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University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
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Philanthropic Studies

School of Liberal Arts
Indianapolis

Chair of Philanthropic Studies Faculty
Professor Richard Turner

Director of Center on Philanthropy
Professor Eugene R. Tempel

Departmental E-mail
maphil@iupui.edu

Departmental URL
www.philanthropy.iupui.edu

Graduate Faculty
Degree Offered
Special Departmental Requirements
Master of Arts Degree
Master of Arts Degree in Philanthropic Studies: Executive Format
Dual Degree Programs
Ph.D. in Philanthropic Studies
Ph.D. Minor in Philanthropic Studies
Courses
Cross-Listed Courses

Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Professors
John D. Barlow (Emeritus, English, German), Wolfgang Bielefeld (Public and Enviromental Affairs), Robert Bringle (Psychology), Dwight Burlingame, Edmund F. Byrne (Emeritus, Philosophy), William Cohen (History), Ulla Connor (English), Anne Donchin (Philosophy), Lawrence J. Friedman (History), Roberta Greene (Social Work), Kirsten Grønbjerg (Public and Environmental Affairs), Roger Hamburg (Emeritus, Public and Environmental Affairs, Political Science), Robert Lehnen (Public and Environmental Affairs), Leslie Lenkowsky*, Angela McBride (Nursing), Paul Nagy (Emeritus, Philosophy), Janet Near (Business), Robert L. Payton*, (Emeritus), James Perry (Public and Environmental Affairs), William Plater (English), James Riley (History), Herman Saatkamp (Philosophy, Medical and Molecular Genetics), William Schneider (History), Jan Shipps (Emerita, Religious Studies, History), David H. Smith (Religious Studies), Richard Steinberg (Economics), Eugene R. Tempel* (Education), Richard C. Turner* (English), Brian Vargus (Political Science), James Wood (Emeritus, Sociology)

Associate Professors
Marc Bilodeau (Economics), James H. Capshew (History and Philosophy of Science), Judith A. Chafel (Education), Karen Harlow* (Public and Environmental Affairs), Elizabeth Kryder-Reid* (Anthropology), Debra Mesch (Public and Environmental Affairs), David Reingold* (Public and Environmental Affairs), Kevin Robbins* (History), Patrick Rooney* (Economics), Mary Tschirhart (Public and Environmental Affairs), Mark Wilhelm (Economics), Patricia Wittberg (Sociology)

Assistant Professors
Richard Gunderman* (Philosophy), Laura Huntoon (Public and Environmental Affairs), Nancy Robertson* (History), Andrea Walton* (Education)

Director of Graduate Studies
Constance M. Baker, School of Nursing, NU 481, (317) 274-4251

Philanthropic studies at Indiana University is interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and systemwide. The field addresses voluntary contributions of service and funds, voluntary associations, and what has been called "the social history of the moral imagination." Areas of inquiry range from the history of philanthropy and philanthropy in literature to nonprofit management and legal issues. Undergraduate and graduate programs in various areas of philanthropic studies are available in the University Graduate School, the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and other schools at IUPUI and IU Bloomington.

New courses and degree programs are developing rapidly. For up-to-date information, please contact the Philanthropic Studies Program.

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Degree Offered

Master of Arts (IUPUI). The Master of Arts in philanthropic studies focuses on the history, culture, and values of philanthropy. Its objectives are to enable students to gain the knowledge and skills either to pursue further graduate study in relevant fields or to pursue careers in the independent sector or in related fields; to enable students to investigate the broader theoretical issues of philanthropy and of their chosen areas of specialization from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives; and to utilize the interdisciplinary base to maintain a thoroughgoing critical inquiry into the historical and cultural implications of philanthropy.

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Special Departmental Requirements

See also general University Graduate School requirements.

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Master of Arts Degree

Admission Requirements
Requirements include a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, a minimum 3.0 grade point average on a scale of 4.0, and a minimum 3.0 average in the student's major field. In addition, students seeking admission to the program should demonstrate an appropriate level of achievement on the Graduate Record Examination (or comparable proficiency test) and must arrange for three letters of recommendation to be addressed to the M.A. program Admissions Committee.

