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School of Education 2008-2010 Graduate Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of
Education
2008-2011
Undergraduate
Academic Bulletin

School of Education
W. W. Wright Education Building 
201 North Rose Avenue  
Bloomington, IN 47405-1006 
(812) 856-8500    Fax (812) 856-8440
Contact School of Education
 

Undergraduate Courses in the School of Education

For descriptions of courses required for teacher certification that are offered by other schools on campus, see the bulletins of those schools.

The abbreviation "P" refers to the course prerequisite or prerequisites. The number of hours of credit given a course is indicated in parentheses following the course title. The abbreviation "B", "I" or "B-I" after the course title indicates whether the course is offered at Bloomington, Indianapolis, or at both campuses.

Courses in this section are listed alphabetically by prefix letter and in ascending numerical order within each of the sections. Unless otherwise specified, the prefix to all courses is EDUC-. Courses numbered 100—299 are lower division undergraduate courses; 300—499 are upper division undergraduate courses; 500 + are graduate courses.

Elementary Education (E)
Foundations of Education (F)
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (H)
Special Education (K)
Language Education (L)
Methods (M)
Mathematics Education (N)
Educational Psychology (G & P & Y)
Science Education (Q)
Secondary Education (A & S)
Instructional Systems Technology (R)
Multicultural/Urban Education (T)
Higher Education and Student Affairs (U)
Computer Education (W)
Reading (X)

Elementary Education (E)

E 201 Multicultural Education & Global Awareness (3 cr.) B-I Examines educators’ and students’ responsibilities in a complex and interdependent world. Students will be guided to develop the skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to live effectively in a world of limited resources, ethnic diversity, cultural pluralism, and increasing interdependence, and confidence with which to face the future.

E 210 Learning in Social Context (9 cr.) B An interdisciplinary exploration of the processes of learning, language, and social development from psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. Issues of diverse learner characteristics in the elementary classroom will be addressed. Course includes a field experience in an elementary school setting.

E 215 Curriculum and Pedagogy (3 cr.) B Addresses the nature of the public school curriculum and pedagogy, their historical antecedents, and a variety of associated issues. It provides the intellectual undergirding to curriculum and teaching that is necessary for more specific activities associated with curriculum development and teaching practices.

E 300 Elementary Education for a Pluralistic Society (3 cr.) B An overview of the principles of multicultural education. An introduction to major ethnic and minority groups in the United States. An historical view of the status of culturally different learners in elementary schools. A focus upon teaching strategies and curricular innovations for culturally diverse classrooms.

E 305 Infusion of Technology (3 cr.) B One of the goals for the Democracy, Diversity, and Social Justice Program is to infuse the study, use, and teaching about technology throughout the entire program. Instead of being a tool that preservice teachers learn about, technology will be studied as a subject and a means to expand research opportunities, stimulate and enhance models of inquiry, and broaden teaching abilities.

E 310 Seminar on Legal Issues in Education (1-3 cr.) B Students in this course will (1) examine issues related to legal and ethical rights and responsibilities of teachers and students; (2) discuss legal cases that have had an impact on our educational system; (3) discuss ethical perspectives on educational dilemmas.

E 320 Envisioning, Exploring, and Creating Our Social Worlds Through Multiple Literacies in the Elementary School (9 cr.) B This interdisciplinary course explores the social studies as ways of knowing about our world; the language arts and language learning theory; aesthetics and the arts; and the multiple roles of the teacher as facilitator of learning, social researcher, and curriculum creator. A field experience is included.

E 321 Science for Early Childhood (1 cr.) B Explores early childhood conceptions of natural phenomena as well as inferences children draw from them. Children’s learning from ages two through eight is of primary interest. Required of students seeking the standard license for kindergarten through primary teaching (K-3), including early childhood (infant-four years). Open to non-early childhood majors by permission of the instructor. (Sem. II only)

E 322 Diversity and Social Justice I (3 cr.) B Students will develop curricula for social studies, language arts, aesthetics, and the arts that responds to multicultural and disability concerns. Curriculum planning and teaching strategies will attend to issues of student diversity in home and community contexts and school settings.

E 324 Teaching Mathematics and Science for All Students (9 cr.) Prepares prospective elementary school teachers to teach mathematics and science in an integrated, discovery-based environment. A major goal of this course is to promote student familiarity with the conceptual understanding and skills necessary for teaching in a manner that promotes the inclusion of all pupils. Constructivism, the History and Philosophy of Science, and Technology and Society comprise three strands that further the aim of democratic teaching as applied to mathematics and science.

E 325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) B Emphasizes the development of objectives, teaching strategies, and evaluation procedures that facilitate the social learning of young children. Special attention given to concept learning, inquiry, decision making, and value analysis.

E 326 Diversity and Social Justice II (3 cr.) Students will develop curriculum for mathematics and science that responds to multicultural and disability concerns. Curriculum planning and teaching strategies will attend to issues of student diversity in home and community contexts and school settings.

E 328 Science in the Elementary Schools (1-3 cr.) B-I The focus of this course will be on developing teacher competencies in writing performance objectives, question asking, evaluating, and sequencing. These competencies will reveal themselves in the preparation and development of science activities and the teaching strategies involved in presenting those activities to elementary school children. P: Q 200; Select one from Geology G 103, G 104, or Q 201;
Q 202 must be taken either as a prerequisite or corequisite with E 328.

E 330 Infant Learning Environments (3 cr.) B-I P: EDUC-P 249-M 101 or taken concurrently. Appropriate instructional strategies to enhance infant-toddler development, care giving skills, and knowledge of appropriate learning environments. Students will apply strategies and knowledge in providing care and educational experiences. Open to students from allied health, psychology, pediatric nursing, and social work. (Sem. I only)

E 333 Inquiry in Mathematics and Science (3 cr.) B Focuses on planning and managing appropriate science and math experiences with children of three to eight years of age. Opportunity for exploring, developing, experimenting, and evaluating instructional materials. Planning appropriate inquiry-oriented experiences will be stressed.

E 335 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) B-I This course has a dual focus. The first involves an overview of the field including an historic perspective, program models, goals of early childhood education, and professional organizations. The second emphasizes the study of observation skills, the characteristics of young children, teacher-child interaction, and classroom management skills. (Sem. I and II)

E 336 Play as Development (3 cr.) B-I Includes theories on development of play and how it can be guided. Shows how children use play to develop individually; to understand the physical, social, and cognitive environment; and to develop physical and motor skills and creative ability. Includes a section on selection and construction of play materials.

E 337 Classroom Learning Environments (3 cr.) B-I P: EDUC-E 335. Focuses on the curriculum aspects of early childhood programs designed to meet ethnic and cultural differences; and on planning, utilizing, and evaluating learning environments. Selection of materials and activities, and the acquisition of skills for using them to stimulate children’s development, are major focuses. (Sem. II only)

E 338 The Early Childhood Educator (3 cr.) B-I P: EDUC-E 335 and E 337. Includes the role of the teacher as a professional educator, including professional responsibilities, legal rights and responsibilities of teachers and students, school and community relations, and involvement in professional organizations. A major emphasis is on parent involvement and parent education. (Sem. I only)

E 339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School
(2-3 cr.) B-I
Describes the methods, materials, and techniques employed in the elementary language arts program.

E 340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (2-3 cr.) B-I Describes the methods, materials, and techniques employed in elementary school developmental reading programs.

E 341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (2-3 cr.) B-I P: EDUC-E 339 and E 340 for Bloomington. P: E 345 and E 340 for Indianapolis. Describes the methods, materials, and techniques employed in diagnosis and corrective instruction in elementary school reading programs.

E 342 Survey of Reading and Language Arts Methods (K-12) (3 cr.) B Surveys contemporary issues in teaching reading and English language arts in grades K through 12. Includes methods, materials, and procedures for language arts, developmental reading, and reading-improvement strategies.

