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University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
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Indiana University 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
(812) 855-8853  
Toll Free (888) 335-7547  
Contact University Graduate School

Graduate Office
Union Building 518
Indiana University–Purdue University
Indianapolis
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 278-2490
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History

School of Liberal Arts
Indianapolis

Chairperson
Associate Professor Philip V. Scarpino*

Departmental E-mail
history@iupui.edu

Departmental URL
www.iupui.edu/~history

Graduate Faculty
Degrees Offered
Special Departmental Requirements
Master of Arts Degree
Dual Degree: Master of Library Science and
  Master of Arts in History

Dual Degree: Master of Arts in History and
  Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies

Certificate in Professional Editing
Courses Offered

Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Mary O'Brien Gibson Professor
John McKivigan

Professors
David J. Bodenhamer, Bernard Friedman (Emeritus), Ralph Gray (Emeritus), Miriam Z. Langsam* (Emerita), William H. Schneider, Peter Sehlinger (Emeritus), Jan Shipps (Emerita), Marianne Wokeck

Associate Professors
Robert Barrows, Kenneth Cutler* (Emeritus), Ch. Didier Gondola*, Elizabeth Kryder-Reid* (Adjunct), Justin Libby (Emeritus), Monroe Little*, Elizabeth Brand Monroe*, Berthold Riesterer (Emeritus)*, Kevin Robbins*, Philip Scarpino*, Xin Zhang*

Assistant Professors
Annie Gilbert Coleman*, Sheila Cooper* (Emerita), Kevin Cramer*, Natalia Lozovsky*, Nancy Robertson*, Michael Snodgrass*

Director of Graduate Studies
Associate Professor Robert Barrows, Cavanaugh Hall 532, (317) 274-5840.

Degrees Offered

Master of Arts, dual Master of Arts and Master of Library Science, dual Master of Arts in History and Philanthropic Studies

The M.A. program in history on the Indianapolis campus offers three areas of concentration: United States history, European history, and public history. United States and European history are traditional areas of concentration and will serve the needs of persons intending to pursue a doctoral program, those seeking a collateral degree to complement such other fields as education or library science, and individuals seeking personal fulfillment. Public history is designed to prepare persons interested in pursuing careers as historians in such settings as historical societies, museums, historic preservation organizations and historic parks, governmental agencies, and business corporations. With its proximity to a large number of such institutions, the Indianapolis campus is an ideal location at which to pursue a degree in public history.

Special Departmental Requirements

See also general University Graduate School requirements.

Master of Arts Degree

Admission Requirements

  1. Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, with an overall undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) and a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B) in the student's undergraduate major (an undergraduate major in history is not required, but applicants without such a background may be required to take additional course work in history at the undergraduate level as a condition for acceptance into the program);
  2. appropriate level of achievement on the Graduate Record Examination General Test;
  3. three letters of recommendation; and
  4. two years of foreign language as an undergraduate with appropriate level of achievement.

Grades
No grade below B- (2.7) in history courses will be counted toward this degree.

Course Requirements
Students pursuing any one of the three concentration areas must take H500 or H501. Those electing United States history must take at least one graduate colloquium and one graduate seminar in United States history and at least one course in non-United States history. Students electing European history must take a graduate colloquium and seminar in that area and at least one course outside their concentration. With the consent of their faculty advisor, students may take as many as 6 credits outside the Department of History. Six (6) credits will be granted upon successful completion of the required master's thesis. A total of 30 credit hours is required for students concentrating in United States and in European history.

Students choosing public history as their area of concentration must take H500 or H501, H542, and a colloquium and seminar in United States history, and do an internship. Four (4) hours of credit will be granted upon satisfactory completion of the internship project. Public history students must also take at least one course outside United States history. With the consent of their faculty advisor, they may take as many as 6 credits outside the Department of History. Two (2) credits will be granted upon successful completion of the required public history paper. A minimum of 36 credit hours is required for students concentrating in public history.

