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School of Education 2008-2010 Graduate Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of
Education
2008-2011
Undergraduate
Academic Bulletin

School of Education
W. W. Wright Education Building 
201 North Rose Avenue  
Bloomington, IN 47405-1006 
(812) 856-8500    Fax (812) 856-8440
Contact School of Education
 

Bloomington Programs

Introduction
New Directions for Teacher Education in Bloomington
IU Bloomington’s Six Principles for Teacher Education
Early Childhood Education Program
Elementary Education Program
Teaching All Learners: A Program in Exceptional Needs and
  Elementary Teacher Education

Secondary Education Programs
Professional Education—A Community of Teachers
All School Settings Education Program
Minors, Endorsements, and License Addition Programs

Introduction

In this section, courses from several schools and departments of Indiana University are listed and coded with three- and four-letter codes that indicate the originating department. Full descriptions of courses not offered in the School of Education can be found in the bulletins for the schools and colleges offering the courses. A guide to the codes is as follows:

Schools:
BUS (Kelly School of Business)
COLL (College of Arts and Sciences)
EDUC (School of Education)
HPER (School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation)
INFO (School of Informatics)
JOUR (School of Journalism)
MUS (School of Music)
SLIS (School of Library and Information Science)
SPEA (School of Public and Environmental Affairs)
SWK (School of Social Work)

Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences:
AAAD (African American and African Diaspora Studies)
AMST (American Studies)
ANTH (Anthropology)
AST (Astronomy)
BIOL (Biology)
CHEM (Chemistry)
CLAS (Classical Studies)
CMCL (Communication and Culture)
CMLT (Comparative Literature)
CSCI (Computer Science)
EALC (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
ECON (Economics)

ENG (English)
FINA (Fine Arts)
FOLK (Folklore and Ethnomusicology)
FRIT (French and Italian)
GEOG (Geography)
GEOL (Geology)
GER (Germanic Studies)
GNDR (Gender Studies)
HISP (Spanish and Portuguese)
HIST (History)
HPSC (History and Philosophy of Science)
LING (Linguistics)
LTAM (Latin American and Caribbean Studies)
MATH (Mathematics)
MEST (Medieval Studies)
NELC (Near Eastern Languages and Cultures)
PHIL (Philosophy)
PHYS (Physics)
POLS (Political Science)
PSY (Psychology)
REL (Religious Studies)
SLAV (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
SOC (Sociology)
SPHS (Speech and Hearing Sciences)
TEL (Telecommunications)
THTR (Theatre and Drama)

The Indiana University School of Education at Bloomington offers teacher education programs leading to Indiana teaching licenses in kindergarten-primary/early childhood education, elementary education, secondary education (senior high/junior high/middle school), special/elementary education and all-school settings, as outlined below. The secondary and all-school settings programs require at least one major chosen from those outlined.

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New Directions for Teacher Education in Bloomington

Indiana University has been involved in preparing students to become teachers since 1851, although the School of Education itself was not founded until 1908. Much has changed since the time of those initial efforts. The campus as a whole has expanded and become world-renowned for its research status. At the same time, the School of Education itself has developed a national and international reputation for both its undergraduate and graduate offerings.

We now find ourselves facing unique challenges in the 21st century. Our technological age requires citizens who can apply knowledge, reason analytically, and solve problems. American society is increasingly diverse, so school classrooms serve students who come from many backgrounds and cultures, and who bring with them a wide range of abilities and interests. The educational community at large is engaged, along with policymakers and the general public, in a national debate about high standards for what all students should know and be able to do. The need for teachers who can help all students meet society’s high performance expectations has created new challenges for teacher preparation.

In 2000, the IU Bloomington faculty approved a set of five goals to serve as guides for all efforts in the School of Education. The goals include (1) to continue IU’s commitment to strong pre-service teacher education, (2) to strengthen the School of Education’s partnerships with P-12 schools and communities, (3) to enhance the school’s research and graduate education programs, (4) to provide leadership in the appropriate use of technologies to enhance teaching and learning experiences, and (5) to promote diversity. These goals are interdependent. Together, they reflect the direction that the School of Education will take as it moves forward in the coming years.

