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School of Education 2002-2004 Undergraduate Online Bulletin Table of Contents

 

Bloomington Programs
 

School of
Education
2000-2002
Undergraduate
Academic Bulletin
Supplement

School of Education
W. W. Wright Education Building 
201 North Rose Avenue  
Bloomington, IN 47405-1006 
(812) 856-8500    Fax (812) 856-8440
Contact School of Education

School of Edcation
Education/Social Work Building (ES) 3137
902 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
(317) 274-6801
 

Elementary Education Programs

Democracy, Diversity, and Social Justice Program

Democracy, Diversity, and Social Justice (DDSJ) is a new elementary education program that will offer its first education courses in the spring of 2000. Over the last four years, faculty and students have developed an innovative, exciting, collaborative program with several distinctive features:

  • An emphasis on the value of diversity as it pertains to students and public schools
  • A commitment to explore diverse issues, ideas, and perspectives that are important for prospective teachers and schools
  • A dedication to recognizing and responding to the intellectual, cultural, social, and emotional needs of elementary school students
  • An enhanced role for current and prospective classroom teachers who can help improve the quality of social life
  • A desire to improve the quality, value, and meaning of classrooms and schools
  • A commitment to creating courses in the DDSJ program that are cohesive and integrated across the program
  • An emphasis on university courses that are intellectually stimulating and connected to ongoing integrated field experiences in local classrooms
  • A program structure based largely on interdisciplinary, team-taught courses in which students share significant decision-making
  • A belief that faculty and students can work together in classes, and in identifying and creating inquiry-based activities
The faculty and students who have created the DDSJ program invite you to join them and to share in the continued discussions that will be necessary as DDSJ is implemented. We welcome all students as colleagues in this exciting new educational venture, as we strive to enhance the quality of educational activities at all levels and the quality of the society that education helps to shape.

The Democracy, Diversity, and Social Justice (DDSJ) Elementary Education Program is divided into four main components, as follows:
General Education 46-47 cr.
Inquiry 15 cr.
Electives 2-3 cr.
Professional Education 64 cr.
Total 128 cr.
General Education (46 - 47 credit hours)
Students who think they have the competence required in a course may contact the chairperson of the department offering the course. If the department chairperson agrees, the student will be permitted to take a credit examination.

Courses listed by number are either specifically required or are part of a group from which selections must be made to fill a specific requirement. See the appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions.

Some COAS TOPICS courses may be used toward completing this general education requirement. See an advisor for course eligibility.

Language Arts (12 credit hours)
Required:
Writing course (3 cr.)
Literature course (3 cr.)

Select courses from the following to meet 6 additional credit hours:
Forms of expression in literature, writing, poetry, speech, and folklore.

Courses especially recommended:
EDUC F203 Communication in the Classroom (3 cr.)
EDUC X460 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.)

The Arts (6 credit hours)
Fine Arts
Required:

Fine Arts studio course (3 cr.)

Select 3 additional credit hours from:
Art History, Communication and Culture, Dance, Film Studies, Music, Telecommunications, Theatre and Drama, or other areas as approved by program faculty

Mathematics (7-8 credit hours)
Students have three options to fulfill their math requirements:
MATH M118/A118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) and
MATH T104 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers via Problem Solving (4 cr.)
P: M118/A118 or

A grade of C or above in:
MATH M211 Calculus I (4 cr.) and
MATH T104 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers via Problem Solving (4 cr.)
P: M118/A118 or M211 or

A grade of B or above in:
MATH M119 Brief Survey of Calculus 1 (3 cr.) or
MATH M120 Brief Survey of Calculus 2 (3 cr.) and
MATH T104 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers via Problem Solving (4 cr.)
P: M118/A118 or M211

Science (9 credit hours)
Nine credit hours in the natural sciences, including at least one laboratory course; at least one 3 credit hour course each in life science, physical science, and earth/space science.

Social Studies (12 credit hours)
Required:
All students must take at least two courses at the 200 level or above.
History course (3 cr.)
Philosophy course (3 cr.)

Remaining courses must be from two of the following areas to meet the total of 12 credit hours:
Anthropology     Economics
Gender Studies
Geography (non-physical)
Political Science
Social Psychology
Sociology
Other courses may be selected with the approval of program faculty.