E 343 Mathematics in the Elementary Schools (1-3 cr.) B-I Emphasizes the developmental nature of the arithmetic process and its place as an effective tool in the experiences of the elementary school child.

E 345 Language Arts and Mathematics for Young Children (4-6 cr.) I Methods of developing language literacy and mathematical thinking through play, arts, and directed experiences. Design of curriculum and appropriate teaching strategies for children ages 3-6.

E 348 Foundations of Early Care and Education I: Focus on Birth to Age 3 (1-10 cr.) B Students will examine the foundations of the fields of early childhood education and early intervention. They will explore the teacher/caregiver role; review contemporary theories of best practices with young children; and begin developing the knowledge and skills needed to facilitate healthy growth, development, and learning in all young children.

E 349 Teaching and Learning for All Young Children I: Focus on Birth to Age 3 (7 cr.) B Students will connect theory with typically and atypically pedagogical skills in real-life settings with typically and atypically developing young children, birth to age three. They will learn how to become keen observers of children and will acquire proficiency in designing, implementing, and assessing environments that are developmentally appropriate and literacy-rich.

E 350 Personal and Professional Growth Groups (1 cr.) B Prepares students for the emotional, social, and intellectual challenges of student teaching; and to help students make a successful transition from undergraduate to professional culture.

E 351 Foundations of Early Care and Education II (1-10 cr.) B Students will examine how historical, social, cultural, and political factors influence the growth, development, and learning of the preschool/kindergarten child. They will examine how these factors influence the preschool/kindergarten child’s educational experiences and how programs should be designed to address the needs of all children.

E 352 Teaching and Learning in Preschool/Kindergarten II (10 cr.) B Engages students in the development, implementation, and assessment of curricula for all children ages 3-5 years. Content areas of mathematics, social studies, science, literacy and art will be emphasized.

E 353 Foundations of Early Care and Education III (5 cr.) B Students will examine how historical, social, cultural, and political factors influence the growth, development, and learning of the K-3 child. They will examine how these factors influence the K-3 child’s educational experiences and how programs should be designed to address the needs of all children.

E 354 Teaching and Learning for All Young Children III: Focus on K/Primary (12 cr.) B Engages students in the development, implementation, and assessment of curricula for all children in K-Grade 3 classrooms. Content areas of mathematics, social studies, science, literacy, and art will be emphasized.

E 425 Senior Seminar in Teaching and Schooling (3 cr.) Assists students in reflecting on their university education and on their experiences in the public schools. Students will explore in depth an educational issue that has significant philosophical, social, and ethical dimensions, and that has implications for the practice of teaching. The course will help synthesize previous activities and investigations, as students develop further their own values and orientations on the meaning of teaching for a democratic society.

E 449 Trade Books and the Teacher (3 cr.) I Emphasis on the use of trade books for teaching language arts and reading K-8. Historical and contemporary folk literature will be used to examine objectives and techniques of instruction.

E 450 Senior Seminar and Student Teaching I (1-15 cr.) B Students will student teach in a preschool or early primary grade placement for 12 weeks. An accompanying seminar will be team-taught by a university instructor and a practicing teacher to help student make connections among professional issues, theories of curriculum, and instruction.

E 451 Senior Seminar and Student Teaching II (1-15 cr.) B Students will student teach in a preschool or early primary grade placement for 12 weeks. An accompanying seminar will be team-taught by a university instructor and a practicing teacher to help students make connections among professional issues, theories of curriculum and instruction, and classroom practice. Students who student teach in the early primary placement (K-third grade) in
E 450 will student teach in a preschool during E 451, and those who teach in a preschool classroom for E 450 will engage in their early primary placement for
E 451. At the completion of E 451, students will present a professional portfolio, demonstrating that they meet professional standards of practice.

E 490 Research in Elementary Education (1-3 cr.) B-I Individual research.

E 495 Workshop in Elementary Education (cr. arr.) B-I For elementary school teachers. Gives 1 credit hour for each week of full-time work.

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Foundations of Education (F)

F110 Windows on Education (2-3 cr.) B-I First-year seminar to support incoming freshmen interested in teaching as a career. The course will facilitate students’ efforts to navigate university life while making an informed decision regarding career choices. The F110 will serve as the First Year Seminar; they may be linked to EDUC F200: Examining Self as a Teacher.

F 200 Examining Self as a Teacher (3 cr.) B-I Designed to help a student make a career decision, better conceptualize the kind of teacher the student wishes to become, and reconcile any preliminary concerns that may be hampering a personal examination of self as teacher. Students will design a major portion of their work.

F 203 Topical Exploration in Education (1-3 cr.) B A one-semester course on a particular topic, established at the request of a faculty member and by the approval of the Academic Affairs Committee. Applies only as elective credit.

F 205 Study of Education and the Practice of Teaching (1-3 cr.) B A review of the literature on various approaches to education as a discipline and a field of inquiry, and an exploration of several approaches to teacher education. Integrates scholarship and inquiry with the development of educational possibilities. Students will begin the process of constructing a set of personal and social commitments that will guide their future teaching activities.

F 400 Honors Seminar (1-3 cr.) B Content varies, but always involves the investigation in depth of significant topics in education. An interdisciplinary approach is taken.

F 401 Topical Exploration in Education (0-3 cr.) Explores various topics of relevance to education, both in the United States and abroad.

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Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (H)

H 340 Education and American Culture (3 cr.) B-I The present educational system, its social impact, and future implications viewed in historical, philosophical, and sociological perspective.

H 341 American Culture and Education (1-4 cr.) B-I An opportunity to participate in a cooperative learning venture as students investigate the sociological, psychological, historical, and philosophical foundations of American education, relating findings, observations, and experiences at Professional Development School sites with current practices and the future of education.

H 380 Latino Education across the Americas (3 cr.) B An overview of important patterns and issues in Latino education. Includes study of major Latin American educational trends and traditions. Focus on the cultural contexts of Latino education, challenges faced by Latinos in contemporary U.S. schools, and strategies for improving Latino educational achievement.

H 427 Education through Travel (2-6 cr.) B Provides an opportunity to visit historical and cultural areas in foreign countries.

H 440 Capstone Seminar in American Elementary Education (3 cr.) I Serves as a capstone seminar in foundations for senior elementary education students. It covers essential content knowledge, theory, and themes in educational history, sociology, and philosophy. It also addresses key issues for understanding the professional world of teachers. It is linked to extensive field experience including student teaching.

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Special Education (K)

K 201 Schools, Society, and Exceptionality (1-3 cr.) B Provides an overview of the many complex issues related to special education policy and practice in the United States. Content will include an introduction to the definitions and characteristics of various exceptionalities, an exploration of the options available for instructing exceptional children in public school settings, and discussions of the many important topics and issues related to planning and implementing special education in American public schools.

K 205 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) B-I Provides an overview of the characteristics and the identification of exceptional children. The course presents the issues in serving exceptional children as they participate in the educational, recreational, and social aspects of their lives.

K 206 Teaching Methods for Students with Special Needs (1-3 cr.) B-I Focuses on curriculum and instructional methods for teaching students with diverse abilities and disabilities. Specifically, students will learn about the historical and legal precedents in special education; student-centered assessment and planning strategies; learning styles; curricular adaptations; individualized instruction; teaming strategies; building classroom communities; and planning for transitions, career exploration, and adult outcomes.

K 305 Teaching the Exceptional Learner in the Elementary School (3 cr.) B Knowledge, attitudes, and skills basic to the education of exceptional learners (students who are handicapped as well as gifted and talented) in the regular elementary classroom. Topics include historical and international perspectives, the law and public policy, profiling the exceptional learner, a responsive curriculum, teaching and management strategies, teachers as persons and professionals. (Sem. I and II)

K 306 Teaching Students with Special Needs in Secondary Classrooms (3 cr.) B Includes an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for effective instruction of students with disabilities in inclusive secondary programs.