One effort that has been constant throughout our history is a commitment to creating and sustaining high-quality, rigorous, engaging courses and programs for candidates aspiring to be teachers at all P-12 levels. A commitment to high-quality programs in turn requires that faculty and candidates in the School of Education, with our colleagues from other units of Indiana University and from the public schools, engage in conversations that lead to novel initiatives, alternative directions, and new ways of thinking about teacher education. We must work collaboratively to help our teacher candidates attain the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for teaching in contemporary schools.

Our collective commitment at IU Bloomington to the development of exemplary teacher education programs has been abundantly clear throughout the past decade. This bulletin provides an outline of our most recent efforts to offer contemporary, responsive, and effective teacher education programs, courses, and policies. Central to our deliberations about the direction of teacher education has been the adoption and enactment in all our teacher education programs of a set of six principles that define, in comprehensive ways, our conceptual framework for teacher education. The six principles are listed below. Accompanying each is an elaboration composed of three parts: a statement about why the principle is important, a statement about implications of the principle for our teacher education programs, and a statement about what the principle implies for teacher candidate expectations.

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IU Bloomington’s Six Principles for Teacher Education

  1. Knowledge and Multiple Forms of Understanding: Effective teachers possess a well-grounded knowledge of the content areas that are central to their teaching. They also have an in-depth comprehension of the forms of knowledge embodied in the traditional disciplines, of the interdisciplinary nature of inquiry, and of the multiple forms of understanding that individual students bring to the classroom. Thus, all our teacher education programs help teacher candidates acquire practical wisdom that integrates forms of understanding, skilled action in and outside classrooms, and a particular sensitivity to the diversity of students. Teacher candidates are expected to be well grounded in student development, the content areas that are central to their teaching, and assessment strategies.
  2. Learning Environment: Teachers are expected to be thoughtful, reflective, caring practitioners in actual educational settings. Teacher education programs must maintain or create experiences in schools and on campus so that instructors can assist candidates in developing and assessing this professional expertise. Thus, all our teacher education programs include early and continuous engagement—through direct immersion or simulation—with the multiple realities of children, teaching, and schools. Teacher candidates are expected to create and nurture a positive physical, social, and academic learning environment.
  3. Personalized Learning: Good teachers build on their students’ interests, orientation to learning, and hopes. Similarly, teacher education programs should offer teacher candidates opportunities to individualize and personalize their preparation as teachers. Thus, all our teacher education programs give teacher candidates a significant measure of control over how, when, and where their learning takes place, thus enabling their interests and values to shape major portions of their work. Teacher candidates are expected to understand students’ ability levels, interests, and learning styles. They should demonstrate instruction that reflects the diversity among all learners.
  4. Community: Effective teacher preparation requires that participants develop a sense of community through engagement in shared activities and issues. The longevity of relationships required to establish community has several advantages for all its members. It brings coherence to programs, fosters an appreciation of the power of cooperative effort, and encourages a dialogue that promotes the continual rejuvenation of teacher education. Thus, all our teacher education programs foster a sense of community among their teacher candidates, among faculty members, among faculty members and candidates, and among the university and the schools. Teacher candidates are expected to understand and to be involved in their academic learning community. They should build and develop relationships within the school, corporation, and community.
  5. Critical Reflection: Effective teachers reflect critically on the moral, political, social, and economic dimensions of education. This requires an understanding of the multiple contexts in which schools function, an appreciation of diverse perspectives on educational issues, and a commitment to democratic forms of interaction. Thus, all our teacher education programs encourage students to develop their own social and educational visions that are connected to critically reflective practice. Teacher candidates are expected to reflect continuously on all aspects of their teaching experience to identify ways for improvement as individuals, as a part of the school community, and as part of the teaching profession.
  6. Intellectual, Personal, and Professional Growth: Teachers are more than technicians or purveyors of information. Accordingly, they must be committed to lifelong intellectual, personal, and professional growth. Because both faculty and teacher candidates must continually develop these habits of mind, teacher education programs must stimulate the exploration and development of the full range of human capabilities. Thus, all our teacher education programs foster intellectual curiosity and encourage an appreciation of learning through the sustained analysis of ideas, values, and practices; and through intuition, imagination, and aesthetic experience. Teacher candidates are expected to develop a philosophy of teaching and learning. This philosophy and continuous professional growth should include values, commitments, and professional development.