Courses especially recommended for students to consider:
ANTH E200 Social and Cultural Anthropology (3 cr.)
ENG L200 Language and Culture (3 cr.)
PHIL P103 Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Philosophical Perspectives (3 cr.)
PHIL P140 Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.)
PHIL P145 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.)
SOC S217 Social Inequality (3 cr.)
SOC S335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.)

DDSJ Inquiry Base (15 credit hours)
Students will identify a set of 15 credit hours of inquiry courses. These courses will be organized around a theme for concentrated, in-depth study. Student-selected themes can include courses in any subject area (for example, science, literature, education, or sociology), but must reflect an inquiry related to democracy, diversity and social justice. Students should be able to articulate their inquiry question and demonstrate how various courses develop their knowledge and thinking; in structors who teach in this program will provide advice and counsel to students in completing this inquiry project. A final paper related to this inquiry will become part of the students’ record of accomplishments. These courses are meant to strengthen critical and social justice perspectives as well as a critical understanding of the cultural constructions of knowledge. The composition of these courses may vary greatly, reflecting students’ inquiry preferences.

Electives (2 - 3 credit hours)

Professional Education (64 credit hours)
The professional component begins early in the student’s educational career. Laboratory/field experiences are initiated as soon as possible and continue throughout the student’s program. This component includes a minimum of a full semester of full-time student teaching in either the first or second semester of the senior year.

DDSJ Grading Policy Regarding Education Courses
Each education course listed below must be passed with a grade of C or higher. If a student receives a grade of C- or lower in any of the education courses required in the DDSJ program, he or she will have to retake that course. In the case of integrated or “block courses” (those totaling 9 credit hours), instructors in the DDSJ program will determine which segments of those courses must be retaken or what additional courses could be taken to meet the requirements of that portion of the course. Whenever possible, DDSJ instructors will arrange opportunities for students to complete independent study courses in the areas that have not been passed at the C level or above.

EDUC F205 The Study of Education and the Practice of Teaching (3 cr.)
EDUC W200 Using Computers in Education (3 cr.)

The following authorized courses require admission to DDSJ:

EDUC E210 Learning in Social Context (9 cr.)
EDUC E215 Curriculum & Pedagogy (3 cr.)

EDUC E305 The Infusion of Technology (A) (1.5 cr.)
EDUC E320 Envisioning, Exploring, and Creating Our Social Worlds through Multiple Literacies in the Elementary School (9 cr.) P/C: 9 credit hours of social studies, 9 credit hours of language arts, 6 credit hours of science, and 7 - 8 credit hours of mathematics
EDUC E322 Diversity and Social Justice I (3 cr.)

EDUC E305 The Infusion of Technology (B) (1.5 cr.)
EDUC E324 Teaching Mathematics and Science for All Students (9 cr.)
EDUC E326 Diversity and Social Justice II (3 cr.)
EDUC E350 Personal and Professional Growth Groups (1 cr.)

EDUC E420 Senior Seminar in Teaching and Schooling (3 cr.)
EDUC E425 Student Teaching/Weekly Seminar (15 cr.)

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Praxis: A Program for Innovative Education

The term praxis is defined as the intimate relationship between theory and practice, which is something this program will strive to develop. In particular, praxis suggests that the best teachers are those who are thoughtful of what it means to educate children in a democratic and pluralistic society, who regularly reflect upon their actions in light of their values, and who then alter either their values or practice in light of their reflection.

The Praxis Program retains the positive features of the elementary education program in place in the 1990s: innovative curricula, an area of concentration as part of the general education requirements, a cluster system in which students take related classes at the same time, and field experiences for three semesters in addition to student teaching. Graduates of the Praxis Program will have extensive knowledge of how children think, how to instruct so that children understand and connect ideas, and how they can make schools better.

The Praxis and Theory into Practice Programs are very similar in terms of course requirements. Both have cohorts of students who know and work with each other for two or more semesters as they move through the programs. Note that there will be more than one section per semester of most courses, so students will have flexibility in scheduling. Praxis is different from other elementary education programs in that there are only two clusters of courses prior to student teaching. Students may take s ome of the other professional education courses at any time and will have a choice between several additional professional education courses. In all professional education courses, there will be a focus on writing, working with diverse populations, and helping students to think critically about what they are learning.