K 307 Methods for Teaching Students with Special Needs (3 cr.) I Prepares future teachers to work with students with diverse abilities in inclusive settings. Participants learn to use learning modalities, varied rates, and complexity of instruction, and to make use of individual interests and preferences. Additionally, differentiating and/or individualizing instruction for all learners and developing classroom management skills are emphasized.

K 343 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed I (3 cr.) B
P: K 205 or consent of instructor. A basic survey of the field of emotional disturbance and social maladjustment. Definitions, classifications, characteristics, and diagnostic and treatment procedures are discussed from a psycho-educational point of view.

K 344 Education of the Socially and Emotionally Disturbed II (3 cr.) B P: K 343 or consent of instructor. A survey of educational curricula, procedures, and materials for socially and emotionally disturbed children. Development of teaching skills is emphasized.

K 350 Introduction to Mental Retardation (3 cr.) B P: K 205 or consent of instructor. A basic survey of the field of mental retardation. Definitions, classifications, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed from medical, psychological, sociological, and educational points of view.

K 351 Vocational Assessment and Instruction for Special Needs Secondary Students (3 cr.) B Emphasizes an awareness of issues and available options related to programming for the special needs adolescent adult. The concept of career education—including preparation in daily-living, personal, social, and occupational skills—is used as the basic framework for the course.

K 352 Education of Students with Learning Disorders (1-3 cr.) B Educational programs for optimum growth and development of educable mentally retarded and learning disabled children. Study and observation of curriculum content, organization of special schools and classes, and teaching methods and materials.

K 361 Assistive Technology for Elementary School Students with Disabilities (Fall, 2 cr.) B Prepares future teachers with the knowledge required to integrate assistive technology into curricula for students with mild to moderate disabilities.

K 362 Team Approaches to the Education of Students with Disabilities (Fall, 3 cr.) B Students will learn techniques related to effective collaboration and interactive teaming in educational settings. Focus will be the development of skills necessary to serve as consultant or co-teacher in school environments.

K 370 Introduction to Learning Disorders (3 cr.) B Survey of historical development and current status of definitions, classifications, assessment, and treatment procedures for learning-disabled students.

K 371 Assessment and Individualized Instruction in Reading and Math (3 cr.) B Emphasizes assessment and remediation procedures that address reading and math problems of mildly handicapped students.

K 405 Building Inclusive Middle and Secondary Schools: Approaches and Issues (1 cr.) B Students will compare and contrast apprenticeship/school experiences, address specialized areas, and explore challenges and issues confronting special education at the middle- and high-school level (e.g., theory vs. practice).

K 410 Trends and Issues in Special Education (3 cr.) I Provides students with an overview of current movements in the field of special education. Major emphasis is on application and implication of principles mandated by P.L. 94-142 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

K 422 Teaching Social Skills (3 cr.) B-I Addresses the social context in which classroom instruction and student interaction take place. The course will provide a framework for 1) observing skills that characterize social competence in school, 2) assessing problems with social behaviors, 3) planning instruction and interventions to teach social skills, and 4) monitoring instruction and interventions.

K 426 Assessment and Instruction (3 cr.) B-I Addresses the wide range of learning problems of low-achieving students, including those with mild disabilities, learning disabilities, and other special needs. It will cover development of individualized and group instructional programs such as assessment practices, curriculum design, classroom organization, and effective teaching practices and remedial techniques for teaching.

K 430 Medical and Physical Management of Students with Severe Disabilities (3 cr.) I Addresses medical and physical aspects of severe disabilities, and focuses on educational implications of various conditions/disorders. Major topics include (1) the nature of common conditions/ disorders, (2) methods for individual adaptations, and (3) procedures for structural modifications. The course incorporates information from various disciplines into classroom programming. The goal is to develop the basic vocabulary to communicate effectively with physical, occupational, and communication therapists and other related service personnel.

K 441 Transition Across the Lifespan (3 cr.) B-I Gives prospective teachers the information and skills necessary to effectively teach students with disabilities at the high school level. An overview of characteristics of secondary students with mild disabilities, school programs, transition from school life to adult life, curriculum issues, and strategies of effective instruction for students with disabilities will be covered.

K 448 Families, School, and Society (3 cr.) B-I Addresses approaches for providing services to families with members who are developmentally disabled, chronically ill, at-risk, or who have other types of impairments. Focusing on the family as a system, it examines the challenges of parents and siblings, presents techniques for parent-professional communication, building collaboration, and increasing family empowerment.

K 452 Classroom Management (3 cr.) B-I Shows students how to plan and implement interventions that improve the motivation and self-management skills of students in the classroom. It will focus on procedures for teaching students how to regulate their behavior, and will address the array of skills they need to learn in order to take responsibility for their actions.

K 453 Management of Academic and Social Behavior (3 cr.) I Surveys principles of behavior management as they pertain to educational environments. Students will learn how to define, observe, measure, record, and change academic and social behavior.

K 461 Curriculum and Methods for Students with Severe Disabilities I (3 cr.) I Introduction to issues in providing educational services to students with severe handicaps across all grade levels. Characteristics, methods, and materials for students traditionally labeled moderately, severely, and profoundly retarded; multiply handicapped; and autistic. Covers design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials for learners with severe disabilities. Emphasis is on basic skill development, task analysis, data-based program modification, and programming generalization and maintenance. Major course activities include readings and class discussion; evaluation of existing curriculum materials; task analysis and program design; and participation in a task force group.

K 462 Curriculum and Methods for Students with Severe Disabilities II (3 cr.) I Focuses on the development of instructional programs in the following curriculum areas across all grade levels: reading, math, self-help/personal management, social/leisure, and vocational areas. Emphasis on programming for generalization and maintenance, and on general elements of classroom management (e.g., scheduling, communication). Major course activities include readings and class discussions, reports on selected curriculum materials, the development of complete instructional programs, and participation in a task force group.

K 465 Service Delivery Systems and Consultation Strategies (3 cr.) I Reviews methods of implementing service delivery systems; consulting with professionals and parents; designing in-service training programs; and developing referral systems, curricular and personnel resources, and evaluation techniques used in special education programs.

K 473 Communication Interventions for Persons with Severe Disabilities (3 cr.) I Planning and implementing communication intervention in educational settings with individuals who are severely disabled, including those who are severely/profoundly mentally retarded, severely developmentally delayed, autistic and autistic-like, or multiply disabled. Intervention is presented within the framework of the development of social interaction and cognitive ability as part of communication skills within the overall classroom and work setting ecology. Also considered is the role of augmentative and alternative education/intervention.

K 480 Student Teaching Special Education (6-15 cr.) B P: Senior standing and completion of major requirements. Provides experiences for each student in his or her respective area of exceptionality, under the direction of a supervising teacher in an educational school setting.

K 488 Supervised Teaching in Special Education (3-12 cr.) B Provides students an opportunity to teach exceptional children under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher and a university special education supervisor.

K 490 Research in Special Education (1-3 cr.) B-I Individual research.

K 490 (variable titles) Topical Seminars for Special Education Dual Certification Program (3 cr.) I

Seminar 1: Families in School and Society
The purpose of this seminar is to learn the perspectives of individuals with disabilities and their families regarding the impact of disabilities in their daily lives. A life-span approach will be used to discuss issues related to birth and early childhood, school-age years, and adulthood. Additional topics include labeling, legal issues, person-centered planning, academic issues, social/emotional issues, behavioral issues, and environmental issues.

Seminar 2: Classroom Management and Behavior Support
The purpose of this course is to provide students with basic knowledge and skills for (1) developing and maintaining proactive classroom environments, (2) teaching children social problem-solving and self-control skills, (3) managing and preventing school-based crisis behaviors, and (4) working with parents and other professionals.

Seminar 3: Collaboration and Consultation
The purposes of this seminar are to explore service delivery options currently available in special education and to assist students to build their collaborative skills, including effective communication and consultation skills.

