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University Graduate School 2004-2005 Specific Graduate Program Information

 

University Graduate
School 2004-2005
Academic Bulletin

University Graduate School
Kirkwood Hall 111  
Indiana University 
Bloomington, IN 47405  
(812) 855-8853  
Toll Free (888) 335-7547  
Contact University Graduate School

Graduate Office
Union Building 518
Indiana University–Purdue University
Indianapolis
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 278-2490
Contact Graduate Office
 

English

College of Arts and Sciences
Bloomington

Chairperson
Professor Stephen Watt

Associate Chairperson
Kathy O. Smith

Departmental E-mail
engdept@indiana.edu

Departmental URL
www.indiana.edu/~engweb

Graduate Faculty
Degrees Offered
Special Departmental Requirements
Master's Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy Degrees
Ph.D. Minors
Area Certificate in English and Germanic Philology
Courses Offered

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Graduate Faculty

(An asterisk [*] denotes associate membership in University Graduate School faculty.)

Distinguished Professors
Philip Appleman (Emeritus), Susan Gubar, James Justus (Emeritus), Terence Martin (Emeritus), Scott Sanders

Chancellor's Professors
Judith Anderson, Robert Fulk, James Naremore

Rudy Professor/COAS Distinguished Professor
Patrick Brantlinger

Ruth Lilly Professor of Poetry
Kevin Young

Tarkington Chair of American Literature
George Hutchinson

Culbertson Chair of Writing
John Schilb

Ruth N. Halls Professor
Paul John Eakin (Emeritus)

Professors
Anthony Ardizzone, George Barnett (Emeritus), Frederick Beaty (Emeritus), Ernest Bernhardt-Kabisch (Emeritus), Patrick Brantlinger, Lawrence Clopper, Don Cook (Emeritus), Alfred David (Emeritus), Georges Edelen (Emeritus), Charles Forker (Emeritus), Robert Fulk, Mary Gaither (Emerita), Donald Gray (Emeritus), Kenneth R. R. Gros Louis (Emeritus, Comparative Literature), Robert Gross (Emeritus), Raymond Hedin, George Hutchinson, Kenneth Johnston (Emeritus), Eugene Kintgen, M. Eugene Lawlis (Emeritus), Peter Lindenbaum (Emeritus), Karma D. Lochrie, Christoph Lohmann (Emeritus), Lewis Miller (Emeritus), Roger Mitchell (Emeritus), Richard Nash*, David Nordloh, Alvin Rosenfeld (Jewish Studies), Murray Sperber (Emeritus), Stuart Sperry (Emeritus), Maura Stanton, Stephen Watt, William Wiatt (Emeritus), Paul Zietlow (Emeritus), Malvin Zirker (Emeritus)

Associate Professors
Purnima Bose*, William Burgan (Emeritus), Linda Charnes, Eva Cherniavsky, Jonathan Elmer, Christine Farris, Mary Favret, Thomas Foster, Paul Gutjahr*, Jeffrey Huntsman, Patricia Ingham, DeWitt D. Kilgore*, Sheila Lindenbaum*, Joan Pong Linton, Joss Marsh, Manuel Martinez, Alyce Miller, Andrew Miller, Michael Rosenblum (Emeritus), John Schilb, Janet Sorensen*, Lee Sterrenburg*, Nicholas Williams, John Woodcock (Emeritus)

Assistant Professors
Dana Anderson, Cathy Bowman, Judith Brown, Yoonmee Chang, Edward Comentale*, Margo Crawford, Ivan Kreilkamp*, Ellen Mackay, Samrat Upadhyay

Adjunct Professors
Mary Ellen Brown, Matei Calinescu (Emeritus), Robert Kelly, Oscar Kenshur (Comparative Literature), John McCluskey Jr. (African American and African Diaspora Studies), James Naremore

Adjunct Associate Professors
Barbara Klinger, Herbert Marks, Melvin Plotinsky (Emeritus), Dror Wahrman

Director of Graduate Studies
Professor Richard Nash, Ballantine Hall 442D, (812) 855-1543

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Degrees Offered

Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy

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Special Departmental Requirements

(See also general University Graduate School requirements.)