As part of a premiere research institution, the IU Bloomington teacher education community is committed to seeing inquiry practices and an inquiry orientation as foundational to all our teacher education programs. This commitment means that undergraduate instructors rarely tell teacher candidates what it means to be an effective teacher, but instead provide guidance along with intellectual and practical entry points into the range of literature, scholarly debates, and experiences that help define contemporary education. Candidates, as a result of this inquiry orientation, will develop the understanding necessary to become effective teachers. In other words, "inquiry" and "practice," "research" and "teaching," "thinking" and "doing" are expected to be integrated concepts and activities, rather than oppositional ones.

Accountability and improvement in teacher preparation are central to IU Bloomington’s mission. Graduates of all our teacher education programs are expected to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected of beginning teachers as set forth by the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) and as adopted by the Indiana Professional Standards Board (IPSB) in its new licensing regulations, known as Rules 2000. Through these standards that focus on systematic assessment and performance-based learning, our teacher education programs commit to engaging in continuous reevaluation and improvement.

As we begin this new millennium, our individual and collective efforts in the School of Education at IU Bloomington continue to be focused on developing the very best possible experiences for teacher candidates, and ultimately on improving the quality of education for P-12 pupils. We eagerly begin this new phase of Indiana University’s 150-year institutional commitment: to offer exemplary educational opportunities for prospective teachers and to enhance the quality of educational experiences in classrooms throughout Indiana, the nation, and the world.

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Early Childhood Education Program

About the Program
General Education
Electives
Professional Education

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About the Program

The undergraduate program in early childhood education is a four-year sequence of courses that prepares individuals to teach in infant/toddler and preschool programs, kindergarten through grade 3 classrooms, and work in other settings that employ early childhood professionals. The course of study is premised on the belief that students should engage in an exploration of literacy and diversity through inquiry and reflection. Literacy involves mastering a variety of symbol systems in which meaning is created and shared with others: reading, writing, art, mathematics, music, science, and others. The program enables students to acquire competence in these areas and the pedagogical expertise necessary to nurture growth and development in all young children.

Students will be actively engaged in a variety of activities, assignments, projects, and field experiences in order to: 1) acquire the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of an effective teacher; 2) develop sensitivity to issues of diversity of all forms (e.g. race, class, culture, gender, disability); and 3) embrace ethical, social, and intellectual commitments to young children.

Admission applications for the Early Childhood Education program are considered October 1 for the Spring semester start of authorized professional education coursework. Students will be admitted in and progress through their course work in a cohort with others who have begun at the same time. The small size of the program is designed to enhance a sense of community among students, core faculty, and practicing professionals. Practitioners from a variety of early childhood settings will be involved in the teaching of courses and the design of field experiences, thereby fostering community among those inside and outside the university.

The Early Childhood Education Program is divided into three main components, as follows:

General Education 41 cr.
Electives 3 cr.
Professional Education 81 cr.
Total 125 cr.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/EarlyChildhood/tabid/5491/Default.aspx

General Education (41 credit hours)
Students who think they have the competence required in a course may contact the chairperson of the department offering the course. If the department chairperson agrees, the student will be permitted to take a credit examination. Students must submit a written appeal to the Academic Standards Committee with the chairperson’s recommendation for a waiver or substitution in the program.

Courses listed by number are either specifically required or are part of a group from which selections must be made to fill a specific requirement. See the appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions. The speech requirement may not be met by correspondence.

Electives (3 credit hours)
Three additional credit hours of course work are required to be selected from any department within the College of Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Music; or School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

Professional Education (81 credit hours)
The professional component begins early in the student’s educational career. Laboratory/field experiences are initiated as soon as possible and continue throughout the student’s sprogram. This component includes full-time student teaching in preschool, kindergarten, primary, and elementary programs.