Seminar 4: Assistive Technology Applications
This seminar assists students to develop an understanding of assistive technology and its role in assisting individuals with disabilities in all areas of life—including education, employment, housing, recreation, and transportation.

Seminar 5: Assessment and Instruction
This seminar assists students in gaining knowledge of formal and informal assessment techniques; how to link assessment to curriculum and instruction; and how to effectively choose, construct, deliver, and evaluate curriculum and instruction to students with diverse learning needs.

Seminar 6: Transition Across the Lifespan
This course provides an in-depth discussion of issues and strategies related to transitions from preschool through elementary, middle, and high school and into adulthood. Relevant laws, planning, processes, strategies for interagency collaboration, and resources will be highlighted.

K 495 Laboratory/Field Experiences in Special Education
(cr. arr.: Max. 9) B-I
P: Consent of instructor. Provides the student with a field-based, supervised experience with individuals with severe handicaps. It allows the opportunity to interact within school/ work/community settings on a daily basis (three hours/day, five days/week). Specific assignments, which are mutually agreed upon between student, cooperating teacher, and practicum supervisor, are also required.

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Language Education (L)

L 400 Instructional Issues in Language Education (3 cr.) B Reviews the principles and current instructional issues related to learning a first or a second language. Besides the general issues of effects of the environment, developmental stages, and basic instructional methodologies, relationships among reading education, English education, and second language education will be explored.

L 407 Instructional Issues in Language Learning for English Teachers (3 cr.) Study of growth in language as a developmental process and how social, cultural, and economic environments are intrinsic parts of language learning. Explores the close relationship between how home language, dialect, and a second language is developed. Addresses how speaking, listening, writing, reading, and observing are interrelated.

L 408 Teaching Young Adult Literature in a Diverse Society (3 cr.) Explores the possibilities of reading literature written for, by, and about young adults in the middle and secondary classroom. We will work on engaging diverse young adults so that they become lifelong readers and responsible citizens, creating curricula and instructional activities that enable students to read the word and the world, and connecting with struggling readers while challenging proficient readers.

L 441 Bilingual Education: Introduction (3 cr.) B-I Introduction to the development of bilingual/bicultural education in the United States—its antecedents, rationale, theories. Comparison of existing bilingual/bicultural programs.

L 442 Teaching English Language Learners: Bilingual and English as a New Language (3 cr.) B Introduces undergraduate student to the theory-based instructional methods and activities that are used in bilingual and English as a New Language education programs. In addition, they are introduced to second language development, theoretical applications, and the sociocultural issues involved in teaching language minority students.

L 490 Research in Language Education (1-3 cr.) B-I Individual research in applied linguistics.

L 491 Alternative Assessment Applications in Language Education (3 cr.) B This course introduces students to classroom applications of the interdisciplinary theoretical tenets that underlie alternative assessment practices. Students will use this knowledge in the ongoing assessment of students’ content and literacy development in language education, particularly bilingual and ENL programs.

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Methods (M)

M 101 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience. Grade: S or F.

M 130 Introduction to Art Education (3 cr.) B Historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of education, and the general processes and techniques of teaching as they apply to art teaching.

M 135 Self Instruction in Art (1-5 cr.) B A general-interest course in art. Talent and past experience are not important. Students select their own topics from a range of prepared opportunities.

M 200 Artifacts, Museums, and Everyday Life (3 cr.) B-I In a combination of museum visits and classroom exercises, students will develop museum-going skills by exploring a range of artifacts reflecting varied media, world cultures, and inquiry disciplines. Discussion, guided conversational techniques, readings, and analytical writing assignments draw on “learning from objects” literature, art history, criticism, and museum education materials.

M 201 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience for sophomores. Grade: S or F.

M 202 Job Search Strategies for Educators (1 cr.) B P: At least junior standing. Provides students entering the job market with the employment skills needed to aid them in their job search, materials processing, interview skill development, and licensure procedures. For many students, this course serves as the capstone experience prior to or during student teaching.

M 235 Looking At and Talking About Art (3 cr.) B An introduction to analyzing pictorial images and particular works of art and forming thoughtful opinions about them. The course is specially designed for students with little or no background in art who want to learn how to respond intelligently to what they see.

M 300 Teaching in a Pluralistic Society (3 cr.) B-I Introduces students to teaching as a profession. Students focus upon the “self as teacher,” learning styles, cultural pluralism, and classroom teaching strategies that respond positively to the personal and ethnic diversity of the learner.

M 301 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience for juniors. Grade: S or F.

M 302 Mathematics Throughout the Secondary Curriculum (1-3 cr.) Students engage in making connections between the mathematics content of certain required mathematics courses and the teaching and learning of secondary school mathematics. Students analyze important “big ideas” in mathematics. Additionally, students prepare and collect lesson plans for use during student teaching and beyond.

M 303 Laboratory/Field Experiences: Junior High/Middle School (0-3 cr.)
B-I
Laboratory or field experiences at the junior high or middle school level. (May be repeated.) Corequisite with M 314 or M 330 or M 336. Grade: S or F.

M 304 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience. Grade: S or F.

M 305 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B Laboratory or field experience. Grade: S or F.

M 306 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience. Grade: S or F.

M 307 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience. Grade: S or F.

M 311 General Methods for Kindergarten/ Elementary Teachers (1-3 cr.) I Explores individualized and interdisciplinary learning methods, measurement and evaluation, teaching process and curriculum development, and organization of the elementary schools.

M 314 (M 313) General Methods for Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Teachers (3 cr.) B-I General methodology and organization; knowledge about the teaching process, including general methods, instructional media, measurement, curriculum development and organization of the senior high/junior high/middle school; and techniques to promote individualized and interdisciplinary learning.

M 316 Secondary General Methods (1-4 cr.) B Introductory course in general teaching strategies for secondary schools with an emphasis on adolescent learning and current issues in curriculum and instruction.

M 317 Student Commonality and Diversity (1-3 cr.) B Examines the implications of diversity and the value of cultural sensitivity in education. Students will become familiar with differences in learning and communication styles on the basis of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic class, and language; and will become familiar with multicultural education in practice and its effects on the curriculum, classroom, and school structure.

M 320 Diversity and Learning: Teaching Every Child (6 cr.) I Integrates information from educational psychology, multicultural education, and special education to prepare students to teach children in their early childhood and middle childhood years. The content includes child development, learning theory, motivation, and assessment. Students reflect critically on personal assumptions and develop attitudes and beliefs supportive of multicultural education and inclusion.

M 321 Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum and Assessment (3 cr.) B-I Critical examination of standards and other influences on secondary mathematics programs. Critical examination of past and current secondary mathematics curricula, text materials, and other resources available to support and guide secondary mathematics programs. Development of knowledge and skills related to assessment tolls and strategies in secondary mathematics. Corequisites M 469 and M 303. Spring semester only.

M 322 Diversity and Learning: Reaching Every Adolescent (6 cr.) I Integrates information from educational psychology, multicultural education, and special education to prepare students to teach adolescents and young adults. The content includes adolescent development, learning theory, motivation, and assessment. Students reflect critically on personal assumptions and develop attitudes and beliefs supportive of multicultural education and inclusion.

M 323 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary Schools (2 cr.) B-I
P: MUS-Z 241. Not open to music majors. Fundamental procedures of teaching elementary school music, stressing music material suitable for the first six grades.

M 324 Teaching About the Arts (1-3 cr.) B-I Introduction to the importance of the arts in elementary school curriculum. Students are given a foundation of methods and materials in art and music that will enable them to integrate the arts into the general curriculum, supplement art lessons given by school art specialists, and encourage student discussion and understanding of art and music in the world today.

M 330 Foundations of Art Education and Methods I (3 cr.) B-I P: H 340, P 254, M 300 and 15 credit hours of art. An introduction to art education theory and related social issues. Supervised art teaching in elementary schools is an important part of this course.

M 332 Art Experiences for Elementary Teachers, Part I (2 cr.) I Not open to art education majors. The selection, organization, guidance, and evaluation of two- and three-dimensional art activities in the elementary grades. Laboratory experiences with materials and methods.