Admission Requirements
Undergraduate major or its equivalent. Graduate Record Examination, both the General Test and the Subject Test in English Literature. A potentially superior student who has not majored in English may be admitted conditionally, but must remove deficiencies without graduate credit. Students who wish to be admitted for the M.A. or M.F.A. in creative writing must submit samples of their work.

Foreign Language Requirements
For the M.A.T. and M.F.A. degrees, none. For the M.A., reading proficiency in one of the following: French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Russian, Spanish. For the Ph.D., either (a) reading proficiency in two languages (one will be French, German, or Latin; the second will be a language from the M.A. list or, by approval of the director of graduate studies, another foreign language or courses in computer science), or (b) proficiency in depth in one language.

Language requirements should be met as soon after beginning graduate work as possible. A student is expected to be working on fulfilling the proficiency requirements every semester until they are completed.

Combined B.A. and M.A.
Candidates for a combined degree must fulfill all requirements for the M.A. (including the language requirement), as well as general and major requirements for the B.A. in English. Upon completion of the 116 credits, including fulfillment of requirements for the English major, students with a minimum GPA of 3.5 overall and 3.7 in English may apply for conditional admission to the graduate program their senior year, which may be counted toward the completion of the M.A. degree in a fifth year of study. (At the discretion of the director of graduate studies, an otherwise qualified student who is still completing an honors thesis may apply for conditional admission.) No courses used to satisfy the B.A. requirements may be applied toward the M.A. The Graduate Record Examination, both General Test and Subject Test in English Literature, is required and must be taken before admission is completed following the final semester of undergraduate study.

Grades
M.A. students must maintain a 3.0 (B) grade point average; M.F.A. and Ph.D. students, a 3.5 grade point average. Admission to the Ph.D. normally requires a 3.7 grade point average and the recommendations of graduate faculty.

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Master's Degrees

Master of Arts Degree with Concentration in Literature
Master of Arts Degree with Special Field Concentration
Master of Arts Degree with Concentration in Writing
Master of Arts Degree with Concentration in Language
Master of Arts for Teachers Degree
Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing
Dual Master of Arts in English and Master of
  Library Science Degree

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Master of Arts Degree with Concentration in Literature

Course Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours, including an L680 or a 700 level seminar. At least one course must be chosen from each of four of the following six fields:

  1. Medieval British Literature and Culture
  2. Early Modern British Literature and Culture
  3. British and/or American Literature and Culture 1640-1830
  4. British and/or American Literature and Culture 1800-1900 (including Celtic, Transatlantic, African American)
  5. Literatures in English, Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries (including African American, Hispanic/Latina(o), Asian American, Postcolonial)
  6. Literacy, Pedagogy, Composition Theory, Literary Theory, English Language. (International students whose native language is not English must take L500.)

Up to 8 credit hours in graduate courses outside the department may, with the prior approval of the director of graduate studies, be counted toward the degree.

Thesis
Optional; if elected, 4 hours of credit.

Final Examination
None.

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Master of Arts Degree with Special Field Concentration

Course Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours, including L680 or a 700-level seminar; at least three courses in a single area of concentration to be chosen in consultation with the director of graduate studies (for example, a genre such as the novel, a period such as the Middle Ages, a specialty such as postcolonial studies, American literature and culture, feminist theory, or composition, rhetoric and literacy). Up to 8 credit hours in graduate courses in a related field outside the department may, with the prior approval of the director of graduate studies, be counted toward the degree.

Thesis
Optional (L699: credit arranged; 4 credit hours maximum).

Final Examination
None.

Note: Students wishing to enter the doctoral program on completion of this M.A. must apply for admission. For admission to the Ph.D. program with concentration in literature, candidates must satisfy the distribution requirements for the M.A. in literature.

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Master of Arts Degree with Concentration in Writing

Course Requirements
W611-W612 or W613-W614; five departmental courses in literature, literary criticism, or English language. Poets may substitute Comparative Literature C570 Theory and Practice of Translation for one of the five required departmental courses; writers of fiction may substitute Theatre and Drama T453 or T454 Playwriting.

Thesis
Required; the candidate must submit, for 4 hours of credit, a body of creative writing of high literary merit and genuine promise.

Final Examination
None.

