IU Bulletins HomeBloomington CampusIndianapolis Campusred
Indiana University

Search University Graduate School 2004-2005 Online Bulletin

University Graduate School 2004-2005 Online Bulletin Table of Contents

University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
Kirkwood Hall 111  
Indiana University 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
(812) 855-8853  
Toll Free (888) 335-7547  
Contact University Graduate School

Graduate Office
Union Building 518
Indiana University–Purdue University
Indianapolis
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 278-2490
Contact Graduate Office
 

History

College of Arts and Sciences
Bloomington

Chairperson
Chancellor's Professor John Bodnar

Departmental E-mail
gradsec@indiana.edu

Departmental URL
www.indiana.edu/~histweb

Graduate Faculty
Degrees Offered
Program Information
Special Departmental Requirements
Master of Arts Degree
Master of Arts for Teachers Degree
Dual Master of Arts and Master of Library Science Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Courses Offered

Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Distinguished Professors
Robert Ferrell (Emeritus), Edward Grant (Emeritus, History and Philosophy of Science), James Riley (College of Arts and Sciences, Graduate School), Denis Sinor (Emeritus, Central Eurasian Studies), Gerald Strauss (Emeritus), David Thelen

Chancellor's Professor
John Bodnar

Robert F. Byrnes Professor David Ransel

Ruth Halls Professor
Phyllis Martin

Donald F. Carmony Chair
Eric Sandweiss

Mendel Chair in Latin American History
Daniel James

Thomas and Kathryn Miller Professor
James Madison

University Professor
Norman Pounds (Emeritus)

John W. Hill Associate Professor
Maria Bucur-Deckard

Professors
Judith Allen, George Alter, John Bodnar, George Brooks, Donald Carmony (Emeritus), Jamsheed K. Choksy (Central Eurasian Studies), Nancy Demand (Emerita), James Diehl (Emeritus), Allen Douglas, Ben Eklof, Dyan Elliott, Jurgis Elisonas (Emeritus, East Asian Languages and Cultures), Lawrence J. Friedman, Jeffrey Gould, Michael Grossberg, Charles Jelavich (Emeritus), George Juergens (Emeritus), Herbert Kaplan (Emeritus), Irving Katz (Emeritus), Hiroaki Kuromiya, James Madison, Phyllis Martin (Emerita), Michael McGerr, Howard Mehlinger (Emeritus, Education), Muriel Nazzari (Emerita), Irene Neu (Emerita), M. Jeanne Peterson (Emerita), Otto Pflanze (Emeritus), Robert Quirk (Emeritus), Alexander Rabinowitch (Emeritus), David Ransel, James Riley, Bernard Sheehan (Emeritus), Lynn Struve, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, George M. Wilson (Emeritus, East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Associate Professors
Maria Bucur-Deckard, Ann Carmichael, Claude Clegg, Nick Cullather, Ellen Dwyer, Arthur Field, Wendy Gamber, Peter Guardino, John Hanson, Carl Ipsen, Tom Keirstead, David Pace, Eric Sandweiss, Leah Shopkow, Steven Stowe, Jeffrey Veidlinger, Dror Wahrman

Assistant Professor
Jonathan Sheehan

Visiting Assistant Professor
Robert Bieder

Adjunct Professors
Robert Eno (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Owen Johnson (Journalism), David Nord (Journalism), Toivo Raun (Central Eurasian Studies), Richard Rubinger (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Steven Stein (Religious Studies)

Adjunct Associate Professors
David Brakke (Religious Studies), James Capshew (History and Philosophy of Science), Kathleen Myers (Spanish and Portuguese)

Director of Graduate Studies
Professor Carl Ipsen, Ballantine Hall 702, (812) 855-8234

Degrees Offered

Master of Arts, Master of Arts for Teachers, dual Master of Arts and Master of Library Science (jointly with the School of Library and Information Science), and Doctor of Philosophy

Program Information

The graduate program in history at Indiana University includes formal course work and opportunities for independent study in nearly all recognized fields, both chronological and geographical. Moreover, the department is strongly committed to interdisciplinary programs, and it works closely with area studies programs, journals, and historical organizations. The graduate program is designed to help students in the development of their knowledge and of their critical and analytical skills. Courses and programs in the Department of History prepare students for work as professional historians in a variety of settings: in public history, editing, librarianship, and government service, as well as in historical research and teaching at all levels.