M 333 Art Experiences for the Elementary Teacher (2 cr.) B-I The selection, organization, guidance, and evaluation of individual and group art activities. Includes laboratory experiences with materials and methods of presenting projects.

M 341 Foundations of Teaching Social Studies (3 cr.) B-I Introductory course in which students will explore perspectives on selected issues and topics of interest to the informed secondary school social studies teacher.

M 342 Methods and Materials for Teaching Elementary Music (3 cr.)
P: MUS-E 231, EDUC-M 300, EDUC-P 254; C: EDUC-M 401. Detailed study of current teaching techniques for the elementary school music class. Dalcroze, Kodaly, and Orff techniques; review of current textbooks and other materials; classroom recorder and guitar.

M 343 Methods and Materials for Teaching Choral Music (2 cr.) B
P: MUS-E 231, MUS-G 370, EDUC-M 300, EDUC-P 254; C: EDUC-M 401
(0 cr.) A study of vocal pedagogy, development of musicianship, rehearsal techniques, program management, and choral literature for elementary through high school choirs. A section of EDUC-M 401 Laboratory/Field Experience is corequisite.

M 344 Methods and Materials for Teaching Instrumental Music (3 cr.)
P: MUS-E 231, MUS-G 370, EDUC-M 300, EDUC-P 254; C: EDUC-M 401. A study of instrumental pedagogy, development of musicianship, rehearsal techniques, and appropriate methods and literature for elementary through high school bands and orchestras.

M 346 Exploring Secondary School Science Teaching (2 cr.) B Prerequisite for M 446 in Bloomington. An introduction to the study of teaching science includes a review of the issues currently surrounding science teaching, observation/participation in a local middle or secondary school, and assisting either a student or practicing teacher.

M 371 Foundations of Art Education (4 cr.) I Historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of art education; curriculum development; individualized and interdisciplinary learning; instructing K-12 audiences; K-12 school organization; and general processes and practice of teaching art including the creative problem-solving process and interpreting, understanding, and judging art. School and museum field experiences included.

M 400 Laboratory /Field Experience (0-3 cr.) I Laboratory or field experience.

M 401 Laboratory/Field Experience for Seniors (0-3 cr.) B-I Laboratory or field experience. Grade: S or F.

M 403 Laboratory/Field Experiences (0-3 cr.) B Laboratory or field experiences at the high school level. (May be repeated.) Corequisite with the required special methods course. Grade: S or F.

M 408 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) I Laboratory or field experience.

M 409 Laboratory/Field Experience (0-3 cr.) I Laboratory or field experience.

M 411 Laboratory/Field Experience: Middle and Secondary School
(1-3 cr.) B
Laboratory or field experiences in middle or secondary school science classes. (May be repeated.) Corequisite with M 446, Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Science.

M 412 Teaching of Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools (3 cr.) B Study of current trends, issues, theories, research in literacy; emphasizing the teaching and learning of writing in secondary schools. Addresses linguistic and cultural diversity issues in composition as it explores the complex varied nature of “good” writing and “effective” communication, tracing the implications for composition pedagogy.

M 416 Inquiry into Secondary English Methods: High School (1-5 credits) B-I Study of current trends, issues, theory, and research in teaching and learning English/Language Arts. Explores language, composition, literature, and media arts; developing multicultural curricula; and engaging students in meaningful inquiry facilitating students’ responsibility for themselves and their world.

M 420 The Student Teaching Seminar: Understanding Schools (2 cr.) B Seminar taught as a corequisite with early childhood (M 423), kindergarten/primary (M 424), elementary (M 425), kindergarten (M 470), and/or middle/junior high school (M 470) student teaching experiences. This seminar will address several issues related to the process of becoming a teacher. Grade: S or F.

M 421 Methods of Teaching Middle/Junior High School Social Studies (3 cr.) B-I Develops concepts and theories from social science, humanities, and education into practices of successful social studies instruction. Integrates social issues and reflective thinking skills into the social studies curriculum. Emphasis on curriculum development skills and building a repertoire of teaching strategies appropriate for middle/secondary school learners.

M 422 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School (3 cr.) B-I Development of knowledge and skills related to analysis and design of mathematics instruction in secondary school mathematics with attention to selection of appropriate mathematical tasks and tools and the development of classroom discourse communities. Students will be teaching lessons in the corequisite field experience, M403.

M 424 Student Teaching: Kindergarten-Primary (1-16 cr.) B-I Full-time supervised student teaching over a full semester, divided equally between a kindergarten and primary grade in a school accredited by the state of Indiana, or an equivalent approved school out of state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university-provided supervision. Grade: S or F.

M 425 Student Teaching: Elementary (1-16 cr.) B-I Full-time supervised student teaching in grades 1-6 for a minimum of 10 weeks in an elementary school accredited by the state of Indiana or an equivalent approved school out of state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university-provided supervision. Grade: S or F.

M 428 Inquiry into Secondary English Methods: Middle School (1-5 cr.) B-I Methods of English instruction are informed by one’s inquiry into one’s students and by teacher and students’ inquiries into the literacy practices of reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and discussing. We will read and discuss pedagogical approaches; then develop, demonstrate and evaluate our own lesson plans and instructional units.

M 430 Foundations of Art Education and Methods II (3 cr.) B P: M 330. Advanced study of curriculum developments in art education. Special attention is given to art teaching in secondary schools.

M 432 Teaching Foreign Language 5-12 (1-3 cr.) B Development and practice of skills and techniques of teaching foreign language, selection of content and materials, and evaluation of student and teacher performance. Micro and teaching lab included.

M 434 Administration of School Bands (2 cr.) B P: Senior standing;
EDUC-M 344 (to be taken during the student teaching semester). Teaching, organization, and administration of school wind and percussion ensembles.

M 435 Young Adult Literature (3 cr.) B Highlights and analyzes recent young adult literature, acknowledging significant earlier texts and their distinguished features. It also considers curricular and pedagogical issues salient to the adoption of multicultural curricula.

M 436 Administration of School Orchestra (2 cr.) P: Senior standing; M 344 (to be taken during the student teaching semester). Teaching, organization, and administration of school orchestras.

M 437 Teaching Science 5-12 (1-3 cr.) B Focuses on curriculum decisions teachers make every day. Specifically, students in this course will examine current learning theories and apply these theories to instructional practices at the middle grades and high school.

M 440 Teaching Problems and Issues Seminar (3 cr.) B-I A comprehensive examination of teaching problems and issues at the junior high school and middle school levels with special emphasis on solution strategies in various contexts.

M 441 (M 442) Methods of Teaching Senior/Junior High/Middle School Social Studies (1-4 cr.) B-I Develops concepts and theories from social science, humanities, and education into practices of successful social studies instruction. Integrates social issues and reflective thinking skills into the social studies curriculum. Emphasis on curriculum development skills and building a repertoire of teaching strategies appropriate for middle/secondary school learners. Includes micro-teaching laboratory.

M 442 Teaching Secondary School Social Studies (3 cr.) I Includes consideration of philosophical and psychological perspectives, development and practice of skills and techniques, selection of content and materials, and evaluation of student and teacher performance. Micro-teaching laboratory included.

M 445 Methods of Teaching Foreign Language (1-4 cr.) B-I Development and practice of skills and techniques for teaching foreign languages, selecting content and materials, and evaluating student and teacher performance. Micro-teaching laboratory included. This course should be taken during the semester immediately preceding student teaching. (Sem. I only)

M 446 Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Science (1-5 cr.) B-I P: 35 credit hours of science. Bloomington only, M 346. Designed for students who plan to teach biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, or physics in the junior high/middle school or secondary school.

M 451 Student Teaching: Junior High/Middle School (1-16 cr.) B-I Full-time supervised student teaching for a minimum of 10 weeks in a junior high or middle school accredited by the state of Indiana or an equivalent approved school out of state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university-provided supervision. Grade: S or F.