Students choosing public history as their area of concentration must take (1) H500 or H501, (2) H542, and (3) a colloquium and seminar in United States history, and (4) do an internship. Four (4) hours of credit will be granted upon satisfactory completion of the internship project. Public history students must also take at least one course outside United States history. With the consent of their faculty advisor, they may take as many as 6 credits outside the Department of History. Two (2) credits will be granted upon successful completion of the required master's thesis. A minimum of 36 credit hours is required for students concentrating in public history.

Foreign Language Requirement
None required for the degree. However, if a student has not met the foreign language admission requirement, that deficiency must be removed prior to the thesis defense. Students planning to go on for the Ph.D. are urged to validate their reading proficiency in a foreign language according to University Graduate School standards.

Dual Degree: Master of Library Science and Master of Arts in History

Study for these two degrees can be combined for a total of 50 credit hours rather than the 66 credit hours required for the two degrees if taken separately. Students take 20 credit hours in history, which must include one graduate seminar and one graduate colloquium. No thesis is required for students earning an M.A. degree in history who are also earning a Master of Library Science (M.L.S.) under this dual degree program. However, students must satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement as spelled out in the University Graduate School Bulletin. No area of concentration is required, but students wishing to focus on public history for the M.A. in history must also include History H542 among the required 20 credits of history course work. Such students may, if they wish, do a public history internship and count a maximum of 2 credit hours of History H543 toward the degree. (Students may enroll in H543 only after having taken or while taking H542.)

The remaining 30 credit hours are taken in the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS). These include 15 credit hours of M.L.S. Foundation courses, 9 credit hours of other required courses, and 6 credits of SLIS electives. See the SLIS Bulletin for details.

Dual Degree: Master of Arts in History and Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies

The dual M.A. in History and M.A. in Philanthropic Studies creates a unique opportunity to pursue critical inquiry into the historical, cultural, philosophical, and economic implications of voluntary action for the public good. Historians routinely study the role of nonprofit organizations, self-help groups, and philanthropic institutions. This dual degree program offers an interdisciplinary focus on the past, present, and future. This degree will be attractive to students wishing to pursue (1) careers that demand the skills and talents developed by cross-training in history and philanthropy; or (2) doctoral programs that encourage new and creative approaches to the historical study of philanthropy, broadly defined.

Admission requirements for the dual degree program are identical to those for each program separately. A separate application must be made to each of the programs. Prospective students are expected to take responsibility for learning about and meeting the different admission requirements and deadlines of each department. Students must make plans early with advisors in both programs to identify (1) common courses and (2) a thesis topic.

Study for these two degrees can be combined for a total of 51 credit hours (U.S. or European history concentrations) or 54 credit hours (public history) rather than the 66 or 72 credit hours that would be required if the two degrees were taken separately. For all concentrations, the required 700-level seminar for the M.A. in history may be selected as an elective to meet the philanthropic studies requirement for one of two theoretical electives. The required history courses with philanthropic studies topics HIST H509 (Topic: History of Philanthropy in the West) or HIST H511 (Topic: History of American Philanthropy) may be taken to meet the history requirement for a history elective. Required courses PHIL P542 Ethics and Values of Philanthropy, or PHST P512 Human and Financial Resources for Philanthropy, may be taken to meet 3 credits of the 6 credits of outside electives that may be taken in the history program. For public history students, HIST H543 Practicum meets the requirement for PHST P590 Internship for the Philanthropic Studies program. A common thesis meets the requirements of both departments.

Certificate in Professional Editing

See the section titled Certificate in Professional Editing for more information.