Special Departmental Requirements

See also general University Graduate School requirements .

Master of Arts Degree

Admission Requirements
(1) Bachelor's degree from a recognized institution, including 24 undergraduate credit hours in history, an overall undergraduate B (3.0) average, and a superior record in history; (2) At least one score above 600 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test; (3) three letters of recommendation; (4) a personal statement concerning intellectual interests and professional aspirations; and (5) a sample of written work, such as a term paper, thesis, or any other piece of writing that indicates ability to communicate well in nonfiction prose. Ideally, a writing sample should also demonstrate the applicant's ability to conduct historical research.

Grades
No grade below B- (2.7) in history courses will be counted toward this degree.

Course Requirements
A total of 30 credit hours; at least 20 of these credit hours must be in the Department of History. Students are required to complete H601 and at least one seminar and two colloquia; the remaining credit hours in history must be completed in graduate colloquia, seminars, or readings courses. Graduate students will be allowed to receive credit for undergraduate courses only in special cases (such as in the study of fields not commonly available at the undergraduate level, or in small fields).

Foreign Language Requirement
Reading proficiency in one of the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, ancient Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, or another language appropriate to the student's program of study, if approved by the University Graduate School.

Students may demonstrate proficiency by any of the three methods normally sanctioned by the University Graduate School or by passing a reading examination prepared by members of the history department faculty. The examination includes two texts of approximately 400 words each, one drawn from primary historical sources and the other typically drawn from historiographical sources. A student will be expected to translate the first text and answer critical questions about the second.

Final Examination
None, unless the student has a grade point average less than 3.3 in history courses, in which case an oral examination is required.

Field Review
M.A. candidates wishing to enter the Ph.D. program and those terminating their program with the master's degree must be recommended for the M.A. degree by the appropriate field committee. Graduate students who enter with an M.A. from another institution will be reviewed a year after pursuing graduate work at IU.

Master of Arts for Teachers Degree

Admission Requirements
Same as for the Master of Arts degree except that reading ability in a foreign language is not required.

Grades
No grade below B- (2.7) in history courses will be counted toward this degree.

Course Requirements
Requirements A361, A362, B391, and others for a total of 20 or more credit hours in history and 36 credit hours in all courses.

Foreign Language Requirement
None.

Final Examination
None.

Dual Master of Arts and Master of Library Science Degrees

Study for these two degrees can be combined for a total of 50 credit hours rather than the 66 credit hours required for the two degrees taken separately. Students take 20 credit hours in history as outlined above under course requirements for the Master of Arts degree and 30 credit hours of library science, including L503, L505, L507, L520, L524, L528, L586 (or History H547 with the topic "Archives"), L596, and L625, plus 3 credit hours of electives in the School of Library and Information Science. Admission to each of the two areas of study is approved separately on the same basis as for other applicants not in the dual program.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Admission Requirements
(1) Completion of the M.A. degree at Indiana University or another recognized institution, (2) a superior record in history, (3) certification in one foreign language, and (4) review and approval by a field committee consisting of faculty in the student's major field. For students with an M.A. degree from Indiana University, this review must take place by the end of a student's third semester of full-time graduate study; for other students, this review is done by a subcommittee prior to admission. For those with M.A. degrees from another institution, a writing sample, a personal statement and three letters of recommendation are required.

Grades
No grade below B- (2.7) in history courses will be counted toward this degree.