M 452 (M 447) Methods of Teaching English in the Senior High/Junior High/Middle School (1-5 cr.) B-I Methods, techniques, content, and materials applicable to the teaching of English in secondary schools, junior high schools, and middle schools. Experiences provided to assess ongoing programs in public schools and to study materials appropriate for these programs.

M 454 Grammar for Teachers (1 cr.) B-I Provides an opportunity for preservice teachers to learn about current insights and strategies in the teaching of grammar from the disciplines of sociolinguistics, composition, and education. The class will examine attitudes and beliefs about grammar in the society at large, as well as investigating trends and research in the teaching of grammar. Students will learn about grammars in oral language as well as written language, with an emphasis on description and diversity. The class will develop a perspective on error through investigation of student work. Specific classroom strategies for helping students conceptualize a language of wider communication and for helping students learn to edit their work will be the goal.

M 456 Methods of Teaching Physical Education (3 cr.) B-I P: General Methods M 314. Development and organization of teaching materials for various teaching styles found in the elementary and secondary public schools. Includes demonstration of teaching skills in laboratory sessions and class management concepts.

M 457 (M 448) Methods of Teaching Senior High/Junior High/Middle School Mathematics (2-4 cr.) B-I P: 30 credit hours of mathematics. Study of methodology, heuristics of problem solving, curriculum design, instructional computing, professional affiliations, and teaching of daily lessons in the domain of secondary and/or junior high/middle school mathematics. (Sem. I only)

M 458 Methods of Teaching Health and Safety (3 cr.) B For health and safety majors only.

M 459 Teaching Mathematics 5-12 (1-3 cr.) B Focuses on the curriculum and instruction issues that teachers make every day in the classroom. Specifically, students in the course will examine current theories and apply these theories to instructional practices.

M 463 Methods in Speech and Hearing Therapy (3 cr.) B Emphasis on school organizational patterns and administrative policies, relevant federal and state legislation, caseload determination, and service delivery models. Offered during the first eight weeks of each semester.

M 464 (M 462) Methods of Teaching Reading (3 cr.) B-I Focuses on middle, junior high, and senior high school. Curriculum, methods, and materials for teaching students to read more effectively.

M 469 Content Area Literacy (1-3 cr.) B-I Focuses on middle, junior, and senior high school. Curriculum, methods, and materials for teaching students to read and learn more effectively in all content areas.

M 470 Practicum (3-8 cr.) B Instructional experience under the direction of an identified supervising teacher, with university-provided supervision in the endorsement or minor area, and at the level appropriate to the area, and in an accredited school within the state of Indiana unless the integral program includes experience in an approved and accredited out-of-state site. The practicum may be full- or part time, but in every instance the amount of credit granted will be commensurate with the amount of time spent in the instructional setting. Grade: S or F.

M 471 Undergraduate Seminar in Music Education (1 cr.) B A practical orientation to the personal and professional problems that attend the student teaching experience. On-site visitation. Permission of the instructor required.

M 472 Teaching Art in the Elementary School (3 cr.) I P: M 371, C 311. Develops understanding and appreciation of teaching, with emphasis on teaching in the elementary schools. Includes curriculum and lesson planning, organization of materials and ideas, and techniques of classroom management. To be taken concurrently with M 301, which encompasses off-campus experiences in the elementary schools.

M 473 Teaching Art in the Secondary Schools (3 cr.) I P: M 371, C 311. Develops understanding and appreciation of teaching, with emphasis on teaching art in the secondary schools. Includes advanced studies of curriculum and lesson planning, classroom organization, and management techniques. Must be taken concurrently with M 401, which encompasses Herron Saturday School experience.

M 474 Undergraduate Seminar in Music Education (1-2 cr.) B P: Consent of instructor. An eight-week course taken in the same semester as student teaching. Current literature in music education, with individual projects concerned with music learning in the schools.

M 477 Methods of Teaching in Health Occupations Education (3-5 cr.) I Teaching methods and techniques, and choices of material and equipment, with emphasis on evaluation.

M 480 Student Teaching: Senior High/Junior High/Middle School
(1-16 cr.) B-I
Full-time supervised student teaching for a minimum of 10 weeks in a junior high/middle school or senior high school accredited by the state of Indiana, or an equivalent approved school out of state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university-approved supervision. Grade: S or F.

M 482 Student Teaching: All Grades (1-16 cr.) Full-time supervised student teaching in the areas of visual arts, music, physical education, special education, or school library/media services for a minimum of 10 weeks at an elementary school, junior high/middle school, and/or senior high school accredited by the state of Indiana, or an equivalent approved school out of state. The experience is directed by a qualified supervising teacher and has university-provided supervision. Grade: S or F.

M 483 Teaching Social Studies 5-12 (1-3 cr.) B Historical and contemporary roles of social studies will be explored with an emphasis on roles played by history, the social sciences, and the humanities. Particular attention is given to development of skills essential to successful social studies instruction and a resource bank of instructional ideas.

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Mathematics Education (N)

N102 Teaching and Learning Elementary School Mathematics I (3 cr.) B-I Helps preservice teachers develop an understanding of the mathematics content and pedagogy relevant for a successful elementary school teacher. Focus is on content and methods that are consistent with recent recommendations about mathematics learning and teaching, and the state of Indiana academic standards. Pedagogical methods address number theory, data and chance, and algebraic thinking.

N103 Teaching and Learning Elementary School Mathematics II (3 cr.) Helps preservice teachers develop an understanding of mathematics content and pedagogy relevant for a successful elementary school teacher. Focus is on content and methods that are consistent with recent recommendations about mathematics learning and teaching, and the state of Indiana academic standards. Pedagogical methods address geometry, measurement, and algebra.

N 343 Mathematics in the Elementary School (1-6 cr.) B-I Emphasizes the developmental nature of mathematical ideas and processes and the role of mathematics in the elementary school curriculum. Public school participation required.

N 443 Teaching Elementary Mathematics Problem Solving (1-6 cr.) B-I The teaching and learning of problem solving. Topics include types of problems, appropriate instructional sequences, strategies for solving problems, factors related to problem difficulty, evaluating problem-solving learning. Work with elementary school children is included. May be repeated.

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Educational Psychology (G & P & Y)

G 203 Communication in the Classroom (3 cr.) B Students study counseling theories and techniques for application to teaching. They learn methods of building community in the classroom, and ways to encourage student participation and respect for others. Students learn techniques and attitudes of group dynamics and leadership. Other topics of communication covered: conflict resolution, active listening, and parent-teacher communication.

P 248 Development of the Healthy Student (3 cr.) B-I Addresses child development in the school context. Promotes understanding of healthy physical, emotional, and social development in a school environment marked by diversity of cultural, social, and personal traits. Includes the role of the teacher in understanding and responding to child needs in this environment.

P 249 Growth and Development in Early Childhood (3 cr.) B-I Focuses on the cognitive, social, affective, and physical development of the child during the early years of life. The goal of understanding the growing child from multiple perspectives guides the study of theory and research on child development. Theoretical study is integrated with observations of and experiences with children in a way that increases the insights and competence of the teacher of young children. Addresses the unique developmental problems of special groups of children: handicapped, economically deprived, and members of minority groups.

P 251 Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers (1-4 cr.) B-I The application of psychological concepts to school learning and teaching using the perspective of development from childhood through preadolescence. Special attention is devoted to the needs of the handicapped.

P 254 Educational Psychology for Teachers of All Grades (1-4 cr.) B-I The application of psychological concepts to school learning and teaching in the perspective of development from childhood through adolescence. Special attention is devoted to the needs of the handicapped.

P 312 Learning: Theory into Practice (3 cr.) This course is concerned with understanding the process of teaching and learning, particularly within a secondary school context. Preservice teachers will be helped to see that learning takes place as an interaction of social, emotional, developmental, and cognitive forces. Units focus on theories of learning and teaching, motivation, the learning process, and assessment. Corequisite course is P 313.

