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University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
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Indiana University 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
(812) 855-8853  
Toll Free (888) 335-7547  
Contact University Graduate School

Graduate Office
Union Building 518
Indiana University–Purdue University
Indianapolis
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 278-2490
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English

School of Liberal Arts
Indianapolis

Chairperson Professor
Christian Kloesel

Departmental E-mail
english@iupui.edu

Departmental URL
english.iupui.edu/

Graduate Faculty
Degree Offered
Program Information
Special Departmental Requirements
Master of Arts Degree
Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)
Certificate in Professional Editing
Courses Offered

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Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Professors
John D. Barlow (Emeritus), Barbara Cambridge*, Edwin F. Casebeer (Emeritus), Ulla M. Connor, Kenneth W. Davis, Jonathan Eller, Sharon Hamilton, Christian J. W. Kloesel, Missy Dehn Kubitschek, William M. Plater, Helen J. Schwartz, Judith A. Spector* (Columbus), William F. Touponce, Richard C. Turner*

Associate Professors
Dennis Bingham, Frederick DiCamilla*, Stephen L. Fox*, Susan Harrington*, David Hoegberg*, Karen R. Johnson*, Karen Kovacik*, Kim Brian Lovejoy*, Melvin L. Plotinsky (Emeritus), Cynthia B. Roy, Jane Schultz, Susan C. Shepherd*, Mary K. Trotter*, Thomas Upton*, Harriet Wilkins*

Assistant Professors
Marjorie Rush Hovde*, Thomas Fletcher Marvin*, Edwin Nagelhout*, Robert Rebein*

Graduate Studies Office For graduate student information and advising, call (317) 274-2258, Cavanaugh Hall 502L.

Degree Offered

Master of Arts

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Program Information

IUPUI's graduate English program has been designed to prepare students for careers in the analysis and production of "texts." To this end, the program covers issues and skills in reading and writing, in the richest sense of these words, in order to prepare students to address these issues and to teach these skills. Graduates of the program should be prepared for such careers as teaching writing and literature, teaching English as a second language, and writing for business, government, and other professions.

In contrast to traditional M.A. programs, which place heavy emphasis on literary history, the IUPUI program focuses on the application of English studies to contemporary situations and problems. While interested students will be encouraged to take courses in literary history, graduates of this program will no doubt have to take additional literary history courses to be qualified candidates for traditional doctoral programs. Because of IUPUI's urban, nonresidential setting, its English graduate program will strive, in its curriculum and scheduling, to meet the special needs of part-time, nonresidential students.

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Special Departmental Requirements

See also general University Graduate School requirements.

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Master of Arts Degree

Admission Requirements

  1. Applicants should have a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 grading scale in the student's undergraduate major, documented by an official transcript. Applicants are normally expected to have been English majors, but admission will be considered also for those who otherwise demonstrate the competency necessary for successful graduate work in English.
  2. Applicants must have taken the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test and earned a score of 600 in at least one of the three areas. Applicants are encouraged to take the examination by December of the year prior to admission.
  3. Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation.

Foreign Language Requirements
None, but M.A. students continuing on for the Ph.D. are encouraged to validate their reading proficiency in a foreign language according to University Graduate School standards.

Grades
M.A. students must maintain a 3.0 (B) grade point average.

Course Requirements
The degree requires 36 credit hours, including 12 credit hours of "core" courses, 20 credit hours of "area" courses (possibly including an internship), and 4 credit hours of thesis work. The three core courses provide an introduction to three major areas in the discipline of English: Language: G500 Introduction to the English Language; Writing: W500 Teaching Composition: Issues and Approaches; Literature: L506 Issues and Motives of Literary Studies. These courses, which carry 4 credit hours each, should be taken at the beginning of the graduate program.

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Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL)

The Certificate in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) is a six-course, 21 credit program. The five required courses include ENG G500, G541, and L535, as well as LING L532 and L534. The elective course can be chosen from ENG G625, G652, and LING T600; courses in other departments relevant to TESL are acceptable with approval from the director. An emphasis in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) can be earned by taking LING T600 as the elective course and completing the practicum in an ESP setting. For more information about the certificate, contact the ESL Program in the Department of English, or visit the IUPUI TESOL Web site at www.liberalarts.iupui.edu/tesol/ .

