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School of Education 2002-2004 Undergraduate Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

 

School of
Education
2002-2004
Undergraduate
Academic Bulletin
Supplement

School of Education
W. W. Wright Education Building 
201 North Rose Avenue  
Bloomington, IN 47405-1006 
(812) 856-8500    Fax (812) 856-8440
Contact School of Education

School of Edcation
Education/Social Work Building (ES) 3137
902 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 274-6801
 

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Programs

School Codes
Program Options
Bachelor of Science: Elementary and Elementary/Middle School Majors
Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School
Licensure Programs
Certificate Programs

School Codes

In this section, courses from different schools and departments of Indiana University are listed and coded with three- and four-letter codes that indicate the originating department. Full descriptions of courses not offered in the School of Education can be found in the bulletins for the schools and departments listed. A guide to the codes is as follows:

EDUC (School of Education)
HER (Herron School of Art)
HPER (School of Physical Education)
JOUR (School of Journalism)
MUS (School of Music)
SLIS (School of Library and Information Science)
SPEA (School of Public and Environmental Affairs)

School of Liberal Arts
AFRO (Afro-American Studies)
ANTH (Anthropology)
COMM (Communication and Theatre)
ECON (Economics)
ENG (English)
FREN (French)
GEOG (Geography)
GER (German)
HIST (History)
PHIL (Philosophy)
POLS (Political Science)
REL (Religious Studies)
SOC (Sociology)
SPAN (Spanish)

School of Science
AST (Astronomy)
BIOL (Biology)
CHEM (Chemistry)
CSCI (Computer and Information Science)
GEOL (Geology)
MATH (Mathematical Sciences)
PHYS (Physics)
PSY (Psychology)
STAT (Statistics)

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Program Options

This bulletin states only the undergraduate requirements for initial teacher certification and for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree. Students interested in graduate work in education should consult the Bulletin of the School of Education Graduate Program. The School of Education offers the following undergraduate programs under current guidelines of the Indiana Professional Standards Board:

Undergraduate Education Programs
Indiana License Types and Coverage
Licensure Programs
Dual Licensure Programs

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Undergraduate Education Programs

Bachelor of Science in Education
Elementary Education
Elementary/Middle School Education
Secondary Education

English
Foreign Language: French, German, Spanish
Mathematics (Purdue School of Science)
Science (Purdue School of Science)
Social Studies
All-Grade Education
Art (Herron School of Art)
Physical Education (School of Physical Education)
Dual Licensure Programs
Adaptive Physical Education (only available with Physical Education program)
Computers
English as a New Language (ENL)
Exceptional Needs
Health (only available with Physical Education program)
Reading
Certification Programs
Coaching
Driver's Education
Students must meet requirements for graduation and certification, as stated in the Bulletin of the School of Education Undergraduate Program current at the time of initial enrollment or as set forth in any subsequent bulletin. Students may not choose to meet requirements as stated in the bulletin for any year prior to enrollment. Neither may students elect to meet requirements from a combination of bulletins or a combination of programs from other IU campuses. Requirements from a single bulletin must be met for each of the program components.

Postbaccalaureate Certification Options
It is also possible for students who hold baccalaureate or graduate degrees to pursue undergraduate teacher certification through the School of Education. Contact Education Student Services for further information.

In general, undergraduate programs in education comprise several distinct components:

  1. A program of general education,
  2. A professional education component, and
  3. Student teaching or other supervised practicum experience.
For secondary education majors or those pursuing a license to teach at the secondary level, preparation in the teaching area or an academic major constitutes a fourth distinct program component. Each component is briefly described below; additional detail is provided later in the bulletin.

General Education
General education refers to courses and other experiences that lay the foundation for IUPUI (IU-Indianapolis) students to evidence progress toward the IUPUI "Principles of Undergraduate Learning." There is a focus on building skills in written and oral communication, information technology, inquiry, science, literature, quantitative reasoning, and both global and democratic perspectives.

Students are encouraged to complete a program of general education by enrolling in course clusters or learning communities designated for education majors whenever they are available. In particular, students are urged to follow the general education template for the first 30 credit hours of their program. The sequence has been planned to provide a strong foundation and to build the connections among the contents of the individual courses.

Professional Education
The professional education component of "Learning to Teach/Teaching to Learn" develops the knowledge, disposition, and skills required in the profession. Some courses address these areas with a general approach, while other courses and field experience focus on what it takes to promote effective teaching and learning at a particular developmental level or in a particular school setting. At IUPUI (IU-Indianapolis), the professional education component is not a collection of isolated courses but rather a carefully articulated program of study. Courses are taken in blocks and in a prescribed order, and ideally across four semesters.

Teaching Area
Candidates pursuing a secondary (middle school/high school) or K-12 license must meet the content standards for the disciplines or subject areas they intend to teach. Typically, this is done by completing 36-51 credit hours in a content area with appropriate supporting areas. Since elementary majors are generalists, they are required to take courses in many disciplines. In addition, their general education component includes a requirement for an academic concentration in a selected area of study. The concentration is intended to be responsive to the interests and talents of individual students and to the public expectation that all teachers will have some area of particular expertise. Course lists for concentrations are available from Education Student Services.

Student Teaching
At IUPUI (IU-Indianapolis), all students are prepared to teach at two developmental levels and can expect to complete two separate student teaching assignments.

The two 8-credit hour experiences for student teaching comprise the culminating experience in the LT/TL program. By assuming full responsibility for a class of students, candidates demonstrate their achievement of standards, and reflect both on student learning and on their own effectiveness as teachers.

