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University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
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Graduate Office
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Indiana University–Purdue University
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Indianapolis, IN 46202
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English and Linguistics

Fort Wayne

Chairperson
Professor Richard Ramsey

Departmental E-mail
ramseyr@ipfw.edu

Departmental URL
www.ipfw.edu/engl

Graduate Faculty
Degrees Offered
Special Departmental Requirements
Master of Arts Degree
Master of Arts for Teachers Degree
Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a New Language
Courses

Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Professors
Avon Crismore, Rodney Farnsworth*, Lynette Felber, Lawrence Friedman* (Emeritus), Henry Kozicki (Emeritus), John Minton*, James Woolf (Emeritus)

Associate Professors
Stuart Blythe*, John P. Brennan*, Beverly Hume*, Michael Kaufmann*, Michael O'Hear*, Richard Ramsey*, Beth Simon, Arline Standley (Emerita), Chad Thompson*, Hermine J. van Nuis*

Assistant Professors
Lidan Lin*, Hao Sun*

Director of Graduate Studies
Associate Professor Stuart Blythe*, Classroom-Medical Building 117, (260) 481-6770

Degrees Offered

Master of Arts (M.A.) and Master of Arts for Teachers (M.A.T.)

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Special Departmental Requirements

(See also general University Graduate School requirements.)

Admission Requirements
To be regularly admitted to a master's program in English, you must have completed an undergraduate major or minor in English with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 (B) and a GPA of at least 3.0 in all English courses. In addition, all applicants must earn a satisfactory score on the general aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination. If these requirements are not met, an applicant may be admitted conditionally. Conditions might, for example, require completing prerequisite courses without credit toward the graduate degree, or maintaining a given GPA over the first 6-12 credits earned in the program.

To receive the M.A.T., a candidate must hold at least provisional public school certification in English. If such certification is lacking when a candidate enters the program, certification requirements must be fulfilled while the M.A.T. requirements are completed.

Grades
A GPA of 3.0 must be maintained while in the program.

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Master of Arts Degree

Course Requirements
At least 30 credit hours in courses administered by the department must be completed. (Courses are generally 3 credit hours.) Students must also demonstrate reading proficiency in an approved foreign language, normally by passing with a grade of A or B a 300-level literature course offered by the Department of Modern Foreign Languages. (A graduate-level foreign language test provides an alternative for students who are prepared to read literature and criticism in an approved language.) Students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 in courses taken to fulfill degree requirements.

The total of 30 credit hours must include at least one course in professional scholarship, one course in critical theory, and one 700-level seminar. The total must include at least three courses in each of two of five available concentrations: (1) British literature before 1700, (2) British literature after 1700, (3) American literature, (4) English language and linguistics, (5) writing, rhetoric, and composition.

All degree requirements must be completed within five years of admission to the program.

Foreign Language Requirement
Reading proficiency in French, German, Spanish, or other approved foreign language normally demonstrated by passing with a grade of A or B a 300-level literature course offered by the Department of Modern Foreign Languages in which the reading is done in the foreign language. A graduate-level foreign language test provides an alternative for students who are prepared to read literature and criticism in an approved language. A student should begin working on the proficiency requirement as soon as admitted and continue to do so every semester until it is satisfied.

Thesis (3-6 cr.)
Required of students who do not stand for the final examination; optional for others.

Final Examination
Required of students who do not complete a thesis, a comprehensive written examination. See director of graduate studies for details.

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Master of Arts for Teachers Degree

Prerequisite
Provisional public school certification in English. Students without provisional certification must fulfill certification requirements as well as requirements for the M.A.T.

Course Requirements
To earn this degree, students must complete at least 36 credit hours of graduate-level courses: at least 24 credits must be in courses administered by the Department of English and Linguistics, including one course in linguistics or the English language, one course in composition theory or rhetorical theory, and one course in ethnic or minority literature. Up to 12 of the 36 required credit hours may be elected from approved courses administered by another department. For students working toward certification, some graduate-level education courses may count as electives for the M.A.T.

Foreign Language Requirements
None.

Thesis (3-6 cr.)
Required of students who do not complete at least one 700-level seminar.

