute, which offers students an opportunity to combine work for an advanced degree in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures with interdisciplinary area study of the former Soviet Union or Eastern Europe.

Attention is also called to the Summer Workshop in Slavic and East European Languages, which offers a special certificate program that provides intensive language training in Russian at advanced levels not available during the regular academic year. The workshop also offers first-year and occasionally second-year courses in other Slavic, East European, and Eurasian languages.

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Special Departmental Requirements

(See also general University Graduate School requirements.)

General Provision
Students wishing the recommendation of the department for teaching positions must present evidence of their ability to teach Russian through actual teaching experience under departmental supervision.

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Master of Arts Degree

Admission Requirements
Graduate Record Examination General Test. Entering students are expected to have: (1) active and passive knowledge of the Russian language adequate for graduate study, as determined by a proficiency examination based on the department's fourth-year course, (2) a general acquaintance with the major works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature equivalent to at least the materials covered in a two-semester undergraduate survey course, and (3) a reading knowledge of German or French. Students seeking to study a departmental language other than Russian must demonstrate a clear interest in that language (e.g., prior study, overseas experience in the relevant country, etc.) for admission.

Students enrolling with deficiencies in any of the areas listed above are encouraged to remove them during the summer preceding the start of their graduate work. Students with a Russian language deficiency are urged to apply to the Summer Workshop. Courses taken to satisfy deficiency requirements in Russian, French, or German will not carry graduate credit and will lie outside of the 30 credit hours required for the M.A. degree. Students with a deficiency in Russian literature may take the departmental undergraduate survey courses (R263-R264) without credit.

General Course Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours of courses carrying graduate credit, at least 20 of which must be taken in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Track Requirements
In addition to the general course requirements, students pursuing the M.A. degree shall complete one of the four programs described below. Tracks 1 and 2 are structured primarily for preparing students who wish to continue toward a Ph.D. degree with a specialization in Russian literature or Slavic linguistics; Track 3 is designed mainly for students pursuing a departmental language other than Russian; Track 4 is for those with other career goals in mind.

Track 1 Russian Literature M.A. Requirements

  1. R500 Proseminar in Russian Literature
  2. L571 Old Church Slavonic or L576 History of the Russian Literary Language or L501 Structure of Russian I
  3. R501-R502 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics I and II
  4. R403 Russian Phonetics
  5. R503 Old Russian Literature or R504 Eighteenth-Century Russian Literature
  6. R505-R506 Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature I and II
  7. R507-R508 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature I and II
Total: 30 credits

Track 2 Slavic Linguistics M.A. Requirements

  1. L501 Structure of Russian I: Phonology and Morphology
  2. L502 Structure of Russian II: Syntax and Semantics
  3. L571 Old Church Slavonic
  4. R403 Russian Phonetics
  5. Two semesters of a West or South Slavic language
  6. R501-R502 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics I and II
  7. R505 Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature I or R506 Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature II
  8. One SLAV linguistics course
Total: 30 credits

Track 3 Language and Area Studies
Two survey-type Slavic literature courses at the graduate level; a departmental language other than Russian (6-12 credit hours), and 3 credit hours in the department as approved by the graduate advisor; and, in addition, 9 credit hours of graduate courses inside or outside the department selected with the approval of the graduate advisor. (Students taking this option are encouraged to fulfill the additional requirements for a certificate in the Russian and East European Institute. See below.)

Track 4 Dual Concentration
Two survey-type Slavic literature courses at the graduate level; plus two additional graduate courses in the department; and a program of at least 9 graduate credits in one other department approved by the graduate advisor, such as business, comparative literature, economics, fine arts, geography, history, linguistics, literature, music, political science, or a foreign language.

Students may be exempted from Slavic language courses by passing proficiency examinations.

Examination
No examination is required for a terminal M.A. degree, but a doctoral admission examination, based on the M.A. program for Tracks 1, 2, or 3, is required for admission to Ph.D. work and must normally be passed before the student registers for the fifth semester of graduate work. (A student working simultaneously for the M.A. degree and an area certificate in the Russian and East European Institute must pass the doctoral admission examination before registering for the sixth semester of graduate work.)

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Master of Arts for Teachers Degree

Admission Requirements
Applicants should have a knowledge of the Russian language adequate for graduate study (a minimum of three years is acceptable, but four is preferred). A broad, solid undergraduate program in the liberal arts is strongly recommended. New students must take a proficiency examination in Russian before registering, and those whose performance is inadequate will be required to take appropriate courses in Russian until their proficiency reaches the level required of B.A. candidates in the department.