Return to Program Options

Indiana License Types and Coverage

The educator preparation programs at both the graduate and undergraduate levels at Indianapolis were developed to meet the license framework adopted by the Indiana Professional Standards Board (IPSB) in 1999. The new framework establishes requirements, not in terms of courses to be taken, but rather in terms of the standards that program graduates are expected to meet. The license framework addresses the principles set forth by the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) and includes both content standards for different subjects/teaching areas and developmental standards associated with particular educational settings (early childhood, elementary, middle school, high school).

Return to Program Options

Licensure Programs

Elementary License
Preparation to teach kindergarten through sixth grade
Developmental Standards: Early Childhood and Middle Childhood
School Settings: Elementary: Primary and Elementary: Intermediate
Content Standards: Generalist: Early and Middle Childhood

Elementary/Middle School License (Starting fall 2003)
Preparation to teach third grade through eighth grade
Developmental Standards: Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence
School Settings: Elementary: Intermediate and Middle School/Junior High School
Content Standards: Generalist: Middle Childhood, Generalist: Early Adolescence, and two of the following: Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies

The Middle School/High School Content Area License
Preparation to teach sixth through twelfth grades in a particular content area
Developmental Standards: Early Adolescence and Adolescence/Young Adult
School Setting: Middle School/Junior High School and High School
Content Standards: Foreign Language, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies

K-12 License
Preparation to teach kindergarten through twelfth grades
Developmental Standards: Early Childhood, Middle Childhood, Early Adolescence, and Adolescence/Young Adult
School Settings: Elementary: Primary, Elementary: Intermediate, Middle School/ Junior High School, and High School
Content Standards: Physical Education or Visual Arts

Return to Program Options

Dual Licensure Programs

Students may complete any of the following dual programs in conjunction with one of the licensure programs listed above. The developmental standards and school setting of the license will be the same as the partner license.

Adaptive Physical Education
Preparation for Physical Education majors to teach adaptive physical education
Content Standard: Adaptive Physical Education

Computer Education Dual License
Preparation to teach computer education
Content Standard: Computer Education

English as a New Language (ENL) Dual License
Preparation to teach children whose first language is not English
Content Standard: English as a New Language

Exceptional Needs Dual License
Preparation to teach children with special needs
Content Standard: Exceptional Needs

Health Dual License
Preparation for physical education majors to teach health education
Content Standard: Health Education

Reading Dual License
Provides expertise in the teaching of reading
Content Standard: Reading

The School of Education at Indianapolis also offers programs at the graduate level that lead to the following licenses:

School Services (Counselor)
Building Level Administrator
District Level Administrator

Return to Program Options

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Bachelor of Science: Elementary and Elementary/Middle School Majors

General Education
Teacher Education Program
Student Teaching (Elementary and Elementary/Middle School)

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General Education

Courses that build the general education foundation for elementary education majors are listed below; they are organized by the Principles of Undergraduate Learning to which they are most directly related. Students are encouraged to follow this template. Both the particular sequence and the course clusters or learning communities designated for education majors have been planned to provide the strongest foundation and to build the most powerful connections among the contents of the individual courses.

First Semester (15 cr.)
First Year Seminar (1 cr.)
EDUC W200 Microcomputers in Education (3 cr.) +
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.) +
GEOG G110 Human Geography (3 cr.)
HPER P290 Movement Experiences (2 cr.)
Social Science Elective (3 cr.) *

Second Semester (18 cr.)
BIOL N100 Contemporary Biology (3 cr.)
Concentration course (3 cr.) **
EDUC Q200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (3 cr.) +
ENG W132 Elementary Composition II (3 cr.) +
HER H100 Art Appreciation (3 cr.)
Historical perspectives elective (3 cr.) *

Third Semester (18 cr.)
COMM R110 Speech Communication (3 cr.) +
Concentration course (3 cr.) **
Diversity Elective (3 cr.) *
GEO/CHEM integrator (3 cr.)
Literature elective (3 cr.) *
MATH M130 or M136 or EDUC N343 (6 cr.) +

Fourth Semester (17 cr.)
Concentration Course (3 cr.) **
Concentration Course (3 cr.) (if not taking MATH 132) **
EDUC E449 or ENG L390 Children's Literature (3 cr.)
MATH 132 (if MATH M130 has been taken) +
MUS E241 Music Fundamentals (2 cr.)
PHYS/AST integrator (3 cr.)
Quantitative reasoning elective (3 cr.) *


* Social Studies Elective
ANTH A103 Human Origins and Prehistory
ANTH A104 Culture and Society
ECON E101 Survey of Current Economic Issues and Problems
POLS Y101 Principles of Political Science
SOC R100 Introduction to Sociology
SOC R121 Social Problems #

* Historical Perspective and Inquiry Elective
HIST H105 American History I
HIST H106 American History II
HIST H217 The Nature of History

* Diversity Elective
AFRO A150 Survey of the Culture of Black Americans
ANTH A104 Culture and Society
POLS Y217 Introduction to Comparative Politics
REL R212 Comparative Religion
WOST W105 Introduction to Women's Studies

* Quantitative Reasoning Elective
MATH M118 Finite Mathematics #
MATH M290 Mathematics and Art #
PHIL P162 Logic
PHIL P265 Elements of Symbolic Logic
POLS Y205 Elements of Political Analysis
PSY B305 Statistics #
SOC R251 Methods of Social Research #
STAT 301 Elementary Statistical Methods (I) #
STAT 302 Elementary Statistical Methods (II) #

* Literature Elective
COMM T130 Introduction to Theater
ENG L115 Literature for Today #
FLAC F200 World Cultures through Literature

** Concentration (9 additional cr. for a total of 12-15 cr.) in one of the following areas. See Education Student Services for course lists for each concentration.