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Elementary Education Program

Theory Into Practice: A Program for Primary and Intermediate Elementary, K-6

The Theory into Practice Program (TIP) is a four-year program for students who want to be elementary school teachers. The TIP program emphasizes the application of theory and research to the day-to-day world of elementary teachers in a wide range of schools. Courses and field experiences focus on helping students develop the entry-level skills and knowledge needed to employ the current and emerging diagnostic and instructional "tools" that are used in a majority of elementary schools and that will allow them to successfully teach students with a diverse set of abilities. Through their subject concentration area, students gain in-depth experience in the subject of their choice—such as math, science, language arts, social studies, or fine arts. Program experiences are designed to help students identify knowledge that is worthwhile for elementary students and to design and teach lessons constructed around such knowledge. As a whole, program experiences provide for a close "fit" between course work and field experiences, with the goal of providing students with many opportunities to apply and reflect upon what they are learning.

Students will typically apply to the TIP program in the sophomore year: by October 1 to begin authorized professional education courses in the spring semester or by March 1 to begin in the fall semester. During their program of studies, students will complete three basic sets of requirements. The General Education component includes work in a cross-section of subject areas conventionally understood as the content of the major. The Area of Concentration enables students to gain a depth of knowledge in a subject of their choice. The Professional Component includes a series of subject-specific methods courses, work in the psychology of learning, applying technology in education settings, multicultural issues, the history of American education, an examination of the purpose of schooling in America, an ongoing set of increasingly demanding field experiences and related seminars. It culminates in a semester-long student teaching experience. Throughout their program, students will build a professional portfolio demonstrating their intellectual growth and ability to reflect.

TIP is an improved version of a program with a proven track record, a history of placing its graduates, and a group of faculty who are leaders in their respective fields. Students who desire a very practical, hands-on approach to their studies and who wish to graduate with the knowledge and skills required by a wide range of employers should consider the TIP program.

Theory Into Practice K-6 Elementary Education Program
This program is divided into three main components, as follows:

General Education 51 cr.
  Distribution 42 cr.
  Area of Concentration 9-10 cr.
Electives 0-2 cr.
Professional Education 77 cr.
Total 128 cr.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/El%20Ed%20June%202008.pdf

General Education: Distribution (51 credit hours)
Students who think they have the competence required in a course may contact the chairperson of the department offering the course. If the department chairperson agrees, the student will be permitted to take a credit examination. Students must submit a written appeal to the Academic Standards Committee with the chairperson’s recommendation for a waiver or substitution in the program.

Courses listed by number are either specifically required or are part of a group from which selections must be made to fill a specific requirement. See the appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions. The speech requirement may not be met by correspondence.

General Education: Area of Concentration (9-10 credit hours)
The Area of Concentration requirement is designed to provide the prospective elementary teacher with depth in one school-related curriculum. Students should choose 15 credit hours from one area listed below to complete with a minimum GPA of 2.5. The credit hours completed to fulfill this requirement must be in addition to those completed to fulfill the distribution requirement. Students should consult an academic advisor to plan an approved sequence to fulfill the Area of Concentration requirement.

Select one area:

Art
Health
Language Arts/Humanities
Mathematics
Music
Reading
Science
Social Studies

Electives (0-2 credit hours)

Professional Education (77 credit hours)
The professional component begins early in the student’s educational career. Laboratory/field experiences are initiated as soon as possible and continue throughout the student’s program. This component includes a minimum of a full semester of full-time student teaching in either the first or second semester of the senior year.

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Teaching All Learners: A Program in Exceptional Needs and Elementary Teacher Education

The goal of the Teaching All Learners Program is to prepare undergraduate students with knowledge of effective strategies and curricula associated with teaching in classrooms with students having a wide range of developmental levels and abilities. Graduates of this program will be prepared to work as consultant teachers, as co-teachers in inclusive settings, as teachers in self-contained classrooms for students with exceptional needs, and as general elementary education teachers. Successful completion of this program will result in license recommendation for K-6 Elementary, both Primary and Intermediate, and K-6 Exceptional Needs.