Applicants who do not meet all of the requirements listed above may be admitted to the program on a provisional basis, in which case their status will be reviewed after a fixed period of time to determine whether they may continue in the program.

Financial Aid
Several scholarships and research assistantships are available. Please contact the Philanthropic Studies Program for more information.

Course Requirements
The M.A. in philanthropic studies requires a total of 36 credit hours: 18 credits of core courses and 12 credits of elective courses. A minimum of 18 credit hours in core and elective courses combined must be in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and not more than 9 credit hours may be taken in courses numbered below 500. These 9 credits may come only from courses approved for University Graduate School credit. In addition, the student will earn 6 hours of credit either for a thesis in a topic approved by the M.A. program advisory committee or for doctoral-level courses (normally 700-level) in a discipline in which future study is planned; for the nonthesis option, at least one of the courses must be an approved research methods course. The approval process for the thesis or its alternative will normally take place after a student has successfully completed 15 credits of course work.

In order to earn the M.A. in philanthropic studies, students must maintain a 3.0 grade average on a scale of 4.0. Grades in courses counting for credit toward this degree may be no lower than C (2.0 on a scale of 4.0).

The 18 credits of core courses normally include History H509 Special Topics in European History (Topic: History of Philanthropy in the West) or History H511 Special Topics in American History (Topic: History of American Philanthropy); Philosophy P542 The Ethics and Values of Philanthropy, Philanthropic Studies P512 Human and Financial Resources for Philanthropy, Philanthropic Studies P521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector, Philanthropic Studies P523 Civil Society and Philanthropy, and Philanthropic Studies P590 Internship in Philanthropic Studies. In addition, students will take either Economics E514 The Nonprofit Economy and Public Policy or Education C595 Legal Aspects of Philanthropy, and one of the following courses: American Studies P520 Philanthropy in American Culture, Anthropology A509 Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Philanthropy, Public and Environmental Affairs V524 Civil Society in Comparative Perspective, or Religious Studies R590 Directed Readings in Religious Studies.

Master of Arts Degree in Philanthropic Studies: Executive Format

Many students interested in the M.A. program are unable to attend on a traditional residential basis because of their distance from Indianapolis and ongoing job responsibilities. To provide access to the M.A. in philanthropic studies for this growing constituency, the Executive Format Master's Program admitted its inaugural cohort of students in 1996.

A participant in the executive format master's program can finish the requirements for the degree in either two or three years by completing:

  • an orientation before the first day of classes;
  • six intense one-week sessions of residential study at IUPUI (three per summer for those selecting the two-year option or two per summer for those selecting the three-year option);
  • distance education and directed off-site course work; and
  • elective study at a qualified institution near the student's home.
Each summer course requires one week of intense on-campus study and is preceded by a pre-residential period of approximately six weeks in length which includes preparatory reading and assignments. Each session is followed by a post-residential period which includes evaluative experiences to be completed at home. During both the pre-residential and post-residential periods, faculty work with students by using telephone, E-mail, fax, and postal service.

Degree requirements for the executive M.A. program are the same as the requirements for the residential M.A. in philanthropic studies.

Applicants for the executive program must meet the same admission criteria as those applying for the residential program, with the addition of three to five years of work experience in the nonprofit sector being recommended. Deadline dates for admission are January 1 for non-U.S. citizens and March 1 for U.S. citizens.

For more information, contact the Center on Philanthropy, (317) 274-4200.

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Dual Degree Programs

Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and
  Master of Arts in Economics

Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and
  Master of Arts in History

Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and
  Master of Public Affairs in Nonprofit Management

Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and
  Master of Science in Nursing

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Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and Master of Arts in Economics

The dual master's degree in philanthropic studies and economics substantially benefits students intending to pursue a career in independent research, academia, or practice. Normally, those pursuing a career in research or academia continue in a Ph.D. program in economics, finance, accounting, management, marketing, or public policy. Very few doctoral programs include substantial content on philanthropy or nonprofit organizations. As such, the M.A. in philanthropic studies provides a broad interdisciplinary background that makes the future researcher sensitive to the institutional details, values, and history of the sector, thus leading to better research. For the future nonprofit manager or leader, economics provides the principles and methodologies to make informed decisions on the appreciative level, the policy level, and the managerial level.