  • Afro-American Studies
  • American Studies
  • Art
  • Creative Writing
  • English as a New Language
  • Geography
  • History
  • Literature
  • Mathematics
  • Movement and Dance
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science/Government
  • Science
  • Theatre
+ Must receive a "C" or higher

# These courses may have prerequisites

Return to Bachelor of Science: Elementary and
  Elementary/Middle School Majors

Teacher Education Program

Admission to the Learning to Teach/Teaching to Learn program is competitive. Applications are due February 7 for fall admission and October 10 for spring. The application can be found at www.education.iupui.edu.

The professional education component is a carefully articulated program of study where courses are taken in blocks and in a prescribed order (presented below). The professional education portion of the program is designed to be a four-semester sequence with courses that are taught on site at professional development schools (PDS) in Marion County. These schools have entered into a special partnership with the School of Education. Students also student teach at these PDS sites. Student teaching requires five days a week.

Students pursuing an initial license to teach in grades K-6 are authorized for professional education courses only after admission to the Teacher Education Program. Because LT/TL is a field-based program in which formal class sessions are integrated with field experiences, most professional education courses are offered at a time when teacher education candidates are able to work with students in K-12 classrooms. Most professional education courses are scheduled during the day, and students will need to make arrangements to devote one (part-time enrollment) or two days (full-time enrollment) each week to complete the class and field experience work.

Students pursuing the elementary/middle school license also will complete additional content area courses in two areas. They may select from mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science.

The School of Education uses performance-based assessments to evaluate students' readiness for an Initial Professional Educator License. In addition to their course assignments, students are expected to pass three benchmark assessments during the LT/TL program. Benchmark I is a rubric that evaluates students' basic competencies and dispositions; Benchmark II is a performance task that involves interviewing individual learners; and Benchmark III is a demonstration of students' teaching abilities. These measures and others, including content area PRAXIS tests and student teaching evaluations, are used to determine whether a student will be recommended for licensure upon completion of the program.

Block I (elementary only) Block I (elementary/middle school only)

A: Diversity and Learning (7 cr.)

A: Diversity and Learning (7 cr.)
EDUC M320 Diversity and Learning (6 cr.) EDUC M322 Diversity and Learning: Reaching Every Adolescent (6 cr.)
EDUC M301 Field Experience (1 cr.) EDUC M301 Field Experience (1 cr.)

B: Literacy and Numeracy in Early Childhood (7 cr.)

B: Middle School (7 cr.)
EDUC E345 Language Arts and Mathematics for Young Children (6 cr.) EDUC S420 Teaching and Learning in the Middle School (3 cr.)
EDUC M303 Field Experience (1 cr.) EDUC M469 Content Area Literacy (3 cr.)

EDUC M303 Field Experience (1 cr.)

* Benchmark I Rubrics at the end of Block I

Block II (both programs)

A: Middle Childhood A (7 cr.)
EDUC E340 Reading Methods I (3 cr.)
EDUC E324 Teaching About the Arts (3 cr.)
EDUC M304 Field Experience (1 cr.)

B: Middle Childhood B (7 cr.)
EDUC E343 Math Methods (3 cr.)
EDUC E328 Science Methods (3 cr.)
EDUC M305 Field Experience (1 cr.)

*Benchmark II performance assessment at the end of Block II

Block III (both programs)

A: Individualizing Instruction (7 cr.)
EDUC K307 Methods of Teaching Students with Disabilities (3 cr.)
EDUC E341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (3 cr.)
EDUC M306 Field Experience (1 cr.)

B: Reflective Practitioner (8 cr.)
EDUC M425 Elementary Student Teaching (8 cr.)

*Benchmark III Portfolio at the end of Block III

Block IV (both programs: IV B is different)

A: Curriculum in a Democracy (7 cr.)
EDUC E325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.)
EDUC H340 Education and American Culture (3 cr.)
EDUC M307 Field Experience (1 cr.)

Block IV B: Reflective Practitioner (8 cr.) Block IV B: Reflective Practitioner (8 cr.)
(elementary program) (elementary/middle school program)
EDUC M425 Elementary Student Teaching (8 cr.) *EDUC M451 Middle School Student Teaching (8 cr.)*

*Students doing a dual licensure program will register for a 4 credit hour practicum for the dual program and 4 hours of traditional student teaching.

Return to Bachelor of Science: Elementary and
  Elementary/Middle School Majors

Student Teaching (Elementary and Elementary/Middle School)

All interns complete student teaching assignments in two school settings. For elementary education majors, student teaching will comprise two 8-week placements, the first in Block IIIB and the second in Block IVB. Elementary majors will complete one primary placement and one intermediate placement. Elementary/middle school majors will complete one elementary placement and one middle school placement. In the elementary/middle school program, the student teaching requirement will be met by 8-week placements in an elementary and middle school settings during Blocks III and IV.