Course Requirements
The minimum course requirements for the Ph.D. degree are six colloquia (courses H600-H699) distributed in two or more fields, two seminars (courses H700-H799) taught by different instructors, one of which must be in the major field; H601 Introduction to the Professional Study of History during the first semester at IU; and courses to complete the outside minor. For those students transferring M.A. credits, a minimum of two colloquia and one seminar must be completed on the IU Bloomington campus. Students may take dissertation credits (H899) to fulfill the 90 credit hours required by the University Graduate School to complete the Ph.D. Students enrolled in the dual concentration program in cultural history must complete H680 and H780 in addition to the requirements listed above.

Foreign Language/Research Skill Requirement
Reading proficiency in two of the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, ancient Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, or others appropriate to the student's program of study, if approved by the University Graduate School. Proficiency may be demonstrated by the means indicated under the heading "Foreign Language Requirement" in the section on the M.A. degree. As a substitute for the second language in certain fields, the student may demonstrate proficiency in an approved research skill clearly useful for the study of history; the choice of a specific skill is subject to the approval of the student's advisory committee and the department's director of graduate studies. With the necessary approval, a student may demonstrate proficiency by earning a grade of B+ (3.3) or higher in a two-course methodological sequence such as History H540 and H541, Anthropology E500 and E606, Folklore and Ethnomusicology F516 and F517, Journalism J500 and J520, or Telecommunications T501 and T510. A student may also demonstrate proficiency in the use of a research skill by achieving an appropriate score on a written examination prepared by members of the history department faculty. The above requirements must be met by the time the student has completed no more than 30 credit hours beyond the M.A. or has been admitted to the Ph.D. program. Some fields, such as Latin American history and ancient history, require proficiency in additional languages.

Qualifying Examination
(1) A rigorous oral examination of no longer than three hours will be required. The purpose of the examination is to demonstrate general command of the major and minor fields of study. The examination should assess students' scholarly preparation to teach courses in their fields through the demonstration of the ability to discuss key issues and problems in these areas. At least two representatives of the student's major field and at least one representative of his/her inside minor field must be present at the examination. The faculty representative for the student's outside minor has the option of participating or waiving participation. Students enrolled in the dual concentration in a time/place field and cultural history should have at least two representatives from the time/place field and two from the cultural history field on their examination committees. (2) There will be a public defense (open to all faculty and graduate students) of the student's dissertation prospectus, which the student's exam committee will preside over. The defense can take place as early as one week, but no later than six months, after the student passes the oral examination. The prospectus will be distributed at least one week in advance of the defense. It should be substantial and should take the form of a grant proposal. It should explain the potential significance of the proposed dissertation project and place it in historiographical context. Students must receive passing grades on both parts of the examination in order to advance to Ph.D. candidacy. The student's examination committee grades both parts of the examination.

Termination of Enrollment in the Doctoral Program
If a doctoral student fails the oral qualifying examination two times, falls below a 3.0 (B) grade point average, fails to meet the language/research-skill requirement by the time 30 credit hours of post-M.A. credit have been earned, or fails to complete the oral qualifying examinations by the end of the approved length of time, the director of graduate studies, in consultation with the advisory committee, can initiate steps to terminate the student's enrollment in the program. The student, however, may make a formal appeal to be given a third chance to pass the qualifying examinations or to be given additional time to raise the grade point average or to complete the qualifying examination. If the appeal is denied, the director of graduate studies will recommend to the dean of the University Graduate School that the student's enrollment in the doctoral program be terminated.

Final Examination
Oral defense of dissertation.

Ph.D. Minor in History
Students in other departments may minor in history by completing, with a grade point average no lower than B (3.0), at least 12 credit hours of course work in history, including one colloquium. No more than 6 credit hours of work transferred from another university may be applied toward this requirement, and such credit must be approved by the director of graduate studies in the Department of History.

To arrange for a history minor, students should consult the director of graduate studies, who will recommend a member of the faculty to serve as an advisor. In consultation with the advisor, a program of study will be outlined and a copy of the plan filed with the director of graduate studies. Upon completion of the course work, either the student's history advisor or the director of graduate studies will attest to the successful completion of the outside minor.