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Master of Arts Degree with Concentration in Language

Course Requirements
A minimum of 30 credit hours, including G500, G780, and at least 12 further credit hours in English language courses, of which at least one course must be selected from G601, G602, G651, and G655.

Thesis
Optional; if elected, 4 hours of credit.

Final Examination
A four-hour written examination. See director of graduate studies for details.

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Master of Arts for Teachers Degree

Prerequisite
Public-school certification in English. Applicants lacking no more than 6 credit hours for certification may be permitted to complete the certification requirements as part of the degree program.

Course Requirements
A total of 36 credit hours, of which 20 credit hours must be in graduate English courses, including G500, G601, G651, or G655 (at least 12 of these 20 credit hours must be taken on the Bloomington campus); 6 credit hours in graduate education courses, including L516 and one additional advanced curriculum course (recommended: S503 or S530); if a minor is to be professionalized, at least 12 credit hours in the subject area. No undergraduate courses will be counted toward the degree.

Thesis and Final Examination
None.

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Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Course Requirements
A total of 60 credit hours, including 16 credit hours of writing workshops (W611-W612 or W613-W614); four courses in literature, culture and language (12-16 hours), at least two of which are on the 600 level or above, from offerings from English, African American and African Diaspora Studies, Comparative Literature and/or Communication and Culture (courses from other departments to be approved on an individiual case basis by the director of creative writing in consultation with the director of graduate studies); and W554; and W664, or W680. Those teaching in W103 Introductory Creative Writing are required to take W554 in their first semester of teaching. Students can take up to 12 credit hours in W699 M.F.A. Thesis. The remaining credit hours are elective. At least 48 credit hours of the degree requirements must be completed in residence.

Thesis
Required; the student must submit, for 4-12 hours of credit, a book-length manuscript.

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Dual Master of Arts in English and Master of Library Science Degree

Admission Requirements
Undergraduate major or its equivalent. Graduate Record Examination, both General Test and Subject Test in English Literature. A superior student who has not majored in English may be admitted conditionally, but must remove deficiencies without graduate credit. Admission to each of the two master's programs is approved separately on the same basis as for other applicants not in the dual program.

Foreign Language Requirements
Reading proficiency in one of the following: French German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Russian, Spanish.

Prerequisites
None

Course Requirements
Study for these two degrees can be combined for a total of 54 credit hours rather than the 66 credit hours required for the two degrees taken separately. Students take 24 credit hours in English. All students must fulfill the core requirements as outlined in the English department's Master of Arts with Concentration in Literature or Special Field Master of Arts degree requirements. No thesis or examination is required for the M.A. degree in English. Students take 30 credit hours in library science, including L524; L505 or L520; L528; L509, L643 or L651; L527 or another management course; and L623. The remaining 12 credit hours are electives chosen in consultation with the library science graduate advisor.

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Doctor of Philosophy Degrees

Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Doctor of Philosophy Degree with Concentration in Literature
Doctor of Philosophy Degree with Concentration in Composition, Literacy
  and Culture

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Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Admission Requirements
Students are eligible for admission to the Ph.D. programs upon successful completion of the M.A. requirements; additional prerequisites include one course from L502, L506, L605, L607, L608, or, with permission of the director of graduate studies, L707. Students are also required to take at least two additional 700-level seminars.

Periodic Review
Each year the graduate faculty will examine the grades and instructors’ reports on all students and will discourage from further work those whose achievements and potential are below standard. Students who fail to maintain a 3.7 grade point average or who accumulate three or more grades of Incomplete will be placed on departmental probation.

Minors
Ph.D. students in English may take minors in the following departments and programs: American studies, African American and African Diaspora Studies, art history, comparative literature, cultural studies, English and German philology, film studies, folklore, French, gender studies, German, Greek, history, Italian, journalism, Latin, linguistics, medieval studies, performance studies, philosophy, religion, Renaissance studies, Slavics, Spanish, theatre and drama, Victorian studies, and West European studies. Requirements for the minor are set by the minor department.

The Department of English offers the following minors: American literature, British literature, children’s literature, pedagogy, creative writing, English and Germanic philology, English language, literary theory, and textual studies. Minors within the department must be approved by the director of graduate studies.