Eligibility Requirements for Student Teaching
To be eligible for student teaching, an intern must have:

  1. Been admitted to the Teacher Education Program
  2. Submitted an application for student teaching before the end of the fall semester of the academic year preceding the year of the desired experience
  3. Achieved passing scores on the Benchmark I Rubric and Benchmark II performance task with no outstanding issues
  4. Achieved senior or graduate standing in the university or be within two semesters and one summer session of graduation. (In no case should a student have competed fewer than 84 credit hours prior to the semester in which the student teaching and/or practicum is to be done)
  5. Completed all professional education and education technology courses within ten years and attained a minimum GPA of 2.5 in all professional education courses with a minimum grade of C in each professional education course
  6. Earned a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 at Indiana University
Application for Student Teaching
All students must file an application for student teaching. This is done during the fall semester of the academic year preceding the year in which the student teaching is to be done. (For example: students apply in fall 2002 for student teaching assignments in either fall 2003 or spring 2004.) The Office of Student Teaching makes arrangements for placement and supervision.

Assessment during Student Teaching (Benchmark III)
A student teaching portfolio submitted at the end of the first student teaching assignment is a key element of the performance assessment system. The requirements of the portfolio are outlined in the LT/TL Curriculum Assessment Handbook. If the student teaching portfolio submitted at the conclusion of the initial student teaching placement does not receive a passing score, the student will receive feedback and have the opportunity to revise and resubmit after the second student teaching placement.

The mentor teachers and university supervisors conduct formal observations of interns.

Return to Bachelor of Science: Elementary and
  Elementary/Middle School Majors

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Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

Each discipline in the secondary program (English, foreign language, mathematics, science, and social studies) requires a unique and highly prescribed program of studies. Students should get the most current program of studies and help with course selection from School of Education advisors. Courses in these programs of study fall into three categories: the common core curriculum, the discipline-based preparation program, and the teacher education program. In all areas of these programs, the courses are carefully selected to prepare students to meet the rigorous content and teaching standards required for a middle school and high school teaching license in the discipline.

Common Core Curriculum
Discipline-Based Preparation Program
English
Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Teacher Education Program

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Common Core Curriculum (45-51 credits)

This part of the curriculum includes courses drawn from the common general education core approved by the faculties of both the School of Liberal Arts and the School of Science and is based on the IUPUI Principles of Undergraduate Learning. Students take:

  • UCOL First Year Experience Course in their discipline (1-3 credits)
  • COMM R100 (3 credits)
  • EDUC W200 or equivalent (3 credits)
  • EDUC H341 (3 credits) (Science majors do not take this)
  • ENG 131 (3 credits)
  • ENG 132 or equivalent (3 credits)
  • 6 credits of Quantitative and Analytical Skills
  • 9 credits of Natural Science
  • 15 credits Humanities, Social Science, and Comparative World Cultures
Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

Discipline-Based Preparation Program (36-51 credits)

Each discipline has a specific program for the preparation of teachers. In some departments, such as Mathematics and Science, students complete discipline-based majors and minors like chemistry and physics. In other departments, such as English, Foreign Language, and Social Studies, students take courses that provide them with a broad spectrum of knowledge across sub-disciplines, such as literature and writing; or history, geography, and economics. All courses in this category must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

Requirements in all the secondary programs are currently under review in light of new license frameworks and standards. The lists that are provided here are subject to change as new courses are developed and gaps in the curriculum are addressed.

Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

English (36 credits)

  1. Language
  2. Literature
  3. Writing Courses
Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

I. Language (6 credits)

ENG G205 Introduction to the English Language (3 cr.)

Elective (Select one in consultation with an advisor):
ENG G206 Introduction to Grammar (3 cr.)
ENG G301 History of the English Language (3 cr.)
ENG G302 Structure of Modern English (3 cr.)
ENG G310 Social Speech Patterns (3 cr.)
ENG W310 Language and the Study of Writing (3 cr.)

Return to English

II. Literature (18 credits)

Literary Genres (6 cr.)

Select either two courses (6 cr.) from Option A OR one course from Option A and one from Option B:

Option A
ENG C292 Introduction to Film Studies (3 cr.)
ENG L203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.)
ENG L204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.)
ENG L205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.)

Option B
ENG L213 Literary Masterpieces I (3 cr.)
ENG L214 Literary Masterpieces II (3 cr.)

Literary Traditions (9 cr.)

Select two courses (6 cr.) from one of the following options:

Option A: Surveys of British Literature
ENG L301 Critical/Historical English Literature I (3 cr.)
ENG L302 Critical/Historical English Literature II (3 cr.)

Option B: Surveys of American Literature

ENG L351 Critical/Historical American Literature I (3 cr.)
ENG L352 Critical/Historical American Literature II (3 cr.)
ENG L353 Critical/Historical American Literature III (3 cr.)

Select one course (3 cr.) from the following:
ENG L220 Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.)
ENG L315 Major Plays of Shakespeare (3 cr.)

Diversity Literature (3 cr.):

Select one course from any of the following:
EDUC X460 Books for Reading Instruction: Adolescent Literature
ENG L207 Women and Literature
ENG L370 Recent Black American Writing
ENG L378 Studies in Women and Literature
ENG L379 American Ethnic and Minority Literature
ENG L406 Topics in African American Literature

Return to English

III. Writing Courses (12 credits)

Writing Nonfiction (3 cr.)

Select one course from the following:
ENG W305 Writing Creative Nonfiction
ENG W314 The Art of Fact: Writing Nonfiction Prose
ENG W315 Writing for the Web

Editing and Style (3 cr.)

Select one course from the following:
ENG G204 Rhetorical Issues in Grammar and Usage
ENG W365 Theory and Practice of Editing

Creative Writing (3 cr.)