Students will typically apply to the Praxis program during their sophomore year. Admission criteria are similar to other elementary education programs: an overall GPA of at least 2.5, passing scores on the PPST/Praxis exams, and successful completion of EDUC P251/M101, EDUC Q200, EDUC W200, and MATH M118/A118 or MATH D116 and D117.

The Praxis Elementary Education Program is divided into three main components, as follows:

General Education
  Distribution 47 cr.
  Area of Concentration 15 cr.
Electives 6 cr.
Professional Education 60 cr.
Total 128 cr.
General Education: Distribution (47 credit hours)
Students who think they have the competence required in a course may contact the chairperson of the department offering the course. If the department chairperson agrees, the student will be permitted to take a credit examination.

Courses listed by number are either specifically required or are part of a group from which selections must be made to fill a specific requirement. See the appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions. The speech requirement may not be met by correspondence.

Some COAS TOPICS courses may be used toward completing this general education requirement. See an advisor for course eligibility.

Language Arts (12 credit hours)
Oral Expression (3 credit hours) (grade of C or better required):
CMCL C121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
CMCL C122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)
EDUC F203 Communication in the Classroom (3 cr.)\

Written Expression (3 credit hours) (grade of C or better required):
AFRO A141-A1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Black Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
ENG L141-L1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
ENG L198 Freshman Literature (3 cr.)
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
ENG W1432 Interdisciplinary Study of Expository Writing (1 cr.)
ENG W170 Projects in Reading and Writing (3 cr.)

Children’s Literature (3 credit hours)
ENG L390 Children’s Literature (3 cr.) or
EDUC X460 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.)

World Literature (3 credit hours)
AFRO A141-A1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Black Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
CMLT C145 Major Characters in Western Literature (3 cr.)
CMLT C146 Major Themes in Western Literature (3 cr.)
CMLT C340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.)
ENG L141-L1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
ENG L202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)
ENG L203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.)
ENG L204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.)
ENG L205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.)

Fine Arts (7 credit hours)
Music (4 credit hours)
MUS E241 Introduction to Music Fundamentals (2 cr.)
EDUC M323 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary Schools (2 cr.) P: MUS E241

Art (3 credit hours)
FINA N110 Introduction to Studio Art (3 cr.)

Mathematics (7 credit hours)
MATH M118/A118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) or
  MATH D116 Introduction to Finite Math I (2 cr.) and
  MATH D117 Introduction to Finite Math II (2 cr.) and
MATH T104 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers via Problem Solving (4 cr.)
P: M118/A118 or D116 and D117

Science (12 credit hours)
EDUC Q200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (3 cr.)
BIOL Q201 Biological Science for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.)
GEOL G103 Earth Science: Materials and Processes (3 cr.) or
  GEOL G104 Earth Science: Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.) or
  GEOL G105 Earth, Our Habitable Planet (3 cr.)
PHYS Q202 Physical Science for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.)

Social Studies (9 credit hours)
United States History (3 credit hours)
HIST A301-A302 American Colonial History I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST A303-A304 United States, 1789-1865 I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST A314-A315 Recent U.S. History I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST H105-H106 American History I-II (3-3 cr.)

World Civilization (3 credit hours)
GEOG G110 Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr.)
GEOG G120 World Regional Geography (3 cr.)
HIST H101-H102 The World in the Twentieth Century I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST H103 Europe: Renaissance to Napoleon (3 cr.)
HIST H104 Europe: Napoleon to the Present (3 cr.)
HIST H111-H112 Historical Background to Contemporary Problems I-II (3-3 cr.)

Electives (3 credit hours)
Select one course from any of the following departments:
Anthropology    Economics
Gender Studies
Geography (non-physical)
History
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
General Education: Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
The Area of Concentration requirement is designed to provide the prospective elementary teacher with depth in one school-related curriculum. Students should choose 15 credit hours from one area listed below to complete with a minimum GPA of 2.5. The credit hours completed to fulfill this requirement must be in addition to those completed to fulfill the distribution requirement. In some instances, courses taken to satisfy the Area of Concentration requirement may be applied toward extended coverage of the elementary license to teach in a specific teaching area in junior high/middle school grades 5 - 9. Students should consult an academic advisor to plan an approved sequence to fulfill the Area of Concentration requirement.