Further information regarding departmental regulations governing advanced degree programs may be found in A Guide to Graduate Studies in History, available on from the department's graduate Web page:www.indiana.edu/~histweb

Courses Offered

History Courses
General and Professional Skills Courses
Colloquia
Seminars
Thesis and Dissertation
Cross-Listed Courses

History Courses

A301-A302 American Colonial History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A303-A304 United States, 1789 to 1865 I-II (3-3 cr.)
A313 Origins of Modern America (3 cr.)
A314 The United States, 1917-1945 (3 cr.)
A315 United States since World War II (3 cr.)
A317 American Social and Intellectual History (3 cr.)
A325-A326 American Constitutional History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A329-A330 Social History of American Enterprise I-II (3-3 cr.)
A337-A338 The American Frontier I-II (3-3 cr.)
A339-A340 History of the South I-II (3-3 cr.)
A345-A346 American Diplomatic History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A347 American Urban History (3 cr.)
A348 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.)
A352 History of Latinos in the United States (3 cr.)
A353-A354 American Economic History I-II (3-3 cr.)
A355-A356 Afro-American History (3-3 cr.)
A361-A362 Studies in American History for Teachers I-II (3-3 cr.)
A364 History of Black Americans (3 cr.)
A371-A372 History of Indiana I-II (3-3 cr.)
A402 Readings in American Environmental History (3 cr.)
A410 American Environmental History (3 cr.)

A421 Topics in United States History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and/or problems in United States history. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

A507 American Cultural History (3 cr.) Central topics in American cultural life and thought from the late nineteenth century to the present. Special focus on the changing sense of personal selfhood among specific ethnic and religious groups, social classes, genders, and professions. Examination of how this changing sense has manifested itself in cultural forms.
B341 History of Spain and Portugal (3 cr.)
B351 Western Europe in the Early Middle Ages (3 cr.)
B352 Western Europe in the High and Later Middle Ages (3 cr.)
B353 The Renaissance (3 cr.)
B354 The Reformation (3 cr.)
B355 Europe: Louis XIV to French Revolution (3 cr.)
B356 French Revolution and Napoleon, 1763-1815 (3 cr.)
B357 Modern France (3 cr.)
B359-B360 Europe from Napoleon to the First World War I-II (3-3 cr.)
B361-B362 Europe in the Twentieth Century I-II (3-3 cr.)
B363-B364 European Diplomatic History since 1870 I-II (2-2 cr.)
B366 Paris and Berlin in the 1920s: A Cultural History (3 cr.)
B377-B378 History of Germany since 1648 I-II (3-3 cr.)
B383-B384 European Intellectual History I-II (3-3 cr.)
B391 Themes in World History (3 cr.)
B393 German History: From Bismarck to Hitler (3 cr.)
B421 Topics in European History (3 cr.)

B568 Modern Italy (3 cr.) Risorgimento and unification; liberal Italy and the mutilated victory (WWI); Italian opera; Fascism; alliance with Nazi Germany and defeat (WWII); Christian Democrats vs. Communists; major cultural movements; the economic miracle; the Mafia; left- and right wing violence and terrorism; the kickbacks scandal and the Second Republic.
C386 Greek History (3 cr.)
C388 Roman History (3 cr.)
C391 History of the Medieval Near East (3 cr.)
C392 History of the Modern Near East (3 cr.)
C393 Ottoman History (3 cr.)
C394 Inner Asia before the Mongol Conquest (3 cr.)

C580 History of Ancient Medicine (3 cr.) Covers the history of ancient medicine in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece (Homeric, Hippocratic, and Asclepian), China, India, Alexandria, and Rome (Soranus, Galen, and the medical service of the Roman army), and modern uses of humoral theory. Major focus is on the Hippocratic treatises as primary sources.
D313 Russian Social and Cultural History, 1801-1917 (3 cr.)
D314 Soviet Social and Cultural History (3 cr.)
D401-D402 History and Civilization of the Byzantine Empire I-II (3-3 cr.)
D418 Russian and Soviet Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)
D419 The Mongols and Medieval Europe (3 cr.)
D430 History of the Eastern and Southern Baltic Region (3 cr.)
D506 Muscovy and Imperial Russia, 1500-1801 (3 cr.)
D510 Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime (3 cr.)
D521 Hungarian History and Civilization to 1711 (3 cr.)
D522 Hungarian History and Civilization, 1711-1918 (3 cr.)
D525 Path to Emancipation: Nationalism in the Balkans, 1804-1923 (3 cr.)