Select one course from the following:
ENG W206 Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG W207 Introduction to Fiction Writing
ENG W208 Introduction to Poetry Writing

Teaching Writing (3 cr.)

Select one course from the following:
ENG W396 Writing Fellows Seminar
ENG W400 Issues in Teaching Writing
ENG W412 Technology and Literacy

Return to English

Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

Foreign Language (36 credits)

Programs in this area lead to teaching French, German, or Spanish. All three language majors require a minimum of 36 credit hours covering language, literature, culture, civilization, and electives. Prior to taking EDUC M445 Methods of Teaching Foreign Language, all language majors must take a departmental proficiency examination. The examination may be taken more than once, but the student must pass the examination before being admitted to student teaching. The examination will test the student's oral proficiency and knowledge of language structure.

French
German
Spanish

Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

French Major (36-41 credit hours)

The French major requires the completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including at least 30 credit hours in 300- and 400-level courses. Courses below the 200 level may not be counted toward licensing.

Prior to admission into EDUC M445 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages, students must take a departmental proficiency examination. The examination may be taken more than once, but the student must pass the examination before being admitted to student teaching. The examination will test the student's oral proficiency and knowledge of language structure.

200-level courses (6-8 credit hours)
This work may be completed through one of the following options:

  1. By completing a sequence of courses at the 200 level
    FREN F203 Second-Year Composition, Conversation, and Reading I (4 cr.)
    FREN F204 Second-Year Composition, Conversation, and Reading II (4 cr.)
  2. By testing into a 300-level course and applying to the Department of French for 6 credit hours in FREN F299 (special credit).
  3. By testing into FREN F204 and receiving a minimum grade of C and then applying to the Department of French for credit in FREN F203 Second-Year French I.
Required (18 credit hours):
FREN F300 Lectures et analyses littéraires (3 cr.)
FREN F307 Masterpieces of French Literature (3 cr.)
FREN F328 Advanced French Composition and Grammar (3 cr.)
FREN F331 French Pronunciation and Diction (3 cr.)
FREN F360 Introduction socio-culturelle à la France (3 cr.)
FREN F421 Fourth-Year French (3 cr.)

Electives (15 credit hours):
FREN F410 French Literature of the Middle Ages (3 cr.)
FREN F428 Seventeenth-Century French Literature (3 cr.)
FREN F443 Nineteenth-Century Novel I (3 cr.)
FREN F444 Nineteenth-Century Novel II (3 cr.)
FREN F452 La Civilisation et littérature québécoise (3 cr.)
FREN F453-F454 Littérature contemporaine I-II (3-3 cr.)
FREN F460 French Fiction in Film (3 cr.)
FREN F480 French Conversation (3 cr.)
FREN F495 Individual Readings in French Literature (1-3 cr.)
FREN F498 Foreign Study in France (4-8 cr.)

Return to Foreign Languages

German Major (36-38 credit hours)

The German major requires the completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including at least 30 credit hours in 300- or 400-level courses. Courses below the 200 level may not be counted toward licensing.

Prior to admission into EDUC M445 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages, students must take a departmental proficiency examination. The examination may be taken more than once, but the student must pass the examination before being admitted to student teaching. The examination will test the student's oral proficiency and knowledge of language structure.

200-level courses (6-8 credit hours)
This course work may be completed through one of the following options:

  1. Advanced placement through German G299 (6 cr.) or
  2. Satisfactory completion of German G225 (4 cr.) and G230 (4 cr.)
Required (15 credit hours):
GER G300 Mittelstufe I (3 cr.)
GER G330 Mittelstufe II (3 cr.)
GER G331 Business German (3 cr.)
GER G333 German Translation Practice (3 cr.)
GER G340 Deutsch: Schreiben und Sprechen (3 cr.)
GER G431 Advanced Business German (3 cr.)
GER G445 Fortgeschrittenes Deutsch: Grammatik (3 cr.)
GER G465 Fortgeschrittenes Deutsch: Kommunikation (3 cr.)

Literature (12 credit hours)
Select from the following:
GER G371 Der deutsche Film (3 cr.)
GER G401 Deutsche Kultur in Amerika (3 cr.)
GER G407 Deutsche Literatur bis 1750 (3 cr.)
GER G408 Deutsche Klassik und Romantik (3 cr.)
GER G409 19. Jahrhunderts: Kultur und Literatur (3 cr.)
GER G410 20. Jahrhunderts: Kultur und Literatur (3 cr.)
GER G490 Das deutsche Kolloquium: Variable Titles (3 cr.)
GER G498 Individual Studies in German (1-3 cr.)

Culture (3 credit hours)
GER G365 Deutsche Kulturkunde (3 cr.)

Return to Foreign Languages

Spanish Major (36-38 credit hours)

The Spanish major requires the completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including 30 credit hours in 300- and 400-level courses. Courses taken in Spanish below the 200 level may not count toward licensing.

Prior to admission into EDUC M445 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages, students must take a departmental proficiency examination. The examination may be repeated, but the student must pass the examination before being admitted to student teaching. The examination will test the student's oral proficiency and knowledge of language structure.