Select one area:
Fine Arts: History of Art, Studio Art, or Music
Health
Language Arts/Humanities
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies

History of Art (FINA) Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
Required (9 credit hours):
A101 Ancient and Medieval Art (3 cr.)
A102 Renaissance through Modern Art (3 cr.)
H100 Art Appreciation (3 cr.)

Electives (6 credit hours)
Select from FINA art history courses at the 200 level or above.

Studio Art (FINA) Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
Required (12 credit hours):
F100 Fundamental Studio—Drawing (3 cr.)
F101 Fundamental Studio—3D (3 cr.)
F102 Fundamental Studio—2D (3 cr.)
H100 Art Appreciation (3 cr.)
(Other 200-level studio courses may also apply)

Electives (3 credit hours):
These 3 credit hours must be chosen from the following studio areas:
Ceramics    Drawing
Graphic Design
Jewelry Design/ Silversmithing
Painting
Photography
Printed and Dyed Textile Design
Sculpture

Music (MUS) Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
Students must take the theory proficiency examination that is given during orientation week each fall or on Monday evening of the first week each fall, spring, or second summer session. Students who score below a grade of C are required to enroll in T109 Rudiments of Music. T109 may be taken concurrently with T151.

Required Core Courses (7 credit hours):
T132 Musical Skills I (1 cr.)
T151 Music Theory and Literature I (3 cr.)
T152 Music Theory and Literature II (3 cr.)

Required Performance Courses (8 credit hours):
P110 Piano Class I (2 cr.)
P120 Piano Class II (2 cr.)
V100 Voice Class (2 + 2 cr.)

Health Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
Required (12 credit hours):
HPER H160 First Aid and Emergency Care (3 cr.)
HPER H263 Personal Health (3 cr.)
HPER H414 Health Education Grades K - 8 (3 cr.)
HPER H464 Coordination of School Health Promotion (3 cr.) (Sem. II only)

Elective (3 credit hours):
HPER F255 Human Sexuality (3 cr.)
HPER F258 Marriage and Family Interaction (3 cr.)
HPER H180 Stress Prevention and Management (3 cr.)
HPER H220 Death and Dying (3 cr.)
HPER N220 Nutrition for Health (3 cr.)

Language Arts/Humanities Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
These 15 credit hours must be chosen from no more than two of the following departments:

Afro-American Studies (literature/music)
Classical Studies
Communication and Culture
Comparative Literature
English
Folklore
Foreign Language
Journalism
Linguistics
Music
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Speech and Hearing Science
Theatre and Drama
Note: At least 6 of the 15 credit hours must be taken at the 300 level or above; no more than 6 credit hours may be from the 100 level.

Mathematics Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
Required:
EDUC N443 Teaching Elementary School Math Problem Solving (3 cr.)
MATH M119 Brief Survey of Calculus I (3 cr.) and
  MATH M120 Brief Survey of Calculus II (3 cr.) or
  MATH M211 Calculus I (4 cr.) and
  MATH M212 Calculus II (4 cr.)

Remaining credit hours to be selected from:
MATH K300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.)
MATH M025 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (3 cr.)
MATH M026 Trigonometric Functions (2 cr.)
MATH T336 Topics in Euclidean Geometry (3 cr.)

Science Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
Required Biology Course (3 credit hours)
Select one course:
BIOL L330 Biology of the Cell (3 cr.)
BIOL L350 Environmental Biology (3 cr.)
BIOL L369 Heredity, Evolution, and Society (3 cr.)
BIOL M310 Microbiology (3 cr.) P: CHEM 2 semesters
BIOL M315 Microbiology Laboratory (2 cr.) P: CHEM 2 semesters

Required Earth Science Course (3 credit hours)
Select one course:
AST A100 The Solar System (3 cr.)
AST A105 Stellar Astronomy (3 cr.)
AST A110 Introduction to Astronomy (3 cr.)
GEOL G105 Earth, our Habitable Planet (3 cr.) or
GEOL G104 Earth Science: Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.)
GEOG G109 Weather and Climate (3 cr.)
GEOL G114 Prehistoric Life (3 cr.)
GEOL G121 Meteorites and Geological Processes in Planets (3 cr.)
GEOL G300 Environmental and Urban Geology (3 cr.)
GEOG G315 Environmental Conservation (3 cr.)