In Teaching All Learners, we emphasize the following:

  • Developing a strong understanding of general education curriculum and techniques
  • Developing mastery in working with students with exceptional behavioral and educational needs
  • The integration of theories, philosophies, and techniques more typically associated separately with either general or special education traditions
  • Research and inquiry
  • Collaborative teaching and learning
  • Intensive field-experience
The Teaching All Learners Program is divided into two main components, as follows:
General Education 51 cr.
Professional Education 79 cr.
Total 130 cr.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see: site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/TAL%20June%202008.pdf

General Education: Distribution (51 credit hours)
Students who think they have the competence required for a course may contact the chairperson of the department offering the course. If the department chairperson agrees, the student will be permitted to take a credit examination. Students must submit a written appeal to the Academic Standards Committee with the chairperson’s recommendation for a waiver or substitution in the program.

Courses listed by number are either specifically required or are part of a group from which selections must be made to fill a specific requirement. See the appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions. The speech requirement may not be met by correspondence.

Professional Education (79 credit hours)
In the Teaching All Learners Program, the professional education courses begin early in the student’s educational career. The courses in the program begin in the spring of the sophomore year. Although there is some flexibility, by the junior year most general education requirements should be completed.

Return to Teaching All Learners: A Program in Exceptional Needs and
  Elementary Teacher Education

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Secondary Education Programs

The Secondary Education Programs lead to a Bachelor of Science: Secondary Education degree in specific content fields. The content fields include exceptional needs, journalism, language arts/English, mathematics, chemistry, earth/space, life sciences, physics, and social studies. The School of Education, in cooperation with the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation and the College of Arts and Sciences, also offers secondary content fields in Health and Theatre, respectively.

Successful completion of a secondary education program requires meeting both academic content and performance-based standards as assessed at different points by the School of Education and by state-designated tests. The secondary education teacher license in Indiana mandates a content field, a target population developmental level of early and late adolescence and young adulthood, and in the school setting multiple assignments at the middle school/junior high or high school grades 5-12.

The Bloomington campus offers two secondary programs:

Anchor Secondary Education Program
Community of Teachers

Both secondary programs include three basic areas of course work:

General Education 33-36 cr.
Content Field 36-63 cr.
Professional Education Arranged-46 cr.
Electives To total 124 cr.
Total 124-145 cr.

For program requirements (program planning sheets), see: site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

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General Education—Anchor Program and A Community of Teachers
(33-36 credit hours)

Courses used to satisfy general-education requirements also may be applied to fulfill requirements for a subject matter specialty study. In such cases, the course may be used to meet all requirements to which it will apply, but the credit hours may be counted only once toward the total of 124 credit hours needed for a degree. The speech requirement may not be met by correspondence course work. Credit examinations are available to students who believe they have the competence required in a course, if the department chairperson agrees. Students must submit the chairperson’s recommendation with an appeal to the Academic Standards Committee for a program substitution or waiver. See appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions. Also, some COAS TOPICS courses may be used toward completing the general-education requirement. See an advisor for course eligibility.

General-education credits require electives from the College of Arts and Sciences in the areas of Arts and Humanities, Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Historical Studies, and Multicultural Studies. To determine which courses fulfill the approved distribution requirement, students must check descriptions of the courses in the College of Arts and Sciences Bulletin, while also using the School of Education Undergraduate Bulletin, and carefully choose the courses that meet the designations required for the license program being sought. A list of culture studies requirements and approved distribution courses can be viewed in the College of Arts and Sciences online bulletin: www.indiana.edu/~bulletin/iub/coas/index.html

Content Fields (36-63 credits)—Anchor Program and A Community of Teachers (majors)
Credit hour requirements for majors are listed below. To be licensed, a student must have at least one major area. The specific requirements in the various subject matter majors are given in detail below. A student may be exempted from some of the required subject matter courses if such courses, or their education equivalent, have been successfully completed on the high school level. In this case, the student should substitute electives or an equivalent number of credit hours in the subject matter area.