Qualifying Examination
A two-part examination, written and oral. All students choose topics in consultation with their advisory committees. The five-hour written part may be taken at the convenience of the student and his/her advisory committee. The two-hour oral part will be administered as soon as possible after the written part. Details are available from the director of graduate studies. The examination may not be taken until the student has fulfilled the language proficiency requirement. The examination may be repeated once.

Research Proposal
After advancement to candidacy, the student will select a research committee consisting of no fewer than three members of the English department faculty and a representative of the minor. When the director of the research committee has approved the dissertation proposal, the student will formally present it to a meeting of the research committee for comment and approval.

Final Examination
Oral, primarily a defense of the dissertation.

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Doctor of Philosophy Degree with Concentration in Literature

Course Requirements
A total of 90 credit hours; students will be required to take 16 credit hours in English beyond the 30 credit hours required for the M.A., and to take at least one course in a fifth distribution field (for a total of course work in five out of the six fields). At least four 700-level seminars in English are required for the Ph.D. Students must also satisfy course requirements for a graduate minor.

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Doctor of Philosophy Degree with Concentration in Composition, Literacy, and Culture

Course Requirements
A total of 90 credit hours, including at least 16 credit hours (four courses) beyond the 30 credit hours required for the M.A. degree, to include at least three 700-level departmental seminars. The total must include L502, W605, L705, a course in language/discourse analysis, and a course that brings a strong historical dimension to the study of writing. Information about relevant courses, including those offered by other departments, is available from the chair of the Composition Committee and the student’s advisory committee.

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Ph.D. Minors

Ph.D. Minor in English and Germanic Philology
Ph.D. Minor in Feminist Critical Studies
Ph.D. Minor in Literacy Studies
Ph.D. Minor in Literary Theory
Ph.D. Minor in Literature and Science

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Ph.D. Minor in English and Germanic Philology

Four courses, to include G601 Old English and at least one of the other older Germanic languages, i.e., German G632 Gothic, G635 Old Icelandic, G638 Old High German, G639 Old Saxon, and G640 Middle High German. The remaining courses may be chosen from: English G602 Middle English, G655 History of the English Language, L710 Beowulf, L711 Old English Literature; German G532 History of the German Language, and G625 Colloquium in Germanic Linguistics (when the topic is appropriate), G640 Reading Middle High German, G636 Old Icelandic Literature, G835 Seminar in Germanic Linguistics (when the topic is appropriate), and any of the remaining older Germanic languages listed above.

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Ph.D. Minor in Feminist Critical Studies

The Minor in Feminist Critical Studies emphasizes feminist criticism and theory. It requires four courses (at least 15 hours of credit), including English L663 Introduction to Feminist Critical Studies and at least one course outside the Department of English; each course must be passed with a grade of B+ (3.3) or higher. Relevant courses include English L605, L700, L707, and L773, Fine Arts A474 and A674, Cultural Studies C601 and C602, Communication and Culture C551 and C604, and Telecommunications T651. Students should consult with the minor advisor in the English department about specific courses of study.

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Ph.D. Minor in Literacy Studies

Jointly administered by the Department of English and the School of Education, the minor requires a minimum of four courses, including English L502, Education L630, and two courses selected from an approved list, at least one of which must be outside the English department. For School of Education students, three of the four courses must be outside the student’s major area. Students should confer with one of the advisors of the Literacy Studies minor; their names can be obtained from the director of graduate studies.

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Ph.D. Minor in Literary Theory

Jointly administered by the Departments of English and Comparative Literature, the minor requires a minimum of three courses, including at least one selected from Comparative Literature C503, C504, C601, or C602; and one from English G660, L605, L607, L608, or L707. Other courses approved for the minor are: French and Italian F584 and G560; Germanic Studies G800; Slavic Languages and Literatures R521; Spanish and Portuguese S473 and S512; and Theatre and Drama T555 and T556. Courses other than those listed above may also be acceptable toward completion of the requirement; written consent to count such courses must be obtained in advance from the graduate advisor in the Department of English or Comparative Literature.