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Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a New Language (TENL)

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching English as a New Language is intended primarily for students working toward a graduate degree in English and for practicing teachers who wish to be trained in teaching English to nonnative speakers. It also serves people who are preparing to live abroad or who wish to facilitate their employment abroad, and those who have technical or business expertise and wish to work with nonnative speakers in professional settings. The required courses will familiarize students with the major theoretical foundations of teaching English as a new and foreign language. Students will become acquainted with ENL pedogogy and resources and will acquire experience by teaching ENL learners in real classrooms. The TENL certificate can stand alone as a separate credential or be integrated with the requirements of the M.A. or M.A.T. program in English.

Course Requirements

Grammar
ENG G500 Introduction to the English Language (3-4 cr.)

Methods
LING P511 Methods and Materials for TESOL I (3 cr.)
LING P512 Methods and Materials for TESOL II (3 cr.)

Language Acquisition
LING L532 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)

Sociolinguistics
LING L619 Language and Society (3 cr.)

Practicum
LING L535 TESOL Practicum (3 cr.)

For further information, contact Professor Hao Sun, TENL Certificate Program Coordinator, Department of English and Linguistics, Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1499, telephone (260) 481-6775, e-mail sunh@ipfw.edu.

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Courses

The following courses are taught in the Department of English and Linguistics at the Fort Wayne campus.

Literature
Writing and Rhetoric
Language
Cross-Listed Courses

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Literature

B501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (3 cr.) Materials, tools, and methods of research.

B502 Introduction to Literacy Studies and the Teaching of College English (3 cr.) Historical and cognitive effects of writing, reading, and language use, and the implication of these effects for the teaching and study of literature and writing.

B553 Studies in Literature (3 cr.) Primarily for secondary-school and junior-college teachers of English. Emphasis on thematic, analytic, and generic study. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

B605 Modern Approaches to Literature (3 cr.) Survey of contemporary critical approaches, emphasizing methods of literary analysis.

B609 History of Literary Criticism (3 cr.) Survey of literary criticism and theory from Plato and Aristotle to 1960, including a variety of literary critics and theorists.

B612 Chaucer (3 cr.) Critical analysis of The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected shorter poems.

B613 Middle English Literature (3 cr.) Selected themes and writers in English from 1100 to 1500.

B622 Elizabethan Poetry (3 cr.) Spenser and other major Elizabethan poets.

B624 Elizabethan Drama and Its Background (3 cr.) English drama, excluding Shakespeare, from the Middle Ages to 1642.

B625 Shakespeare (3 cr.) Critical analysis of selected texts.

B627 English Poetry of the Early Seventeenth Century (3 cr.) Major poets and their intellectual milieu, 1600-1660.

B628 Milton (3 cr.) Poetry and prose, with special attention to Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.

B635 British Literature 1660-1790 (3 cr.) Poetry and nonfiction prose. Emphasis on Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson and his circle.

B637 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama (3 cr.) English drama from 1660 to 1800.

B639 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.)

B642 Romantic Literature (3 cr.) Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and other writers of the British Romantic movement.

B644 Victorian Literature (3 cr.) Poetry and nonfiction prose from 1837 to 1900.

B645 British Fiction 1800-1900 (3 cr.)
B648 Twentieth-Century British Poetry (3 cr.)
B649 Twentieth-Century British Fiction (3 cr.)
B651 American Literature 1800-1865 (3 cr.)
B652 American Literature 1865-1914 (3 cr.)
B654 American Literature since 1914 (3 cr.)
B655 American Fiction to 1900 (3 cr.)

B656 Twentieth-Century American Fiction (3 cr.) American fiction since 1900, including such writers as Dreiser, Lewis, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner.

B657 Recent Writing (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

B660 Studies in British and American Writers (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

B666 Survey of Children's Literature (3 cr.) Survey of literature for children and adolescents from the medieval period to the present.

B668 Topics in Children's Literature (3 cr.) Study of a period, a genre, or a group of writers. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

B673 Studies in Women and Literature (3 cr.) Women writers and literary representations of women.