Required Physical Science Course (5 credit hours)
Select from the following:
CHEM C101 Elementary Chemistry I (3 cr.)
CHEM C121 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.)
CHEM C102 Elementary Chemistry II (3 cr.)
CHEM C122 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.)
PHYS P110 Energy (2 cr.)
PHYS P120 Energy and Technology (3 cr.)
PHYS P151 Excursions into Physics (3 cr.)
PHYS P201 General Physics I (5 cr.)
PHYS P202 General Physics II (5 cr.)
PHYS S406 Research in Physics (1-3 cr.)

Required Interdisciplinary Courses (4 credit hours):
COAS E405 Integrated Science for Elementary Education (3 cr.) and
EDUC Q405 Integrated Laboratory Field Experience (1-3 cr.) P: E328

Social Studies Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
These 15 credit hours must be chosen from no more than two of the following departments:
Afro-American Studies (history)    Anthropology
Economics
Geography (non-physical)
History
History and Philosophy of Science
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Note: At least 6 of the 15 credit hours in the Social Studies Area of Concentration must be from the 200 level or above. No more than 6 credit hours may be from the 100 level. Courses may be taken from more than two of the departments listed above if the courses are thematically connected.

Electives (6 credit hours)

Professional Education (60 credit hours)
In the Praxis program, the professional education courses begin early in the student’s educational career. The professional education component includes a full semester of full-time student teaching in either the first or second semester of the senior year.

Prerequisite Courses
EDUC P251 Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.) and
  EDUC M101 Laboratory/Field Experience (2 cr.)
EDUC W200 Using Computers in Education (3 cr.)

Required Educational Foundation Courses (6 credit hours)
EDUC E310 Legal, Ethical, and Gender Issues in Education (3 cr.)
EDUC K205 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) or
  EDUC K305 Teaching the Exceptional Learner in the Elementary School (3 cr.)

Additional Foundation Courses (6 credit hours)
EDUC E300 Teaching in a Pluralistic Society (3 cr.)
EDUC F205 The Study of Education and the Practice of Teaching (3 cr.)
EDUC H340 Education in American Culture (3 cr.)

Admission to the Teacher Education Program, including satisfactory completion of the PPST exam, is required for the following cluster courses.

Cluster Courses - First Semester (14 credit hours)
EDUC E343 Mathematics in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.)
EDUC E328 Science in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P/C: MATH T104, PHYS Q202
EDUC E339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (3 cr.)
EDUC E340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (3 cr.)
EDUC M201 Laboratory/Field Experience (2 cr.)

Cluster Courses - Second Semester (11 credit hours)
EDUC E325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.)
EDUC E341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (3 cr.) P: E340
EDUC M333 Art Experiences for Elementary Teachers (2 cr.)
EDUC M401 Laboratory/Early Field Experience (3 cr.)

Cluster Courses - Third Semester (15 credit hours)
All of the above Professional Education courses must be completed before student teaching.
EDUC M420 Student Teaching Seminar: Understanding Schools (2 cr.)
EDUC M425 Student Teaching: Elementary (13 cr.)

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Theory Into Practice: A Program for Elementary Education Majors

The Theory Into Practice Program (TIP) is a four year program for students who want to be elementary school teachers. The TIP program emphasizes the application of theory and research to the day-to-day world of elementary teachers in a wide range of schools. Courses and field experiences focus on helping students develop the entry-level skills and knowledge needed to employ the current and emerging diagnostic and instructional “tools” that are used in a majority of elementary schools and tha t will allow them to successfully teach students with a diverse set of abilities. Through their subject concentration area, students gain in-depth experience in the subject of their choice—such as math, science, language arts, social studies, or fine arts. Program experiences are designed to help students identify knowledge that is worthwhile for elementary students and to design and teach lessons constructed around such knowledge. As a whole, program experiences provide for a close “fit” between course wor k and field experiences, with the goal of providing students with many opportunities to apply and reflect upon what they are learning.