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Ph.D. Minor in Literature and Science

The literature and science minor consists of four courses. Two of the four will be Department of English courses from the area of literature and science. One of those English courses will be L769 Literature and Science, the “core” course for the minor. The non-English department courses will either come from a relevant science, or from the Department of History and Philosophy of Science or from some other relevant (nonliterary) discipline. The minor will be administered by the director of graduate studies in English, in consultation with the literature and science faculty as necessary.

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Area Certificate in English and Germanic Philology

Also offered is a certificate in English and Germanic philology, requiring four courses in addition to the four required for the minor. These may include any of the courses listed above, as well as courses in other departments (e.g. linguistics, folklore, classical studies, and anthropology) that are relevant to the history and prehistory of the Germanic languages, and to early Germanic literature and culture. For information about relevant courses, see the graduate advisor in the Department of English.

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Courses Offered

500 Level
600 Level
700 Level

500 Level

G500 Introduction to the English Language (4 cr.) An introduction to the English language: its nature, structure, and development.

L500 Introduction to Graduate Study for International Students (4 cr.) The methods and assumptions of graduate study in English and American literature, with special emphasis on classroom participation, the preparation and delivery of reports, and the writing of critical essays based on individual research. Admission must be approved by the departmental advisor for international students.

L501 Professional Scholarship in Literature (4 cr.) Materials, tools, and methods of research.

L502 Contexts for the Study of Writing (2-4 cr.) Historical and cognitive effects of writing, reading, and language use, and the implication of these effects for the teaching and study of literature and writing.

L503 Teaching of Literature in College (2-4 cr.) Classroom teaching of literature in the light of current approaches.

L505 Teaching Children's Literature at the Post-Secondary Level (2 cr.) Classroom teaching of children's literature in the light of current approaches.

L506 Issues and Motives of Literary Studies (4 cr.) The conditions and assumptions of studying English, with emphasis on the application of theory to a culturally and historically diverse range of writings.

L507 English Outside the Academy (4 cr.) Primarily for Special Field M.A. candidates. Explores discourses and domains of thought and language use that link the academy with areas of expertise outside it, including law, publishing, the media, advertising, health, and counseling.

L553 Studies in Literature (1-3 cr.) Primarily for secondary-school and junior-college teachers of English. Emphasis on thematic, analytic, and generic study. With consent of instructor, may be repeated once for credit.

L599 Internship in English (1-4 cr.) Primarily for Special Field M.A. candidates. Students will define a project and secure both a faculty and an external sponsor. Likely external sponsors will include the IU Foundation, the IU Press, advertising agencies, charities, legal or political offices, health agencies, and writing centers. Number of credit hours depends on length of commitment.

W500 Teaching Composition: Issues and Approaches (4 cr.) Consideration of fundamental issues in the teaching of writing and the major approaches to composition instruction. Specific topics include teaching invention and revision, diagnosing errors, teaching style and organization, making assignments, and evaluating student writing.

W501 Teaching of Composition in College (1-2 cr.) Practical teaching of composition; current theories and policies.

W511 Writing Fiction (4 cr.) Either W511 or W513 may count once for the M.A. or M.F.A., but not toward specified course requirements for the Ph.D.

W513 Writing Poetry (4 cr.) Either W511 or W513 may count once for the M.A. or M.F.A., but not toward specified course requirements for the Ph.D.

W553 Theory and Practice of Exposition (1-3 cr.) Primarily for secondary-school and junior-college teachers of English.

W554 Teaching Creative Writing (2 cr.) Theory and practice of teaching the writing of poetry and fiction at the college level, with attention to matters of curricular design and classroom technique. Required of those teaching W103 for the first time. Open also to graduate students not in the creative writing program.

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600 Level

600-level courses in literature may be taught either as topical colloquia or historical surveys, at the discretion of the instructor. All courses at this level will be understood as prefatory to the kind of work done in 700-level seminars, without prerequisites.

G601 Introduction to Old English (4 cr.) G500 recommended but not required. Introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Old English; intensive reading of major prose and verse texts.

G602 Introduction to Middle English (4 cr.) P: G601 or equivalent.

G603 Celtic Languages and Literature (4 cr.) P: G500 or its equivalent. Introduction to such languages as Old Irish and Welsh, or literatures in these languages. Topic varies.