Credit earned in general education may be used where applicable to meet the course requirements in any subject matter area.

Health Education
Please see the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (HPER) bulletin for details about this program.

Journalism (JOUR) (36 credit hours)
For access to 12 credit hours of authorized journalism courses prior to admission to the Teacher Education Program, the student should do the following:

  1. Meet with and obtain the signature of an advisor in University Division, the School of Journalism, or the School of Education
  2. Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.3 (Note: a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 is required for admission to the Teacher Education Program).
  3. Complete listed prerequisites.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

Language Arts/English (37 credits)

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

Mathematics (MATH) (42 credit hours)
The student must have already achieved a knowledge of mathematics with the competence to enter a first-semester calculus course. College course work may be taken to acquire competence, but such course work will not count as hours of credit toward the major or minor in mathematics.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

Chemistry, Earth-Space Science, Life Sciences, or Physics (43 credits)
The secondary science programs total 124 credits each, including 43 credit hours distributed in the sciences identified as appropriate for the secondary curriculum. Successful completion of the program in four years requires attention to when courses are offered and prerequisites.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

Social Studies (51-63 credits)
This major consists of an overall minimum of 51 credit hours in the areas listed below. At least 24 of them must be in courses numbered 200 or above. In no single area can more than 6 credit hours of course work at the 100 level be counted toward the major requirements. Advanced course work may be substituted for those courses specifically listed.

  1. Choose three social studies subject areas and complete the required number (15-21) of credit hours in each area. Recommendation: government and citizenship, historical perspectives, geographical perspectives, and economics are considered critical subject areas for schools; psychology and sociology are considered less critical.
  2. Select up to 6 credit hours of required 100-level survey courses in each social studies subject area. No more than 6 credit hours at the 100 level may be used in any subject area.
  3. At least 24 credit hours must be completed at the 300 level or higher in the social studies major.
  4. Choose an additional 6 hours distributed from two of the remaining social studies subjects to complete the 51 hours.
  5. A 2.5 overall GPA is required in the social studies major, including content field designated seminars attached to methods courses M 341 and M 421.
  6. 6. A 2.5 minimum GPA is required in each of the three social studies subject areas for certification.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

Theatre (34 credit hours)
The College of Arts and Sciences manages the course requirements for the Theatre program. The general education courses are specific to the college.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

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Professional Education—A Community of Teachers

A highly individualized way to earn a secondary teaching license, A Community of Teachers (CoT) centers on an ongoing seminar that features intensive, hands-on work in one school. Students complete the program not by earning course credits but by completing a portfolio of evidence of their ability as teachers. CoT is also open to students in the All School Settings Program seeking degrees in K-12 art, music, and physical education.

The Seminar
The central requirement of the program is an ongoing seminar (EDUC-S 400) that is led from one semester to the next by the same faculty member. Each seminar group contains students from different majors and includes both beginning students and student teachers. Each semester, the seminar’s focus is determined by the students and their professor; and under the umbrella of the seminar, each student organizes and carries out an individualized program of preparation. The seminar replaces six of the professional education courses of the standard program: EDUC-W 200, EDUC-P 312, EDUC-P 313, EDUC-H 340, EDUC-M 300, and the first special methods course; as well as all fieldwork courses associated with the program. However, completion of any of these courses still counts as progress toward the completion of the CoT program.

The Apprenticeship
CoT students spend one day a week in a school of their choice, working with a teacher of their choice who has consented to be their mentor. The relationship continues throughout students’ professional preparations, including student teaching.

The Portfolio
The activities of the apprenticeship are guided by a list of 30 Program Expectations that students satisfy by building evidence of their teaching capabilities. The evidence is organized in a portfolio that supports the case students must make to the faculty of their readiness to enter the profession.