D527 The People vs. The Emperor: Nation-Making and Imperial Decline in East Central Europe, 1780-1918 (3 cr.)

D528 The Search for European Integration: Eastern Europe in the Twentieth Century (3 cr.)

E531 African History from Ancient Times to Empires and City States (3 cr.) Origins and groupings of African peoples; political, social, and economic evolution to ca. 1750; Africa's contacts with the ancient world, trans-Sahara and Indian ocean trades; growth of states and empires; spread of Islam.

E532 African History from Colonial Rule to Independence (3 cr.) The slave trade and its abolition; European imperialism and colonial rule; impact of Islam and Christianity; nationalism and the struggle for independence; reassertion of African culture and identity; development issues.

E533 Conflict in Southern Africa (3 cr.) Early populations and environment; spread of European settlement, interaction with African societies and early race relations; Zulu power and white power; discovery of minerals and industrialization; urbanization and segregation; African and Afrikaner nationalism; south Africa and its neighbors; Mandela and the new South Africa.

E534 History of Western Africa (3 cr.)

E536 History of East Africa (3 cr.) Developments over the past two millennia in East Africa (Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, and northern Mozambique). Topics include the environment and peoples of the region, the emergence of hierarchical societies, the economic and political changes of the nineteenth century, the era of European imperialism, the transformations associated with the colonial period, and African independence.

E538 History of Muslim West Africa (3 cr.) Introduction to the history and historiography of Muslim West Africa; develops the origins of Islam in West Africa and the ways West Africans have incorporated, transformed, and amplified Muslim beliefs and practices throughout history.

F341 Latin America: Discovery, Conquest, and Empire (3 cr.)

F342 Latin America: Evolution and Revolutions since Independence (3 cr.)

F432 Twentieth-Century Revolutions in Latin America (3 cr.)

F536 Modern Central American History (3 cr.) Studies social, economic, cultural, and political development from 1821 to 1990. Major topics include coffee and liberalism, United States and Nicaragua, the era of reform, revolution and counterrevolution.

F543 Modern Brazil since 1850 (3 cr.)

F546 Modern Mexico (3 cr.) Places contemporary Mexico in historical perspective, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include nineteenth-century social and political movements, the causes and consequences of the 1910 revolution, the formation of Mexico's political system, problems of economic growth, and the changing patterns of gender, class, and ethnicity in Mexican society.

G465 Chinese Revolutions and the Communist Regime (3 cr.)

G467 Traditional Japan (3 cr.)

G468 Early Modern Japan (3 cr.)

G567 Premodern Japan (3 cr.) Society and culture on the Japanese archipelago from their origins to the high middle ages. Prehistoric Jomon and protohistoric Yayoi. Formation of the Japanese state under the influence of Chinese and Korean models. Heian courtly culture. Ascendancy of military elites and developments in popular culture during Kamakura and Muromachi periods.

G568 Early Modern Japan (3 cr.) Samurai culture, expansion of Buddhism, and sectarian violence. High feudalism, unification, and the Tokugawa settlement after 1600. Encounter with European civilization, closed country. Urbanization, social and cultural change, rise of agrarian prosperity in the Edo period to about 1800.

G569 Modern Japan (3 cr.) Western impact and social and intellectual change in late Tokugawa Japan from about 1720. The Meiji Restoration. State capitalism and the Japanese development process. Empire, war, defeat, U.S. occupation, and renewal in the twentieth century. Japan's rise to the front rank of world economic powers after World War II.