Major Field Requirements
A minimum of 20 credit hours, to include R501-R502, R403, and History D411 or equivalent. Students who have not had a two-semester nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature course must take R263-R264 (without graduate credit) or replace these with two survey-type Russian literature survey courses at the graduate level. Students who have not taken a course in methods of teaching modern foreign languages are required to take Education M455 Methods of Teaching Modern Foreign Languages or the departmental equivalent.

Language Requirement
Active knowledge of Russian (fifth-year proficiency level).

Examination
Oral and written test of proficiency in Russian.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Two plans of study are offered.

Plan A: Russian Literature
Plan B: Slavic Linguistics

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Plan A: Russian Literature

(A comparable program will be worked out for students choosing another Slavic literature as their major field.)

Admission Requirements
A doctoral admission examination based on the Indiana University M.A. degree in Slavic languages and literatures under Track 1 (Russian literature). Students holding an M.A. in Slavic languages and literatures from another institution will be required, at the discretion of the department, to pass this examination no later than their second semester in attendance at Indiana University.

General Requirements

  1. 30 credits from M.A.
  2. 12 credits from minor (if second Slavic language, must include second year).
  3. R503 Old Russian Literature or R504 Eighteenth-Century Russian Literature.
  4. L571 Old Church Slavonic or L576 History of the Russian Literary Language. or L501 Structure of Russian I (N.B.: if L571 or L576 used for M.A., this course must be L501).
  5. Two semesters of a second Slavic language.
  6. At least five literature courses in the department, including at least one seminar.
Total: 90 (at least 69 credits of course work and up to 21 credits of dissertation).

Language Requirement
Active knowledge of written and spoken Russian beyond the minimum required for the M.A.; reading knowledge of German, French, and one other Slavic language.

Qualifying Examination
Three written examinations. One will cover all genres of literature in one of the following three periods: (1) from the beginning to 1800, (2) from 1800 to 1890, (3) from 1890 to the present. The second examination will cover the whole history of Russian literature, but will be confined to all forms of narrative. The third examination will cover one of the following categories in its entirety: (1) poetry, exclusive of drama; (2) dramatic literature; (3) criticism.

All three of these written examinations are to be taken within two successive semesters. When they have been passed, an oral examination will be given shortly thereafter. The oral examination will cover not only all of Russian literature, but also the following: Russian history and culture and major literary developments in the rest of Europe, including those in the second Slavic literature. The examination will be designed to provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate the range and depth of their scholarly interests and ability.

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Plan B: Slavic Linguistics

Admission Requirement
A doctoral admission examination based on the Indiana University M.A. degree in Slavic languages and literatures under Track 2 (Slavic linguistics). Students holding an M.A. in Slavic languages and literatures from another institution will be required, at the discretion of the department, to pass this examination not later than their second semester in attendance at Indiana University.

General Requirements

  1. 30 credits from M.A.
  2. R505 Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature I or R506 Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature II.
  3. Two semesters of a third Slavic language.
  4. 12 credits from minor (if another Slavic language, must include second year).
  5. Six diachronic and synchronic linguistics courses, including at least one seminar.
Total: 90 (at least 69 credits of course work and up to 21 credits of dissertation).

Language Requirement
Active knowledge of a major Slavic language beyond the minimum required for the M.A.; reading knowledge of one Slavic language from each of the other two branches and of German and French.

Qualifying Examination
Four written examinations covering (1) the general topic of Slavic synchronic linguistics, (2) a specialized area of Slavic synchronic linguistics, (3) the general topic of Slavic diachronic linguistics, and (4) a specialized area of Slavic diachronic linguistics. The topics of the two specialized exams are to be worked out together with a faculty advisor chosen by the student. All four examinations must be taken within two successive semesters. When all have been passed, an oral examination will be given shortly thereafter.

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Courses

The Graduate Russian Program
Russian Literature Courses
The Graduate Program in Slavic Linguistics
The Graduate Programs in Other Slavic and
  East European Languages and Literatures

Summer Workshop in Slavic and East European Languages
Other Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Languages

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The Graduate Russian Program

Russian Language Courses

R401-R402 Advanced Russian I-II (3-3 cr.) P: B or better in R302. Refinement of active and passive language skills, with emphasis on vocabulary building and word usage. Extensive reading, discussion, composition writing. Individualized remedial drill in grammar and pronunciation aimed at preparing students to meet departmental language proficiency standards. Recitation class supplemented by lab and conversation sections.

R403 Russian Phonetics (3 cr.)

R405-R406 Readings in Russian Literature I-II (3-3 cr.) May not be used for credit toward graduate degree in the department.