Admission requirements for the dual degree program are identical to those for each program separately. Separate application must be made to each of the two programs. Students are expected to take responsibility for learning about and meeting the admission requirements of each school individually, which may differ from each other in application documents required, minimal standards of criteria for admission, and deadline dates. Students must make plans early with advisors in both programs to identify (1) common courses and (2) thesis credit.

Study for the two degrees can be combined for a total of 51 credit hours rather than the 66 credit hours that would be required if the two degrees were taken separately. Two of the required core courses for the M.A. in economics may be selected as electives to meet the philanthropic studies requirement for two applied electives. One of the required philanthropic studies courses, Economics E514 The Nonprofit Economy and Public Policy, may be taken to meet 3 of the 12 credit hours of electives required in the economics program. A common thesis meets the requirements of both departments.

Further information regarding regulations governing advanced degree programs may be obtained from the respective departments.

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Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and Master of Arts in History

The M.A. in philanthropic studies and history, an interdisciplinary dual-degree program, creates a unique opportunity to pursue critical inquiry into the historical, cultural, philosophical, and economic implications of voluntary action for the public good. Historians routinely study the role of nonprofit organizations, self-help groups, and philanthropic institutions. This degree will be attractive to students wishing to pursue (1) careers that demand the skills and talents developed by cross-training in history and philanthropy or (2) doctoral programs that encourage new and creative approaches to the historical study of philanthropy, broadly defined.

Admission requirements for the dual degree program are identical to those for each program separately. A separate application must be made to each of the programs. Prospective students are expected to take responsibility for learning about meeting the differing admission requirements and deadlines of each department. Students must make plans early with advisors in both programs to identify (1) common courses and (2) thesis topic.

Study for these two degrees can be combined for a total of 51 credit hours (U.S. or European history concentrations) or 54 credit hours (public history) rather than the 66 or 72 credit hours that would be required if the two degrees were taken separately. For all concentrations, the required 700-level seminar for the M.A. in history may be selected as an elective to meet the philanthropic studies requirement for one of two theoretical electives. The required philanthropic studies course History H509 Special Topics in European History (Topic: History of Philanthropy in the West) may be taken to meet the history requirement for a history elective. Required courses Philosophy P542 The Ethics and Values of Philanthropy or Philanthropic Studies P512 Human and Financial Resources for Philanthropy may be taken to meet 3 of the 6 credits of outside electives that may be taken in the history program. For public history students, History H543 Practicum in Public History meets the requirement for Philanthropic Studies P590 Internship in Philanthropic Studies, for the Philanthropic Studies Program. A common thesis meets the requirements of both departments.

Further information regarding regulations governing advanced degree programs may be obtained from the respective departments.

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Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and Master of Public Affairs in Nonprofit Management

The continual blurring of sectors and the call for government devolution demand that advanced education for public managers must address critical issues associated with the relationship between and the functions of nonprofit and government agencies. The combined degree in public affairs in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) and in the Philanthropic Studies Program provides an education with breadth and depth. Students in this combined degree program have the opportunity to pursue critical inquiry into the "how" and the "why" of nonprofit management and philanthropy. As a result they are better prepared to be reflective practitioners.

Admission requirements for the combined degree program are identical to those for each program separately. Separate application must be made to each of the two programs, and students should take responsibility to learn about and meet the admission requirements of each school individually, which may differ from each other in application documents required, minimal standards of criteria for admission, and deadline dates. Applicants should apply for the combined degree option before completing the core requirements or 33 credit hours of the M.P.A. with a nonprofit management concentration and before completing the core requirements or 18 credit hours of the M.A. in philanthropic studies. Students must make plans early with advisors in both programs to identify (1) common courses and (2) thesis credit.