G580 Early China (3 cr.) China from its neolithic background through the Quin and Western Han dynasties. Examines the Shang tribal polity, royal and aristocratic phases of the Zhou state, and the creation of the imperial system in the Qin-Han period. Changing patterns of ideology, political legitimacy, and social organization through archaeological and textual sources.

G582 Imperial China I (3 cr.) The Chinese empire from the Han through the Tang dynasties (second century B.C. through tenth century A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns, political forms, social classes, economic developments, religious movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources. Credit given for only one of G582 or G461.

G583 Imperial China II (3 cr.) The Chinese empire from the Song through the middle Qing dynasties (tenth through eighteenth centuries A.D.). Relations among demographic patterns, political forms, social classes, economic developments, philosophical movements, and cultural diversification, investigated through secondary and translated primary sources. Credit given for only one of G583 or G461.

G585 Modern China (3 cr.) Survey of the final century of dynastic rule and the rise to power of the Nationalist and Communist parties, highlighting social and cultural developments, the impact of Western imperialism, and the evolution of revolutionary ideologies. Credit given only for G585 or G462.

G587 Contemporary China (3 cr.) Survey of recent Chinese history focusing on social, cultural, and political life in the People's Republic of China and post-1949 Taiwan. Events covered include the Long March, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Credit given for olny one of G587 or G462.

H425 Topics in History (1-3 cr.)

T500 Topics in History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems of limited scope from the perspective of social and historical studies. Topics will vary but will ordinarily cut across fields, regions, and periods. May be repeated for credit.

Return to Courses

General and Professional Skills Courses

H500 History of Historical Thought (4 cr.) Approaches to the historian's craft and reflections on history as a type of scholarly thinking. Recommended for new graduate students and others interested in history as a branch of knowledge. With the consent of the director of graduate studies, may be repeated for credit when the instructor differs.

H501 Historical Methodology (4 cr.) Discussion and application of the various methods and strategies used in historical research.

H509 Special Topics in European History (3 cr.) Study of special topics in history of Europe at graduate level. May be repeated once for credit.

H511 Special Topics in United States History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in United States history. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

H520 Shaping Careers in History (2 cr.) Introduces students to the history profession in order to facilitate planning of careers in the university and beyond. Emphasis placed on the changing nature of careers inside and outside academia and ways students might construct a program of study to serve their professional goals.

H521 Special Topics in African, Asian, or Latin American History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in African, Asian, or Latin American history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., traditional Asia, modern Asia, Latin American intellectual History.

H523 The Holocaust (3 cr.) Intensive introduction to the historical events and intellectual developments leading up to and surrounding the destruction of European Jewry during World War II. The Holocaust will be examined against the backdrop of modern Jewish and modern German history.

H524 Issues in Contemporary Historiography (4 cr.) Overview of the discipline of history. Focuses on understanding and placing in perspective current debates in the field. Topics vary, but attention will be paid in each case to overarching themes such as the differences between historical subfields and the overlaps and divergences between history and other disciplines.

H540 Quantitative Methods in History (4 cr.)

H541 Advanced Quantitative Methods (4 cr.)

H542 Public History (4 cr.) The application of history to public needs and public programs. Historic preservation, archival management, oral history, editing, public humanities programming, historical societies, etc.

H543 Practicum in Public History (1-4 cr.) P: H542. Internships in public history programs, field work, or research in the historical antecedents of contemporary problems.

H546 History of Science, Medicine, and Technology (3 cr.) Study of topics in the history of science, medicine, and technology. May be repeated once for credit.

H547 Special Topics in Public History (3 cr.) Intensive study and analysis of selected topics in public history. Topics will vary from semester to semester, e.g., to include historic preservation, material history, archival practice, and historical editing.

H575 Graduate Readings in History (cr. arr.)**

H580 The Teaching of College History (1-2 cr.) Approaches to college-level instruction in history, either (1) through training to be an associate instructor, or (2) through work as a course assistant, assisting a faculty member in planning and teaching a 300- or 400-level history course. May be repeated once for credit. S/F grading.