R407-R408 Readings in Russian Culture, History, Society I-II (3-3 cr.) P: R302 or equivalent. P or C for R407: R401 or consent of department. P or C for R408: R402. Extensive translation from the original of selected works on Russian history, government, music, folklore, geography, culture. Discussion of both linguistic problems and content.

R491-R492 Russian for Graduate Students I-II (3-3 cr.) Graduate credit not given.

R501-R502 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics I-II (3-3 cr.)

R592 Methods of Russian Language Instruction (3 cr.) Methods of teaching russian. The course will deal with all methods currently in use in foreign language pedagogy with emphasis on proficiency oriented teaching as applied to russian. Review of russian textbooks and video materials. Design and preparation of syllabi and development of lesson plans. Required for slav ais.

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Russian Literature Courses

Survey Courses

R503 Old Russian Literature (3 cr.) Lectures and readings in the original of Old Russian literary works from the eleventh to the seventeenth centuries.

R504 Eighteenth-Century Russian Literature (3 cr.) Russian intellectual life during the century of Russia's Europeanization; philosophical, religious, aesthetic, and social problems revealed in the writings of leading Russian authors of the century.

R505-R506 Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature I-II (3-3 cr.) Development of Russian prose from Sentimentalism and Romanticism through Realism, with a focus on analysis of primary sources and original texts, to discover narrative and aesthetic principles and practices of major writers of the century.

R507-R508 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature I-II (3-3 cr.) Principal literary movements, major literary works from Symbolism through the Revolution and the Soviet period, culminating in the writing of the Perestroika period.

R520 Twentieth-Century Russian Author: (name variable) (3 cr.) Thorough investigation of the oeuvre of one or several twentieth-century Russian author(s).

R545 Jewish Characters in Russian Literature (3 cr.) Approaches the "Jewish Question," the identity and self-identity of Jewish characters from the standpoints of literary analyses, cultural ethnography, folklore and religious studies, and social and political history. Literary works of major nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian writers provide the primary sources for the discussions.

R563 Pushkin to Dostoevsky (3 cr.) (For non-SLAV and SLAV linguistics graduate students only.)

R564 Tolstoy to Solzhenitsyn (3 cr.) (For non-SLAV and SLAV linguistics graduate students only.)

R530 Pushkin (3 cr.)
R531 Gogol (3 cr.)
R532 Dostoevsky (3 cr.)
R533 Tolstoy (3 cr.)
R534 Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (3 cr.) Introduction to the masterworks of Leo Tolstoy and Feodor Dostoevsky. Discussions focus on four major novels; in addition, students read several important short stories and novellas by each author. Lectures in English; readings may be done in English or Russian. (For non-SLAV and SLAV linguistics graduate students only.)
R535 Chekhov (3 cr.)

Genre Courses

R550 Russian Drama (3 cr.)

R551 Russian Poetry (3 cr.) Metrical and thematic developments in Russian poetry against aesthetic and philosophical background. Major works read in the original.

R552 Russian and Soviet Film (3 cr.)

R553 Central European Cinema (3 cr.) Emphasizes broad cultural approach to the subject of Central European cinema. Highlights the major developments of cinema in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and the former Republics of Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia in the post-Stalin era. The course will be divided into four segments, each dealing with a separate theme.

Theory Courses

R500 Proseminar in Russian Literature (3 cr.) Designed as an introduction to graduate study in Russian literature. Research methods, sources. History of Slavic scholarship. Required of all graduate literature majors, in first or second semester of study.

R598 Literary Theory in its Russian and East European Context (3 cr.) Advanced survey of literary theories originating in the Slavic world (Formalism, Bakhtin, Tartu School, etc.) and their interaction with western literary theories.

L599 Prague School Linguistics and Poetics (3 cr.) P: interest in theory. An interdisciplinary introduction into linguistics, semiotics, and literary theory based on the methodology of the Prague School. Gives students tools with which to approach analysis in any of these areas. Also included are theory of theater, folklore, and visual arts.

Seminars

R601 Seminar in Russian Literature (1-6 cr.) Subject to vary. Intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary movement. Research papers required. May be repeated for credit.

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The Graduate Program in Slavic Linguistics

Slavic Linguistics Courses

Synchronic Courses

L501 Structure of Russian I: Phonology and Morphology (3 cr.) Introduction to graduate study in Slavic linguistics. Survey of the field. Research sources. Basic concepts of diachronic linguistics. Introduction to synchronic linguistic theory: Bloomfield, Chomsky, Jakobson.

L502 Structure of Russian II: Syntax and Semantics (3 cr.) P: L501 or consent of instructor. Introduction to the syntactic and semantic structure of contemporary standard Russian.