200-level courses (6-10 credit hours)
May be completed through one of the following options:

  1. SPAN S203 Second-Year Spanish I (4 cr.)
    SPAN S204 Second-Year Spanish II (4 cr.)
    SPAN S311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.)
  2. Placing by examination in SPAN S204 (4 cr.) and receiving 3 credit hours of special credit upon successful completion of the course (7 cr.), and SPAN S210 (2 cr.) for a total of 9 credit hours.
  3. Placing by examination at the 300 level and receiving 6 credit hours of special credit in SPAN S298 upon the successful completion of a 300-level course.
Language (12 credit hours)
SPAN S313 Writing Spanish I (3 cr.)
SPAN S317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.)
SPAN S320 Spanish Pronunciation and Diction(3 cr.)
SPAN S428 Applied Spanish Linguistics (3 cr.)

Literature (6 credit hours)
SPAN S360 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 cr.)
Additional 3 credit hours selected from 300- or 400-level literature courses

Culture and Civilization (3 cr.)
SPAN S363 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 cr.)

Electives (9 cr.)
To be selected from any 300- or 400-level courses not taken to fulfill other requirements.

Return to Foreign Languages

Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

Mathematics (38 credits)

Students pursuing the standard senior high/junior high/middle school teacher certification program in mathematics for a first undergraduate degree at IUPUI must be enrolled in the IUPUI School of Science and must meet degree requirements for the IUPUI School of Science as well as those for teacher certification, which include the professional education program and benchmarks.

CSCI 230 Computing I (3 cr.)
MATH 163 Integrated Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5 cr.)
MATH 164 Integrated Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5 cr.)
MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus (4 cr.)
MATH 262 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (4 cr.)
MATH 300 Foundation of the Number Systems (3 cr.)
MATH 351 Elementary Linear Algebra (3 cr.)
MATH 453 Algebra I (3 cr.)
MATH 463 Advanced Geometry (3 cr.)
MATH 583 History of Elementary Mathematics (3 cr.)
STAT 311 Introductory Probability I (3 cr.) or
  STAT 511 Statistical Methods I (3 cr.)

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Science (51 credits)

Students pursuing licensure to teach biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics at the secondary level must first meet the requirements of the School of Science for a bachelor's degree in science and then complete the Transition to Teaching (T2T) program. The T2T program is a post-baccalaureate program and is in the pilot stages. More detailed information about the program can be found in the graduate bulletin.

The license framework adopted by the Indiana Professional Standards board in June 1999 represents a significant departure from earlier regulations. Rather than the traditional single discipline license in science, the new framework will license middle and high school teachers for the following areas. Students should complete courses in one or more of the following licensure areas:

Life Science/Chemistry
Physical Science—Chemistry
Physical Science—Physics
Earth/Space Science
Physics
Chemistry

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Life Science/Chemistry

(Biology major with science concentration)

BIOL K101 Concepts of Biology I
BIOL K103 Concepts of Biology II
BIOL K322 Genetics
BIOL K341/K342 Principles of Ecology/Lab
BIOL K338/K339 or K483 or K484 *
BIOL K356/K357 *
BIOL K331, K332 or K443 *
CHEM C105/C125 Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C106/C126 Chemistry II/Lab
CHEM C341/C343 Organic I/Lab
CHEM C342 Organic II
PHYS P201 Physics I
PHYS P202 Physics II

*Two of these courses must be taken with the associated laboratory.

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Physical Science—Chemistry

(Chemistry major with science concentration in physics)

CHEM C105/C125 Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C106/C126 Chemistry II/Lab
CHEM C341/C343 Organic Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C342/344 Organic Chemistry II/Lab
CHEM C310/C311 Analytical Chemistry/Lab
CHEM C325 Introduction Instrumental Analysis
CHEM C360 Elementary Physical Chemistry
PHYS P201 Physics I
PHYS P202 Physics II
PHYS 200 or 342/432L Modern Physics

One additional course with a laboratory selected from biology, geology, or physics.

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Physical Science—Physics

(Physics major with chemistry minor)

PHYS 152 Mechanics
PHYS 251 Heat, Electricity, Optics
PHYS 300 Introduction to Elementary Math Physics
PHYS 310 Intermediate Mechanics
PHYS 330 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 342/342L Modern Physics/Lab
PHYS 353 Electronics Laboratory
PHYS 400/401 Physical Optics/Lab
PHYS 416 Thermal Physics
PHYS 442 Quantum Mechanics
CHEM C105/C125 Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C106/C126 Chemistry II/Lab
CHEM C341/C343 Organic Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C342 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM C310 or C360

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Earth/Space Science

(Geology major with collateral science concentration)

GEOL G110 Physical Geology
GEOL G206 Advanced Physical Geology Lab
GEOL G209 History of the Earth
GEOL G221 Introductory Mineralogy
GEOL G222 Introductory Petrology
GEOL G303 Geologic Mapping/Field
GEOL G304 Principles of Paleontology
GEOL G334 Principles of Sedimentation

Four GEOL 300-400 level courses (12 credits)
CHEM C105/C125 Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C106/C126 Chemistry II/Lab

Two courses selected from two of the following areas: astronomy (recommended), biology, climatology, oceanography, and physics.

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Physics

(Physics major)

PHYS 152 Mechanics
PHYS 251 Heat, Electricity, Optics
PHYS 300 Introduction to Elementary Math Physics
PHYS 310 Intermediate Mechanics
PHYS 330 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 342/342L Modern Physics/Lab
PHYS 353 Electronics Laboratory
PHYS 400/401 Physical Optics/Lab
PHYS 416 Thermal Physics
PHYS 442 Quantum Mechanics
CHEM C105/C125 Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C106/C126 Chemistry II/Lab

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Chemistry

(Chemistry major)

CHEM C105/C125 Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C106/C126 Chemistry II/Lab
CHEM C341/C343 Organic Chemistry I/Lab
CHEM C342/344 Organic Chemistry II/Lab
CHEM C310/C311 Analytical Chemistry/Lab
CHEM C325 Introduction to Instrumental Analysis
CHEM C360 Elementary Physical Chemistry
PHYS P201 Physics I
PHYS P202 Physics II

Two additional courses having a laboratory component chosen from biology, geology, or physics.