P 313 Adolescents in a Learning Community (3 cr.) Adolescent development in a school context. Understanding adolescents as people and how they function in a community of learners, with particular emphasis on their interaction with others in a school environment marked by a diversity of cultural, social, and personal traits. Includes the role of the teacher in understanding and responding to adolescent needs in this environment. For students seeking admission to a teacher education program. Corequisite course is P 312.

P 314 Life Span Development (3 cr.) P: PSY-P 101 or equivalent. A course surveying human development from infancy through old age, emphasizing the life-span perspective on development. Major theories, current and classical research findings, and educational implications for all life stages from birth to death.

P 348 Foundations of Child Growth and Development: Focus on Birth to Age 3 (3 cr.) B Students will examine historical as well as contemporary theories of child growth and development for typically and atypically developing children throughout the early childhood period. All facets of development will be examined, including physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive development. Particular focus will be on prenatal-to-age 3 development.

P 351 Foundations of Child Development: Focus on 3- to 8-year-old children (1 cr.) B Students will examine child growth and development for typically and atypically developing children, including physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive development. Particular focus will be on 3- to 8-year-old children.

P 450 Child Development Seminar (3 cr.) Students will revisit child development theories, issues, and trends; and will discuss the direct application of this information in the preschool, kindergarten, and primary grade classrooms in which they are student teaching.

P 490 Research in Educational Psychology (1-3 cr.)

Y 420 Approaches and Issues in Educational Research (1-3 cr.) B-I Introduction to basic designs, methods and principles in educational research. Students will learn to interpret and critique published research studies, and will learn rudiments of data collection and analysis.

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Science Education (Q)

Q 200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (1-3 cr.) B-I Provides the elementary education major with background in the science process skills needed to complete required science courses.

Q 328 Field Experience/Methods Linkage Elementary (1-6 cr.) Science lesson preparation. Students prepare solutions, assemble equipment, and perform whatever additional practice is needed to prepare for taking a science lesson into a school.

Q 405 Integrated Science Lab/Field Experience (1-4 cr.) B Lab for integrated science course for elementary education majors with science area of concentration. Lab for 1 credit for elementary certification for grades 1-6. For 3 credits integrates field experience at middle school level for middle school certification with lab component. Must be taken concurrently with COLL-E 405.

Q 446 Field Experience/Methods Linkage (0-3 cr.) B Corequisite M446 Science lesson preparation. Students prepare solutions, assemble equipment, and perform whatever additional practice is needed to prepare for taking a science lesson into a school.

Q 490 Research in Science Education (1-6 cr.) B-I Individual research and study in science education.

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Secondary Education (A & S)

A 308 Legal Issues for Secondary Teachers (3 cr.) B-I Focuses primarily on legal concerns affecting teachers in public secondary schools. Topics addressed include tort liability, church/state relations, expression rights, children with disabilities, conditions of employment, discrimination and harassment, student testing, collective bargaining, teacher lifestyle choices, copyright concerns, teacher contracts and dismissal, record-keeping practices, and student discipline.

S 303 Topics in Secondary Education (.5-3 cr.) Various topics will be covered in this course in order to incorporate timely professional issues in the secondary curriculum. May be repeated.

S 400 Field-Based Seminar in Teacher Education (2-4 cr.) Discussion of issues in secondary education and exploration of problems of the field. Students spend approximately one day each week in the schools, satisfying performance standards for teacher certification. May be repeated. Instructor’s permission required. Grade: S or F.

S 405 The Middle and Junior High School (3 cr.) Provides future middle and junior high teachers with an understanding of how early adolescent students and school structures affect curriculum, instruction, and classroom management decisions. The course meets the middle/junior high school endorsement requirement for elementary school majors.

S 420 Teaching and Learning in the Middle School (3 cr.) I Middle schools operate on unique philosophical and organizational foundations. This course will explore the design of middle schools and the ways teachers work to meet the needs of a diverse range of learners, including those with specific needs. Preservice teachers will develop the skills needed to provide challenging learning opportunities for young adolescent learners.

S 430 Teaching and Learning in the High School (3 cr.) This course for secondary teachers explores curriculum planning for conceptual learning that is developmentally appropriate for adolescents and young adults. It includes the topics of high school organization and reform, assessment, critical thinking, urban school settings, risk behaviors, identity development, and importance of the larger community context.

S 490 Research in Secondary Education (1-3 cr.) B-I Individual research.

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Instructional Systems Technology (R)

R 311 Introduction to Instructional Technology (3 cr.) B Offers an introduction to the field and profession of instructional technology. It includes the historical and accepted views of the field as well as direction in applying instructional design processes toward the student’s primary field of study.

R 341 Multimedia in Instructional Technology (3 cr.) B Focuses on the development of skills using the latest multimedia tools for instructional technology. Significant attention is made to interface design, message design, and appropriate matching of media tools with specific goals and contexts.

R 347 Impact of Games and Simulations in Instruction (3 cr.) B Examines the potential of gaming, simulations, and virtual environments for the purpose of instruction. It also addresses their social, cognitive, and affective impact on users. Taxonomies, goals, production roles, and techniques are examined in detail.

R 441 Development and Management in Instructional Technology (3 cr.) B Focuses on the role of the instructional technology manager/consultant by observing ongoing projects in a wide variety of contexts and examining management strategies. Students will generate reports and technology prototypes from these observations to satisfy stated goals.

R 481 Specialized Project in Instructional Technology (3 cr.) B A capstone course that focuses on an individual or group project. The goal is to bring closure to the knowledge and skills addressed in the cognate course sequence. The project development is to be instructional technology focused with content and context in the student’s major.

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Multicultural/Urban Education (T)

T 450 Cultural/Community Forces and the Schools (3 cr.) B Promotes modification of instructional strategies within diverse educational settings by providing opportunities to analyze community forces and cultures through cultural orientation workshops, culturally focused readings, direct residential participation in community-related activities, and biweekly preparation of cultural summary reports.

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Higher Education and Student Affairs (U)

U 205 Human Development Opportunities for College Students (1-3 cr.) B-I Opportunities are given for students to better understand their personal development, to learn and use human relations skills, to assess humanistic issues in both personal and societal terms, and to establish goals for the future. Class emphasis will vary, depending upon student needs and the specific topics to be addressed.

U 206 Orientation to College Life (1-3 cr.) B-I P: Freshman or sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Focuses on transition: advancing from high school to IU, transferring from a two- or four-year college to IU, or returning to academic life as an adult student.

U 207 Leadership Training (1-3 cr.) B-I Leadership development and training. Topics may include theories of leadership, group dynamics, organizational theory, and other issues of interest to current or potential student leaders.

U 208 Training for Paraprofessionals in Student Affairs (1-3 cr.) B-I Development of specific skills for paraprofessional student staff such as resident advisors (RAs) and student orientation leaders. Topics may include theories of student development, leadership skills, crisis intervention, confrontation skills, and information about appropriate university policies and resources.

U 210 Survival Skills at IU (0-3 cr.) Focuses on survival skills for new students. Topics may include strategies for building self-esteem, increasing assertiveness, managing time, goal setting, and other nonacademic skills that can assist novice students.

U 211 Community Development (1-3 cr.) Topical seminar focusing on community development for students living in residence halls, Greek-letter housing units, living-learning groups, and other naturally occurring or self-selected living groups. Topics may include community building, conflict resolution, and group dynamics.

U 212 Current Issues in Undergraduate Life (1-3 cr.) Topical seminar addressing issues of interest to new undergraduates. Topics may include student diversity and campus life, the role and status of college women, or college students and alcohol.

U 450 The Undergraduate Student Personnel Assistant (1-2 cr.) B Prepares undergraduate students to serve as student assistants in student personnel administration, e.g., orientation student assistant, undergraduate resident assistants.