H591 Teaching World History (3 cr.) Introduction to the teaching of the undergraduate courses in world history. Topics include current curricula in world history; textbooks and other readings in world history; and multimedia resources. Students will prepare an undergraduate course syllabus of their own design.

H592 Teaching World History Practicum (3 cr.) A first practical experience in teaching an unergraduate advanced topics course in world history. Topics are at the discretion of the student, but require authorization by the instructor and the Department of History. Students will have complete responsibility for the course taught.

H593 Teaching United States History (3 cr.) Introduction to teaching undergraduate courses in United States History. Topics include: curricula in U.S. history, pedagogy in U.S. history, textbooks, and multimedia resources. Students will design two undergraduate course syllabi.

H594 Teaching Unites States History II: Practicum (3 cr.) A first practical experience in teaching an undergraduate advanced topics course in United States history. Topics are at the discretion of the student, but require authorization by the instructor and the Department of History. The student will have complete responsibility for the course taught.

H601 Introduction to the Professional Study of History (4 cr.) Introduces graduate students into the demands of the historical profession, introduces theory and methods of history, historiography, and fundamental research skills.

Return to Courses

Colloquia

These colloquia are of seminar size and involve oral and written study of the problems, bibliographies, interpretations, and research trends in the fields with which they respectively deal; they are the chief means by which a student becomes knowledgeable in history at a professional level and prepares for the doctoral qualifying examination. Any of them may be taken more than once, upon approval of the student's advisory committee.
H605 Colloquium in Ancient History (4 cr.)
H610 Colloquium in Medieval European History (4 cr.)
H615 Colloquium in Early Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
H620 Colloquium in Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
H630 Colloquium in British and British Imperial History (4 cr.)
H640 Colloquium in Russian History (4 cr.)
H645 Colloquium in East European History (4 cr.)
H650 Colloquium in United States History (4 cr.)
H665 Colloquium in Latin American History (4 cr.)
H675 Colloquium in East Asian History (4 cr.)
H680 Colloquium in Cultural History (4 cr.)
H685 Colloquium in Near Eastern History (4 cr.)
H695 Colloquium in African History (4 cr.)
H699 Colloquium in Comparative History (4 cr.) Selected topics that cut across conventional geographic and chronological periods. May be used by thematic minors as one of the three colloquia required of Ph.D. candidates.

Return to Courses

Seminars

These courses involve research at a mature level with primary sources in specialized topics and problems in the field with which they respectively deal. They train the student in historical scholarship. Any of them may be taken more than once, upon approval of the student's advisory committee.
H705 Seminar in Ancient History (4 cr.)
H710 Seminar in Medieval European History (4 cr.)
H715 Seminar in Early Modern European History (4 cr.)
H720 Seminar in Modern Western European History (4 cr.)
H730 Seminar in British and British Imperial History (4 cr.)
H740 Seminar in Russian History (4 cr.)
H745 Seminar in East European History (4 cr.)
H750 Seminar in United States History (4 cr.)
H765 Seminar in Latin American History (4 cr.)
H775 Seminar in East Asian History (4 cr.)
H780 Seminar in Cultural History (4 cr.)
H785 Seminar in Near Eastern History (4 cr.)
H799 Seminar in World History (4 cr.)

Return to Courses

Thesis and Dissertation

H898 M.A. Thesis (1-6 cr.)**

H899 Ph.D. Dissertation (cr. arr.)**

**These courses are eligible for a deferred grade

Return to Courses

Cross-Listed Courses

(Bloomington only)

Graduate
G773 Seminar in Economic History (1-6 cr.) Selected topics in economic history. Offered by Departments of Economics and History and the Department of Business Economics and Public Policy in the School of Business. May be taken more than once for credit.

Victorian Studies
V711 Social Science and Social Philosophy in the Victorian Age (4 cr.)

Return to Courses

Return To Top



Indiana University
Office of Creative Services
Von Lee 319
517 East Kirkwood Avenue
Bloomington, IN 47408-4060

Last updated: 01 June 2016 01 34 33

Submit Questions or Comments
Copyright 2016 The Trustees of Indiana University