*Recommended: C483. Total of 33 credit hours of chemistry courses is required. The Department of Chemistry requires a minimum grade of C in all chemistry courses (C- grades are unacceptable).

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Return to Bachelor of Science: Middle School/High School

Social Studies (27 hours)

This program prepares an individual to teach middle school or high school social studies in three of six areas:

  • Economics
  • Geographical Perspectives
  • Government and Citizenship
  • Historical Perspectives
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
All students are expected to complete course work in the area of Historical Perspectives and to select at least two additional areas of specialization. The core curriculum for students in this program of studies is designed with social studies courses that all prospective teachers must take. The advanced discipline-based work outlined below provides more student choices.

Disciplinary Specialization (27 credits)
Complete the courses for Historical Perspectives and your choice of at least 2 additional areas.

Historical Perspectives (9 credits)
Choice of 200-level or higher (3 cr.)
Choice of 300-level or higher (3 cr.)
Choice of 300-level or higher (3 cr.)

Economics (9 credits)
ECON E202 (3 cr.)
ECON E270 (3 cr.)
Choice of 300-or 400-level course (3 cr.)

Geographical Perspectives (9 credits)
GEO G326 or G327 (3 cr.)
GEO G314 or G315 (3 cr.)
GEO G300 or G337 or G338 (3 cr.)

Government/Citizenship (9 credits)
(Select three)
POLS Y215 (3 cr.)
POLS Y301 (3 cr.)
POLS Y304 (3 cr.)
POLS Y305 (3 cr.)
POLS Y306 (3 cr.)
POLS Y307 (3 cr.)
POLS Y319 (3 cr.)
POLS Y322 (3 cr.)
POLS Y324 (3 cr.)
POLS Y360 (3 cr.)
POLS Y383 (3 cr.)
POLS Y384 (3 cr.)

Psychology (9 credits)
PSY B105 or B307 (3 cr.)
PSY B310 or B340 or B360 (3 cr.)
PSY B370 or B380 (3 cr.)

Sociology (9 credits)
SOC R121 (3 cr.)
SOC R351 (3 cr.)*
SOC R356 or R357 (3 cr.)*

*Requires R100 as a prerequisite course.

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Teacher Education Program (38 credits)

Admission to the Learning to Teach/Teaching to Learn program is competitive, and applications are due February 7 for fall admission and October 10 for spring (except for science students, who make application to the Transition to Teaching program instead of to Learning to Teach/Teaching to Learn). Students must have a 2.5 overall GPA and a 2.5 GPA in their discipline-based courses. At least one-half of their discipline-based course work must be completed before they begin the teacher education program.

The teacher education program is designed to be a four-semester sequence. The courses must be taken in blocks. All the blocks require students to spend time in schools. Student teaching is required five days a week.

Block I Diversity and Learning (7 credits)
EDUC M322 Diversity and Learning: Reaching Every Adolescent (6 cr.)
EDUC M301 Field Experience (1 cr.)
Benchmark I Rubrics

Block II Middle School Block (7 credits)
EDUC M469 Content Area Literacy (3 cr.)
EDUC M303 Field Experience (1 cr.)
EDUC S420 Teaching and Learning in the Middle School (3 cr.)

Block III High School Block (4 credits)
EDUC S430 Teaching and Learning in High School (3 cr.)
EDUC M304 Field Experience (1 cr.)

Content Block (4 credits)
May be taken concurrently with Block II or Block III.
EDUC XXX Discipline-Based Methods (3 cr.)
EDUC M403 Field Experience (1 cr.)
Benchmark II Assessment

Block IV Student Teaching (16 credits)
EDUC M425 Student Teaching in Middle Schools - 8 weeks (8 cr.)
Benchmark III Assessment
EDUC M480 Student Teaching in High School - 8 weeks (8 cr.)

Student Teaching (16 credit hours)
For students pursuing a license to teach at the secondary level, student teaching comprises the final semester. Back-to-back placements in middle school and high school settings are arranged through the School of Education. Either developmental level may be scheduled first; order will depend on student preference and availability of mentor teachers.

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Licensure Programs

All-Grade Licensure Programs
Dual Licensure Programs

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All-Grade Licensure Programs

Students pursuing an all-grades license must be students in good standing in either HPER or Herron, and meet the degree requirements of the relevant school as well as the School of Education requirements for licensure.

General Education
Students must complete the program of general education outlined by the relevant school (HPER or Herron).

Teaching Areas

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Because of changes in the state license framework, the requirements for Physical Education students pursuing a teaching license are currently under review. Students are encouraged to contact Dr. Betty Jones, chair of teacher education in the School of Physical Education, for a current list of requirements in the teaching area.

VISUAL ARTS
The art education program is currently under review and students are encouraged to consult with Dr. Cindy Bixler Borgmann, coordinator of art education in the Herron School of Art.

Professional Education AND Student Teaching
The professional education and student teaching requirements for students in all-grades programs are currently under review. Students should consult an academic advisor in the School of Education for specific information.