Approximately 60 students (two sections) per semester will be admitted to the program. By holding enrollments at this level, the program will be able to develop a sense of community among instructors and students, and foster a sense of cooperation and support among instructors and students that will continue well beyond graduation.

Students will typically apply to the TIP program toward the end of their freshman year or early during their sophomore year. Admission criteria include an overall GPA of at least 2.5, passing scores on the PPST/Praxis exams, successful completion of EDUC P251/M101, EDUC Q200, EDUC W200, and MATH M118/A118 or D116 and D117. During their program of studies, students will complete three basic sets of requirements. The General Education component includes work in a cross-section of courses in numerous subject areas. The Area of Concentration enables students to gain a depth of knowledge in a subject of their choice. The Professional Component includes a series of subject-specific methods courses, work in the psychology of learning, applying technology in education settings, multicultural issues, the history of American education, an examination of the purpose of schooling in America, an ongoing set of increasingly demanding field experiences and related seminars, and culminates with a semester-long student teaching experience. Throughout their program, students will build a professional portfolio demonstrating their intellectual growth and ability to reflect.

In summary, TIP is an improved version of a program with a proven track record, a history of placing its graduates, and a group of faculty who are leaders in their respective fields. Students who prefer a very practical, hands-on approach to their studies and who wish to graduate with the knowledge and skills required by a wide range of employers should consider the TIP program.

The Theory Into Practice Elementary Education Program is divided into three main components, as follows:

General Education
  Distribution 50 cr.
  Area of Concentration 15 cr.
Electives 3-4 cr.
Professional Education 59 cr.
Total 128 cr.
General Education: Distribution (50 credit hours)
Students who think they have the competence required in a course may contact the chairperson of the department offering the course. If the department chairperson agrees, the student will be permitted to take a credit examination.

Courses listed by number are either specifically required or are part of a group from which selections must be made to fill a specific requirement. See the appropriate school bulletins for course descriptions. The speech requirement may not be met by correspondence.

Some COAS TOPICS courses may be used toward completing this general education requirement. See an advisor for course eligibility.

Language Arts (15 credit hours)
Oral Expression (3 credit hours) (grade of C or better required):
CMCL C121 Public Speaking (3 cr.)
CMCL C122 Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)

Written Expression (3 credit hours) (grade of C or better required):
AFRO A141-A1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Black Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
ENG L141-L1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
ENG L198 Freshman Literature (3 cr.)
ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
ENG W1432 Interdisciplinary Study of Expository Writing (1 cr.)
ENG W170 Projects in Reading and Writing (3 cr.)

Literature and Writing Electives (3 credit hours)
Select one course:

CMCL C223 Business and Professional Communication (3 cr.)
CMCL C324 Persuasion (3 cr.)
COAS W333 Intensive Writing/Corequisite (0-3 cr.)
EDUC F203 Communication in the Classroom (3 cr.)
ENG W103 Introductory Creative Writing (3 cr.)
ENG W203 Creative Writing (3 cr.)
ENG W231 Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
ENG W270 Argumentative Writing (3 cr.)
ENG W301 Writing Fiction (3 cr.)
ENG W303 Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
ENG W350 Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.)

Children’s Literature (3 credit hours)
EDUC X460 Books for Reading Instruction (3 cr.) or
  ENG L390 Children’s Literature (3 cr.)

World Literature (3 credit hours)
AFRO A141-A1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Black Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
CMLT C145 Major Characters in Western Literature (3 cr.)
CMLT C146 Major Themes in Western Literature (3 cr.)
CMLT C340 Women in World Literature (3 cr.)
ENG L141-L1421 Introduction to Writing and the Study of Literature I-II (4-4 cr.)
ENG L202 Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)
ENG L203 Introduction to Drama (3 cr.)
ENG L204 Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.)
ENG L205 Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.)

Fine Arts (7 credit hours)
Music (4 credit hours)
MUS E241 Introduction to Music Fundamentals (2 cr.)
EDUC M323 The Teaching of Music in the Elementary Schools (2 cr.) P: MUS E241

Art (3 credit hours)
FINA N110 Introduction to Studio Art (3 cr.)