Exceptional Needs-Early and Late Adolescence
The secondary special education program is available as a major only through the CoT program. The program includes the standard 36 credit hours of general education; combines the special education content and professional education requirements into 56 credit hours; and requires a content field concentration of 14-20 credit hours in language arts, mathematics, or science content and methods course work. The required content field concentration does not currently meet secondary major licensing requirements.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/SecondaryEd/tabid/5502/Default.aspx

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All School Settings Education Program

The All School Settings programs in music education, physical education, and visual arts education lead to a Bachelor of Science degree in those select content fields. The School of Music and the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation offer the degree programs in those respective fields. These programs are currently under revision. Detailed information and advising about those particular programs is provided by those schools.

Successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in music education, physical education, and visual arts programs requires meeting both academic content and performance-based standards, as assessed at different points by the respective schools and by state designated testing. The All-Grade education teacher license in Indiana mandates a content field; a target population at developmental levels of early and middle childhood, early and late adolescence and young adulthood; and multiple assignments in the school settings of kindergarten, elementary, middle school/junior high or high school grades 5-12.

The All School Settings program is divided into three main components. With the addition of electives, course work must total a minimum of 124 credit hours, as follows:

General Education 33 cr.
Professional Education 28-53 cr.
Subject Matter Specialty Studies 36-62 cr.1
Electives 0-22 cr.2
Total 124 cr.

Courses used to satisfy general education requirements also may be applied to fulfill requirements for a subject matter specialty study. In such cases, the course may be used to meet all requirements to which it will apply, but the credit hours may be counted only once toward the total of 124 credit hours needed for a degree.

1 Credits vary—see subject areas for the specific number of credit hours required for each subject.
2 Approximate because subject matter concentration credit hours may be used to satisfy general-education requirements, leaving the need for more electives to reach 124 credit hours for graduation.

Music Education
See the School of Music Bulletin for program details.

Physical Education
See the HPER Bulletin for program details.

Visual Arts
For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Visual%20Arts%20June%202008.pdf

World Languages (36-39 Credits)
For program requirements see the program planning sheet for each area:

Chinese
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Chinese%20June%202008.pdf

French
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/French%20June%202008.pdf

German
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/German%20June%202008.pdf

Japanese
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Japanese%20June%202008.pdf

Latin
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Latin%20June%202008.pdf

Russian
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Russian%20June%202008.pdf

Spanish
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Spanish%20June%202008.pdf

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Minors, Endorsements, and License Addition Programs

Minors/Endorsements
Due to changes in the state licensing framework, teaching minors and endorsements are no longer offered by the Indiana University School of Education.

License Addition Programs
The State of Indiana has authorized the Indiana University School of Education to offer license additions in selected areas. License additions have been approved in the areas of English as a Second Language, Computer Education, Health, Middle Grades Mathematics, Physical Education, and Reading Level I for elementary and secondary licenses.

Computer Educator License Addition
The Computer Education License (CEL) program will equip teachers to use technology integration methods, manage a computer lab, and provide enrichment experiences for students in settings at the same level as their original license. The license addition also permits secondary teachers to teach specific technology courses in middle, junior, and high school settings. The program is available to currently licensed teachers and teacher candidates who are completing an initial license in a recognized Teacher Education Program. In most cases, it may not be possible to complete this license addition as part of the four-year undergraduate degree program.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/Portals/204/sheets/Computer%20Educator%20License
%20Addition%20June%202008.pdf

English as a Second Language License Addition
A license addition in English as a Second Language will prepare teachers to work with students of different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. To earn an additional teaching area in English as a Second Language, students must first apply to the program through the Department of Language Education. This program is available only to teachers who have completed an initial license or teacher candidates who are in the process of completing an initial license in a recognized Teacher Education Program. Candidates must demonstrate oral proficiency in English as well as competence in a foreign language equivalent to two semesters of university foreign language or two years of high school foreign language. In most cases it may not be possible to complete this license addition as part of the four-year undergraduate degree program. Course work for the program will involve a combination of graduate and undergraduate courses.

For program requirements (program planning sheet), see:
site.educ.indiana.edu/DegreeProgramsForms/ESLLicense/tabid/
5810/Default.aspx

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