Courses Offered

300- and 400-Level Courses
General and Professional Skills Courses
Colloquia
Seminars

300- and 400-Level Courses

A301-A302 American Colonial History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A303-A304 United States, 1789 to 1865 I-II (3-3 cr.)
A313 Origins of Modern America, 1865-1917 (3 cr.)
A314 The United States, 1917-1945 (3 cr.)
A315 United States since World War II (3 cr.)
A317 American Social and Intellectual History (3 cr.)
A325-A326 American Constitutional History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A345-A346 American Diplomatic History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A347 American Urban History (3 cr.)
A348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.)
A352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.)
A364 History of Black Americans (3 cr.)
A371-A372 History of Indiana I-II (3-3)
A402 Readings in American Environmental History (3 cr.)
A410 American Environmental History (3 cr.)
A421 Topics in United States History (3 cr.)
B351 Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (3 cr.)
B352 Western Europe in the High and Later Middle Ages (3 cr.)
B353 The Renaissance (3 cr.)
B354 The Reformation (3 cr.)
B355 Europe: Louis XIV to French Revolution (3 cr.)
B356 French Revolution and Napoleon, 1763-1815 (3 cr.)
B357 Modern France (3 cr.)
B359-B360 Europe from Napoleon to the First World War I-II (3-3 cr.)
B361-B362 Europe in the Twentieth Century I-II (3-3 cr.)
B393 German History: From Bismarck to Hitler (3 cr.)
B421 Topics in European History (3 cr.)
C386 Greek History (3 cr.)
C388 Roman History (3 cr.)
D313 Russian Social and Cultural History, 1801-1917 (3 cr.)
D314 Soviet Social and Cultural History (3 cr.)
F341 Latin America: Discovery, Conquest, and Empire (3 cr.)
F342 Latin America: Evolution and Revolutions since Independence (3 cr.)
F432 Twentieth-Century Revolutions in Latin America (3 cr.)
G467 Traditional Japan (3 cr.)
G468 Early Modern Japan (3 cr.)
G585 Modern China (3 cr.)
H425 Topics in History (1-3 cr.)

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General and Professional Skills Courses

H500 History of Historical Thought (4 cr.) Approaches to the historian's craft and reflections on history as a type of scholarly thinking. Recommended for new graduate students and others interested in history as a branch of knowledge. With the consent of the director of graduate studies, may be repeated for credit when the instructor differs.

H501 Historical Methodology (4 cr.) Discussion and application of the various methods and strategies used in historical research.

H509 Special Topics in European History (3 cr.) Study of special topics in history of Europe at graduate level. May be repeated once for credit.

H511 Special Topics in United States History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in United States history. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

H521 Special Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., traditional Asia, modern Asia, Latin American intellectual history.

H542 Public History (4 cr.) The application of history to public needs and public programs. Historic preservation, archival management, oral history, editing, public humanities programming, historical societies, etc.

H543 Practicum in Public History (1-4 cr.) Internships in public history programs, fieldwork, or research in the historical antecedents of contemporary problems.

H546 History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (3 cr.) Study of topics in the history of science, medicine, and technology. May be repeated once for credit.

H547 Special Topics in Public History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in public history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., to include historic preservation, material history, archival practice, and historical editing.

H575 Graduate Readings in History (cr. arr.)**

**These courses are eligible for a deferred grade.

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Colloquia

These colloquia are of seminar size and involve oral and written study of the problems, bibliographies, interpretations, and research trends in the fields with which they respectively deal; they are the chief means by which a student becomes knowledgeable in history at a professional level and prepares for the doctoral qualifying examination. Any of them may be taken more than once, upon approval of the student's advisory committee.

H615 Colloquium in Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
H620 Colloquium in Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
H630 Colloquium in British and British Imperial History (4 cr.)
H640 Colloquium in Russian History (4 cr.)
H650 Colloquium in United States History (4 cr.)
H665 Colloquium in Latin American History (4 cr.)

H699 Colloquium in Comparative History (4 cr.) Selected topics that cut across conventional geographic and chronological periods. May be used by thematic minors as one of the three colloquia required of Ph.D. candidates

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Seminars

These courses involve research at a mature level with primary sources in specialized topics and problems in the field with which they respectively deal. They train the student in historical scholarship. Any of them may be taken more than once, upon approval of the student's advisory committee.

H715 Seminar in Early Modern European History (4 cr.)
H720 Seminar in Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
H730 Seminar in British and British Imperial History (4 cr.)
H750 Seminar in United States History (4 cr.)
Thesis and Dissertation
H898 M.A. Thesis (1-6 cr.)**

**These courses are eligible for a deferred grade.

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