Mathematics (7 credit hours)
MATH M118/A118 Finite Mathematics (3 cr.) or
  MATH D116 Introduction to Finite Math I (2 cr.) and
  MATH D117 Introduction to Finite Math II (2 cr.) and
MATH T104 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers via Problem Solving (4 cr.)
P: M118/A118 or D116 and D117

Science (12 credit hours)
EDUC Q200 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry (3 cr.)
BIOL Q201 Biological Science for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.)
GEOL G103 Earth Science: Materials and Processes (3 cr.) or
  GEOL G104 Earth Science: Evolution of the Earth (3 cr.) or
  GEOL G105 Earth, Our Habitable Planet (3 cr.)
PHYS Q202 Physical Science for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.)

Social Studies (9 credit hours)
United States History (3 credit hours)
HIST A301-A302 American Colonial History I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST A303-A304 United States, 1789-1865 I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST A314-A315 Recent U.S. History I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST H105-H106 American History I-II (3-3 cr.)

World Civilization (3 credit hours)
GEOG G110 Introduction to Human Geography (3 cr.)
GEOG G120 World Regional Geography (3 cr.)
HIST H101-H102 The World in the Twentieth Century I-II (3-3 cr.)
HIST H103 Europe: Renaissance to Napoleon (3 cr.)
HIST H104 Europe: Napoleon to the Present (3 cr.)
HIST H111-H112 Historical Background to Contemporary Problems I-II (3-3 cr.)

Electives (3 credit hours)
Select one course from any of the following departments:
Anthropology    Economics
Gender Studies
Geography (non-physical)
History
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
General Education: Area of Concentration (15 credit hours)
The Area of Concentration requirement is designed to provide the prospective elementary teacher with depth in one school-related curriculum. Students should choose 15 credit hours from one area to complete with a minimum GPA of 2.5. The credit hours completed to fulfill this requirement must be in addition to those completed to fulfill the distribution requirement. In some instances, courses taken to satisfy the Area of Concentration requirement may be applied toward extended coverage of the elementary license to teach in a specific teaching area in junior high/middle school grades 5 - 9. Students should consult an academic advisor to plan an approved sequence to fulfill the Area of Concentration requirement.

The Area of Concentration requirement for the Theory Into Practice Program is the same as that for the Praxis Program; please see the Praxis Program for the list of requirements.

Electives (3 - 4 credit hours)

Professional Education (59 credit hours)
The professional component begins early in the student’s educational career. Laboratory/field experiences are initiated as soon as possible and continue throughout the student’s program. This component includes a minimum of a full semester of full-time student teaching in either the first or second semester of the senior year.

EDUC F205 The Study of Education and the Practice of Teaching (3 cr.)
EDUC H340 Education and American Culture (3 cr.)
EDUC P251 Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.) and
  EDUC M101 Laboratory/Field Experiences (2 cr.)
EDUC W200 Using Computers in Education (3 cr.)

Admission to the Teacher Education Program, including satisfactory completion of the PPST exam, is required for the remaining professional education courses (grouped by semester):

EDUC E310 Legal, Ethical, and Gender Issues in Education (3 cr.)
EDUC E328 Science in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) P/C: MATH T104, PHYS Q202
EDUC E343 Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 cr.) and
  EDUC M201 Laboratory/Field Experience (2 cr.)
EDUC E339 Methods of Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School (3 cr.)
EDUC E340 Methods of Teaching Reading I (3 cr.)
EDUC E325 Social Studies in the Elementary Schools (3 cr.) and
  EDUC M401 Laboratory/Field Experience (2 cr.)
EDUC E341 Methods of Teaching Reading II (3 cr.) P: E340
EDUC K305 Teaching the Exceptional Learner in the Elementary School (3 cr.)
EDUC M333 Art Experiences for Elementary Teachers (2 cr.)

All of the above Professional Education courses must be completed before student teaching.

EDUC M420 The Student Teaching Seminar: Understanding Schools (2 cr.)
EDUC M425 Student Teaching: Elementary (13 cr.)

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1ENG L141 and L142, as well as AFRO A141 and A142, are each 4 credit hour courses. Three credit hours of each course will count as literature and 1 credit hour of each will count as composition.


2ENG L143 is composition credit attached to specified literature courses. It may be repeated once for credit.




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