L503 Russian Word Formation (3 cr.) P: L501. Survey of principles of word formation in Russian. Discussion of formal (morphophonemic) rules governing prefixation, suffixation, and compounding; productive vs. non-productive processes; and the semantics of derived words.

L504 Comparative Slavic Morphosyntax (3 cr.) Selected topics in the morphosyntax of Slavic languages will be examined from a comparative perspective. Introduces students both to modern generative grammar and to a range of relevant problems posed by Slavic.

L505 Structure and History of a Slavic Language (3 cr.) Synchronic and diachronic analysis of a single Slavic language (usually of language not regularly taught in department), including developmental trends and dialects. Will attempt to provide rapid facility for reading texts (especially linguistic), by building on student's knowledge of Russian.

L599 Prague School Linguistics and Poetics (3 cr.) P: interest in theory. An interdisciplinary introduction into linguistics, semiotics, and literary theory based on the methodology of the Prague School. Gives students tools with which to approach analysis in any of these areas. Also included are theory of theater, folklore, and visual arts.

Diachronic Courses

L571 Old Church Slavonic (3 cr.) History and grammar of Old Church Slavonic; alphabet, sound system, morphology, and elements of syntax. Reading of Old Church Slavonic texts.

L572 Comparative Slavic (3 cr.) A comparative survey of the Slavic languages and their historical development.

L573 History of East Slavic (3 cr.) Survey of East Slavic phonology from Common Slavic to the present. Dialectal divergence in Old Russian and formation of Great Russian, Ukrainian, and Belorussian as literary languages.

L574 History of South Slavic (3 cr.) Since Common Slavic period. Phonemic and morphological divergences within Southern Slavic language group. Formation of Southern Slavic literary languages, with emphasis on history of Serbo-Croatian and Bulgarian.

L575 History of West Slavic (3 cr.) Since Common Slavic period. Formation of Western Slavic literary languages, with emphasis on the history of Polish and Czech. Development of Polish and Czech phonemic systems and their dialectal differentiation.

L576 History of the Russian Literary Language (3 cr.) P: S571. Formation of Russian literary language in connection with cultural development of Kievan Russia and the Muscovite state; Slavic and non-Slavic influences before and after Peter the Great; standardization of Russian in nineteenth century and innovations after October Revolution.

Seminars

L600 Proseminar in Slavic Linguistics (3 cr.) Introduction to the profession of Slavic linguistics. Emphasis on linguistic argumentation, research methods, sources, and critical reasoning. Exposure to a range approaches to Slavic linguistics and practical training in research methodology and scholarly argumentation. Preparation for doctoral program admissions examination.

L601 Seminar in Synchronic Slavic Linguistics (1-6 cr.) Detailed investigation of one or more specialized areas of synchronic Slavic linguistics. Topic varies; may be repeated for credit.

L602 Seminar in Diachronic Slavic Linguistics (1-6 cr.) Detailed investigation of one or more aspects of Slavic historical linguistics (e.g., historical phonology, morphophonology, morphology, syntax). Examination of general theories and specific issues, complex problems and controversial or innovative solutions. Topic varies, may be repeated for credit.

L603 Topics in Slavic Linguistics (1-6 cr.)

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The Graduate Programs in Other Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures

Czech and Slovak

C501-C502 Elementary Czech I-II (3-3 cr.)
C503-C504 Intermediate Czech I-II (3-3 cr.)
C505-C506 Advanced Intermediate Czech I-II (3-3 cr.) Development of oral and written fluency and comprehension in Czech language based on morphological, lexical, and syntactical analysis of contemporary textual materials.
C511 Intensive Elementary Czech I (5 cr.)
C512 Intensive Elementary Czech II (5 cr.)
C513 Intensive Intermediate Czech I (5 cr.)
C514 Intensive Intermediate Czech II (5 cr.)
C563-C564 Literature and Culture of the Czechs and Slovaks I-II (3-3 cr.) Survey of Czech and Slovak literatures, emphasizing their relation to the literatures of the other Slavic peoples and of Western Europe.

C565 Seminar in Czech Literature and Culture (3 cr.) Intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Research papers required. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
V501-V502 Elementary Slovak I-II (3-3 cr.)

Polish
P501-P502 Elementary Polish I-II (3-3 cr.)
P503-P504 Intermediate Polish I-II (3-3 cr.)
P505-P506 Advanced Intermediate Polish I-II (3-3 cr.)
P511 Intensive Elementary Polish I (5 cr.)
P512 Intensive Elementary Polish II (5 cr.)
P513 Intensive Intermediate Polish I (5 cr.)
P514 Intensive Intermediate Polish II (5 cr.)