G651 American English (4 cr.) Growth and development of the English language in America from the first settlements to the present; dialectal diversity of American English.

G655 History of the English Language (4 cr.) A survey of the evolution of the English language from its earliest stages to the present, with reference to its external history and to its phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary.

G660 Stylistics (4 cr.) Survey of traditional and linguistic approaches to the study of prose and poetic style. Attention will center on the description of the verbal characteristics of texts, what those characteristics reflect about the author, and how they affect the reader.

L605 Critical and Interpretive Theory (4 cr.) Introduction to one or more major modes of contemporary criticism or critical theory.

L607 History of Literary Criticism to the Enlightenment (4 cr.) A survey of the history of literary criticism and theory from Plato and Aristotle to the Enlightenment, including works by Greco-Roman, medieval, and Renaissance figures.

L608 History of Literary Criticism from 1750 to 1960 (4 cr.) A survey of the history of literary criticism and theory from the late Enlightenment or early Romantic periods to 1960, including a variety of modern literary critics and theorists.

L612 Chaucer (4 cr.) Critical analysis of The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected shorter poems.

L613 Middle English Literature (4 cr.) P: L612 or G602 or equivalent.

L616 English Drama to the 1590s, Exclusive of Shakespeare (4 cr.)

L621 English Literature 1500-1660 (4 cr.) Extensive reading in nondramatic literature.

L622 Spenser and Milton (4 cr.) Critical analysis of the major texts.

L623 English Drama from the 1590s to 1800, Exclusive of Shakespeare (4 cr.) P: familiarity with half a dozen plays of Shakespeare.

L625 Shakespeare (4 cr.) Critical analysis of selected texts.

L631 English Literature 1660-1790 (4 cr.) Extensive reading in poetry and nonfictional prose.

L639 English Fiction to 1800 (4 cr.)

L641 English Literature 1790-1900 (4 cr.) Extensive reading in poetry and nonfictional prose.

L645 English Fiction 1800-1900 (4 cr.)

L649 British Literature since 1900 (4 cr.) Extensive reading in all genres.

L651 American Literature 1609-1800 (4 cr.) Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from John Smith through Charles Brockden Brown.

L653 American Literature 1800-1900 (4 cr.) Intensive historical and critical study of all genres from Washington Irving through Frank Norris.

L655 American Literature and Culture 1900-1945 (4 cr.) Study of American literature and culture from the turn of the century to 1945.

L656 American Literature and Culture 1945 to the Present (4 cr.) Studies in American literature and culture from 1945 to the present.

L663 Introduction to Feminist Critical Studies (4 cr.) An introduction to and examination of major works, methods, issues, and developments in feminist theory and criticism.

L666 Survey of Children's Literature (4 cr.) Survey of literature written for children and adolescents from the medieval period to the present.

L671 Modern British and Irish Drama (4 cr.)

L672 Modern American Drama (4 cr.)

L673 Studies in Women and Literature (4 cr.) Women's literary accomplishments and representations of women in English from the sixteenth century to the present.

L674 Studies in International English Literature (4 cr.) Literatures from Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific islands, the Indian subcontinent, or Canada.

L680 Special Topics in Literary Study and Theory (4 cr.) Readings in sociological, political, psychological, and other approaches to literature.

L695 Individual Readings in English (1-4 cr.)

L699 M.A. Thesis (cr. arr.)

W601 Development of Rhetoric and Composition (4 cr.) Traces the development of rhetorical theory from Plato through the Renaissance and up to the present; puts special emphasis on exploring how present-day composition programs and practices reflect the past.

W602 Contemporary Theories in Rhetoric and Composition (4 cr.) An introduction to current research in rhetoric and composition. Draws on insights from linguistic theory, cognitive theory, and rhetorical theory to develop greater understanding of the writing process and build pedagogical applications.

W609 Directed Writing Projects (1-4 cr.)

W610 Indiana Writing Workshop (2 cr.) P: acceptance to the Indiana Writers' Conference held in June of each year. Intensive training in various forms of writing at the conference; submission of significant body of writing before the end of the last summer session.

W611-W612 Writing Fiction I-II (4-4 cr.) May be repeated once for credit.