Study for the two degrees can be combined for a total of 60 or 63 credit hours rather than the 87 or 90 credit hours that would be required if the two degrees were taken separately. The dual degree curriculum requires 21 credits of core courses in nonprofit management, 15 credit hours of philanthropic studies core courses, Philanthropic Studies P521 (or SPEA V521), SPEA V525 Management in the Nonprofit Sector, two nonprofit application courses, one general management course, and one theoretical elective in philanthropic studies. Philanthropic Studies P590 Internship in Philanthropic Studies meets the experiential requirement for the M.P.A. Finally, students are required to complete a thesis on an approved topic by their thesis committee or 6 credits of doctoral-level work approved by their graduate advisor.

Further information regarding regulations governing advanced degree programs may be obtained from the respective departments.

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Dual Degree Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies and Master of Science in Nursing

While the M.S.N. with a major in nursing administration provides an essential background for the nurse executive, the addition of the M.A. in philanthropic studies adds an appreciation of the philanthropic tradition and the skills to become accomplished developmental officers.

Admission requirements for the combined degree program are identical to those for each program separately. Separate application must be made to each of the two programs. Students are expected to take responsibility for learning about and meeting the admission requirements of each school individually, which may differ from each other in application documents required, minimal standards of criteria for admission, and deadline dates. Applicants should apply for the combined degree option before completing 21 credit hours in the M.S.N. in Nursing Administration Program and before completing the core requirements or 18 credit hours of the M.A. in philanthropic studies. Students must make plans early with advisors in both programs to identify (1) common courses and (2) thesis credit.

Study for the two degrees can be combined for a total of 60 credit hours rather than the 78 credit hours that would be required if the two degrees were taken separately. Two of the required courses for the M.S.N. are used as electives to meet the Philanthropic Studies Program requirement of two electives. The P590 Internship required for the M.A. will meet the administrative practicum requirement for the M.S.N. The M.A. thesis or approved doctoral-level courses, plus one additional approved course, fulfill the required M.S.N. focus concentration. Students can choose between Nursing L671 or Philanthropic Studies P512, and Economics E514 in the M.A. program may be taken to meet the SPEA H514 requirement in the M.S.N. program.

Further information regarding regulations governing advanced degree programs may be obtained from the respective departments.

For more information, contact the Center on Philanthropy, (317) 274-4200.

Return to Dual Degree Programs

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Ph.D. in Philanthropic Studies

Designed to prepare future researchers and leaders in the world of philanthropy, higher education, and nonprofit organizations. The major goal of the program is to prepare future leaders who assist in the solving of social problems from the perspective of understanding the social relationships of philanthropy. The Ph.D. will prepare students for academic positions as well as research and leadership positions in nonprofit organizations.

Before admission to the PhD. program, students must complete a master's degree in philanthropic studies or at least 30 credits of equivalent graduate course work. Equivalent work will be determined by the Admissions Committee. Examples include courses in nonprofit management, civil society, philanthropic history, ethics, religion, and philanthropy.

The minimum requirements for the Ph.D. in philanthropic studies are 90 credit hours of advanced study, of which 30 semester hours may be transferred from a master's degree or equivalent program that has covered the concepts of philanthropic studies as described in Indiana University's M.A. in Philanthropic Studies Program. The credit hours for the Ph.D. are distributed in the following categories: 12 credit hours of required courses, 12 credit hours for the minor, 9 credit hours of research methods, 6 credit hours of electives, 21 credit hours of dissertation credit.

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Ph.D. Minor in Philanthropic Studies

Ph.D. students in other departments may, with the consent of their committee, minor in philanthropic studies. The minor will enable the student to take an organized body of courses focusing on the history, culture, and values of philanthropy, defined broadly as "voluntary action for the public good."

The director of graduate studies in philanthropic studies will recommend a member of the faculty to serve as an advisor. Four courses are required to be taken from an approved list and in consultation with the advisor. With written approval from the director of graduate studies in philanthropic studies, courses other than those listed may also be accepted to fulfill degree requirements. Because the subject of philanthropy is inherently interdisciplinary, no more than two courses may be taken in any one department.

The minor requires that the 12 credit hours of approved course work, including P521, be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or higher in each course. No more than 6 credit hours of course work may be transferred from another university and applied toward this requirement, and such credit must be approved by the director of graduate studies in philanthropic studies. To arrange for a philanthropic studies minor, students should contact the director of graduate studies in philanthropic studies.