P563-P564 Survey of Polish Literature and Culture I-II (3-3 cr.) I: Polish literature from its origins to the end of the eighteenth century. II: Polish literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

P565 Seminar in Polish Literature and Culture: (variable title) (3 cr.) Intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary or cultural development. Research papers required. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Romanian
M501-M502 Elementary Romanian I-II (3-3 cr.)
M503-M504 Intermediate Romanian I-II(3-3 cr.)
M511 Intensive Elementary Romanian I (5 cr.)
M512 Intensive Elementary Romanian II (5 cr.)
M513 Intensive Intermediate Romanian I (5 cr.)
M514 Intensive Intermediate Romanian II (5 cr.)
M565 Individual Readings in Romanian Language and Literature (cr. arr.)

South Slavic

B501-B502 Elementary Bulgarian I-II (3-3 cr.)

B601 Introduction to Bulgarian (3 cr.) P: knowledge of another Slavic language or consent of instructor. Introduction to basic morphology and syntax of Bulgarian.

K501-K502 Elementary Slovene I-II (3-3 cr.)

K 511 Intensive Elementary Slovene I (5 cr.) No previous knowledge of Slovene required. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Slovene language and to culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. SSII

K 512 Intensive Elementary Slovene II (5 cr.) No previous knowledge of Slovene required. Introduction to basic structure of contemporary Slovene language and culture. Reading and discussion of basic texts. SSII

K601 Introduction to Slovene (3 cr.) P: consent of instructor. Phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Slovene language. For reading knowledge.
S501-S502 Elementary Serbian and Croatian I-II (3-3 cr.)
S503-S504 Intermediate Serbian and Croatian I-II (3-3 cr.)
S505 Advanced Intermediate Serbian and Croatian I (3 cr.) P: S504 or equivalent proficiency. Reading of literary texts from a variety of periods and locations in the Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian speech area. Sequence of readings in original parallels syllabus of S563-S564 in translation. Review of grammar, syntax, and expansion of lexicon as needed.

S506 Advanced Intermediate Serbian and Croatian II (3 cr.) P: S504 or equivalent proficiency. Reading of literary texts from a variety of periods and locations in the Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian speech area. Sequence of readings in original parallels syllabus of S563-S564 in translation. Review of grammar, syntax, and expansion of lexicon as needed.

S511 Intensive Elementary Croatian/Serbian I (5 cr.)

S512 Intensive Elementary Croatian/Serbian II (5 cr.)

S513 Intensive Intermediate Croatian/Serbian I (5 cr.)

S514 Intensive Intermediate Croatian/Serbian II (5 cr.)

S563-S564 Literature and Culture of the Southern Slavs I-II (3-3 cr.) Survey of the cultures of the Slovenes, Croats, Serbs, Bosnians, Macedonians, and Bulgarians from earliest times to the present. Reading and discussion of their major literary works in translation.

S565 Seminar in South Slavic Literatures (3 cr.) P: S563-S564 or consent of instructor. Intensive study of an author, a period, or a literary development. Research papers required. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

G501-G502 Elementary Georgian I-II (3-3 cr.)

G511 Intensive Elementary Georgian I (5 cr.)

G512 Intensive Elementary Georgian II (5 cr.)

U601 Introduction to Ukrainian (3 cr.) P: knowledge of another Slavic language or consent of instructor. Introduction to basic morphology and syntax of Ukrainian.

General Slavic Courses

S540 Graduate Readings in Slavic Studies (cr. arr.)** Readings may be selected in any of the Slavic languages.

S560 Special Studies in Slavic Literature (3 cr.)

S801 Ph.D. Dissertation (cr. arr.)**

**These courses are eligible for a deferred grade.

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Summer Workshop in Slavic and East European Languages

Russian

R431 Intensive Russian Oral (2 cr.)

R434 Intensive Russian Phonetics (1 cr.)

W507 Advanced Russian I (5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R401 and R402.

W557 Advanced Russian II (5 cr.)

W508 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics I (5 cr.) Intensive summer equivalent of R501 and R502.

W558 Advanced Russian Syntax/Stylistics II (5 cr.)

W509 Advanced Russian Syntax and Stylistics III (5 cr.) Intensive Russian at the sixth-year level.

W559 Advanced Russian Syntax/Stylistics IV (5 cr.)

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Other Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Languages

Undergraduate and graduate sections, on the elementary and intermediate levels, of the following languages are offered on a varying basis: Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Slovene, Serbian and Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Georgian, Uzbek, Azeri, Kazak, Estonian, Turkmen.

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