W613-W614 Writing Poetry I-II (4-4 cr.) May be repeated once for credit.

W615 Writing Creative Nonfiction (4 cr.) Writing workshop in such modes as personal essay, autobiography, and documentary. Open also to graduate students not in the creative writing program.

W664 Topics in Current Literature (4 cr.) The study of recent poetry and prose, emphasizing special formal, technical, and intellectual concerns of author and work. Open also to graduate students not in the creative writing program.

W680 Theory and Craft of Writing (4 cr.) Elements of poetic prosody or the major fictive techniques or both: nature of stress, concepts of meter, nature of rhythm, prosodic use of syntax, theories of fictive realism, nature of fictive romance, point of view, etc. Students will do some writing. Open also to graduate students not in the creative writing program.

W697 Independent Study in Writing (1-4 cr.) P: two semesters of W611, W612, W613 or W614.

W699 M.F.A. Thesis (cr. arr.)

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700 Level

The following courses are seminars requiring directed individual study and investigation. For each the prerequisite is advanced graduate standing, or a 600-level course in the subject, or the consent of the instructor; it is recommended that a student take L501 before enrolling in a seminar. With consent of the instructor, a student may take a 700-level course twice for credit.

G780 Special Studies in English Language (4 cr.) P: G500 or equivalent.

L700 Topics in Feminist Critical Studies (4 cr.) Readings in feminist theories of representation, gender, sexuality, the institution, or other areas of feminist critical endeavor.

L701 Descriptive Bibliography and Textual Problems (4 cr.)
L705 Problems in Composition, Literacy, and Culture (4 cr.)
L707 Studies in Literary Theory and Criticism (4 cr.)

L710 Beowulf (4 cr.) P: G601. Critical reading of the text of the poem, with consideration of its relationship to other writings in Old English and the heroic tradition in literature.

L711 Old English Literature (4 cr.) P: G601 or equivalent.

L712 Chaucer (4 cr.) P: L612 or L613 or equivalent.

L713 Middle English Literature (4 cr.) P: L612 or L613 or equivalent.

L715 English and Scottish Popular Ballads (4 cr.) Student investigation of principal problems met in ballad scholarship. Special attention to textual relationships, dissemination, and unique qualities of genre.

L721 Spenser (4 cr.)
L723 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (4 cr.)
L725 Shakespeare (4 cr.)
L730 Renaissance Poetry and Prose (4 cr.)
L731 Milton (4 cr.)
L733 Restoration and Augustan Literature (4 cr.)
L736 Age of Johnson (4 cr.)
L739 English Fiction to 1800 (4 cr.)
L741 Romantic Literature (4 cr.)
L743 Victorian Literature (4 cr.)
L745 English Fiction 1800-1900 (4 cr.)
L749 Twentieth-Century British Literature (4 cr.)

L751 Major American Writers 1700-1855 (4 cr.) Two or three writers. Techniques and thematic comparisons.

L753 Major American Writers 1855 to the Present (4 cr.) Two or three writers. Techniques and thematic comparisons.

L761 American Poetry (4 cr.)

L763 American Fiction (4 cr.)

L766 Children's Literature (4 cr.) Issues in the critical and historical study of literature for children or young adults.

L769 Literature and Science (4 cr.) Major developments in modern science, the philosophical issues they raise, and their influence on modern thought and literature.

L773 Topics in Feminist Literary History (4 cr.) Feminist critical research on literary texts in cultural contexts, or focusing on a particular historical period, theme, genre, or author.

L774 Topics in International English Literature (4 cr.) Topics in English literature from Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific Islands, the Indian subcontinent, or Canada.

L775 Studies in Modern Drama (4 cr.)

L776 Comparative Drama (4 cr.) Selected topics in comedy or tragedy.

L779 Literature and Society (4 cr.) Analysis of representative works of different periods to illustrate the study of literature in relation to its age, or as a social product. Consideration of economic, political, class, and other cultural influences.

L780 Special Studies in English and American Literature (4 cr.)

L790 Independent Study (cr. arr.) Consent of the instructor required. Open to Ph.D. candidates in English only.

L799 Ph.D. Thesis (cr. arr.)

W780 Special Studies in Composition (4 cr.)

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