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Courses

P501-P502 The Philanthropic Tradition I-II (3-3 cr.) These interdisciplinary courses will examine the core values of philanthropy and the principal patterns of philanthropic behavior and organization with particular emphasis on the Western tradition and the American adaptation of it. Permission of the instructor required.

P512 Human and Financial Resources for Philanthropy (3 cr.) This course is designed to familiarize beginning graduate students with the three major areas subsumed under resources of the independent sector: volunteers, grantmaking, and financial resources obtained through a fundraising program. The course will be divided into four parts to include the theoretical framework for the sector; government, corporate, and foundation resources; charitable donations by individuals; and volunteer management.

P521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.) The theory, size, scope and functions of the nonprofit and voluntary sector are covered from multiple disciplinary perspectives including historical, political, economic and social. Same as SPEA V521.

P523 Civil Society and Philanthropy (3 cr.) The course explores the relationship of civil society to the state, how the nonprofit sector affects the state and how the state regulates the sector. A continuing theme will be how and whether the state and philanthropic institutions make investments in strengthening civil society.

P530 Topics in Philanthropic Studies (3 cr.) In-depth study of selected topics and issues in philanthropic studies. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. Course may be repeated once for credit, provided that the topic is different. Variable title approval requested.

P555 Readings in Philanthropic Studies (1-4 cr.) A tutorial course involving in-depth study and analysis of a specific topic in philanthropic studies, by arrangement with instructor. Permission of director required.

P590 Internship in Philanthropic Studies (3 cr.) A course for the advanced student of philanthropy. Students work 10 hours per week for a voluntary association, applying knowledge gained in earlier courses to practical situations. Requirements include a journal and a substantial term paper.

P600 M.A. Thesis in Philanthropic Studies (3-6 cr.)

P690 Research in Philanthropic Studies (3 cr.) P: one semester of M.A. course work. Students will research specialized topics related to philanthropic studies agreed upon with the instructor from and in their chosen disciplinary perspective. In some instances, team research may be carried out. The course may be repeated once with approval by the chair of philanthropic studies.

P696 Topics in Biomedical Ethics (3 cr.) Topics in biomedical ethics focusing on variable issues, such as the healthcare needs of medically underserved people, responsibilities toward such groups, and evaluation of proposals to restructure the bioethical framework to rectify institutionalized injustices in research proprieties and medical practice. The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

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Cross-Listed Courses

The seminars and colloquia listed below often treat topics relevant to the Philanthropic Studies Program. In addition, new courses are being developed. Please see the graduate advisor for information about current offerings.

American Studies
G751 Seminar in American Studies (3-4 cr.)
P520 Philanthropy in American Culture (3 cr.)

Anthropology
A509 Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Philanthropy (3 cr.)

Economics
E514 The Nonprofit Economy and Public Policy (3 cr.)

Education
C585 Principles of Fundraising Management (3 cr.)
C595 Legal Aspects of Philanthropy (3 cr.)
C654 Higher Education in the U.S. (3 cr.)
C750 Topical Seminar (1-6 cr.)
H637 Topical Seminar (3 cr.)

English
L680 Topics: Philanthropy and Literature (4 cr.)

History
H509 Special Topics in European History: History of Philanthropy in the West (3 cr.)
H511 Special Topics in American History: History of American Philanthropy (3 cr.)
H650 Colloquium in United States History (4 cr.)

Journalism
J528 Public Relations Management (3 cr.)
J529 Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.)

Nursing
J595 Action Research and Community Health Policy (3 cr.)

Philosophy
P542 The Ethics and Values of Philanthropy (3 cr.)

Religious Studies
R590 Directed Readings in Religious Studies (1-6 cr.)
R770 Social Ethics (3 cr.)

School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA)
V521 The Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector (3 cr.)
V522 Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)
V523 Civil Society and Public Policy in the United States (3 cr.)
V524 Civil Society in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.)
V525 Nonprofit Management (3 cr.)
V526 Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)
V550 Topics in Public Affairs (1-3 cr.)

Sociology
S613 Complex Organizations (3 cr.)

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