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Certificate in Professional Editing

See the section titled Certificate in Professional Editing for more information.

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Courses Offered

500 Level
600 Level
700 Level
Cross-Listed Course

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500 Level

The 500 level is reserved for courses that are methodologically, professionally, and pedagogically oriented.

G500 Introduction to the English Language (4 cr.) An introduction to the English language: its nature, structure, and development.

G541 Materials Preparation for ESL Instruction (4 cr.) Students will learn about materials preparation, syllabus design, and test preparation by applying a variety of theories to books and other ESL (English as a Second-language) teaching devices (e.g., tapes, videotapes, software programs) in order to evaluate their usefulness and will learn to evaluate ESL materials for adequateness.

L501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (4 cr.) Materials, tools, and methods of research.

L502 Introduction to Literacy Studies and the Teaching of College English (2-4 cr.) Historical and cognitive effects of writing, reading, and language use, and the implication of these effects for the teaching and study of literature and writing.

L506 Issues and Motives of Literary Studies (4 cr.) The conditions and assumptions of studying English, with emphasis on the application of theory to a culturally and historically diverse range of writings.

L532 Second-Language Acquisition (3 cr.) (offered as Linguistics L532 at Bloomington)

L534 Linguistics Resources and TESOL (3 cr.)

L553 Studies in Literature (1-3 cr.) Primarily for secondary-school and junior-college teachers of English. Emphasis on thematic, analytic, and generic study. With consent of instructor, may be repeated once for credit.

L560 Literary Studies in England and Scotland (6 cr.) Provides on-site opportunities in England and Scotland to explore the literary landscapes of British authors in relation to the English and Scottish school systems. Designed primarily for education majors and continuing certification credits. Offered biannually.

L573 Studies of Literary Appreciation I (3 cr.)

L590 Internship in English (4 cr.) A supervised internship in the uses of language in the workplace. Each intern will be assigned a problem or task and will develop the methods for solving or completing it. Each intern will complete a portfolio of workplace writing and self-evaluation.

W500 Teaching Composition: Issues and Approaches (4 cr.) Consideration of fundamental issues in the teaching of writing and the major approaches to composition instruction. Specific topics include teaching invention and revision, diagnosing errors, teaching style and organization, making assignments, and evaluating student writing.

W510 Computers in Composition (4 cr.) Based in current theories about the process of writing, this course surveys the use of computer programs (such as word processing) as writing tools, computer-assigned instruction as teaching aids, and computer programs as research aids to study writing.

W553 Theory and Practice of Exposition (1-3 cr.) Primarily for secondary-school and junior-college teachers of English.

W590 Teaching Composition: Theories and Application (4 cr.) Current theories of composition and their pedagogical implications.

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600 Level

600-level courses in literature may be taught either as topical colloquia or historical surveys, at the discretion of the instructor. All courses at this level will be understood as prefatory to the kind of work done in 700-level seminars, without prerequisites.

G625 Introduction to Text Linguistics/Discourse Analysis (4 cr.) This course introduces students to current approaches to text and discourse coherence, including recent theories of cognitive and interactional text modeling.

G652 English Language Sociolinguistics (4 cr.) A survey course in American and British sociolinguistics, this course investigates the theoretical bases, the major works, and the methodological approaches of current sociolinguistics.

L655 American Literature and Culture 1900-1945 (4 cr.) Study of American literature and culture from the turn of the century to 1945.

L681 Genre Studies (variable title: The Epic) (4 cr.)
L695 Individual Readings in English (1-4 cr.)

L699 M.A. Thesis (cr. arr.)

W600 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (4 cr.) Covers selected issues in current composition and rhetorical theory. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

W609 Directed Writing Projects (1-4 cr.)

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700 Level

The following courses are seminars requiring directed individual study and investigation. For each the prerequisite is advanced graduate standing, or a 600-level course in the subject, or the consent of the instructor; it is recommended that a student take L501 before enrolling in a seminar. With consent of the instructor, a student may take a 700-level course twice for credit.

L701 Descriptive Bibliography and Textual Problems (4 cr.)

Cross-Listed Course

Linguistics
L535 TESOL Practicum (3 cr.)

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