B675 Studies in American Ethnic and Minority Literature and Culture (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

B680 Special Topics in Literary Study and Theory (3 cr.) Readings in sociological, political, psychological, and other approaches to literature. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

B688 Irish Literature and Culture (3 cr.) Study of one writer, a group of writers, a period, or a genre. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.
B695 Individual Readings in English (1-3 cr.) Independent study.
B699 Master's Thesis (3-6 cr.)
B712 Chaucer (3 cr.) P: ENG B612, B613, or equivalent.
B725 Shakespeare (3 cr.)
B731 Milton (3 cr.)
B733 Restoration and Augustan Literature (3 cr.)
B739 British Fiction to 1800 (3 cr.)
B741 Romantic Literature (3 cr.)
B743 Victorian Literature (3 cr.)
B745 British Fiction 1800-1900 (3 cr.)
B749 Twentieth-Century British Literature (3 cr.)
B751 Major American Writers 1700-1855 (3 cr.)
B753 Major American Writers 1855 to the Present (3 cr.)
B780 Special Studies in British and American Literature (3 cr.)

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Writing and Rhetoric

C501 Teaching of Composition in College (1-2 cr.) Practical teaching of composition; current theories and policies.

C505 Teaching Composition: Issues and Approaches (2-3 cr.) P: permission of instructor. Fundamental issues in the teaching of writing. Topics include teaching invention and revision, diagnosing errors, teaching style and organization, making assignments, and evaluating student writing.

C507 Writing Center Theory and Praxis (3 cr.) Examines techniques for responding to writers in writing centers, including nontraditional populations and writers in various disciplines. Understand and test cognitive, social constructionist, and collaborative theories through consulting in the writing center mentored by experience writing consultants and the director. Write journals, a case study outline, and a paper linking theory to practice.

C511 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: permission of the instructor.

C513 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) P: permission of the instructor.

C521 Introduction to Professional Writing (3 cr.) Discourse in professional disciplinary contexts (e.g., engineering, sciences, social sciences, humanities). Emphasis on research tools in professional writing and on methods of contextual, intentional, structural, and stylistic analysis.

C531 Theory and Practice of Exposition (3 cr.) Primarily for secondary-school and junior-college teachers of English.

C532 Advanced Argumentative Writing (3 cr.) Techniques for analyzing and constructing arguments for different disciplines and professions, especially the use of proofs, evidence, and logic; major issues of argument, such as the ethics of persuading audiences and the uses of style.

C601 History of Rhetoric (3 cr.) Development of rhetorical theory from Plato to the present, including the influence of historical rhetoric on present-day composition theory.

C602 Contemporary Theories of Composition (3 cr.) Current research in rhetoric and composition. Draws on insights from linguistic theory, cognitive theory, and rhetorical theory to develop greater understanding of the writing process and build pedagogical applications.

C611 Writing Fiction (3 cr.) P: C511 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated once for credit.

C613 Writing Poetry (3 cr.) P: C513 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated once for credit.

C682 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit under a different topic.

C697 Independent Study in Writing (1-3 cr.)

C780 Special Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (3 cr.) May be repeated once for credit under a different topic.

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Language

D501 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.) An introduction to the nature, structure, and development of the English language.

D552 Linguistics and the Teacher of English (3 cr.) Topics in applied English linguistics, intended for English teachers at all levels.

D600 History of the English Language (3 cr.) Survey of the evolution of the English language from its earliest stages to the present, with reference to its external history and to its phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary.

D601 Introduction to Old English (3 cr.) Introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Old English and intensive reading of major prose and verse texts.

D660 Stylistics (3 cr.) Survey of traditional and linguistic approaches to the study of prose and poetic style. Attention to the verbal characteristics of texts, what they reflect about the author, and how they affect the reader.

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Cross-Listed Courses

Comparative Literature
C541 Modern Drama (4 cr.)
C586 Colloquium in Literature and the Other Arts (4 cr.)
C592 Genre Study in Film (3 cr.)

Film
K502 Genre Study in Film (3 cr.)

Linguistics
L430 Language Change and Variation (3 cr.)
L485 Topics in Linguistics (3 cr.)
L534 Linguistic Resources and the Teaching of English as a Second-language (TESOL) (3 cr.)
L535 TESOL Practicum (3 cr.)
L543 Syntactic Analysis (3 cr.)
L575 Introduction to Linguistic Theory (3 cr.)
L619 Language and Society (3 cr.)
L690 Variable Title (1-4 cr.), to match the undergraduate offerings

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