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Dual Licensure Programs

About the Dual Licensure Program
Computer Dual Program
English As A New Language Dual Program
Reading Dual Program
Special Education (Mild Intervention) Dual Program

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About the Dual Licensure Program

Students who wish to be licensed in an additional area may take designated course work to earn a dual license. Dual licensure programs are only available to students obtaining their initial teaching license. The additional content area will be applicable to the developmental levels of the initial license. Programs are available at the graduate level for licensed teachers who seek to add other certification areas to their licenses.

Students apply to a dual program when completing the application to teacher education. However, some of the course work for certain programs may be completed prior to entering the teacher education program. See an advisor in the School of Education for details. A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for each dual licensure area.

Students will student teach in their dual licensure area during the second student teaching experience. They will register for the appropriate 4 credit hour practicum and 4 additional credit hours of the traditional student teaching for their initial program. The all-grade requirements are currently under development. See an advisor in the School of Education for information.

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Computer Dual Program (21 credit hours)

The addition of the "Computer Endorsement" to the standard teaching license serves as credential for those who wish to teach computer education.

EDUC W200 Microcomputers for Education: An Introduction (3 cr.)
EDUC W204 Programming for Microcomputers in Education (Java for Educators) (3 cr.) or
CSCI N331 Visual Basic Programming (3 cr.)
EDUC W210 Survey of Computer-Based Education (3 cr.)
EDUC W220 Technical Issues in Education (3 cr.)
EDUC W310 Computer-Based Teaching Methods (3 cr.)
EDUC W410 Practicum in Computer-Based Education (4 cr.)

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English As A New Language Dual Program (25 credit hours)

EDUC E449 Trade Books for the Classroom (elementary and elementary/middle school majors) or
EDUC X460 Books for Reading Instruction (all-grade and secondary majors) (3 cr.)
EDUC L442 Teaching English Language Learners: Bilingual and ENL (3 cr.)
EDUC M470 Practicum in ENL (4 cr.)
EDUC X400 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading (3 cr.)
EDUC X470 Psycholinguistics for Teachers of Reading (3 cr.)
ENG G205 Introduction to English Language (3 cr.)
ENG G206 Introduction to Study of Grammar (3 cr.) or
ENG G310 Social Speech Patterns (P: G205, G206, or consent of instructor)
ENG G432 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)
ENG G441 Materials Preparation for ESL Instruction (4 cr.)

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Reading Dual Program (22 hours)

The holder of the reading minor is eligible to be a reading teacher at the level of the certification to which it is attached.

Required courses: Elementary and Elementary/Middle School Majors
EDUC E340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (3 cr.)
EDUC E341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (3 cr.)
EDUC E449 Trade Books for the Classroom (1-3 cr.) or ENG L390 Children's Literature (3 cr.)
EDUC X401 Critical Reading in the Content Area (3 cr.) or
EDUC X400 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading in the Classroom (3 cr.)
EDUC X425 Practicum in Reading (4 cr.)
EDUC X470 Psycholinguistics for Reading Teachers (3 cr.) or an advisor-approved linguistics course

Electives: Approved courses from reading, educational psychology, special education, and language-related areas.

Required Courses: Secondary and All-Grade Majors
EDUC M469 Content Area Literacy (3 cr.)
EDUC X400 Diagnostic Teaching of Reading in the Classroom (3 cr.)
EDUC X401 Critical Reading in the Content Area (3 cr.)
EDUC X425 Practicum in Reading (4 cr.)
EDUC X460 Books for Reading Instruction (Adolescent Literature) (3 cr.) or ENG L376 Adolescent Literature (3 cr.)
EDUC X470 Psycholinguistics for Reading Teachers (3 cr.) or an advisor-approved linguistics course

Electives: Approved courses from reading, educational psychology, special education, and language-related areas.

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Special Education (Mild Intervention) Dual Program

Students will be licensed in two developmental areas based on their initial program. This program prepares students to teach students with mild intervention needs. Mild intervention certification will replace licensure in the areas of learning disabilities and mild cognitive disabilities in the state of Indiana.

Students must enroll in either the full-time or part-time Learning to Teach/Teaching to Learn program. Students may only start this program during the fall semester. In addition, students are required to take one of the following 3 credit seminars each semester while completing this program:

Required Special Education courses:

Seminar 1: EDUC K490 (Fall) Families in School and Society
Seminar 2: EDUC K490 (Spring) Classroom Management and Behavior Support
Seminar 3: EDUC K490 (Summer I) Collaboration and Consultation
Seminar 4: EDUC K490 (Summer II) Technology Applications
Seminar 5: EDUC K490 (Fall) Assessment and Instruction I—Mild
Seminar 6: EDUC K490 (Spring) Transition Across the Lifespan
Practicum: EDUC K495 (4 cr.) (taken during student teaching semester)

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Certificate Programs

While requirements are under review in light of the new state license framework, the following certificates are available. A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for each program.

Coaching (18 credit hours)

BIOL N217 Human Physiology (5 cr.)
HPER A480 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (1 cr.)
HPER P397 Kinesiology (3 cr.)
HPER P450 Principles and Psychology of Coaching (3 cr.)
HPER Theory and Techniques of Coaching: 6 credits from the following: A361, A362, A363, A364, A365, A366, A367, A368, A369, A370, A371, or A372.

Driver And Traffic Safety

HPER S350 Content and Materials in Safety Education (2 cr.)
HPER S360 Highway Safety Administration (3 cr.)
HPER S456 Traffic Safety Education for Teachers (4 cr.)
HPER S458 Driver Education Multiple Instruction Techniques (3 cr.)

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