U 495 Seminar in Leadership Training (1-3 cr.) B The theory and practice of group work, leadership techniques, communication, human relations, problem solving, and decision making. Cases emphasize the role of the student leader in the total university community.

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Computer Education (W)

W 200 Using Computers in Education (1-3 cr.) B-I Develops proficiency in computer applications and classroom software; teaches principles and specific ideas about appropriate, responsible, and ethical use to make teaching and learning more effective; promotes critical abilities, skills, and self-confidence for ongoing professional development.

W 201 Beginning Technology Skills (1 cr.) Brings the student to a technology skill level that meets minimum-level competencies with technology, including basic functionality with operating systems, file management, e-mail, word processing, presentation software, and hardware operation. Graded Pass/Fail after completion of standardized assessments.

W 204 Programming for Microcomputers in Education (3 cr.) I Develops programming skills necessary for using a computer and for understanding computer programming as it applies to teaching. Not offered for credit if W 201 or W 202 has been taken.

W 205 Microcomputer Graphics for Teachers (3 cr.) B P: EDUC-W 200 or its equivalent. Includes programming in high- and low-resolution graphics to generate graphs, letter forms, pictures, and diagrams. Students will also work on selected software and peripherals. The primary focus is on the application of computer graphics to teaching in elementary and secondary schools.

W 210 Survey of Computer-Based Education (3 cr.) B-I P: EDUC-W 200 or permission of instructor. The first course for the computer endorsement program. Students will explore issues of infusing technology into the K-12 curriculum, increase range and depth of computer applications and peripherals, and participate in professional development activities. Learning is assessed through computer-based assignments and teaching portfolio creation.

W 220 Technical Issues in Computer-Based Education (3 cr.) B-I
P or C: EDUC-W 210. Examines computer hardware, operating systems, software applications, and peripheral devices in classroom settings, including networking, communications, and multimedia. Problem-based laboratory exercises supplement lectures and demonstrations.

W 301 Integrating Technology into Teaching Part I (1 cr.) B-I
P: EDUC-W 201. Provides students with skills and experiences that allow for effective and appropriate integration of technology into teaching and learning activities. Focus will be on reviewing current models of effective technology integration, surveying available technology in schools, and developing classroom lessons and activities.

W 310 Integrating Technology Into K-12 Classrooms (3 cr.) B-I
P: EDUC-W 210. Students will explore various pedagogical approaches, design and implement technology-bases lessons for K-12 classrooms, participate in professional development activities, and reflect on the integration of technology in the classroom. Learning will be documented and assessed through written assignments and a teaching portfolio.

W 401 Integrating Technology into Teaching Part II (1 cr.) B-I
P: EDUC-W 201 and W 301. Provides students with skills and experiences that allow for effective and appropriate integration of technology into teaching and learning activities. Students will have the opportunity to implement and evaluate a technology-integrated classroom activity in an advanced field experience.

W 410 Practicum in Computer-Based Education (3-8 cr.) B-I The culminating experience for the candidates seeking to be licensed in computer instruction. Either 8 weeks of full-time fieldwork or 16 weeks of half-time fieldwork in an educational setting that incorporates instructional computing.

W 435 Technology Leadership in K-12 (3 cr.) B-I P: W 210 and W 310. Focuses on issues typically encountered by technology leadership personnel at schools. Topics include planning for, implementing, and integrating technology into classroom activities; staff development and training; acceptable Internet use; acquiring funding for technology initiatives; building stakeholder collaboration; and managing technology systems in school settings.

W 450 Internship in Instructional Computing B-I P: EDUC-W 210 or permission of instructor. Complete semester-long internship experience with a classroom teacher or other individual or group in an appropriate setting. Exchange regular reflections with the practicum supervisor. A corequisite for the Computer Endorsement Cohort. (Enrollment in this course should be for one credit each semester for up to six credits for the Cohort.)

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Reading (X)

X 100 Practice in Reading and Study for Self-Improvement (0 cr.) Attempts to discover weaknesses in the student’s methods of reading and study, and to provide remedial exercises. Much of the work is done on an individual basis. (Offered at regional campuses only.)

X 101 Techniques in Textbook Reading (2-3 cr.) B-I Instruction and guided practice in techniques for learning from printed materials. Emphasis is on gaining information from texts, practicing retrieval, and discussing concepts. Much of the work is done on an individual basis.

X 150 Reading/Learning Techniques I (1-3 cr.) B-I Emphasis on mechanics of reading, flexibility in reading, styles of learning, listening comprehension, vocabulary development, word attack, reading comprehension, and reading rate.

X 151 Reading/Learning Techniques II (1-3 cr.) B-I Develops higher levels of learning skills, with instruction and practice in critical reading and listening, understanding and applying principles, and methods of learning.

X 152 Reading/Learning Techniques III (1-3 cr.) B-I Offered in two options: as a reading rate course with major topics covering reading rate development, comprehension power, skimming, and scanning; or as individualized study for students who want to work in a special area in conjunction with an instructor on an individually designed program. Variable title.

X 153 Reading and Reasoning for the New College Student (2-3 cr.) B Emphasis on transition to college-level analytical and critical reading, including argument analysis; convergent, divergent, and constructive reading of texts; and concept/theme building through reading. Experiences in the main library and career services center are provided. Students will address issues of commitment and persona; responsibility for college learners.

X 155 Critical Reading and Research Seminar (3 cr.) B Focus is on academic literacy for high achieving or honors students, including critical reading on challenging materials, inquiry, acclimation to the environment of high expectations, and both social and intellectual diversity of a university campus. Readings and inquiry center on a theme selected for particular groups.

X 156 College and Life Long Learning (1-2 cr.) B Students attend 11 public workshops on a wide range of reading, study, and learning skills topics offered by the Student Academic Center and meet for 13 individual conferences with instructors or peer mentors to discuss concepts and application. Emphasis is on developing positive (and eliminating negative) behaviors.

X 157 Key Strategies for Academic Success (1-3 cr.) B Three one-hour modules cover personal aspects of learning, college-level intellectual skills and strategies, and performance on examinations. These modules may be taken singularly or in any combination and/or order for a maximum of three credit hours.

X 158 Culture of College (3 cr.) B Presents a comprehensive view of college as a culture to be learned and understood while developing academic and personal skills that support success. Intended for students on academic probation or entering students who would benefit from sustained support for a full semester.

X 159 Connecting with Campus Resources (2 cr.) B Students construct a plan for academic success in consultation with instructors and peer mentors, seek out resources and experiences to fulfill that plan, and complete collaborative and writing activities to enrich their insights. Focus is on learning to function as active members of the campus learning community.

X 160 Mastering Academic Skills for Reinstated Students (3 cr.) A team approach is taken to support students who have successfully petitioned for reinstatement after academic dismissal. Students meet regularly with an instructor, peer mentor, and counseling intern while completing four course units geared toward developing the academic skills and understanding necessary for success.

X 400 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading in the Classroom (3 cr.) Diagnosis of reading difficulties and solution to problems through research, conference, and practice in the use of materials and equipment.

X 401 Critical Reading in the Content Area (1-3 cr.) B Aids elementary and secondary teachers in the development of instructional strategies that assist students in the comprehension, critical analysis, and integration of ideas presented in print material of various subject matter areas.

X 425 Practicum in Reading (1-8 cr.) B-I P: X 400 or E 339-41 or E 331-32; or consent of instructor. Students will work in selected elementary and secondary classrooms, diagnosing reading problems and developing students’ reading competence.

X 460 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.) B Examines use of trade books and non-text materials for teaching language arts and reading K-8. Special sections may focus on specific student populations. Section emphasis announced each semester.

X 470 Psycholinguistics for Teachers of Reading (1-3 cr.) B-I Explores the linguistic and cognitive dimensions of language. Discusses relationships among the systems of language and among the various expressions of language. Always includes topics on semantics, grammar, and dialect.

X 490 Research in Language Education (1-6 cr.) B-I Individual research.

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